Yet Another Cycling Forum

Off Topic => The Pub => Topic started by: pcolbeck on April 18, 2019, 11:59:04 am

Title: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: pcolbeck on April 18, 2019, 11:59:04 am
OK I admit it I'm a tool junkie. I love good tools and hate rubbish ones.
Currently I'm slightly obsessed with German screwdrivers and screwdriver bits, Werea and Wiha, so much better than the standard junk. I have a great fondness for ratcheting screwdrivers of all vintages and good adjustable spanners (old Bahco or King Dick) too. I love trawling car boot sales for unloved classic tools, hand planes, files, chisels and the like.

But my favourite  thing of all for some reason is pliers.

I have far too many old Elliot Lucas pliers some restored and some sitting in the box of rusty stuff to be dealt with at some nebulas time in the future. Of the modern ones I like Knippex.
Today Amazon delivered me two pairs of Japanese "Engineer" brand pliers. I had to have these as they just look so great and are unique in that the ridges on the jaws run at 90deg to normal pliers so you can undo sheared off or rusty screws with them. Plus who can resist something named "Neji-sarus" with styling like something out of Star Wars?

Any other tool o'holics ?

(http://www.engineer.jp/_products/pz58/p/PZ-58.jpg)
Title: Re: Conffesions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on April 18, 2019, 01:34:16 pm
The missus would say I am, but I never buy anything I don't need.

N.B. variable values of 'need'.
Title: Re: Conffesions of a tool junkie
Post by: rogerzilla on April 18, 2019, 01:36:34 pm
I have a complete set of tools for 1" headsets, including reaming and facing.  They have saved a lot of trouble with headsets that won't adjust properly, and reduced a few JIS forks to ISO.
Title: Re: Conffesions of a tool junkie
Post by: essexian on April 18, 2019, 01:42:00 pm
Am I the only one who cringes a little when their wife goes into their tool box...... I know that sounds sexist but its not meant to. It's simply that I have seen her do strange things with the wrong set of pliers.


And yes, I am more than happy to show her what does what but it's easier to do it myself...... blimey, does that mean she has trained me to do jobs I don't want to do when she wants them done......  :facepalm:
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Jurek on April 18, 2019, 01:46:00 pm
Hello. My name is Jurek and I am a tool junkie.
Title: Re: Conffesions of a tool junkie
Post by: rafletcher on April 18, 2019, 01:51:50 pm
My wife wouldn't dream of going into my toolbox, she's happy enough to criticise me for using the wrong tool when I'm too idle to  ;D.

I was digging through the cycle tool box the other day, and among the current stuff, I found a set of genuine Campag tools - BB, headset and pedal spanners, cone spanners, crank extractor. No earthly good to me now, but I'm struggling to get rid of them. I will though, soon....

Likewise I have a headset press I'll not be needing any more, but it's only a Cyclo one so might hang on to it in case someone needs to borrow one...
Title: Re: Conffesions of a tool junkie
Post by: pcolbeck on April 18, 2019, 02:27:28 pm
My wife steals small ball peen hammers. I keep buying them and they keep disappearing. Every so often I find one in a random draw in the house. She likes rearranging the pictures and mirrors hence the vanishing hammers.
Title: Re: Conffesions of a tool junkie
Post by: andytheflyer on April 18, 2019, 05:04:58 pm
My wife steals small ball peen hammers. I keep buying them and they keep disappearing. Every so often I find one in a random draw in the house. She likes rearranging the pictures and mirrors hence the vanishing hammers.
Be thankful she's choosing a hammer.  Mine'd try a pair of pliers to knock in a picture pin...…. Which is why I don't let her near my tools. Yes dear, my tools.
Title: Re: Conffesions of a tool junkie
Post by: Karla on April 18, 2019, 06:55:25 pm
Pcolbeck, you might know already but the junk/antique shops in Kirkbymoorside have some nice tools; I picked up an excellent East German socket set plus several other items when I worked up there.
Title: Re: Conffesions of a tool junkie
Post by: pcolbeck on April 18, 2019, 08:11:29 pm
Pcolbeck, you might know already but the junk/antique shops in Kirkbymoorside have some nice tools; I picked up an excellent East German socket set plus several other items when I worked up there.

No I didn't know so thanks. Its just up the road from me but not really a place you would visit without a reason. From here you bypass it on either side depending on where you are going.  I'll have to have a trip. Pcolbeck junior goes there a lot as that's where a load of his ex school mates came from and my main visits to Kirby have been as a Dads Taxi delivering him to house parties before he could drive.
Title: Re: Conffesions of a tool junkie
Post by: hatler on April 18, 2019, 09:10:42 pm
There's a few junkies here. (https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=100775.0)
Title: Re: Conffesions of a tool junkie
Post by: Mrs Pingu on April 18, 2019, 09:13:07 pm
I bought a technician's bag to put our tools in in a nice control freak's orderly way because the bag for life we'd been transporting them in previously was driving me up the wall. (Think the brazil nut in muesli effect).
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Tim Hall on April 18, 2019, 09:42:00 pm
Hello. My name is Jurek and I am a tool junkie.
Oh. I thought bringing, for example, a set of laser etched lock picks to the pub to show them off was perfectly normal behaviour.
Title: Re: Conffesions of a tool junkie
Post by: drossall on April 18, 2019, 10:59:25 pm
Am I the only one who cringes a little when their wife goes into their tool box...
Happily, my wife assumes that the point of getting a husband is to have someone to make use of the contents of the toolbox. And I am able to argue that various tools were obtained to do this or that job that was so ordained. The latest, which arrived today, being one to split a watch bracelet in order to replace a worn catch on hers :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Conffesions of a tool junkie
Post by: Aunt Maud on April 19, 2019, 07:34:24 am
I'm Aunt Maud and I'm an addict for carpentry hand tools and tool chests.

Here's a chest I'm working on during my limited spare time at college, it's made from 200 year old reclaimed Honduran mahogany and a bit of walnut it's 3'x2'x2'.

It's already full of carving tools and a few nice wooden planes.

(https://i.imgur.com/nPuCNf8.jpg)
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Jurek on April 19, 2019, 07:48:43 am
That lid fit.
Good for IP65?
Title: Re: Conffesions of a tool junkie
Post by: Aunt Maud on April 19, 2019, 07:54:59 am
Sadly, yes.

Everyone keeps asking why I don't put it on wheels, as it would be easy to move. Which is why I don't put it on wheels, as I don't want someone to come along and easily move it.

Currently it weighs over 100kg.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Jurek on April 19, 2019, 08:05:23 am
 :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Jurek on April 19, 2019, 08:11:38 am
I bought a technician's bag to put our tools in in a nice control freak's orderly way because the bag for life we'd been transporting them in previously was driving me up the wall. (Think the brazil nut in muesli effect).
An interesting analogy.
Does the bag render your tools radioactive?

ETA - The brazil nut effect (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brazil_nut) is a thing. In a granular convection kind of way. Or is that what you meant?
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Jurek on April 19, 2019, 08:48:12 am
My tool case (https://live.staticflickr.com/8498/8389647745_1f1c7966be_c.jpg) from my freelancing days.
It's a Zero Halliburton case.
A Zero Halliburton case was one of the few items of luggage left intact when the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine terrorists blew up four hijacked airliners at Dawson's Field in 1970.
I've fitted the lid with a pair of gas springs.
When you pop the locks, the lid opens automatically.
The speed of the rise is governed by the weight of the tools stored in the lid.
Title: Re: Conffesions of a tool junkie
Post by: Zipperhead on April 19, 2019, 10:42:00 am
You lot think that you've got problems? I watch youtube videos about restoring old tools (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMrMVIBtqFW6O0-MWq26gqw/videos). (Not that kind Roger, that requires subscription to "specialist" sites).

I'm almost disappointed that the job I need to do on my motorbike this morning won't require the use of my little Wera Zyklops ratchet.
Title: Re: Conffesions of a tool junkie
Post by: Beardy on April 19, 2019, 10:49:11 am
The problem with getting more experienced1 is that each new job doesn’t necessarily mean the need for new tools and so my tool acquisition growth [TAG] has slowed down considerably in recent years. I’m thinking of taking up horological studies to rectify this problem.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: andytheflyer on April 19, 2019, 11:25:04 am
My tool case (https://live.staticflickr.com/8498/8389647745_1f1c7966be_c.jpg) from my freelancing days.
It's a Zero Halliburton case.
Oooooh.  Takes me back to my early career as an engineering geologist working in coastal engineering surveying.  The sparkies keeping the marine geophysical kit working had tool cases like this.  Our tools, on the drilling side, were rather bigger and heavier and there was no way you'd put them in a case.  More like a 20' container......
Title: Re: Conffesions of a tool junkie
Post by: pcolbeck on April 19, 2019, 11:28:38 am
You lot think that you've got problems? I watch youtube videos about restoring old tools (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMrMVIBtqFW6O0-MWq26gqw/videos). (Not that kind Roger, that requires subscription to "specialist" sites).

Me too. ScoutCrafter puts one or two out a week.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1KhUcdotTuz2u3i5RSerA

I especially like Geoffrey Croker's channel. Some nice dry wit.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUOfupxqzuqSL_rfzA3PENQ
Title: Re: Conffesions of a tool junkie
Post by: Jurek on April 19, 2019, 11:29:21 am
^
^
^
^
That Wera Zyklops ratchet is a delight. I'm just struggling to justify buying one.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Mrs Pingu on April 19, 2019, 01:29:48 pm
I bought a technician's bag to put our tools in in a nice control freak's orderly way because the bag for life we'd been transporting them in previously was driving me up the wall. (Think the brazil nut in muesli effect).
An interesting analogy.
Does the bag render your tools radioactive?

You're gonna have to explain that one to me... ???
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Jurek on April 19, 2019, 01:50:34 pm
I bought a technician's bag to put our tools in in a nice control freak's orderly way because the bag for life we'd been transporting them in previously was driving me up the wall. (Think the brazil nut in muesli effect).
An interesting analogy.
Does the bag render your tools radioactive?

You're gonna have to explain that one to me... ???

Brazil nuts are around 1000 times more radioactive than other foodstuffs.
Also - I've edited my post, coincidentally, while you were posting.  :)
Title: Re: Conffesions of a tool junkie
Post by: Torslanda on April 19, 2019, 03:07:06 pm

Everyone keeps asking why I don't put it on wheels, as it would be easy to move. Which is why I don't put it on wheels, as I don't want someone to come along and easily move it.

Currently it weighs over 100kg.

Bacuase it would become The Luggage . . .
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Mrs Pingu on April 19, 2019, 05:26:51 pm
I bought a technician's bag to put our tools in in a nice control freak's orderly way because the bag for life we'd been transporting them in previously was driving me up the wall. (Think the brazil nut in muesli effect).
An interesting analogy.
Does the bag render your tools radioactive?

ETA - The brazil nut effect (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brazil_nut) is a thing. In a granular convection kind of way. Or is that what you meant?

Yes, that's what I meant :)
(That's the second time I've posted that phrase today)
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Jurek on April 19, 2019, 05:36:09 pm
I bought a technician's bag to put our tools in in a nice control freak's orderly way because the bag for life we'd been transporting them in previously was driving me up the wall. (Think the brazil nut in muesli effect).
An interesting analogy.
Does the bag render your tools radioactive?

ETA - The brazil nut effect (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brazil_nut) is a thing. In a granular convection kind of way. Or is that what you meant?

Yes, that's what I meant :)
(That's the second time I've posted that phrase today)
S'funny how stuff can become become misinterpreted.
Until I'd looked into it, I'd assumed 'Brazil nut amongst the museli' was a reference to finding something delightful amongst the otherwise dull.
Possibly also true  :)
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Mrs Pingu on April 19, 2019, 05:44:15 pm
Just to be contrary, I've never much cared for Brazil nuts ;)

And prolly what I should have explained, the tool I wanted was always at the bottom, being smaller than the BFO hammer etc.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Jurek on April 19, 2019, 05:48:03 pm
I hear you   ;D
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: rafletcher on April 19, 2019, 05:49:35 pm
 I’m extremely allergic to Brazil nuts, and for that matter Walnuts. Near anaphalaxis allergic. I like tools though.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: orienteer on April 19, 2019, 07:29:50 pm
Brazil nuts contain selenium, an essential element rarely found in our soil in Europe. One nut contains double our daily requirement apparently.  :)

Rather expensive at present due to poor harvests.  :(
Title: Re: Conffesions of a tool junkie
Post by: Aunt Maud on April 19, 2019, 07:40:49 pm

Everyone keeps asking why I don't put it on wheels, as it would be easy to move. Which is why I don't put it on wheels, as I don't want someone to come along and easily move it.

Currently it weighs over 100kg.

Bacuase it would become The Someone else's Luggage . . .

FTFY
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: pcolbeck on May 03, 2019, 06:42:55 am
Oops I appear to have bought a Stanley 5803 hand drill on eBay. I already have several hand drills but just look at the gorgeous 1960s styling and its unused!

(http://www.findmytool.co.uk/images/old/drilling/drills/stanley/5803/large1.jpg)

That's not the actual one, it hasn't arrived yet, just a pic of the same model.

I'm going to have to find a matching 1960s Stanley brace now aren't I ...
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Jurek on May 03, 2019, 07:19:54 am
Nicely encased to protect your fingers from that nasty pinion.  :)
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Ham on May 03, 2019, 07:21:19 am
It's odd, now I can't work out how I survived for years without a couple of Vessel JIS drivers.

I swear tools breed in my shed, though.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: pcolbeck on May 03, 2019, 07:40:55 am
It's odd, now I can't work out how I survived for years without a couple of Vessel JIS drivers.

Nah you just buggered up the heads on your motorbike fasteners without realizing why - just like the rest of us did. I had 20 years of playing with motorbikes along with all my mates and can never remember anyone mentioning JIS screwdrivers. Wondering which weird imperial socket or spanner was needed for some doodah on a Landrover yes but motorbike fasteners, they are just Philips aren't they, hang on that's a bit stiff and oops it's cammed out and rounded it out bugger it  ...
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Tail End Charlie on May 03, 2019, 07:54:31 am
Yeah, there used to be a whole market for Allen bolt kits for specific motorbikes. My first set was for a Z200, still have the impact driver I bought for that job.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: andytheflyer on May 03, 2019, 07:55:14 am
It's odd, now I can't work out how I survived for years without a couple of Vessel JIS drivers.

Nah you just buggered up the heads on your motorbike fasteners without realizing why - just like the rest of us did. I had 20 years of playing with motorbikes along with all my mates and can never remember anyone mentioning JIS screwdrivers. Wondering which weird imperial socket or spanner was needed for some doodah on a Landrover yes but motorbike fasteners, they are just Philips aren't they, hang on that's a bit stiff and oops it's cammed out and rounded it out bugger it  ...
Well if you insist on buying Japanese motorcycles.....

Says he, smugly, admiring the new mid torque range torque wrench bought ready for the engine re-furb on his '73 Tiger 750.  Except that it's going to see action first on the '72 Daytona 500 that he picked up, in bits, yesterday, and is currently awaiting unloading from the back of his car.

Glad I kept those Whitworth sockets over all those years since I last had a British bike.  (But I'll have to confess to having had a Honda Revere in the interim, but I didn't need a JIS screwdriver because it never went wrong, and didn't drip oil over my nice clean, painted garage floor).
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: andytheflyer on May 03, 2019, 07:56:13 am
Yeah, there used to be a whole market for Allen bolt kits for specific motorbikes. My first set was for a Z200, still have the impact driver I bought for that job.
Still is.  I'm about to buy my second set of these this year.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Tail End Charlie on May 03, 2019, 08:18:22 am
Yeah, there used to be a whole market for Allen bolt kits for specific motorbikes. My first set was for a Z200, still have the impact driver I bought for that job.
Still is.  I'm about to buy my second set of these this year.
Don't know why, but I find that very reassuring to hear, almost like a bit of my youth still lives on.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Tail End Charlie on May 03, 2019, 08:24:24 am
It's odd, now I can't work out how I survived for years without a couple of Vessel JIS drivers.

Nah you just buggered up the heads on your motorbike fasteners without realizing why - just like the rest of us did. I had 20 years of playing with motorbikes along with all my mates and can never remember anyone mentioning JIS screwdrivers. Wondering which weird imperial socket or spanner was needed for some doodah on a Landrover yes but motorbike fasteners, they are just Philips aren't they, hang on that's a bit stiff and oops it's cammed out and rounded it out bugger it  ...
Well if you insist on buying Japanese motorcycles.....

Says he, smugly, admiring the new mid torque range torque wrench bought ready for the engine re-furb on his '73 Tiger 750.  Except that it's going to see action first on the '72 Daytona 500 that he picked up, in bits, yesterday, and is currently awaiting unloading from the back of his car.

Glad I kept those Whitworth sockets over all those years since I last had a British bike.  (But I'll have to confess to having had a Honda Revere in the interim, but I didn't need a JIS screwdriver because it never went wrong, and didn't drip oil over my nice clean, painted garage floor).
I've also kept all my imperial spanners and sockets from the times I worked on old bikes and cars. I never did fully understand the difference between the sizes and threads etc. Stuff I play around with now are all metric which makes life very much easier.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: chrisbainbridge on May 03, 2019, 10:23:49 pm
Not many to swap on a BSA  Bantam!  I swapped everything to hex socket in 1975. But then I also set the points on Deansgate with a bit of fag paper out of the gutter when it had rattled loose!
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Ham on May 04, 2019, 08:40:59 am
I still have (and regularly use) my Britool 1/2" socket set (AF, Whit, Metric), rather like this (https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/BRITOOL-1-2-Drive-Socket-Set-No-NA760C-Metric-Whitworth-AF-/323451132152?_trksid=p2349526.m4383.l10137.c10&nordt=true&rt=nc&orig_cvip=true), except mine is too early to have namby pamby rubber on it. Bought secondhand in about ....70? for (what was a princely sum of) £5. Often, a poorly made or buggered up metric nut will have a better fit on one of the imperial sockets.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Torslanda on May 04, 2019, 09:33:38 pm
Just borrowed* (ahem!) a cotter pin pressing tool from a trade acquaintance. It's many years old and made from forged steel.

I've been warned to ensure the cotter pin exits downwards 'because the pin comes out like a bullet - and you don't want to be pointing at the window!'

*I'm going to do my best to buy it...
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on May 05, 2019, 11:13:36 am
I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill!
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: rogerzilla on May 05, 2019, 03:54:44 pm
Just borrowed* (ahem!) a cotter pin pressing tool from a trade acquaintance. It's many years old and made from forged steel.

I've been warned to ensure the cotter pin exits downwards 'because the pin comes out like a bullet - and you don't want to be pointing at the window!'

*I'm going to do my best to buy it...
IME they come out with a moderate single tap if they were put in with anti-seize.  They're put in dry at the bike factory, which is why a cotter press is needed 40 years later.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: andytheflyer on May 05, 2019, 05:11:51 pm
I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill!
So did I after 'managing' for years with one of those stands you put a drill into.  One of those stands that always seems to bugger up anything you try to drill vertically.

So I bought the Axminster Craft pillar drill.  Should have done it years ago.  Now I can drill vertically, repeatably, and under total control.  Particularly as I also bought a fairly hefty engineer's vice too.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: pcolbeck on May 05, 2019, 09:13:19 pm
Got these delivered today from Amazon. Specifically for holding lawnmower pull cord recoil springs but I am sure I will find more uses for them, plus they are orange!

(https://www.grip-on.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/127-10_opt.png)

I already have a selection of Mole grips in various sizes mainly picked up from car boot sales but long nose ones don't seem to come up. Weirdly the 10 inch ones are half the price of the otherwise identically 6 inch ones. No idea why.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Kim on May 05, 2019, 09:25:57 pm
So did I after 'managing' for years with one of those stands you put a drill into.  One of those stands that always seems to bugger up anything you try to drill vertically.

So I bought the Axminster Craft pillar drill.  Should have done it years ago.  Now I can drill vertically, repeatably, and under total control.  Particularly as I also bought a fairly hefty engineer's vice too.

On the basis that I needed to drill a great many accurately-positioned holes in aluminium enclosures for a project a couple of years back, I invested in some of Silverline's cheapest chinesium.  It's been a revelation in terms of accuracy, and while it's clearly been engineered down to a price, the chuck doesn't wobble and it seems more than adequate for plastic/wood/sheet aluminium.  If it breaks, I'll happily replace it with a decent one.   :thumbsup:

Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: pcolbeck on May 05, 2019, 09:32:00 pm
Agreed. I was looking for a decent pillar drill at a not exorbitant price when an unused Aldi one turned up down the road for £30. It was a thoughtful but unwanted gift to a nice bloke who had a 1908 lathe he had restored in his shed (you can imagine what he thought of an Aldi drill). Anyhow its a million times better than using the Wolf drill stand for my electric drill. Of course a week after I bought it a Fobco Star turned up at a sensible price near where I was working so I have that now as well. A different league again and will last forever. Its a restoration project though now as I want to make it nice and whist I sort out the Fobco I am quite happy using the Aldi one, I think they were only about £60 new!

Buy a second hand cheap one then wait patiently for a Fobco, Meddings or Startrite to turn up cheap in your area.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: pcolbeck on May 05, 2019, 10:02:17 pm
Oh and don't discount three phase. You can get cheap  2 to 3 phase converters these days that would also let you control the speed of the drill.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: andytheflyer on May 06, 2019, 08:12:16 am
I did lurk for a while looking for a used pillar drill, but those that I thought worth a punt were always miles away.  Yes, yes, I know, I drove 450 miles in a day last week to pick up a 72 Triumph Daytona in bits, but that's different, innit?

The Axminister was about twice the price of the Chinesium ones, and I suppose it's still made in China, but at least the keyless chuck runs true and the stand is fairly mahoosive.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on May 06, 2019, 08:23:25 am
I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill! I wanna pillar drill!
So did I after 'managing' for years with one of those stands you put a drill into.  One of those stands that always seems to bugger up anything you try to drill vertically.

So I bought the Axminster Craft pillar drill.  Should have done it years ago.  Now I can drill vertically, repeatably, and under total control.  Particularly as I also bought a fairly hefty engineer's vice too.

I've been using a 30-year-old Bosch hand drill in a 40-year-old E.German drill stand that's built like a tank. It'll drill vertically like a good'un and it's got a 13mm throat, like many of the pillar drills out there, and I can even mount the baseplate backwards, turn the pillar through 180° and drill down beside the bench into tall pieces. However I only have electronic speed reduction, which doesn't give me full power on low speeds, and I haven't got a tilting base-plate.  For my next build I need to drill 49 5mm holes at a consistent 70° to the workpiece and I'm not looking forward to it.  Doing it with a handheld drill & jig doesn't really appeal to me.

They aren't particularly expensive. Think I'll have a look around & start the domestic propaganda machine. After all, the missus got a new chainsaw last month.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: CommuteTooFar on May 06, 2019, 02:17:28 pm
I had a cheap pillar drill once.  Then the roof of the shed blew off. It is now a lump of rust.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: CommuteTooFar on May 06, 2019, 02:28:51 pm
I know I am not a tool junkie I have a table saw that arrived last month still in its box.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on May 07, 2019, 08:41:32 am
I did a bit of research yesterday and concluded that unless you pay €€€€ for a pillar drill you get rubbish. So what else is new?

Most tellingly, there are two kinds of transmission, 2-pulley and 3-pulley. The cheap models have two conical pulleys and you're meant to shift the belt up & down to change speed, keeping it horizontal, otherwise it wears out prematurely. 3-pulley machines have an intermediate pulley and two belts: you can get many more speeds and the belts alway stay horizontal. The cheap pulleys are likely plastic, too, vs. steel in the decent kit.

Most of them now have self-tightening chucks, which are a bastard to get drills out of after a heavy job. I haven't yet got arthritis in my hands but I do have tendons and things that go click and hurt (arthritis after all, maybe?), and I want a nice big chuck key, ta very much.

On some of them (e.g. Scheppach) the tilting table is so constructed that you can't get a spanner or a socket onto the hex-head bolt that secures it.

On none of the models I looked at will the table tilt towards the user, so that if you have a series of slanting holes to drill in a wide piece you're screwed. You get a single axis only, perpendicular to the column. Maybe the higher-end models allow 2 axes, but my wallet starts to whimper when I look at them.

That's about it. I'll stick with my old Bosch/GDR model and use jigs.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: pcolbeck on May 08, 2019, 09:17:42 pm
Most old high quality pillar drills have only two pulleys and you move the belt to change speed. Doesnt make them rubish. A good pillar drill was always expensive there really isnt a way of making a good cheap one.
Even a hand cranked Stanley Continental breast drill was £70 in 1980.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on May 09, 2019, 09:08:01 am
I'll admit I'm not all that familiar with pillar drills - as I wrote, I haven't got one and I've never had one.  I'm just passing on what I gleaned from looking at the lower end. For what I'm doing, this looks quite adequate:

https://www.axminster.co.uk/axminster-craft-ac220rd-bench-radial-drill-105107

but I'd love a test drive before buying.

That Stanley was quite a piece of kit, wasn't it?  I've seen a few of those in joiners' kit and on fleamarkets, but I've never been tempted.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Jurek on May 09, 2019, 01:37:58 pm
I'll admit I'm not all that familiar with pillar drills - as I wrote, I haven't got one and I've never had one.  I'm just passing on what I gleaned from looking at the lower end. For what I'm doing, this looks quite adequate:

https://www.axminster.co.uk/axminster-craft-ac220rd-bench-radial-drill-105107

but I'd love a test drive before buying.

That Stanley was quite a piece of kit, wasn't it?  I've seen a few of those in joiners' kit and on fleamarkets, but I've never been tempted.
I had something very similar from Axminster, until I gave it away about a year ago. (It had lain, unused, in the cupboard under my stairs for around 13 years).
It was a good piece of kit.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Ham on May 09, 2019, 05:25:01 pm
Just found out about these sprint tools  today https://www.screwfix.com/p/spring-tools-wwa1105-spring-tools-woodworking-set-5-pieces/8831x

You need to see the vid here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fjBu-tWdqoc to see them in use, the UK site (www.springtools.co.uk) doesn't seem to be up at the moment, I'm waiting for that to come back on stream before adding to the Very Necessary Tool addiction.

Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Wobbly John on May 09, 2019, 07:05:09 pm
A tip for getting pillar drills back perpendicular to the table if you have tilted it: Bend a 'Z' shape, only with right angledish corners about 2-3" sides, from stiff wire. put one end in the chuck, and adjust table height until the other end touches it. turn chuck by hand and fettle until the 'pointer' end just touches the table 360deg.  ;)
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: redshift on May 09, 2019, 09:06:23 pm
A tip for getting pillar drills back perpendicular to the table if you have tilted it: Bend a 'Z' shape, only with right angledish corners about 2-3" sides, from stiff wire. put one end in the chuck, and adjust table height until the other end touches it. turn chuck by hand and fettle until the 'pointer' end just touches the table 360deg.  ;)

"Sorry chaps, I can't come out tonight' cos I'm tramming my drill press..."

Classy Excuses, No. 211 in an occasional series.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Jurek on May 09, 2019, 09:10:22 pm
A tip for getting pillar drills back perpendicular to the table if you have tilted it: Bend a 'Z' shape, only with right angledish corners about 2-3" sides, from stiff wire. put one end in the chuck, and adjust table height until the other end touches it. turn chuck by hand and fettle until the 'pointer' end just touches the table 360deg.  ;)

"Sorry chaps, I can't come out tonight' cos I'm tramming my drill press..."

Classy Excuses, No. 211 in an occasional series.

There was a time when that was a regular event around these parts...
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Jurek on May 09, 2019, 09:15:15 pm
A tip for getting pillar drills back perpendicular to the table if you have tilted it: Bend a 'Z' shape, only with right angledish corners about 2-3" sides, from stiff wire. put one end in the chuck, and adjust table height until the other end touches it. turn chuck by hand and fettle until the 'pointer' end just touches the table 360deg.  ;)

"Sorry chaps, I can't come out tonight' cos I'm tramming my drill press..."

Classy Excuses, No. 211 in an occasional series.

There was a time when that was a regular event around these parts...

My boss's daughter has moved into new premises with her boyfriend recently.
He has helped them move.
His words:
They cannot fit a plug.

It's endemic.
How did that happen?
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Kim on May 09, 2019, 09:26:53 pm
They cannot fit a plug.

It's endemic.
How did that happen?

*googles*  The Plugs And Sockets (Safety) Regulations 1994

Ever since then appliances have had to be supplied with an appropriate plug, with moulded plugs proliferating soon afterwards.  The tail end of Gen X were only just old enough to be competent with mains electricity while appliances were still being supplied with bare flex.

And of course nobody since can afford to own a house, so have no DIY skills to speak of by default.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: redshift on May 09, 2019, 09:34:14 pm
When we became a 'service economy,' stopped manufacturing and stopped teaching practical science and engineering in schools, that's when.  In my industry (Broadcast Engineering, which is a bit niche, I know) there's almost a 30-year skills gap.  We have to teach basic soldering, fault-finding and suchlike to graduates - stuff I learned in school (or at least, while I was school-age).

Oh, and definitely since they started putting moulded plugs onto appliances prior to sale - that's very much a lost skill for lots of millennials.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Kim on May 09, 2019, 09:47:16 pm
There have been a couple of times when I've been bemused by my peers not knowing how to wire a plug.  I mean, sure, I've had an affinity for electrons[1] since a formative age and naturally tended towards situations where those skills were actually used, but we *were* taught this stuff in school.  I suppose if you've basically never needed to do it, you just recycle the neurons.


[1] I'm positive.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: drossall on May 09, 2019, 10:48:15 pm
They cannot fit a plug.
I think I commented on this to a thread involving Kim before. As physics students around 1980, we got a lecture on wiring plugs, because so many post-graduates were electrocuting themselves.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on May 10, 2019, 08:01:13 am
A tip for getting pillar drills back perpendicular to the table if you have tilted it: Bend a 'Z' shape, only with right angledish corners about 2-3" sides, from stiff wire. put one end in the chuck, and adjust table height until the other end touches it. turn chuck by hand and fettle until the 'pointer' end just touches the table 360deg.  ;)

Told yiz all the Universe would fall apart without wire coathangers.

Didn't one of the Brontesaurus sisters write a book called Coathanger Abbey?
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: andytheflyer on May 10, 2019, 08:01:31 am
I learned plug wiring from an early age because my late dad was red-green colour blind (back when wiring was red and black).  He needed someone to show him which one was the red.  It also stopped him from being called up into the RAF in WW2, so they sent him down the mines to join the rest of the men in his family.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on May 10, 2019, 08:58:10 am
They cannot fit a plug.
I think I commented on this to a thread involving Kim before. As physics students around 1980, we got a lecture on wiring plugs, because so many post-graduates were electrocuting themselves.

Dear oh lor. I think we got that lesson at school when I was 9.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on May 10, 2019, 10:06:21 am
Getting back to pillock drills, I've seen a couple of videos where folk seemed quite happy with the (deep breath) Titan TTB541DBT (https://www.screwfix.com/p/titan-ttb541dbt-530mm-drill-press-230v/17643) (breathe in). It fits my budgetary bracket just now.

Any opinions?
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Tim Hall on May 10, 2019, 10:25:05 am
They cannot fit a plug.
I think I commented on this to a thread involving Kim before. As physics students around 1980, we got a lecture on wiring plugs, because so many post-graduates were electrocuting themselves.

Dear oh lor. I think we got that lesson at school when I was 9.
We teach it at Scouts from time to time. I learnt it from my Ladybird Book of Electricity. Or if I didn't, I certainly used said tome to advise my Mum which size fuse was needed in the washing machine.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: drossall on May 10, 2019, 10:39:44 am
Good plan. I might do that (for the Skills Challenge of course). Getting the right fuse is almost a separate task!
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Ham on May 10, 2019, 12:38:58 pm
I happened to be in Homebase and saw one of these

https://uk.ryobitools.eu/power-tools/drilling-and-screwdriving/drill-press/rdp102l/rdp102l-1/ which is also in the same price bracket (https://www.homebase.co.uk/ryobi-390w-drill-press-rdp102l_p397232)

It seemed to be better quality than some of the Titan stuff I've seen, although obv it varies from item to item. I liked the front placed switch, too. I liked the motor was lower and more likely genuine wattage than the Titan.

I also managed not to buy it.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Kim on May 10, 2019, 01:11:24 pm
Good plan. I might do that (for the Skills Challenge of course). Getting the right fuse is almost a separate task!

Advice on fuses changed at some point, with 3A or 13A now covering most options[1].

The important thing is to bear in mind that the job of the plug fuse is simply to protect the cable.  The appliance will, if necessary, have its own protection downstream of the cable entry.


[1] The notable exception being the IEC C13 'kettle lead', which probably merits a 10A fuse in accordance with the connector rating.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Beardy on May 10, 2019, 02:12:21 pm
Good plan. I might do that (for the Skills Challenge of course). Getting the right fuse is almost a separate task!

Advice on fuses changed at some point, with 3A or 13A now covering most options[1].

The important thing is to bear in mind that the job of the plug fuse is simply to protect the cable.  The appliance willshould have, if necessary, have its own protection downstream of the cable entry.


[1] The notable exception being the IEC C13 'kettle lead', which probably merits a 10A fuse in accordance with the connector rating.
corrected that for you.  :)
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Tim Hall on May 10, 2019, 02:40:06 pm
<stuff about wiring plugs>

Good plan. I might do that (for the Skills Challenge of course). Getting the right fuse is almost a separate task!

Advice on fuses changed at some point, with 3A or 13A now covering most options[1].

The important thing is to bear in mind that the job of the plug fuse is simply to protect the cable.  The appliance will, if necessary, have its own protection downstream of the cable entry.


[1] The notable exception being the IEC C13 'kettle lead', which probably merits a 10A fuse in accordance with the connector rating.
We combined The Wiring of Plugs* with a Brief Introduction to Ironing. This then morphed into a Short Discussion on Fuses and Fire in The Home when an iron burst into flames.


* This is the cord grip, which in your case you have not got.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on May 10, 2019, 02:48:57 pm
I happened to be in Homebase and saw one of these

https://uk.ryobitools.eu/power-tools/drilling-and-screwdriving/drill-press/rdp102l/rdp102l-1/ which is also in the same price bracket (https://www.homebase.co.uk/ryobi-390w-drill-press-rdp102l_p397232)

It seemed to be better quality than some of the Titan stuff I've seen, although obv it varies from item to item. I liked the front placed switch, too. I liked the motor was lower and more likely genuine wattage than the Titan.

I also managed not to buy it.

I've seen some negative YouTube crits of that Ryobi - an ungreased spindle bearing on one and one of the sockets that take the raising & lowering handles left unthreaded on another. Also a very flimsy pulley cover on top and a hard-to-reach belt tensioning wheel.  Belt tensioning looks very easy on the Titan.

I'll have a gander at the Titan next time I'm in town.  It's hard to find a shop around here that actually has such items in stock, you mostly get "you order it and we'll get it in".
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Mr Larrington on May 10, 2019, 03:29:25 pm
A tip for getting pillar drills back perpendicular to the table if you have tilted it: Bend a 'Z' shape, only with right angledish corners about 2-3" sides, from stiff wire. put one end in the chuck, and adjust table height until the other end touches it. turn chuck by hand and fettle until the 'pointer' end just touches the table 360deg.  ;)

Told yiz all the Universe would fall apart without wire coathangers.

Didn't one of the Brontesaurus sisters write a book called Coathanger Abbey?

No, Coathanger Abbey was by Jane Austin-Westminster.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Jurek on May 10, 2019, 08:45:47 pm
They cannot fit a plug.
I think I commented on this to a thread involving Kim before. As physics students around 1980, we got a lecture on wiring plugs, because so many post-graduates were electrocuting themselves.
My father taught me how to wire a plug, probably around the time I was ~ 10 years old, and wires were red black and green. He was in the employ of Hoover at that time.
What he didn't teach me and, to be fair, I only discovered this very recently, is to be very generous with the length of earth wire which you leave inside the plug.
That way, when things have gone awry, and the flex has been ripped away from the plug, the last remaining connection is the earth. :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: hubner on May 12, 2019, 10:38:14 am
I'm not sure why being able to wire a plug is having knowledge about electrics.

Wiring a plug is just cutting and stripping wires and doing up a few screws! Anyone can do that just by following a diagram and instructions.

Quote
My boss's daughter has moved into new premises with her boyfriend recently.
He has helped them move.
His words:
They cannot fit a plug.

It's endemic.
How did that happen?

 If somebody doesn't know how to do it, it's probably they've never seen it done (and never had the need to wire a plug, as mentioned), it doesn't mean they don't have the ability to do it once they know how.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Kim on May 12, 2019, 05:35:08 pm
What he didn't teach me and, to be fair, I only discovered this very recently, is to be very generous with the length of earth wire which you leave inside the plug.
That way, when things have gone awry, and the flex has been ripped away from the plug, the last remaining connection is the earth. :thumbsup:

This is one of the many safety features of BS1363.  If you strip the wires to the correct length (usually specified on the little bit of cardboard that comes with new plugs) for the channel inside the plug, the earth always gets yanked out last.

I remember my parents having some (presumably non-compliant) plugs where the terminals were all in a neat horizontal row.  Much easier to strip the wires to the right length, and at the time I wondered why all plugs weren't made that way.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: CommuteTooFar on May 13, 2019, 03:18:00 pm
Today I unpacked my Evolution Rage Table Saw.  Fiddly slightly awkward process, I dropped two bolts into the machine. Found one when i turned it over. Not sure where the other has gone.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on May 13, 2019, 04:04:40 pm
Health to use it, as me Da would always say.  Wish I still had my old Lurem table saw combo. You'd have a time turning it upside down, it weighed 300 kilos.

Anyway, I'm about to go and unpack the Titan drill press I just splurged on. It seemed to come out of the YT reviews OK.

Missus did the dirty on me just as I was turning into the Brico Depôt car park: "I could use a new pair of running shoes..."  :-\  :facepalm:
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Ham on May 13, 2019, 04:13:01 pm
Today I unpacked my Evolution Rage Table Saw.  Fiddly slightly awkward process, I dropped two bolts into the machine. Found one when i turned it over. Not sure where the other has gone.

It's hiding inside the venturi tube.

This piece of wisdom is a hangover from many years ago when I was putting a head back together and bolted the air intakes to the horizontal twin Webber DCOE probably that bit too late at night and, after probably half hour of searching, decided it must have fallen on the floor. As has been by now established, it hadn't and got sucked in a mile or so down the road :(

Even if the saw doesn't have a venturi tube, it will have something functionally similar.

In other news I dug up my Wolfcraft saw/router table over the weekend, it's a bench that allows you to convert a skill saw into a table saw, router into table router. While not perfect it does a job and has - thus far - prevented a splurge on something I have no room for.

ETA something like this (http://www.wolfcraft.com/en/products/p/machine_tables-2/machine_tables_master_cut_1500/s/p/index.html). only mine has a router hole and mount in it, too.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: andytheflyer on May 13, 2019, 06:16:35 pm
Today I unpacked my Evolution Rage Table Saw.  Fiddly slightly awkward process, I dropped two bolts into the machine. Found one when i turned it over. Not sure where the other has gone.
In other news I dug up my Wolfcraft saw/router table over the weekend, it's a bench that allows you to convert a skill saw into a table saw, router into table router. While not perfect it does a job and has - thus far - prevented a splurge on something I have no room for.

ETA something like this (http://www.wolfcraft.com/en/products/p/machine_tables-2/machine_tables_master_cut_1500/s/p/index.html). only mine has a router hole and mount in it, too.
Drool...……………..
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: pcolbeck on May 13, 2019, 06:35:17 pm
In other news I dug up my Wolfcraft saw/router table over the weekend, it's a bench that allows you to convert a skill saw into a table saw, router into table router. While not perfect it does a job and has - thus far - prevented a splurge on something I have no room for.

ETA something like this (http://www.wolfcraft.com/en/products/p/machine_tables-2/machine_tables_master_cut_1500/s/p/index.html). only mine has a router hole and mount in it, too.

I picked up quite a nice Skil circular saw for £10 at a car boot sale the other week with the idea of doing a DIY version of that. Loads of plans and ideas for doing this on Youtube, some very involved that seem to require you already having a table saw to make them which kind of defeats the object ....
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Ham on May 13, 2019, 08:25:04 pm
Well, when I bought it, it was sub-£100 (£70 comes to mind?) and it is now £140 (https://www.screwfix.com/p/wolfcraft-master-cut-1500-multifunction-workbench/9647p) - according to the blurb it is compatible with routers, although I can't see the cutouts I have (circle centre with four radial tracks to secure the device) if it does still work for that, it is really worth having.

I got mine to replicate some victorian mouldings, so it paid for itself. It isn't perfect, but it is bloody good, and with the addition of a clamp behind the guides (to avoid any play) it can be a precision bit of kit, and it folds down. One of the nicest aspects is the PROPER on/off control you get with it.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Wobbly John on May 13, 2019, 09:02:14 pm
They cannot fit a plug.
I think I commented on this to a thread involving Kim before. As physics students around 1980, we got a lecture on wiring plugs, because so many post-graduates were electrocuting themselves.

Dear oh lor. I think we got that lesson at school when I was 9.
We teach it at Scouts from time to time. I learnt it from my Ladybird Book of Electricity. Or if I didn't, I certainly used said tome to advise my Mum which size fuse was needed in the washing machine.

Plug fitting is still taught on most Science sylabusses. CLEAPSS - the school science safety advisors, say that you should bend the earth pin so that it cannot be plugged in, if students are wiring plugs.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on May 13, 2019, 09:09:22 pm
Nobody does that in Aussie schools. So they take time away from scholastic subjects to teach this sort of thing here? Whatever floats your boat.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Wobbly John on May 13, 2019, 09:15:12 pm
Well, when I bought it, it was sub-£100 (£70 comes to mind?) and it is now £140 (https://www.screwfix.com/p/wolfcraft-master-cut-1500-multifunction-workbench/9647p) - according to the blurb it is compatible with routers, although I can't see the cutouts I have (circle centre with four radial tracks to secure the device) if it does still work for that, it is really worth having.

I got mine to replicate some victorian mouldings, so it paid for itself. It isn't perfect, but it is bloody good, and with the addition of a clamp behind the guides (to avoid any play) it can be a precision bit of kit, and it folds down. One of the nicest aspects is the PROPER on/off control you get with it.

I have 2 circular saw tables in my garage - I bought one for £30 then I managed to obtain a better one that was destined for a skip (for free). My table router was £32 and before I had them, I had a Workmate style table with drop-in circular saw and router plates - I think it cost me £5  :demon:

I splashed out £50 on a unused Makita sliding compound mitre saw  - still boxed and complete with folding table (Closed bid auction and nobody else bid on it  ;)), and also £50 on my Drummond metal lathe, which is over 100 years old!  :o
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Wobbly John on May 13, 2019, 09:19:20 pm
Nobody does that in Aussie schools. So they take time away from scholastic subjects to teach this sort of thing here? Whatever floats your boat.

Isn't there legal impications about fitting your own plugs in Aus?
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on May 13, 2019, 09:31:01 pm
Indeed, Aussies are much less tolerant than Brits regarding dodgy DIY of stuff that can kill the next (unsuspecting) owner.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Tim Hall on May 13, 2019, 09:59:59 pm
Indeed, Aussies are much less tolerant than Brits regarding dodgy DIY of stuff that can kill the next (unsuspecting) owner.
Sockets in bathrooms are what made me twitch when I was in Sydney.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on May 13, 2019, 10:06:41 pm
They are installed properly and earth leakage devices have been mandatory since 1991. It seemed really odd to me that Brits didn't insist on reliable wiring and that charging of toothbrushes and shavers has to be done outside the bathroom.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Kim on May 13, 2019, 10:22:21 pm
Plug fitting is still taught on most Science sylabusses. CLEAPSS - the school science safety advisors, say that you should bend the earth pin so that it cannot be plugged in, if students are wiring plugs.

I remember a set of those lurking in the physics prep room when I was doing my A-levels.  The dangling end of the cable was properly insulated, too.  Seemed like overkill compared to just turning the power off in the classroom, as they did when I was taught, but never underestimate the power of year 9s armed with stupidity.

My main memory of the domestic electricity part of the syllabus was the teacher (who was, admittedly, a bit rubbish) failing to come up with a convincing reason for ring mains.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Tim Hall on May 13, 2019, 10:23:41 pm
They are installed properly and earth leakage devices have been mandatory since 1991. It seemed really odd to me that Brits didn't insist on reliable wiring and that charging of toothbrushes and shavers has to be done outside the bathroom.
Toothbrush charging and shavers can be done in the bathroom in the UK, as it uses special magica built in isolation transformer. 
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: bludger on May 13, 2019, 10:26:05 pm
Nobody does that in Aussie schools. So they take time away from scholastic subjects to teach this sort of thing here? Whatever floats your boat.

It's more that you learn to apply scholastic knowledge via practical implementation. When I work with older people they can often give me very thorough breakdowns of how car petrol engines work, as that is the case study used in their maths and science lessons, for example.

I can't remember if I was taught wiring plugs in DT - in any case my dad taught me how with cheapo electronics brought back from the middle east 💁‍♂️
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Kim on May 13, 2019, 10:28:30 pm
They are installed properly and earth leakage devices have been mandatory since 1991. It seemed really odd to me that Brits didn't insist on reliable wiring and that charging of toothbrushes and shavers has to be done outside the bathroom.

We're allowed sockets outside the Safe Area (some official definition of what you're likely to reach with a limb immersed in a bath or sink, I think), though many British bathrooms are small enough that the whole room counts.

We're also allowed low-current sockets fed through an isolating transformer within the safe area:  The two pin ones that tend to have "Shavers only" written on them in large friendly letters.

I'm not sure if an appropriately IP-rated socket (I'm thinking Ceeform, or one of those outdoor sockets that enclose the plug) would be permitted if you wanted to install a washing machine or something, but it would seem like a perfectly reasonable thing to do.


It's ridiculous when you look at what's normal and ordinary in kitchens.  Put it out of splash range and require an RCD, sorted.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Wobbly John on May 13, 2019, 10:49:10 pm
Plug fitting is still taught on most Science sylabusses. CLEAPSS - the school science safety advisors, say that you should bend the earth pin so that it cannot be plugged in, if students are wiring plugs.

I remember a set of those lurking in the physics prep room when I was doing my A-levels.  The dangling end of the cable was properly insulated, too.  Seemed like overkill compared to just turning the power off in the classroom, as they did when I was taught, but never underestimate the power of year 9s armed with stupidity.

My main memory of the domestic electricity part of the syllabus was the teacher (who was, admittedly, a bit rubbish) failing to come up with a convincing reason for ring mains.

Actually, the recomendation is to bend the earth pin (I drilled and pop riveted ours) AND turn the power off...  :facepalm:
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on May 13, 2019, 11:40:47 pm
So, can you use a decent hairdryer in a small British bathroom?
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Kim on May 13, 2019, 11:50:37 pm
So, can you use a decent hairdryer in a small British bathroom?

Only a permanently installed one, I think.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Beardy on May 14, 2019, 08:29:13 am
Plug fitting is still taught on most Science sylabusses. CLEAPSS - the school science safety advisors, say that you should bend the earth pin so that it cannot be plugged in, if students are wiring plugs.

I remember a set of those lurking in the physics prep room when I was doing my A-levels.  The dangling end of the cable was properly insulated, too.  Seemed like overkill compared to just turning the power off in the classroom, as they did when I was taught, but never underestimate the power of year 9s armed with stupidity.

My main memory of the domestic electricity part of the syllabus was the teacher (who was, admittedly, a bit rubbish) failing to come up with a convincing reason for ring mains.
To be fair to him, I don’t believe their is a convincing reason for ring mains.

ETA . Apologies for that, I’ve made an assumption that it was a male teacher.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on May 14, 2019, 10:00:12 am
Nobody does [wiring plugs] in Aussie schools. So they take time away from scholastic subjects to teach this sort of thing here? Whatever floats your boat.

When we did it at school I was startled to be learning about something that actually applied to real life. It felt weird.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on May 14, 2019, 10:05:03 am
Returning to earth after purchasing the Titan drill press, I have realized that I'm going to have to remodel a significant chunk of my workshop to accommodate it, or grow 20cm and another elbow joint to shift the belts on the pulleys.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on May 14, 2019, 10:27:18 am
In the UK you can buy an electric toothbrush which you're expected to charge from a shaver socket but the toothbrush plug is actually a schuko (or something of that ilk) which only fits with a bit of shoving and even then not completely.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: pcolbeck on May 14, 2019, 11:30:53 am
Returning to earth after purchasing the Titan drill press, I have realized that I'm going to have to remodel a significant chunk of my workshop to accommodate it, or grow 20cm and another elbow joint to shift the belts on the pulleys.

May I suggest folding steps ?

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71gr7hebs1L._SL1500_.jpg)
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: robgul on May 14, 2019, 11:47:39 am
In the UK you can buy an electric toothbrush which you're expected to charge from a shaver socket but the toothbrush plug is actually a schuko (or something of that ilk) which only fits with a bit of shoving and even then not completely.

One of our bathrooms has an electric towel rail (about 60 watts) that's wired to a fused spur box - I chopped the plug off the toothbrush base and just wired it into the same spur box.

Rob
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on May 14, 2019, 11:52:08 am
Returning to earth after purchasing the Titan drill press, I have realized that I'm going to have to remodel a significant chunk of my workshop to accommodate it, or grow 20cm and another elbow joint to shift the belts on the pulleys.

May I suggest folding steps ?

I have hop-ups & such, but I need to get round the side of the thing too.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Kim on May 14, 2019, 12:22:35 pm
Plug fitting is still taught on most Science sylabusses. CLEAPSS - the school science safety advisors, say that you should bend the earth pin so that it cannot be plugged in, if students are wiring plugs.

I remember a set of those lurking in the physics prep room when I was doing my A-levels.  The dangling end of the cable was properly insulated, too.  Seemed like overkill compared to just turning the power off in the classroom, as they did when I was taught, but never underestimate the power of year 9s armed with stupidity.

My main memory of the domestic electricity part of the syllabus was the teacher (who was, admittedly, a bit rubbish) failing to come up with a convincing reason for ring mains.
To be fair to him, I don’t believe their is a convincing reason for ring mains.

ETA . Apologies for that, I’ve made an assumption that it was a male teacher.

Well yes.  The traditional excuse is that they reduce the amount of copper needed, which was important when these things were standardised after the war.  I suspect the reason we haven't moved over to 16A radials is that troubleshooting and testing the things keeps electricians in business.

And yes, the teacher in question was indeed female.  That's not why she was a bit rubbish.  (That was because she was a) a chemist being made to teach physics  and  b) straight out of teacher-training camp, and not yet wise in the ways of class control.)  I had an inspirationally brilliant female physics/electronics teacher in subsequent years.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on May 16, 2019, 01:23:14 pm
Plug fitting is still taught on most Science sylabusses. CLEAPSS - the school science safety advisors, say that you should bend the earth pin so that it cannot be plugged in, if students are wiring plugs.

I remember a set of those lurking in the physics prep room when I was doing my A-levels.  The dangling end of the cable was properly insulated, too.  Seemed like overkill compared to just turning the power off in the classroom, as they did when I was taught, but never underestimate the power of year 9s armed with stupidity.

My main memory of the domestic electricity part of the syllabus was the teacher (who was, admittedly, a bit rubbish) failing to come up with a convincing reason for ring mains.
To be fair to him, I don’t believe their is a convincing reason for ring mains.

ETA . Apologies for that, I’ve made an assumption that it was a male teacher.

Well yes.  The traditional excuse is that they reduce the amount of copper needed, which was important when these things were standardised after the war.  I suspect the reason we haven't moved over to 16A radials is that troubleshooting and testing the things keeps electricians in business.

And yes, the teacher in question was indeed female.  That's not why she was a bit rubbish.  (That was because she was a) a chemist being made to teach physics  and  b) straight out of teacher-training camp, and not yet wise in the ways of class control.)  I had an inspirationally brilliant female physics/electronics teacher in subsequent years.
[disclaimer: I am a bit rubbish at this elextrickery business]
I thought there was a safety justification, based on trying to restrict the max length of a spur and load on a spur (or radial)?
A radial, by its nature, can carry a higher load. It will also not get extended, unless you have a real bodger taking spurs and loops off the ring.

A radial might get extended, then extended . . .

The solution to that would be to have mandatory max lengths/load combinations; not beyond the bounds of testing equip I would have thought.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Mr Larrington on May 17, 2019, 11:34:49 am
There is a story that the ring main came about as a result of a post-WW2 shortage of copper, but Wikinaccurate claims this is A Myth.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: pcolbeck on May 17, 2019, 04:24:13 pm
I am unreasonably pleased because Screwfix have delivered a Makita belt sander and 1/3 sheet sander this afternoon. I have never had a belt sander before, it's a beast! Hopefully the weather stays dry and I can try it out sorting out the garden table that hasn't been refinished for 10 years.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Wobbly John on May 17, 2019, 09:28:22 pm
I am unreasonably pleased because Screwfix have delivered a Makita belt sander and 1/3 sheet sander this afternoon. I have never had a belt sander before, it's a beast! Hopefully the weather stays dry and I can try it out sorting out the garden table that hasn't been refinished for 10 years.

If you have a pressure washer, start with that.  ;)

Remember to keep the cable well out of the way of belt sanders. I have a old version of the Makita belt sander, which is still compatable with current belts, sole-plate pad etc, but seems to weigh twice as much, and be more powerful (we have a newer one at work, thus the abilty to compare).
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: pcolbeck on May 17, 2019, 09:49:35 pm
Thanks. I do have a pressure washer, did the table last spring. The Makita I bought is an M9400 which is from their red DIY range. Never had anything but blue Makita before but this gets good reviews. Opinion seems to be its based on an older blue 9400 but made in China. That isn't necessarily a bad thing since the old ones were apparantly hard to kill, we will see. The 1/3 sheet sander is a blue Makita as there was only £5 difference between that and the red one rather than £200 between the red and blue belt sanders! My last 1/3 sheet sander was some unknown brand I got form B&Q or Homebase 20 years ago and its only just given up the ghost so I hope this one lasts me out :)

Thanks for the warning re teh cable, I managed to cut the hedge trimmer cable twice last year! Good job I always fit RCDs to outside cable :)
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on May 18, 2019, 09:38:49 am
I am unreasonably pleased because Screwfix have delivered a Makita belt sander and 1/3 sheet sander this afternoon. I have never had a belt sander before, it's a beast! Hopefully the weather stays dry and I can try it out sorting out the garden table that hasn't been refinished for 10 years.

Practise on a few bits of scrap first. Newton's 3rd law applies.

https://youtu.be/F9hCPe4KNtg
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Jurek on May 18, 2019, 09:58:47 am
I am unreasonably pleased because Screwfix have delivered a Makita belt sander and 1/3 sheet sander this afternoon. I have never had a belt sander before, it's a beast! Hopefully the weather stays dry and I can try it out sorting out the garden table that hasn't been refinished for 10 years.

Practise on a few bits of scrap first. Newton's 3rd law applies.

https://youtu.be/F9hCPe4KNtg
We used to do this with a pair of DeWalts, in the museum workshop where I was once employed.
They have a surprising amount of grunt.
See also: Deploying a compressed airline to spin up the outer race of a bearing, before dropping said bearing onto a concrete floor...
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on May 18, 2019, 10:43:00 am
See also: Deploying a compressed airline to spin up the outer race of a bearing, before dropping said bearing onto a concrete floor...

Well now, I've got all of those... the bearings I have are a bit small, though.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Jurek on May 18, 2019, 11:21:17 am
See also: Deploying a compressed airline to spin up the outer race of a bearing, before dropping said bearing onto a concrete floor...

Well now, I've got all of those... the bearings I have are a bit small, though.
You need a bearing with an ID of ~ 25mm or more.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on May 18, 2019, 12:47:19 pm
Yeah, all mine are 25mm OD
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: pcolbeck on May 23, 2019, 04:48:02 pm
Bosch how I love thee. Delta sander that's at least 10 years old and the pad has de-laminated, glued it back together but I doubt it will hold. Quick Google and a new pad delivered today.
Try that with your B&Q own brand and the like, actually I have with sliding mitre saw that was only three years old, I needed a part and B&Q couldn't even tell me who made the damn thing never mind get a spare.
Bosch even have exploded diagrams on their web site where you can find the exact part number you need.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on May 25, 2019, 04:06:21 pm
Nipped over to the local DIY hole for some work gloves I need and came back with the gloves, a selection of bolts, nuts, washers and wing-nuts, then added one of those el cheapo angle grinders because, as somebody put it, at 12€90 why not plus a bunch of discs and a bill for 57€. Oh, missus went to and got some dog treats. Bloody expensive, dog treats.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on May 27, 2019, 08:27:10 am
Re the el cheapo angle grinder: it works but (a) the return spring in the switch is so strong that it slides the untextured body out of my hand unless I pull back against it with the side handle, (b) it makes a racket to wake the dead and (c) the odour of ozone is impressive.  That may diminish as the brushes wear in.

I reckon this'll mostly serve to push me towards buying a decent one.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: pcolbeck on May 27, 2019, 11:52:58 am
Yes similar experience here. I have a big Makita angle grinder and a Powerline or some such cheapo little one. The Powerline is on borrowed time until it gets replaced by a Makita. Small decent angle grinders aren't that expensive. I replaced my old cheap 1/3 sheet sander with a Makita one last week, big improvement especially in noise levels and vibration !
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on May 27, 2019, 12:15:33 pm
Mine was mostly a lock for the stable of a bolted horse: some of the piping we had to get through last Friday were hard to get at with a hacksaw. This one'll do for the next water-heater, in 15 years or so if I'm still around.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: hairyhippy on June 09, 2019, 09:39:42 pm
Yep. I have a tool problem. I have work tools. Upstairs tools. Downstairs tools. Shed 1 tools. Shed 2 tools. Oh and the garage.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on June 10, 2019, 09:01:12 am
Yep. I have a tool problem. I have work tools. Upstairs tools. Downstairs tools. Shed 1 tools. Shed 2 tools. Oh and the garage.

Crikey. I have workshop & house tools and a basic rule that if a workshop tool goes into the house then it goes back to the shop before the day's out.  The converse does not apply.

Meanwhile, anyone here got a plunge/track saw?  They look to be incredibly useful.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Ham on June 10, 2019, 09:34:09 am
A real one or a hankering for one?

With a decent skill saw along with sufficient clamps to create a guide it's hard to justify the cost or storage space. If I was doing it as a day job, it'd be a slam dunk.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: CommuteTooFar on June 10, 2019, 10:04:36 am
Before buying a track saw its worth having a look at the tracks available.

There are two issues.  Some tracks are usable by other brands of saw. Festool, Makita and I believe Evolution can run on each others tracks.
So with care you can buy cheaper tracks for your saw.

The cheapest saws Aldi/Lidl, Screwfix etc often come with very short tracks. So if your plan is to rip full size sheets you may need to join four sections of track.

Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Kim on June 10, 2019, 12:22:13 pm
I just learned that parallel action pliers are a thing and bought some because they look like they'll come in useful.

Wishing this had happened before I upgraded the potentiometers on my bench power supply (which involved a great deal of failing to hold M3 nuts and pinching my skin with with long-nose pliers while I did up the screw from the other side of the panel), but there you go...
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Jurek on June 10, 2019, 12:37:30 pm
I just learned that parallel action pliers are a thing and bought some because they look like they'll come in useful.

Wishing this had happened before I upgraded the potentiometers on my bench power supply (which involved a great deal of failing to hold M3 nuts and pinching my skin with with long-nose pliers while I did up the screw from the other side of the panel), but there you go...
Most of them look quite cheap and nasty, but I think you'd be struggling produce something giving you parallel action from a conventional forged tool.

As far as parallel jaws go, this delightful tool  is a V.E.G. (Very expensive godsend)
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48036243031_e1789fb4f0_o.png)
I bought from Tourettes Tools in Fulham around 20 years ago.
Smooth jaws (so no marky), parallel action, can be locked off a la Mole Grips.
A delight to use - but I think they were something like 45 squid  :o

Great for universal spannering, with little risk of trashing the fastener.

They're currently my tool-of-choice for crimping cable end crimps.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Kim on June 10, 2019, 12:50:17 pm
They seem to mostly be a jewellery thing, which makes sense.  It's small stuff where they're likely to be more useful anyway.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on June 10, 2019, 01:08:23 pm
A real one or a hankering for one?

With a decent skill saw along with sufficient clamps to create a guide it's hard to justify the cost or storage space. If I was doing it as a day job, it'd be a slam dunk.

Used to do the portable circular saw/clamp/lath bit before I got a decent table saw. Nowadays I just have a small table saw with a crappy fence. Track saw looks more precise.

Before buying a track saw its worth having a look at the tracks available.

There are two issues.  Some tracks are usable by other brands of saw. Festool, Makita and I believe Evolution can run on each others tracks.
So with care you can buy cheaper tracks for your saw.

The cheapest saws Aldi/Lidl, Screwfix etc often come with very short tracks. So if your plan is to rip full size sheets you may need to join four sections of track.



Yeah. I've been following Peter Millard's track-saw videos on YT where he compares various el cheapos with Festool. I don't reckon I'd ever need more than 2x70cm tracks. Aldi/Lidl saws are apparently rebadged Sheppach kit & Scheppach tracks are available separately, which is the other consideration with el cheapos.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: pcolbeck on June 11, 2019, 02:32:07 am
Most of them look quite cheap and nasty, but I think you'd be struggling produce something giving you parallel action from a conventional forged tool.

Knipex pliers wrenches come in a variety of sizes and are really high quality. Not cheap though.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/KNIPEX-pliers-wrench-chrome-plated-plastic-coated/dp/B000X4KP1C
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on June 11, 2019, 08:00:55 am
Yup. I have a pair of Knipex C-clip spreaders and they're very nicely made. When El Prez did our water heater last month he had a complete Knipex electrician's tool bag (https://www.knipex.com/index.php?id=1216&L=1&page=group_detail&parentID=1373&groupID=2526) - his retirement present.

Facom are pretty good too.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Jurek on June 11, 2019, 08:51:16 am
Most of them look quite cheap and nasty, but I think you'd be struggling produce something giving you parallel action from a conventional forged tool.

Knipex pliers wrenches come in a variety of sizes and are really high quality. Not cheap though.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/KNIPEX-pliers-wrench-chrome-plated-plastic-coated/dp/B000X4KP1C

They're 'ver nice.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Kim on June 11, 2019, 01:37:50 pm
I have nothing bad to say about their wire cutters, particularly the Super Knips series.

I should probably get some of their wire strippers, but my preferred technique is to use really cheap ones with the locknut removed, so I can strip different diameters by feel.  Doing it properly would seem like faff.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Jurek on June 11, 2019, 02:02:11 pm
I note with some disappointment that Lindstrom no longer produce their pliers / cutters with a box joint - A thing of beauty in itself.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on June 11, 2019, 02:51:39 pm
I have nothing bad to say about their wire cutters, particularly the Super Knips series.

I should probably get some of their wire strippers, but my preferred technique is to use really cheap ones with the locknut removed, so I can strip different diameters by feel.  Doing it properly would seem like faff.

I have one of these things:

(https://assets-alpha.megadepot.com/product/image.640x640/martindale/MAWS001.jpg)

Nice enough to use and not much to get wrong unless you put the wire in the wrong notch.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: bludger on June 11, 2019, 02:53:49 pm
(https://d1vfu4m1fkicia.cloudfront.net/imgs/products/px/950x600_constWH/TOJOOMT_P1.jpg?v=c)

I don't need it. I don't need it. I don't need it. I don't need it. I don't need it.

https://www.planetx.co.uk/i/q/TOJOOMT/jobsworth-outdoor-multi-tool
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Jurek on June 11, 2019, 02:57:36 pm
(https://d1vfu4m1fkicia.cloudfront.net/imgs/products/px/950x600_constWH/TOJOOMT_P1.jpg?v=c)

I don't need it. I don't need it. I don't need it. I don't need it. I don't need it.

https://www.planetx.co.uk/i/q/TOJOOMT/jobsworth-outdoor-multi-tool
You're right. You don't need it.
The more you make use of the hammer and the axe, the less your wire cutters will cut wire.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on June 18, 2019, 08:14:35 am
I'm currently angling for a nail gun on the strength of needing to panel the hall where the dogs rub against it.  Strategy is (a) get nail gun (b) proclaim current air compressor inadequate (c) get new compressor (d) inflate dogs.

Part (a) duly accomplished: Rapid PB131 and a 7-metre air line.  Impressed: it bangs a 5 cm nail through 4.4 cm of pine as if it were hollow.  Compressor restarts after only 15 shots, though - noisy. Plan (b) duly initiated.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Mr Larrington on June 18, 2019, 01:08:01 pm
Be sure to post pictures if things progress as far as (d).
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on June 18, 2019, 01:32:20 pm
Cervantes would give us to believe that it is easier than writing a book...
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: pcolbeck on June 18, 2019, 01:49:05 pm
Had a good score at a car boot sale on Sunday. Stanley Yankee spiral screwdriver in really nice condition. These are great tools but the choice of bits is limited and they are never with the screwdriver.
You can buy an adaptor that lets them use modern hex bits but is either cheap Chinesium or expensive and German.  This one came complete with a German adaptor and all the whole thing was only £4 !

Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on June 18, 2019, 02:58:58 pm
Those used to be the bee's knees in the Sixties.  I still have mine, and I inherited the Inlaw Paw's, which is enormous.  I never much liked them because you had to press like buggery and if you slipped off the screw the bit cut into the workpiece with your thrust and that of the spring combined.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Little Jim on June 18, 2019, 03:17:35 pm
I still find mine really useful as a big FO screwdriver to shift recalcitrant screws.  You really can get loads of torque with one and there are not many screws that refuse to budge.  Just don't do it with the spiral extended though.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: ElyDave on June 18, 2019, 03:39:12 pm
(https://d1vfu4m1fkicia.cloudfront.net/imgs/products/px/950x600_constWH/TOJOOMT_P1.jpg?v=c)

I don't need it. I don't need it. I don't need it. I don't need it. I don't need it.

https://www.planetx.co.uk/i/q/TOJOOMT/jobsworth-outdoor-multi-tool
You're right. You don't.
The more you make use of the hammer and the axe, the less your wire cutters will cut wire.

That axe is good enough for cheese and that's about all, I wouldn't worry
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on June 18, 2019, 03:44:55 pm
It does look like the type of gadget that does lots of things not quite well enough. In fact it screams to be made in a camo version.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Jurek on June 19, 2019, 10:05:23 am
<snip>

That axe is good enough for cheese and that's about all, I wouldn't worry

I suspect that cheese is what the pivot for the pliers/cutters is fashioned from.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: robgul on June 19, 2019, 11:01:40 am
I still find mine really useful as a big FO screwdriver to shift recalcitrant screws.  You really can get loads of torque with one and there are not many screws that refuse to budge.  Just don't do it with the spiral extended though.

Yep - I've got the full-size Yankee and smaller one about 10" long - both still in frequent use although I have some newish battery tools too.  The advent of Pozidriv screws has made a big difference to screwing with the Yankee spiral ... and the smaller one has a couple of bits like an old-style Rawlplug tool (the fluted ones that had a holder that you hit with a hammer) that you can drill into plasterboard/soft material.

Latest purchases are a cheapie table saw from Aldi and a Bosch cordless glue-pen/gun .... and a cordless sabre-saw.

.... and one of these (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41Q60ilfOIL.jpg) is a recent acquisition - pure indulgence but creates a neater crimp than just pliers.   [I believe that you can get a similar tool that stamps initials into the cable end crimp!!]

Rob
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Mr Larrington on June 19, 2019, 11:27:37 am
Lt. Col. Larrington (retd.) has a spiral screwkidiser wrought from finest Chinesium which is still functional after 45 of your Earth years.  I hope to inherit it, along with his Rolex.  But the grandfather clock can go for firewood.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on June 19, 2019, 02:48:31 pm
Latest purchases are a cheapie table saw from Aldi and a Bosch cordless glue-pen/gun .... and a cordless sabre-saw.

Rob

MrsT is fond of intoning that cheap stuff is more expensive in the long run, but my credo is that if you buy cheaper stuff you can get more - and you're not so worried about breaking it, come to that.  In any case it's 90% Chinesium these days.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: robgul on June 19, 2019, 04:30:34 pm
Latest purchases are a cheapie table saw from Aldi and a Bosch cordless glue-pen/gun .... and a cordless sabre-saw.

Rob

MrsT is fond of intoning that cheap stuff is more expensive in the long run, but my credo is that if you buy cheaper stuff you can get more - and you're not so worried about breaking it, come to that.  In any case it's 90% Chinesium these days.

Although it's Aldi the machine is a rebadged version of the same saw sold by Screwfix at twice the price.   Agree in principle on "cheap is expensive" but my usage is pretty minimal and not mission critical for woodworking stuff ... cycle tools are another matter, virtually all Park Tool in my workshop.

Rob
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Kim on June 19, 2019, 04:34:42 pm
My take on that is that it's fine to buy cheap if you're not sure it's going to get a lot of use, but to always replace a broken / worn out tool with a good quality one.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on June 20, 2019, 08:15:22 am
When I recently bought  drill, I deliberately bought the cheapest I could find; £15 from Argos. The only reason I bought it was that I didn't want to have to wait till Thursday evenings when I can use one at Bike Kitchen or borrow friends', with the inevitable carting of stuff to be drilled or drill. I figure if it lasts ten drillings that'll be a several of years for me and if I do find I end up using it regularly, I can buy something from Black & Decker or even Bosch.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: JennyB on June 20, 2019, 09:13:09 am
When I recently bought  drill, I deliberately bought the cheapest I could find; £15 from Argos. The only reason I bought it was that I didn't want to have to wait till Thursday evenings when I can use one at Bike Kitchen or borrow friends', with the inevitable carting of stuff to be drilled or drill. I figure if it lasts ten drillings that'll be a several of years for me and if I do find I end up using it regularly, I can buy something from Black & Decker or even Bosch.


I read somewhere that the average home DIY drill is used (presumably meaning switched on and under load) for a total of only ten hours.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Ham on June 20, 2019, 11:00:40 am
probably ten minutes, not ten hours!
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Kim on June 20, 2019, 12:19:07 pm
About one set of shelves worth, surely?
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on June 20, 2019, 01:12:11 pm
Latest purchases are a cheapie table saw from Aldi and a Bosch cordless glue-pen/gun .... and a cordless sabre-saw.

Rob

MrsT is fond of intoning that cheap stuff is more expensive in the long run, but my credo is that if you buy cheaper stuff you can get more - and you're not so worried about breaking it, come to that.  In any case it's 90% Chinesium these days.

Although it's Aldi the machine is a rebadged version of the same saw sold by Screwfix at twice the price.   Agree in principle on "cheap is expensive" but my usage is pretty minimal and not mission critical for woodworking stuff ... cycle tools are another matter, virtually all Park Tool in my workshop.

Rob

Trouble is that given the ebb'n'flood manner in which Aldi/Lidl replenish stock you're only likely to see them once or twice a year. The quality, probably at Screwfix too, is likely to be less than consistent.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: pcolbeck on June 24, 2019, 09:20:28 am
Finally got to try the Makita Red belt sander on Saturday. Its a beast! Sanded down the garden table top in about 15 minutes, highly recommended as long as you don't need variable speed. Did the legs and the grooves between the slats with a Lidl sending attachment for an angle grinder. That worked well also but the quality of the hook and loop disk for attaching the pads to wasnt up to much. Plastic and melted when used continuously, mind you at £3.00 for the disk and six sanding disks I cant complain, did the job. 3/4 of a tin of Danish Oil and the table doesn't look 20 years old any-more.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: robgul on July 11, 2019, 08:12:07 pm
A pillar drill for my home workshop - from Screwfix's "finest" range - cheap-ish and cheerful but does what I want it to - downside is finding bench-space for it.   Also ordered a couple of sets of blades for my Ryobi jig-saw - in particular the wide-blade ones to cut sheet material more easily.

AND  a big treat at the shop today was to purchase a Shimano press-fit bottom bracket removal tool (we already had a press to put them in) - very satisfying using the BIG Park Tool hammer with it :thumbsup:

Rob
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on July 12, 2019, 09:09:13 am
That the big Titan?  Quite pleased with mine. Grumbles: table wobbles a bit from side to side while cranking so you have to line up the work afterwards. A bit of a pain if you have work clamped down and have to drill a hole of varying diameters, e.g. to seat a T-nut in a 10mm hole.  Also, the laser is nice but would be nicer if the beams intersected at a less acute angle.

OTOH watching the beast chew 34mm holes as if the workpiece were blancmange is rather impressive. With this fleamarket article at that:

(https://pbase.com/image/169484887.jpg)

That's not the workpiece, BTW, it's sacrificial scrap.

I want to get a proper adjustable fly cutter but all the translations into French I can find refer to insects and sadism*.

Meanwhile, I toddled into the local Leroy Merlin (motto: We have everything you don't need) with MrsT yesterday to get a set of router bits, so of course had a gander at battery-operated circular saws and a serious look at mitre saws, since mine dates from the era when Real Men® didn't extract dust, and anyway the angle stops are inaccurate and there's no way to adjust them.  Lingered long over a nice Redstone then of course came out with just a set of router bits.

I'm going to have to actually produce something one of these days.

*ETA: Hah!  I just did a search on "fly cutter" instead of "... in French" and got trépan.  Shades of Maturin's brain surgery.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: robgul on July 12, 2019, 10:18:55 am
That the big Titan?  Quite pleased with mine. Grumbles: table wobbles a bit from side to side while cranking so you have to line up the work afterwards. A bit of a pain if you have work clamped down and have to drill a hole of varying diameters, e.g. to seat a T-nut in a 10mm hole.  Also, the laser is nice but would be nicer if the beams intersected at a less acute angle.

OTOH watching the beast chew 34mm holes as if the workpiece were blancmange is rather impressive. With this fleamarket article at that:

(https://pbase.com/image/169484887.jpg)

That's not the workpiece, BTW, it's sacrificial scrap.
 >> SNIP

Meanwhile, I toddled into the local Leroy Merlin (motto: We have everything you don't need) with MrsT yesterday to get a set of router bits, so of course had a gander at battery-operated circular saws and a serious look at mitre saws, since mine dates from the era when Real Men® didn't extract dust, and anyway the angle stops are inaccurate and there's no way to adjust them.  Lingered long over a nice Redstone then of course came out with just a set of router bits.

I'm going to have to actually produce something one of these days.

*ETA: Hah!  I just did a search on "fly cutter" instead of "... in French" and got trépan.  Shades of Maturin's brain surgery.

Ah - Leroy Merlin .... paradise in France .... makes UK outfits look amateur.  It's the go-to every time I'm in France ..... and it's owned by the same people as Decathlon (and Auchan) which if you ignore most of the cycle stuff has some great clothing and shoes.

Rob
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on July 12, 2019, 10:51:55 am
Oh, they're definitely not amateur.  They've whittled their wood stock (sorry) down to fast-moving items only, plus 47 kinds of composite.  Even their battens are made up of 30cm chunks (of scrap, most likely) glued end to end - just the thing for a handyman who'll be painting it anyway and doesn't care.

Our local LM took over from a German chain called Obi, who in turn took over from a locally-owned business called Bricker. Back when Bricker had it they had a great stock of wood that you could pick through: I panelled a chunk of our lounge & built a 7-meter bookcase just with wood from their stock, ditto half-a-dozen other bits of furniture. This is a timber-growing region, after all, and we have everything from oak to epicea, but if you want a planed oak board from LM you'll order two weeks ahead and take what you get: no checking for shakes or warp, or picking out the best figure.

When I go there now I come out wishing there was somewhere adequate to shop.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: robgul on July 12, 2019, 09:26:17 pm
.... I'm thinking about buying an £80 Aldi Bandsaw . . .

Rob
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on July 13, 2019, 07:52:38 am
It'll probably be better than the Metabo I bought two years back.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: hairyhippy on July 22, 2019, 10:07:30 pm
Time to own up. In a moment of madness last year I bought the Festool track saw. It has transformed my life. I love it. So many projects. So much fun. Can't recommend track saws highly enough.

In conjunction with a Paulk style workbench (mine is smaller to fit in  single garage) that I built I am now a very happy wannabe chippy.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: robgul on July 23, 2019, 10:13:05 am
Succumbed to an Aldi bench combination belt/disc sander machine ..... running out of bench space!

Rob
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on July 23, 2019, 03:43:49 pm
Dusty efforts.  My Scheppach one has an excuse for a dust extraction port that I hooked up religiously to the vacuum when I first had it, but the dust went everywhere notwithstanding.  Nowadays I don't bother.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: pcolbeck on November 04, 2019, 09:03:27 pm
Yankee screwdrivers - why the hell did these fall out of fashion !

I have picked up a couple of small ones at carboots over the last couple of years but never really used one in anger. This summer I picked up a big one with a hex but adaptor for a couple of quid.
I cleaned and lubed it and left it on the workbench.

I was putting up a hammer rack (that's another story I have far too many hammers) and the electric screwdriver had a flat battery so I tried the big Yankee, oh wow what a revelation !
So much torque and controllable torque at that, you can feel it and the screw never cams out. Much much better than an electric driver plus its long and narrow so gets into places that you can't get an electric screwdriver. Since then I have used it on a couple of other projects and now its my go to tool for screwing thing into rawlpugs in walls or into wood.

I would still use an electric screwdriver for non torque applications like computer cases where there are loads of machine screws that need removing or screwing in, much faster but for screwing stuff in against resistance Yankee screwdrivers are the dog danglees..
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on November 04, 2019, 09:41:18 pm
Is that like a Birmingham screwdriver? (Having googled, I know what it is and have even used one, but had never heard the name.)
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Ham on November 04, 2019, 10:03:55 pm
Yankee screwdrivers - why the hell did these fall out of fashion !

I have picked up a couple of small ones at carboots over the last couple of years but never really used one in anger. This summer I picked up a big one with a hex but adaptor for a couple of quid.
I cleaned and lubed it and left it on the workbench.

I was putting up a hammer rack (that's another story I have far too many hammers) and the electric screwdriver had a flat battery so I tried the big Yankee, oh wow what a revelation !
So much torque and controllable torque at that, you can feel it and the screw never cams out. Much much better than an electric driver plus its long and narrow so gets into places that you can't get an electric screwdriver. Since then I have used it on a couple of other projects and now its my go to tool for screwing thing into rawlpugs in walls or into wood.

I would still use an electric screwdriver for non torque applications like computer cases where there are loads of machine screws that need removing or screwing in, much faster but for screwing stuff in against resistance Yankee screwdrivers are the dog danglees..

I assume you are talking of the Yankee pump driver

You might think so, but in my dim, distant and speckled past I used to be paid to screw things up (as opposed to it just being a by-product of my employment). In this case, it was curtain fitting (includes rails and blinds) and I can tell you that the Yankee Pump, whilst being a thing of wonder and beauty is not suited for repetitive fixing requiring high torque. It is also precarious using to face fix on the top of a ladder, somewhat better at top fix for obvious reasons. Instead the tool of choice at the time was the Yankee red handled stanley ratchet driver, which I still have (a quick eBay turns up these (https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/4-Ratchett-Screwdrivers-2-Stanley-Yankee-And-2-Guys/274080539418))

As far as I know the pump action were preferred by cabinet makers/shopfitters.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: chrisbainbridge on November 04, 2019, 10:05:45 pm
They are brilliant.  My FiL gave me my one as a Christmas present 38 years ago and I still have it and use it regularly

Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: chrisbainbridge on November 04, 2019, 10:07:05 pm
Oh, I assumed that this meant a Stanley ratchet screwdriver, which is what I have.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Ham on November 04, 2019, 10:30:35 pm
They are both Yankee ratchet drivers, one is a pump action which is what pcolbeck was describing. As I recall the pump could be locked in and function as a "normal ratchet" but (a) the ratchet wasn't as good (b) if it came loose (which it did more often as it wore) it would make REELY NARSTY indiscriminate mess of anything, surfaces, objects, flesh.

Possibly where the expression "you'll have someone's eye out with that" originated.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: andytheflyer on November 05, 2019, 07:53:33 am
When my father died I raided his tool collection for the tools that I wanted.  He had a couple of Yankee screwdrivers.  I have his spanners (the Whitworth ones are particularly useful for that "what is that size" moment when spannering on my classic Triumph motorcycles) and some small socket sets, a portable vice and some lovely Stanley planes.  The Yankees I passed on.  IIRC they were particularly adept at mangling any fine surface when the bloody things slipped.

I will confess to being a Tool Junkie, but even I have to draw the line somewhere.

Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on November 05, 2019, 08:16:07 am
The Yankees I passed on.  IIRC they were particularly adept at mangling any fine surface when the bloody things slipped.

I will confess to being a Tool Junkie, but even I have to draw the line somewhere.

This.  I have a couple of the things but I stopped using them years decades ago.  Just for fun (fun???) I cleaned & lubed one a few months back, tried it, cried "bloody horrible" and put it back on the rack.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Gattopardo on November 05, 2019, 05:39:02 pm
Machine Mart is now selling JIS screwdrivers https://www.machinemart.co.uk/p/6-piece-jis-screwdriver-set/ there are also the more expensive laser ones too.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Wombat on November 05, 2019, 07:15:24 pm
Machine Mart is now selling JIS screwdrivers https://www.machinemart.co.uk/p/6-piece-jis-screwdriver-set/ there are also the more expensive laser ones too.

Ooh, thank you for telling me that!  Why are JIS drivers so hard to get, but essential for all owners of aged Japanese motorcycles, etc.?
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: TheLurker on November 05, 2019, 08:46:19 pm
Yankee (pump action) screwdrivers?  No thank you very much.  Dreadful bloody things.  I've got two festering somewhere in the garage and they can rust in pieces.

Tool pron : http://www.squirestools.com/tools-and-materials.htm

Wonderful.  No pissing about with flash, fancy CSS, JavaScript or any of that crap.  Here, have a PDF copy of the relevant section of our catalogue for you to browse at your leisure and even print off so that you may leave it lying around suitably annotated with strong hints as to what would constitute acceptable gifts.  I know what I'm going to be asking Father Christmas' for this year.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Jurek on November 07, 2019, 05:43:52 pm
I had a  a Yankee pump-action screwdriver.
I'm not sure what happened to it - ie: it's lost.
I cannot say that I am saddened by this.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on November 08, 2019, 08:50:46 am
I'm just remembering the moment when the wife of a visiting chum came into my workshop, looked at my array of chisels and exclaimed "gosh, what a lot of screwdrivers!"
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Kim on November 08, 2019, 12:37:00 pm
I'm just remembering the moment when the wife of a visiting chum came into my workshop, looked at my array of chisels and exclaimed "gosh, what a lot of screwdrivers!"

Better than the other way round  :hand:
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on November 08, 2019, 01:38:30 pm
Oh, I dunno - using a screwdriver as a chisel won't get you far but driving screws with a chisel will bugger the edge. Regrinding is a bore unless you've got a Tormek or similar. I haven't.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Mr Larrington on November 08, 2019, 05:15:01 pm
Opening paint tins with a chisel is certainly grounds for divorce.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: spesh on November 08, 2019, 05:17:08 pm
Opening paint tins with a chisel is certainly grounds for divorce being killed utterly to DETH and buried under a suspiciously new patio.

Gratis.   ;)
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: andytheflyer on November 08, 2019, 05:52:18 pm
What he said ^
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: spesh on November 08, 2019, 05:55:05 pm
Further to the above, the same should also apply for cow-okers who "borrow" Lindstrom cutters in order to attend to their manicure.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: robgul on November 08, 2019, 08:43:21 pm
Seeing the mention of "spiral ratchet" screwdrivers - as in Yankee or Stanley - they are simply brilliant - I have 2 .... small one from about 1969 and the big one I bought when I did a massive house renovation in about 1983.  Looking after them, oiling the spiral etc and they go on for ever.

I have to confess that the old slotted head screws weren't ideal for it but the advent of Pozidriv (and whatever they call cross-head screws nowadays) and the screwdrivers come into their own (although I do have a couple of battery drill/drivers)

..... I'm still hankering after a bandsaw and am considering a seasonal request letter for late December.

Rob

PS: Not exactly tools but I'm acquring some PVC interlocking heavy duty "checkerplate" tiles for my newly expanded workshop.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on November 09, 2019, 09:50:08 am
Opening paint tins with a chisel is certainly grounds for divorce.

Sorting through the Inlaw Paw's stuff after he died I discovered a very nice Marples chisel encrusted with paint.  It gets quite a lot of use these days.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on November 09, 2019, 10:13:31 am
..... I'm still hankering after a bandsaw and am considering a seasonal request letter for late December.

Sore point with me, that.   I only needed a small one, so I bought an 8"-throat Metabo BAS 261 in 2017 and a worse POS for the money I've yet to see - bad design and sloppy assembly.  I had to invalidate the guarantee half a dozen different ways to make it usable.  I get the impression that if you're going to pay less than 800€-1200€ you might as well go to Aldi.  Unfortunately, most low-end machines use the same style of upper blade guide arm, which is specially designed to stop you seeing the blade with both eyes at once. Oh, and if you use the built-in LED illumination on the Metabo it casts a deep shadow right where you don't need it.

Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: hubner on November 09, 2019, 10:44:47 am
Crappy blunt and abused chisels made from soft steel (or tempered to be soft) make excellent paint tin openers!
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: T42 on November 09, 2019, 01:50:40 pm
I don't believe in opening paint tins.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: orienteer on November 09, 2019, 02:10:05 pm
I still have, and often use, a wooden-handled ratchet screwdriver I bought in Woolworths over 40 years ago.

I also have a T-handle ratchet screwdriver with 6 interchangeable bits, made in China, bought in a Japanese 100-yen (=70p) shop about 15 years ago. I keep this in the house rather than the garage for minor domestic maintenance jobs, along with an Aldi cordless driver/drill combo bought about 2 years ago for £29.99.

Oh, another old tool is a double-sided Japanese saw (fine and coarse toothed) bought in a Daimaru department store 45 years ago. These saws cut on the pull rather than push stroke, so the blade is very slim to achieve fine cuts.

Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: CarlF on November 09, 2019, 06:08:34 pm
I have a purpose made paint tin opening tool.

Do I win the tool junkie thread?
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: andytheflyer on November 10, 2019, 10:54:47 am
Now this man really is a tool junkie..........

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=guSG03tB2vQ
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: pcolbeck on November 11, 2019, 09:39:16 am
Was in Barnetts (A brilliant and huge traditional DIY / lighting and cookware shop in York) on Friday and they had a nice Bahco box of screwdriver bits on special offer. Full set of PZ, PH slotted and Torx. So I bought it. I already have Wera and Weha sets of the more common ones so this will fill in the weird used only once in blue moon sizes. Now I can throw away the quality street tin of rubbish bits I have collected over the years.
I also bought a set of Wiha SoftFinish screwdrivers for normal clean jobs to go with the Were Chiseldrivers I already have for more heavy duty jobs in the garage (these are brilliant by the way they have striking caps and hex shoulders shanks if you need some serious leverage)
This is part of the plane to replace the loads of cheap tools I have acquired over the years with a smaller number of better quality ones.
Next weekend I will be going through my toolboxes and dumping all the crap screwdrivers.
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Torslanda on December 07, 2019, 10:11:55 pm
By the by I need some new pliers for shop use. I have some Park long nose but after 7 years of constant daily use they're getting a bit tired.

Looking for a set, long nose, combi, side cutters.

Bahco? Knippex? Or something else...?
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Zipperhead on December 08, 2019, 01:43:47 am
Bahco? Knippex? Or something else...?

*cough* (https://www.lindstromtools.com/pdf.php)
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Jaded on December 08, 2019, 09:24:29 am
Is that like a Birmingham screwdriver? (Having googled, I know what it is and have even used one, but had never heard the name.)

This is a Birmingham screwdriver
(click to show/hide)
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: bobb on December 08, 2019, 10:07:17 am
..... I'm still hankering after a bandsaw and am considering a seasonal request letter for late December.

Sore point with me, that.   I only needed a small one, so I bought an 8"-throat Metabo BAS 261 in 2017 and a worse POS for the money I've yet to see - bad design and sloppy assembly.  I had to invalidate the guarantee half a dozen different ways to make it usable.  I get the impression that if you're going to pay less than 800€-1200€ you might as well go to Aldi.  Unfortunately, most low-end machines use the same style of upper blade guide arm, which is specially designed to stop you seeing the blade with both eyes at once. Oh, and if you use the built-in LED illumination on the Metabo it casts a deep shadow right where you don't need it.


I was seriously considering the 10" one Aldi have been offering recently (https://www.aldi.co.uk/ferrex-10-inch-bandsaw/p/019596291909000) for £150. Although there are a lot of good reviews around, there were just too many "had to send it back twice" or "had to modify it" reviews to make me pull the trigger - even at that low price.

It seems at the lower price points - whatever the brand (or indeed whatever it's branded as) you get a lot of people raving about them but at least 25% of reviews are terrible....
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Jurek on December 08, 2019, 11:10:14 am
..... I'm still hankering after a bandsaw and am considering a seasonal request letter for late December.

Sore point with me, that.   I only needed a small one, so I bought an 8"-throat Metabo BAS 261 in 2017 and a worse POS for the money I've yet to see - bad design and sloppy assembly.  I had to invalidate the guarantee half a dozen different ways to make it usable.  I get the impression that if you're going to pay less than 800€-1200€ you might as well go to Aldi.  Unfortunately, most low-end machines use the same style of upper blade guide arm, which is specially designed to stop you seeing the blade with both eyes at once. Oh, and if you use the built-in LED illumination on the Metabo it casts a deep shadow right where you don't need it.


I was seriously considering the 10" one Aldi have been offering recently (https://www.aldi.co.uk/ferrex-10-inch-bandsaw/p/019596291909000) for £150. Although there are a lot of good reviews around, there were just too many "had to send it back twice" or "had to modify it" reviews to make me pull the trigger - even at that low price.

It seems at the lower price points - whatever the brand (or indeed whatever it's branded as) you get a lot of people raving about them but at least 25% of reviews are terrible....
You, of all people, should know that cheap tools are generally teh meh. ;)
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: andytheflyer on December 08, 2019, 11:41:12 am
..... I'm still hankering after a bandsaw and am considering a seasonal request letter for late December.

Sore point with me, that.   I only needed a small one, so I bought an 8"-throat Metabo BAS 261 in 2017 and a worse POS for the money I've yet to see - bad design and sloppy assembly.  I had to invalidate the guarantee half a dozen different ways to make it usable.  I get the impression that if you're going to pay less than 800€-1200€ you might as well go to Aldi.  Unfortunately, most low-end machines use the same style of upper blade guide arm, which is specially designed to stop you seeing the blade with both eyes at once. Oh, and if you use the built-in LED illumination on the Metabo it casts a deep shadow right where you don't need it.


I was seriously considering the 10" one Aldi have been offering recently (https://www.aldi.co.uk/ferrex-10-inch-bandsaw/p/019596291909000) for £150. Although there are a lot of good reviews around, there were just too many "had to send it back twice" or "had to modify it" reviews to make me pull the trigger - even at that low price.

It seems at the lower price points - whatever the brand (or indeed whatever it's branded as) you get a lot of people raving about them but at least 25% of reviews are terrible....

IMHO, you are better off hunting for a better quality used machine on Fleabay or wherever, then doing whatever needs to be done to get it back to near-perfect condition.  That way, and I've done this, you end up with a better quality machine, that you know inside out, and you may well have still paid less overall than on some cheapo bit of re-badged new Chinese tat.  That's not to say that the Chinese cannot make good quality tools, they certainly can, but they make tools to a price point set by the UK importers, and that price point is too low to buy anything even half decent.

And breathe...........
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Kim on December 08, 2019, 12:59:16 pm
Is that like a Birmingham screwdriver? (Having googled, I know what it is and have even used one, but had never heard the name.)

This is a Birmingham screwdriver
(click to show/hide)

Made in Digbeth[1]. (https://twitter.com/fokawolf/status/1201925456062226434)


[1] "It's like Stokes Croft, but industrial"
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on December 09, 2019, 11:28:20 am
A Stokes Croft screwdriver is probably a can of nitrous!
Title: Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
Post by: robgul on December 09, 2019, 09:12:06 pm
Is that like a Birmingham screwdriver? (Having googled, I know what it is and have even used one, but had never heard the name.)

This is a Birmingham screwdriver
(click to show/hide)

Made in Digbeth[1]. (https://twitter.com/fokawolf/status/1201925456062226434)


[1] "It's like Stokes Croft, but industrial"

Huh, the spoiler pic is just the lightweight model

Rob