Yet Another Cycling Forum

General Category => The Knowledge => Health & Fitness => Topic started by: Peter on January 06, 2019, 11:07:30 am

Title: Unexpected reaction to thawing out
Post by: Peter on January 06, 2019, 11:07:30 am
I came in from a ride with very cold (numb) hands the other day.  Nothing very unusual in that, though I try to avoid it.  I just waited to thaw out naturally, not using applied heat.  I knew it was going to hurt, which it did, to the extent of making even talking a strain.  However, what was a shock was that I suddenly felt I was going to be sick.  I made it to the bathroom and managed to control the sensation without actually being sick.  Then, just as suddenly, I broke out in perspiration over my whole body - not dripping but definitely wet.  Soon after this, I was back to normal.

Has anybody else had a similar experience, or know what was going on?  Perhaps I should add that I was pretty well wrapped up and only my hands felt affected by the cold.

Thanks

Peter
Title: Re: Unexpected reaction to thawing out
Post by: delthebike on January 06, 2019, 11:32:54 am
Too hot too soon, blood goes to you external areas (skin) to cool things down and less to your branze. You feel sick/faint and sweat.
Title: Re: Unexpected reaction to thawing out
Post by: Wobbly John on January 06, 2019, 12:51:13 pm
The only times I've experienced this, boozamahol was involved  :facepalm:
Title: Re: Unexpected reaction to thawing out
Post by: hellymedic on January 06, 2019, 01:39:50 pm
Severe pain is known to make people faint and vomit.

A cold sweat is another reaction to extreme stress.

This seems rather OTT to what I (and you, I imagine) would otherwise term as a 'simple' matter.

If you would describe the pain as just about 'the worst pain ever' I'd accept this as a reaction.

Otherwise, I suggest you get checked out.
Title: Re: Unexpected reaction to thawing out
Post by: Kim on January 06, 2019, 01:51:15 pm
Sounds like the symptoms (other than the obvious) I get from an IBS attack.  Wibbly blood pressure, presumably.
Title: Re: Unexpected reaction to thawing out
Post by: Peter on January 06, 2019, 10:51:12 pm
Thank you all.

Helly, that's a fascinating, if slightly perturbing reply!  I know (via treadmil and scanner investigation) that I have an irregular heartbeat and low blood pressure.  But the specialist who dealt with me (a couple of years ago) seemed to think that the low BP and bradycardia (which I also have) were consistent with a lifetime of vigorous exercise and that I had nothing to worry about.  He also didn't seem concerned about the missed beats.  That said, I definitely felt stressed as my hands thawed out, so I can imagine my heart wasn't enjoying the experience.  However, I didn't become light-headed and I really was "back to normal" as soon as the nausea abated, which, like the sweat, only lasted a couple of minutes.  I think an obvious precaution is just to stop my hands getting that cold in future by assuming they are colder than I think (when they are numb, they are numb!).  But I will have a word with my GP.


Edit to add :-

As to the worst pain ever, I support Newcastle United, so probably "no".  Seriously, it was bad but I don't think it was as bad as the pain from sequestrated herniated disc - or dentistry as a teenager.  But that may be because I knew the pain in my hands was temporary, I don't know.
Thanks

Peter

PS  Kim, I really hope you don't get the IBS attacks very often!
Title: Re: Unexpected reaction to thawing out
Post by: fimm on January 07, 2019, 11:29:57 am
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hot_aches
Quote "The hot aches (also known among North American ice climbers as the screaming barfies) is a very painful physical reaction to the cold, most often felt in the hands or feet."
To barf is to vomit.
I thought I'd read of people feeling like they were going to throw up from hot aches elsewhere.
Title: Re: Unexpected reaction to thawing out
Post by: Peter on January 07, 2019, 12:11:28 pm
fimm, that's very interesting and seems likely to be near the mark, thanks.  What confused the issue for me was that I'd only been out for a couple of hours at about 3 degrees Centerparcs, and I've not that long ago done 200s at sub-zero, taking 11 hours, with nothing like this effect.  However, I know my hands have deteriorated badly because of arthritis (a couple of fingers can lose sensation in any temperature) so obviously I'm going to have to be careful and take better precautions, rather than simply rely on my now faulty nervous system to tell me what's going on.

Thank you again
Peter
Title: Re: Unexpected reaction to thawing out
Post by: ElyDave on January 07, 2019, 04:49:19 pm
thank Fimm, that is indeed interesting, considering the trouble I have with my feet as it gets below 1 or 2 celcius I'm surprised I've never come across this.  Next time I feel sick in the shower fter a ride I'll know why
Title: Re: Unexpected reaction to thawing out
Post by: Auntie Helen on January 10, 2019, 06:40:56 am
What confused the issue for me was that I'd only been out for a couple of hours at about 3 degrees Centerparcs,
Isn’t autocorrect wonderful sometimes!
Title: Re: Unexpected reaction to thawing out
Post by: ElyDave on January 10, 2019, 10:10:14 am
maybe it's a Yorkshire term "it's reet Centreparcs out there today"
Title: Re: Unexpected reaction to thawing out
Post by: Peter on January 10, 2019, 08:18:02 pm
Sorry, it was a joke.  I meant 3 degrees centrifuge.
Title: Re: Unexpected reaction to thawing out
Post by: Kim on January 10, 2019, 08:18:40 pm
Can't be a very good centrifuge if it only turns 3 degrees...
Title: Re: Unexpected reaction to thawing out
Post by: Wowbagger on January 10, 2019, 09:27:16 pm
Can't be a very good centrifuge if it only turns 3 degrees...

Maybe it covers those 3 degrees so fast that its work is done and it doesn't need to turn any further.
Title: Re: Unexpected reaction to thawing out
Post by: Flite on February 14, 2019, 08:23:52 pm
Bit late with this, but I have had exactly the same experience as Peter. Extremely cold hands, thawing out with severe pain = hotache.  Rolling around on the floor in agony, feeling faint, giddy, sick. Used to happen quite a lot when I was younger.  I am now much more careful about not letting my hands get that cold as I know I have Reynaulds. Basically, my hands do not produce much heat of their own, and need an external source. Modern tech has helped. I never go anywhere without disposable hand warmers (tea bag type) in case.  But I also have HotRox, which are electric and charge up via USB like a small mobile phone, which are great for walking, but too clumsy for biking.
So on the bike today, I had disposable handwarmers inside mitts and all inside Hotpogs (barmitts made of the sort of material Carradice use for saddlebags).  Even in the coldest weather that set up means I can ride for a couple of hours.