Yet Another Cycling Forum

Off Topic => The Pub => Food & Drink => Topic started by: Jurek on July 21, 2019, 01:49:23 pm

Title: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Jurek on July 21, 2019, 01:49:23 pm
In the interest of keeping all of you safe and healthy, I elected to try some tinned potatoes today.
Crosse* & Blackwell.
Score 1= 1/10
Score 2 = (I tried a second one, because I could not believe that something tasting so awful could be marketed as food) -9/10

*In a previous life, as a milkman (1st job after leaving school) I used to deliver to a house previously owned by  Mrs.Crosse in Palace Road, Tulse Hill, London.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Kim on July 21, 2019, 01:51:31 pm
Put them in the Brexit bunker next to the dogs milk, then?
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: hellymedic on July 21, 2019, 02:09:50 pm
I might have sampled tinned potatoes, certainly never bought them though.

My first thought about these is

WHY?

I suppose they'd be good for bunker stores...
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on July 21, 2019, 02:13:32 pm
I'd like to say that I admire your bravery, Jurek, but the truth is I'm amazed at you doing something so foolish.  :hand:

Put them in the Brexit bunker next to the dogs milk, then?
So that they can be used as missiles against zombies? Or so they can posted to friends abroad as a plea for mercy?

WHY?
For school dinners? It's the only possible application. Just because something tin be canned can be tinned, doesn't mean it should. 
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Jurek on July 21, 2019, 02:33:47 pm
I might have sampled tinned potatoes, certainly never bought them though.

My first thought about these is

WHY?

I suppose they'd be good for bunker stores...
I've been given a book (https://www.pride.kitchen/pages/salad-love-book) and thought that tinned spuds might be capable of making a useful contribution to some of the recipes within.
My thinking was deeply flawed.
Straight to compost.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: nobby on July 21, 2019, 04:00:00 pm
I might have sampled tinned potatoes, certainly never bought them though.

My first thought about these is

WHY?

I suppose they'd be good for bunker stores...

Saves cooking and smothered in mayo they taste ok  :)
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Johnny Faro on July 21, 2019, 04:18:27 pm
What. I love tinned potatoes! I'd rather not think of the process they go through as probably chemically pealed
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: CrinklyLion on July 21, 2019, 04:56:17 pm
More likely to be mechanically peeled in a rumbler.  That was how we did it in the chippy I worked in as a teen :)

I'm with Nadiya and Jack on the subject of tinned spuds.  They aren't great for all purposes but they are perfectly fine for many applications, cheap and handy. I usually have a couple of tins lurking in the kitchen cupboards.

https://inews.co.uk/inews-lifestyle/food-and-drink/nadiya-hussain-jack-monroe-tinned-potatoes/
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Jurek on July 21, 2019, 05:15:24 pm
More likely to be mechanically peeled in a rumbler.  That was how we did it in the chippy I worked in as a teen :)

I'm with Nadiya and Jack on the subject of tinned spuds.  They aren't great for all purposes but they are perfectly fine for many applications, cheap and handy. I usually have a couple of tins lurking in the kitchen cupboards.

https://inews.co.uk/inews-lifestyle/food-and-drink/nadiya-hussain-jack-monroe-tinned-potatoes/

I've a lot of time for Jack Monroe.
However, tinned spuds continue to barely raise the needle on the taste-o-meter, whilst scoring highly on the disappoint-gauge.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: jiberjaber on July 21, 2019, 05:27:43 pm
Up their with tinned peas and carrots - memories of 'caravan food' from when I was a kid... not detestable but probably good bunker food.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Basil on July 21, 2019, 05:34:16 pm
There are some foods that should never be canned.
Mushrooms.   :sick:
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: CrinklyLion on July 21, 2019, 05:36:47 pm
Also a standard inclusion in the crinkly food cupboard, those.

They're rubbish on a pizza, for example, but can work really well in a stew.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Kim on July 21, 2019, 05:42:06 pm
Sealing them away in an airtight container seems like an eminently sensible way of dealing with mushrooms....
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: jiberjaber on July 21, 2019, 06:00:27 pm
Sealing them away in an airtight container seems like an eminently sensible way of dealing with mushrooms....

Then nuking them from orbit....   :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Kim on July 21, 2019, 06:02:08 pm
Sealing them away in an airtight container seems like an eminently sensible way of dealing with mushrooms....

Then nuking them from orbit....   :thumbsup:

Radioactive mutant mushrooms?  Had enough of that sort of thing in the fridge when I was a PSO...
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: jiberjaber on July 21, 2019, 08:38:36 pm
Sealing them away in an airtight container seems like an eminently sensible way of dealing with mushrooms....

Then nuking them from orbit....   

Radioactive mutant mushrooms?  Had enough of that sort of thing in the fridge when I was a PSO...
All mushrooms == food of the devil
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on July 21, 2019, 09:03:55 pm
No mushrooms in devil's food cake!
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Paul on July 22, 2019, 07:53:02 am
Are tinned potatoes pre-cooked?

What stops tinned anything from disintegrating?
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: CrinklyLion on July 22, 2019, 08:13:02 am
Most tinned veg is put raw into the tin with water and salt then the tin is lidded and sealed and then gets cooked which simulataneously cooks the contents and sterilises them.

The spuds in tinned potatoes tend to be small ones, are often billed as 'new' potatoes and generally seem to hold together.  If you add them to a stew or curry then they behave pretty much as cold leftover new potatoes would.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: spesh on July 22, 2019, 12:16:19 pm
Most tinned veg is put raw into the tin with water and salt then the tin is lidded and sealed and then gets cooked which simulataneously cooks the contents and sterilises them.

The spuds in tinned potatoes tend to be small ones, are often billed as 'new' potatoes and generally seem to hold together.  If you add them to a stew or curry then they behave pretty much as cold leftover new potatoes would.

I was convinced that the catering staff in my hall of residence were using tinned potatoes for the Sunday roast. Forget the roasties that you or your mother can produce, these were quite often rock-hard hollow shells fit only for having their ballistic properties investigated.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Kim on July 22, 2019, 12:24:32 pm
Most tinned veg is put raw into the tin with water and salt then the tin is lidded and sealed and then gets cooked which simulataneously cooks the contents and sterilises them.

The spuds in tinned potatoes tend to be small ones, are often billed as 'new' potatoes and generally seem to hold together.  If you add them to a stew or curry then they behave pretty much as cold leftover new potatoes would.

I was convinced that the catering staff in my hall of residence were using tinned potatoes for the Sunday roast. Forget the roasties that you or your mother can produce, these were quite often rock-hard hollow shells fit only for having their ballistic properties investigated.

Sunday roast?  Luxury!  In Shite Bunker, Sunday lunch was a Pot Noodle and your choice from the manky fruit tray.

I know this because, as residents in the (much cheaper) nearby self-catering accommodation, we'd often accept refugees from the Bunker on a "if I can use your kitchen I'll bake you a CAKE" basis.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: spesh on July 22, 2019, 12:36:44 pm
We may well have got Sunday lunch in what was High/Ridge Hall, but quite frankly, they needn't have bothered, given how it was generally the most disappointing meal of the week. Having said that, the inmates of Lake/Wyddrington Halls spent some time being served grub at the top of the Vale while a cockroach infestation was being dealt with, and they reckoned that our caterers were better than theirs.  :o ;D

For reference, I'm going by what the halls were called back in the 90s - IIRC, High and Ridge were merged into a mixed hall, renamed Chamberlain some time after I had graduated, before being demolished the other year (probably because it was going to cost less to build new accommodation than to bring the old buildings up to meeting modern building standards/fire regulations).
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: pcolbeck on July 22, 2019, 02:09:38 pm
Tinned potatoes are a bone of contention in our house. I love them and Mrs Pcolbeck says they are the work of Stan.
When I was a kid at Christmas we would have roast potatoes, mashed potatoes and tinned potatoes with Christmas dinner. Irish roots, you cant have too many types of potatoes with your dinner.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: spesh on July 22, 2019, 02:13:45 pm
Might as well face it, you're addicted to spuds. :demon:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ad0w59lBfXU
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Paul H on July 22, 2019, 02:27:37 pm
Up their with tinned peas and carrots - memories of 'caravan food' from when I was a kid...
Yes this thread has bought back memories of family holidays in the 60/70's, camping or caravan parks, where we lived off tinned food for a week.  I don't think I've had tinned potatoes since and now have to get some for the nostalgia, maybe to take seaside camping for the full experience.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: pcolbeck on July 22, 2019, 02:55:17 pm
I had tinned potatoes, beans and fried "bacon grill" a while ago for nostalgias sake. It was lovely.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Basil on July 22, 2019, 03:16:48 pm
I've never had one of those tinned "Full English Breakfast".  I feel that I just must now. In the same spirit that I once bought and consumed a pot noodle.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: jiberjaber on July 22, 2019, 03:18:55 pm
I had tinned potatoes, beans and fried "bacon grill" a while ago for nostalgias sake. It was lovely.

That sounds like tea for one night this week sorted... :) thanks for the trip down memory lane... (also add corned beef to that instead of bacon grill sometimes)  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Paul on July 22, 2019, 04:11:55 pm
Irish roots, you cant have too many types of potatoes with your dinner.
Oh yeah.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: trekker12 on July 22, 2019, 04:26:06 pm
I've never had one of those tinned "Full English Breakfast".  I feel that I just must now. In the same spirit that I once bought and consumed a pot noodle.

Just don't.

I've eaten them in the distant past when I was a student (or possibly extra weight in my rucksack because it counted as 'cooking' on a DofE expedition). Not recommended.

'Don't let boil' it says on the can but unless you nuke it to the point of full liquid evaporation the sausages remain obstinately cold or lukewarm at best and they are the horrid slimey skinless ones which have no relevence to the word sausage whatsover. The can also includes scotch eggs - presumably because if you don't cover it in sausage meat (more meat than the sausages thobut) and breadcrumbs it disintegrates (or explodes) during the canned cooking process, cold (see above) slippery scotch eggs are just hideous.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Jurek on July 22, 2019, 07:30:26 pm
I've never had one of those tinned "Full English Breakfast".  I feel that I just must now. In the same spirit that I once bought and consumed a pot noodle.
No Basil.
Just no, no and no.
Have some self-respect.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Canardly on July 22, 2019, 07:44:05 pm
There is always ketchup?
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Kim on July 22, 2019, 07:53:58 pm
There is always ketchup?

Or Vicodin...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFtpibohxg0&t=32
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFtpibohxg0&t=32
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Basil on July 22, 2019, 08:14:53 pm
I've never had one of those tinned "Full English Breakfast".  I feel that I just must now. In the same spirit that I once bought and consumed a pot noodle.
No Basil.
Just no, no and no.
Have some self-respect.

Yeah, but what if I'm one day lying on my death bed (or disappearing under a haymaker) and I have to wonder how bad they could have been?
Bit like the pot noodle. At least I know how bad that was.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Adam on July 22, 2019, 10:01:32 pm
I've occasionally cooked tinned potatoes, just for a change.  Fry them in a hot pan until they're starting to go brown, sprinkle a bit of seasoning onto them, either mixed herbs or Fajita, perhaps add some grated cheese to melt on the top, and then serve.

Delicious.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Jaded on July 22, 2019, 10:16:13 pm
Tinned butter, anyone?
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Jurek on July 22, 2019, 10:20:13 pm
Tinned butter, anyone?
I think that probably warrants a custodial sentence.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: andrewc on July 22, 2019, 10:37:04 pm
Canned butter seems popular with the hardcore survivalist types, but you don't seem able to get it in the UK. https://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=179311



Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Jaded on July 22, 2019, 10:50:37 pm
Tinned butter, anyone?
I think that probably warrants a custodial sentence.

Hmmm, custodial butter sentence versus the strait jacket of tinned potatoes?

We need some way of deciding this...
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Kim on July 22, 2019, 11:42:00 pm
What happens to butter when you tin it?  I mean, it's not like it's going to get any more squidgy, is it?  And presumably it still wins over hydrogenated bearing grease margarine.  Never encountered the stuff...
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Paul on July 23, 2019, 07:39:55 am
I've never had one of those tinned "Full English Breakfast".  I feel that I just must now. In the same spirit that I once bought and consumed a pot noodle.
No Basil.
Just no, no and no.
Have some self-respect.

Yeah, but what if I'm one day lying on my death bed (or disappearing under a haymaker) and I have to wonder how bad they could have been?
Bit like the pot noodle. At least I know how bad that was.
Definitely do it.  Best eaten in a tent with kids, when it becomes a gourmet breakfast.

They aren’t all the same. I found the Morrison’s version okay.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Paul on July 23, 2019, 08:22:35 am
I've never had one of those tinned "Full English Breakfast".  I feel that I just must now. In the same spirit that I once bought and consumed a pot noodle.
No Basil.
Just no, no and no.
Have some self-respect.
i

Yeah, but what if I'm one day lying on my death bed (or disappearing under a haymaker) and I have to wonder how bad they could have been?
Bit like the pot noodle. At least I know how bad that was.
Definitely do it.  Best eaten in a tent with kids, when it becomes a gourmet breakfast.

They aren’t all the same. I found the Morrison’s version okay.
I mean you and the kids should have breakfast together. Not that the kids should be eaten with the breakfast.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on July 23, 2019, 08:33:52 am
What happens to butter when you tin it?  I mean, it's not like it's going to get any more squidgy, is it?  And presumably it still wins over hydrogenated bearing grease margarine.  Never encountered the stuff...
Presumably it becomes perfect for survivalists because the oxygen and the flies are kept out, the tin can be made into a knife blade and everyone's last meal should be buttered toast soldiers. Which means you also need a tin of sliced white. Or... something.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: CrinklyLion on July 23, 2019, 08:55:26 am
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61%2Bwpjr6FXL.jpg)
https://www.amazon.co.uk/CANNED-BREAD-Camping-fishing-survival/dp/B07D2GVD3D
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on July 23, 2019, 09:10:20 am
I knew I was right to be suspicious of anglers.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Oscar's dad on July 23, 2019, 09:19:50 am
What. I love tinned potatoes! I'd rather not think of the process they go through as probably chemically pealed

Me too!  Although they don’t really taste like potatoes. In fact I love most tinned food, here in France they have a great selection of weird and wonderful stuff in tins and jars which I am sampling as the opportunity presents much to the horror of The Current Mrs R  :smug: :sick:
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: ElyDave on July 23, 2019, 09:33:11 am
Tinned anything was very much a case in teh ration packs I used to play around with in my air cadet days
- Tinned sausages, about half a dozen in a tin full of lard  :sick: when warm, worse when cold
- cheese and butter, meh
- unrecognisable stews, generally ok with copious application of S&P and herbs
- oatmeal blocks and mixed fruit pudding - I'd sell my own soul for those, or even my first born

As for tinned potatoes, I'm going camping next week, and whilst I've added fig rolls to my list, I'm not expecting zombies, and  tinned spuds are useless against midges, so they'll be staying where the should be - nowhere near me.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Mr Larrington on July 23, 2019, 10:09:54 am
Canned butter seems popular with the hardcore survivalist types, but you don't seem able to get it in the UK. https://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=179311

I'm sure the Army has it, and any survivalist worth his tinned salt will be up for a supply run on their nearest military hangout.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: pcolbeck on July 23, 2019, 10:13:05 am
Surely this is the king of canned food:

(https://www.thegoodfoodnetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Cslt-cnd-420g-600x506.jpg)
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Mr Larrington on July 23, 2019, 10:22:15 am
In my touring-in-France days tinned cassoulet and saucisses aux lentilles were the two staples.  Along with vin rouge of the tooth-enamel-stripping variety.

ETA: that one ^^^^ looks rather too posh (as well as too small)
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Oscar's dad on July 23, 2019, 10:22:56 am
Surely this is the king of canned food:

(https://www.thegoodfoodnetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Cslt-cnd-420g-600x506.jpg)

I bought some of that, it isn’t cheap, and was underwhelmed, it was quite greasy. Perhaps I should try again, in the interests of science of course.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Oscar's dad on July 23, 2019, 10:24:02 am
In my touring-in-France days tinned cassoulet and saucisses aux lentilles were the two staples.  Along with vin rouge of the tooth-enamel-stripping variety.

I have some of that to try next!
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Jurek on July 23, 2019, 10:30:31 am
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61%2Bwpjr6FXL.jpg)
https://www.amazon.co.uk/CANNED-BREAD-Camping-fishing-survival/dp/B07D2GVD3D

Quote
Grate for camping....
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: trekker12 on July 23, 2019, 10:33:40 am
Tinned anything was very much a case in teh ration packs I used to play around with in my air cadet days
- Tinned sausages, about half a dozen in a tin full of lard  :sick:when warm, worse when cold
- cheese and butter, meh
- unrecognisable stews, generally ok with copious application of S&P and herbs
- oatmeal blocks and mixed fruit pudding - I'd sell my own soul for those, or even my first born

As for tinned potatoes, I'm going camping next week, and whilst I've added fig rolls to my list, I'm not expecting zombies, and  tinned spuds are useless against midges, so they'll be staying where the should be - nowhere near me.

The Armed forces have since lost their love affair with tinned food. It's all in foil packets now. I've just bought two 24 hour ration packs* ready for the more remote parts on a trek along the Cambrian Way next week - even the peanuts are vacuum packed in foil.

* A friend of a friend I was drinking with recently who is ex Serbian Army** suggested they were better than Wayfairer type meals - the problem I'm finding is they are wet food so each box is nearly 4kg. I don't expect them to survive into the second week where the pubs run out on account of needing to shed some weight.

** He has some stories to tell from the 90s
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Jurek on July 23, 2019, 10:36:11 am
What. I love tinned potatoes! I'd rather not think of the process they go through as probably chemically pealed

Me too!  Although they don’t really taste like potatoes. In fact I love most tinned food, here in France they have a great selection of weird and wonderful stuff in tins and jars which I am sampling as the opportunity presents much to the horror of The Current Mrs R  :smug: :sick:

I remember what you are like. Sampling a sausage from The Promenade Cafe in Gravesend despite having had several warnings regarding their quality - And then when you tasted it, even you pulled a face....
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Oscar's dad on July 23, 2019, 10:47:54 am
I’d forgotten about that!   ;D
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: pcolbeck on July 23, 2019, 10:52:04 am
I bought some of that, it isn’t cheap, and was underwhelmed, it was quite greasy. Perhaps I should try again, in the interests of science of course.

Greasy, it's cassoulet of coarse it's greasy !
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: spesh on July 23, 2019, 11:05:48 am
Surely this is the king of canned food:

(https://www.thegoodfoodnetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Cslt-cnd-420g-600x506.jpg)

Nah... confit de canard, accept no substitutes.

Lovely tender duck, and all that spare duck fat makes for great roast or sautéed spuds.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: ElyDave on July 23, 2019, 11:09:12 am
soemthing like that may find its way into my basket...
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Oscar's dad on July 23, 2019, 11:28:21 am
I bought some of that, it isn’t cheap, and was underwhelmed, it was quite greasy. Perhaps I should try again, in the interests of science of course.

Greasy, it's cassoulet of coarse it's greasy !

Okay, I shall try again and report back.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: ian on July 23, 2019, 11:31:01 am
They're an essential ingredient of corned beef pie (chop up a tin of corned beef into a pyrex dish, add drained tin of potatoes, cover with frozen puff pastry and put in oven till the pastry is cooked). I confess I've not eaten this since I was a kid, but I now have a craving that I know won't be shared by my wife.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: pcolbeck on July 23, 2019, 11:38:21 am
I bought some of that, it isn’t cheap, and was underwhelmed, it was quite greasy. Perhaps I should try again, in the interests of science of course.

Greasy, it's cassoulet of coarse it's greasy !

Okay, I shall try again and report back.

A bottle of robust red to wash it down with is a must.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Ham on July 23, 2019, 12:21:40 pm
I bought some of that, it isn’t cheap, and was underwhelmed, it was quite greasy. Perhaps I should try again, in the interests of science of course.

Greasy, it's cassoulet of coarse it's greasy !

Okay, I shall try again and report back.

The canonical method for canned cassoulet is to empty into a shallow dish, grate some emmental over (dot with butter to add extra crispy brown-ness) and bake for around 30 minutes @ 1800 +, eat with the nearest thing to french bread
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: pcolbeck on July 23, 2019, 12:26:57 pm
I bought some of that, it isn’t cheap, and was underwhelmed, it was quite greasy. Perhaps I should try again, in the interests of science of course.

Greasy, it's cassoulet of coarse it's greasy !

Okay, I shall try again and report back.

The canonical method for canned cassoulet is to empty into a shallow dish, grate some emmental over (dot with butter to add extra crispy brown-ness) and bake for around 30 minutes @ 1800 +, eat with the nearest thing to french bread

I have a really big tin of it that came with the proper dish for baking it in. I need to organise some friends who also like cassoulet as Mrs and Master Pcolbeck cant even stand the idea of it.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: andrewc on July 23, 2019, 12:32:46 pm
One of the big tins just about fits in a trangia saucepan  :P
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: ian on July 23, 2019, 12:45:56 pm
Cassoulet? You can recreate this French meal with an industrial-sized tin of beans and sausages and a KFC bargain bucket. OK, if you want to be classy, a Nandos take-out.

Soirees at The Asbestos Palace are always appropriately majestic.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Oscar's dad on July 23, 2019, 05:47:53 pm
I bought some of that, it isn’t cheap, and was underwhelmed, it was quite greasy. Perhaps I should try again, in the interests of science of course.

Greasy, it's cassoulet of coarse it's greasy !

Okay, I shall try again and report back.

The canonical method for canned cassoulet is to empty into a shallow dish, grate some emmental over (dot with butter to add extra crispy brown-ness) and bake for around 30 minutes @ 1800 +, eat with the nearest thing to french bread

I’m on it and the bottle of robust red. This may warrant a separate thread...
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Ham on July 23, 2019, 05:51:52 pm
If you are still in Frogland and are feeling flush, Comte is possibly the best cheese to use but a bit of a waste, French emmental is good, too. I have been known to grate a little parmesan with anemic supermarket emmental.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Jurek on July 23, 2019, 05:53:02 pm
I’d forgotten about that!   ;D

The only thing which beats your expression on that occasion, is that of delthebike when, along with Wowbagger,  Aunty Helen and others, we rode to Foulness Island on the one day in the year that the MOD allow public access.
The pub on the island is no longer open for business, so a picnic was the order of the day.
Amongst our comestibles, Pippa and myself had some olives. Del had never tasted an olive...

I don't think Del actually finished the olive that he tried that day, and I'll put money on it that he hasn't tried another one since.
Olives. The Marmite of your five-a-day.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: rafletcher on July 26, 2019, 12:32:19 pm
The company provided "hog" roast was accompanied by potato salad made with tinned potatoes (as opposed to being tinned potato salad IYSWIM). It was, well, ok.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: ian on July 26, 2019, 05:12:23 pm
My mother still does the 'euuuueegghhh, it's for your ears' every time she sees a bottle of olive oil. I don't think anyone in my family other than me has even contemplated an olive.

I grew up with For Mash Get Smash!
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: caerau on July 26, 2019, 05:21:51 pm
Olive oil is for your ears?  ??? ??? ???


This is my WTF moment of the week - please explain :-)




[edit] Ah, OK, googled it.  Nvm
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: hellymedic on July 26, 2019, 06:06:57 pm
I didn't Google.

I am old enough to remember when Boots the Chemist sol Olive Oil in 50ml bottles for the softening of ear wax and it was not otherwise available for purchase.

I KNOW I'm more than middle-aged...

Still, we'll revert to those 'Good Old Days' after Brexit.

Hurrah for Bread and Dripping!
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Basil on July 26, 2019, 07:42:13 pm
Ah. Digging deep in the dripping bowl for the dark bits for your toast.

Yes. I remember olive oil in the ears as a wax cleaner.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Kim on July 26, 2019, 07:48:32 pm
I had a strange upbringing:  Augmentin for ears, olive oil wasn't a thing, and dripping was kept in a tin on the kitchen windowsill until the day the cat, erm, redistributed, it.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: ian on July 26, 2019, 08:58:12 pm
I remember the little bottle of olive oil. Certainly, no one thought of eating it. I don't even think it was single estate cold-pressed extra virgin. My grandparents ate bread and dripping. Minging.

It's seriously no joke that I didn't taste a herb or spice beyond salt and pepper till I was 18. OK, an honourable exception for Knorr Parsley Sauce.

That first chicken curry Pot Noodle literally blew my mind.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: rafletcher on July 26, 2019, 09:01:48 pm
Dripping on toast (especially the gravy bit at the bottom) with pepper. Yum.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Canardly on July 26, 2019, 09:06:24 pm
Those days may be about to return.  ::-)
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: rafletcher on July 26, 2019, 09:14:05 pm
Those days may be about to return.  ::-)

We weren’t poor, it was just what one did 60 years ago.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Canardly on July 26, 2019, 09:26:59 pm
I am not referring to poverty, I allude to lack of choice.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: andrewc on July 26, 2019, 11:12:29 pm
I remember the little bottle of olive oil. Certainly, no one thought of eating it. I don't even think it was single estate cold-pressed extra virgin. My grandparents ate bread and dripping. Minging.

It's seriously no joke that I didn't taste a herb or spice beyond salt and pepper till I was 18. OK, an honourable exception for Knorr Parsley Sauce.

That first chicken curry Pot Noodle literally blew my mind.


Sounds about right.  I don't think I had Chinese, Indian or Italian food until I started going on work nights out when I was 20/21 (84/85).   Spaghetti came in tins.   Garlic was dangerous foreign muck.  There was a deep pan on the cooker full of solidified fat for doing chips.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Robh on July 26, 2019, 11:32:56 pm
When  I turned up at my first day at art college, in 1974, I’d just turned 20. I had travelled to the other end of the country (Bromley, Kent) from Stoke, and I had nowhere to live. A caring older student took in myself and another northerner until we could find somewhere to stay. That first night she cooked a veggie meal for us and, being the shy well-raised kid that I was, I complemented her on how she had cooked the tomatoes, as I’d never had them cooked like that before. She explained that they were red peppers.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: MikeFromLFE on July 27, 2019, 08:10:29 am
Before Mrs M and I married (we've just passed the 42 year mark) we went out for a meal to the flat of one of her Irish cousins. I gobbled down this exotic, strange concoction, my fiancee seriously offended her relation by refusing to even attempt to eat spag bog.
It was a source of severe embarrassment, and the family rift never healed.

Sent from my Moto E (4) Plus using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: rafletcher on July 27, 2019, 09:01:26 am
When  I turned up at my first day at art college, in 1974, I’d just turned 20. I had travelled to the other end of the country (Bromley, Kent) from Stoke, and I had nowhere to live. A caring older student took in myself and another northerner until we could find somewhere to stay. That first night she cooked a veggie meal for us and, being the shy well-raised kid that I was, I complemented her on how she had cooked the tomatoes, as I’d never had them cooked like that before. She explained that they were red peppers.

Sometime in the early ‘50’s my father was sent to the market to buy red peppers for a recipe my mother wanted to try for the first time. He came home with red chillies. A difference they discovered when attempting to eat said meal  :o
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: rafletcher on July 27, 2019, 09:04:58 am
Before Mrs M and I married (we've just passed the 42 year mark) we went out for a meal to the flat of one of her Irish cousins. I gobbled down this exotic, strange concoction, my fiancee seriously offended her relation by refusing to even attempt to eat spag bog.
It was a source of severe embarrassment, and the family rift never healed.

Sent from my Moto E (4) Plus using Tapatalk

In comparison to many I think I had quite a broad diet growing up in the ‘60’s. We regularly had curry, spag bol, Spanish ommette, and a “Galloping Gourmet” recipe of pork chops with peaches. And we had Chinese takeaways too, though not Indian, that came much later to deepest Sussex.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: ian on July 28, 2019, 06:27:35 pm
I think the only ethnic food we had growing up in the eighties was Chinese (and people there, even in these marginally enlightened times, will still go to the 'Chinkies') but it wasn't allowed in our house on account it was suspiciously foreign. My parents still won't eat pasta or rice, it's potatoes or potatoes. That said, my mother mostly stopped eating in the early 90s and now survives on cigarettes and the very occasional cheese cob (as they call a roll thereabouts). My father obsessively avoids garlic and is still going on about the time he inadvertently ate some rocket (about fifteen years ago). The way they cook steak is criminal – for a minimum of 30 minutes in the pan. Everything is overcooked to death. Then when they've plated it, they put it back in the oven to 'make sure it's hot' and give it another 30 minutes cooking.

My breakout food was really Pot Noodles and Beanfeast when I arrived at university. Then, of course, the student staples of kebab and extra chilli sauce and, best of all, fish and chips and curry sauce at 3am on a Saturday morning from the chippy in Chinatown. I really don't think I sat down in an actual restaurant until I was into my early twenties.

I'm a bit more culinary cultured these days but I confess, having eaten at a fair number of Michelin starred and similar places, but I'm happiest with a crisp sandwich.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on July 29, 2019, 11:39:34 am
I think the only ethnic food we had growing up in the eighties was Chinese
Glanced at this, read it as "Chelsea". We had Chelsea buns, they were pretty exotic. No one talked about Chelsea boots though.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Gattopardo on July 29, 2019, 08:13:33 pm
I think the only ethnic food we had growing up in the eighties was Chinese
Glanced at this, read it as "Chelsea". We had Chelsea buns, they were pretty exotic. No one talked about Chelsea boots though.
Chelsea smile?
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: caerau on July 29, 2019, 09:08:47 pm
I think the only ethnic food we had growing up in the eighties was Chinese (and people there, even in these marginally enlightened times, will still go to the 'Chinkies') but it wasn't allowed in our house on account it was suspiciously foreign. My parents still won't eat pasta or rice, it's potatoes or potatoes. That said, my mother mostly stopped eating in the early 90s and now survives on cigarettes and the very occasional cheese cob (as they call a roll thereabouts). My father obsessively avoids garlic and is still going on about the time he inadvertently ate some rocket (about fifteen years ago). The way they cook steak is criminal – for a minimum of 30 minutes in the pan. Everything is overcooked to death. Then when they've plated it, they put it back in the oven to 'make sure it's hot' and give it another 30 minutes cooking.

My breakout food was really Pot Noodles and Beanfeast when I arrived at university. Then, of course, the student staples of kebab and extra chilli sauce and, best of all, fish and chips and curry sauce at 3am on a Saturday morning from the chippy in Chinatown. I really don't think I sat down in an actual restaurant until I was into my early twenties.

I'm a bit more culinary cultured these days but I confess, having eaten at a fair number of Michelin starred and similar places, but I'm happiest with a crisp sandwich.


Sounds like my brother-in-law and he's quite young (well about 40). My sister is nearly as bad - though her food fussiness is mostly attention seeking as far as I can tell. And it's not like he grew up in a deprived or working class family - his dad owns a palatial pad in the countryside near Luton Dunstable and his two sisters have about three thoroughbred horses each.  He'll do pizza but that's about as exotic as it gets.  What makes me laugh is that he 'can't stand foreign muck' - 'what's wrong with English food' - and spends as much time as he possibly can on holiday abroad - usually somewhere like Mexico. Bet he's pleased about the all inclusive thing  ::-)
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: ian on July 30, 2019, 10:15:57 am
I confess I've never understood 'all-inclusive' holidays. Why?
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Oscar's dad on July 30, 2019, 10:51:00 am
I bought some of that, it isn’t cheap, and was underwhelmed, it was quite greasy. Perhaps I should try again, in the interests of science of course.

Greasy, it's cassoulet of coarse it's greasy !

Okay, I shall try again and report back.

Continuing the off-topic theme, I tried Ham's recommendation for preparing cassoulet and accompanied it with a red, hopefully pcolbeck considers it sufficiently robust.  The combination was excellent but TCMR still isn't convinced:

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48372475381_a4261eef62_k.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/2gGvzEe)
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48372606347_1c5672265b_k.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/2gGwfAg)
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48372603597_cbdfaa51b2_k.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/2gGweLR)
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48372603697_b803aab00d_k.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/2gGweNz)
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48372603817_862867405c_k.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/2gGweQD)
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Ham on July 30, 2019, 11:34:17 am
 :thumbsup:

Excellent attempt, lost a point or two not allowing it to brown, but frankly that is always a inherent issue of internal tension of opposing forces, and improves the cleanability of the pan. Some crispy bits are in evidence on the sides, so a good compromise.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Oscar's dad on July 30, 2019, 12:50:13 pm
I didn’t allow it to brown as I was so anxious to eat it!
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Ham on July 30, 2019, 12:55:53 pm
I didn’t allow it to brown as I was so anxious to eat it!

...internal tension of opposing forces....

'sactly ;)
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: pcolbeck on July 30, 2019, 12:56:48 pm
Dont tell the French you put cheese on the top of cassoulet, there will be an international incident !
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Ham on July 30, 2019, 01:00:32 pm
Actually, I'm certain that method of serving tinned cassoulet was one I learned in France.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: pcolbeck on July 30, 2019, 01:12:43 pm
Actually, I'm certain that method of serving tinned cassoulet was one I learned in France.

Perhaps there is a special dispensation for tinned cassoulet. It does sound like a good idea.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Oscar's dad on July 30, 2019, 03:35:11 pm
It was chuffin’ lovely.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Jaded on July 30, 2019, 06:06:44 pm
Do not read if hungry.

(click to show/hide)
.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Hot Flatus on July 30, 2019, 10:21:40 pm
Macedoine salad, in France in the 80s.

Vomit.

(https://static.cuisineaz.com/400x320/i15-macedoine-aux-coquillettes.jpg)
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Oscar's dad on July 31, 2019, 06:57:25 am
Do not read if hungry.

(click to show/hide)
.

Agreed it isn’t the most appetising food to look at. 
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: ian on July 31, 2019, 09:42:47 am
Fruit has no place in salads that don't start with the word fruit.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: caerau on July 31, 2019, 02:42:46 pm
Tomato is sort of a fruit thobut?  :demon:
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: ian on July 31, 2019, 03:05:40 pm
It's an honorary vegetable. Like peppers and aubergines.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: caerau on July 31, 2019, 03:07:44 pm
 :smug:


I dub thee - Lord Banana.




Now - you cannot complain  :P O:-)
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: ian on July 31, 2019, 05:24:36 pm
Bananas are, to be fruitily pedantic, berries (strawberries aren't).

That said, commercial bananas are bred not to have seeds and are all vegetatively propagated clones.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: hellymedic on July 31, 2019, 07:51:47 pm
Bananas are, to be fruitily pedantic, berries (strawberries aren't).

That said, commercial bananas are bred not to have seeds and are all vegetatively propagated clones.

Tomatoes are berries thobut.
Banana is mostly Cavendish strain.
Blackberries aren't berries either...
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Jurek on July 31, 2019, 07:55:31 pm
Bananas are, to be fruitily pedantic, berries (strawberries aren't).

That said, commercial bananas are bred not to have seeds and are all vegetatively propagated clones.
I thought that bananananas were a herb.
Right or wrong?
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: SteveC on July 31, 2019, 08:15:47 pm
I thought that bananananas were a herb.
Right or wrong?
Right (at least, I remember being told that a long time ago).
They're not a tree, but a herbaceous perennial.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on July 31, 2019, 08:23:02 pm
I'm sure I remember bananas having little black seeds in when I was little. Did we eat a different variety back then (1970s)?

Anyway, getting back to the topic, sort of: what about tinned bananas? I've never seen them but I'm sure someone's had them.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on July 31, 2019, 08:26:24 pm
Answering my own questions: not quite.

There are bananas in jars of syrup:
https://www.essenceofthailand.com/BuenasSweetBananas340g.html?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI9L2N-_Df4wIVxbTtCh07iQ12EAYYAiABEgIDpvD_BwE

And canned banana blossom:
https://www.essenceofthailand.com/LamthongBananaBlossominBrine565g.html?gclid=EAIaIQobChMInoDYnfHf4wIVDbTtCh0lAAL3EAQYASABEgJXhPD_BwE

Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: ian on July 31, 2019, 09:14:42 pm
Bananas are monocotyledon from the ginger family. In the wild they grow from a single fertilised ovary, hence they are a berry (though Cavendish are parthenocarpic triploid mutants, yah!). Tomatoes are indeed berries too. As are kumquats. Cavendish has been the stable variety since the late 1950s when Gros Michel succumbed to Panama Disease. You gets lots of different bananas out in the far east, but they don't travel (as they quickly ripen). Of course as the Cavendish cultivar is a clone, any nasty disease gets it's claws (or rather hyphae) into it, and we'll be banana-less. Lots of people are working on that.

I don't think commercial bananas in the UK have every had seeds in recent memory (technically they do, but they never mature) but they generally are small black seeds.

Finally I'm finding a use for my botany degree!

Apropos of nothing I watched a chap produce a plantain in a bar the other week and then attempt to eat it. He didn't get very far.

In other news, my mum's favourite story was the time she found a tarantula in a box of bananas and it (allegedly) chased her.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Efrogwr on July 31, 2019, 10:02:19 pm
Bananas are, to be fruitily pedantic, berries (strawberries aren't).

That said, commercial bananas are bred not to have seeds and are all vegetatively propagated clones.

Tomatoes are berries thobut.
Banana is mostly Cavendish strain.
Blackberries aren't berries either...

Are they consolidated drupes? I think that they are related to raspberries.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: ian on August 01, 2019, 10:00:54 am
Top points, blackberries and raspberries are collections of small drupelets.

Basically, fruit are generally classified into drupes or berries. Other than apples and stuff, which are pomes.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on August 01, 2019, 11:09:01 am
I don't think commercial bananas in the UK have every had seeds in recent memory (technically they do, but they never mature) but they generally are small black seeds.
I've definitely eaten bananas in the UK with small black seeds in. I remember wondering what they were! (i was quite small at the time)
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: ian on August 01, 2019, 12:42:47 pm
Maybe they were bugs who had got to your banana first.

Pretty much all commercial bananas are Cavendish and those that aren't are still triploid AAA cultivars (all of which are parthenocarpic because they're triploid – meiosis is disrupted in non-even polyploids.). The A genome is Musa acuminata (there's a B genome, Musa balbisiana).

That said, it could have mutated, it happens – so you end up with a tetraploid AAAA which would have seeds. Wild diploid bananas also exist, but they tend to have small fruit suitable for nomming by bats – most cultivated plants, botany fans, are polyploids as they make for bigger fruit and yields. Wheat, for instance, is hexaploid. Also, breeding for polyploidy is essential when you get sterile crosses in breeding programmes.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on August 01, 2019, 02:18:34 pm
Thank you ian. It's genuinely interesting though I do fear you may be slipping into developer speak.  ;) (what sort of developer is another question)
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Oscar's dad on August 01, 2019, 05:09:49 pm
I think this thread must be in line for an award for going off on a massive tangent. Tinned potatoes to the ins and outs of bananas!  Impressive even by yacf standards!
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: ian on August 01, 2019, 05:58:49 pm
Thank you ian. It's genuinely interesting though I do fear you may be slipping into developer speak.  ;) (what sort of developer is another question)

Well, we are diploid, which means we have two sets of chromosomes (and we make haploid cells, in the down-belows). There are human tissues that can have more than two sets of chromosomes (so are polyploid) but they're somatic exceptions. Most animals are diploid, though a lot of a fish and amphibians are tetraploid. Mutations that affect meiosis often lead to polyploidy, in most cases it leads to infertility or is fatal to any zygote.

Plants are a bit more flexible, more so when we breed them – wheat, for instance, is effectively three different organisms crammed into the same package, hence hexaploid (three diploids).

To put things back on track, most commercial potatoes (like the kind you find in tins) are tetraploid (but not diploidized, oh no, so have four alleles at each gene locus, frankly a bit greedy but there you go, anything for a crisp sandwich), but potato is quite a good species in which to stupid polyploidy in as they're quite variable in the wild.

Once upon a time botanist and molecular geneticist – I am available for stimulating after-dinner speaking engagements, and ladies (and gents), alas, I'm spoken for.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Jurek on August 01, 2019, 06:23:37 pm
I think this thread must be in line for an award for going off on a massive tangent. Tinned potatoes to the ins and outs of bananas!  Impressive even by yacf standards!


It has taken five pages to move from tinned potatos to bananananas.
In the next thread I start, I'll have to try harder.
FWIW I remember the terms 'Monocotyledon' and 'Dicotyledon' from O-level biology.
Unfortunately I cannot remember what either mean.
(other than one of *something* and the other, two of *something* - seed?)
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: hellymedic on August 01, 2019, 06:55:22 pm
I don't think commercial bananas in the UK have every had seeds in recent memory (technically they do, but they never mature) but they generally are small black seeds.
I've definitely eaten bananas in the UK with small black seeds in. I remember wondering what they were! (i was quite small at the time)

Me too!
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: hellymedic on August 01, 2019, 07:01:44 pm
I think this thread must be in line for an award for going off on a massive tangent. Tinned potatoes to the ins and outs of bananas!  Impressive even by yacf standards!


It has taken five pages to move from tinned potatos to bananananas.
In the next thread I start, I'll have to try harder.
FWIW I remember the terms 'Monocotyledon' and 'Dicotyledon' from O-level biology.
Unfortunately I cannot remember what either mean.
(other than one of *something* and the other, two of *something* - seed?)

[Botany backwards]

Cotyledons are seed leaves.

Monocotyledons have one, dicots have two.

Monocots have long thin leaves and include grasses, onions and bulb flowers.

Dicots include most other broad-leaved plants.

This applies to angiosperms, whose seeds are covered.

Gymnosperms have naked seeds and include conifers, like pine.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: chrisbainbridge on August 14, 2019, 04:57:22 pm
 Interesting to note that bananas are actually dying out. The Cavendish variety which was resistant to the original Panama fungus is not resistant to the latest variant. As the Cavendish variety is now the universal commercial crop, damage to the Cavendish variety is leading to major problems. The fungus has just recently been found in South America and been confirmed in Colombia according to the BBC.

 If they do not find a cure we could see the end of bananas as a commercial crop.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Oscar's dad on August 14, 2019, 05:03:46 pm
French tinned food update...

Last week me and Oaky OTP enjoyed pork products with lentils. In fact so keen were we to eat it we forgot to take photos. Next up I have a tin of rabbit with something I can’t identify from the picture on the tin. Might this be a step too far...?
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: ian on August 14, 2019, 05:35:45 pm
Interesting to note that bananas are actually dying out. The Cavendish variety which was resistant to the original Panama fungus is not resistant to the latest variant. As the Cavendish variety is now the universal commercial crop, damage to the Cavendish variety is leading to major problems. The fungus has just recently been found in South America and been confirmed in Colombia according to the BBC.

 If they do not find a cure we could see the end of bananas as a commercial crop.

They're not going to find a cure, but they need to find a suitable source of resistance – generally, you'd find a resistant variety and cross it into the line, and then spend a long time breeding out (by back-crossing) the detrimental traits you added as part of the package. Obviously a bit more difficult for a plant cultivar you can't breed. So you have to tinker with the ploidy so it becomes fertile again so you can do this, or (traditionally) mutagenesis (take lots of plantlets and expose them to nasty radiation or mutagenic chemicals and then select for resistance), or proceed to direct genetic manipulation (which would be the better and quicker solution, especially with CRISPR). Of course, then you have consumer issues with GM. I think they'll change their minds when faced by angry gorillas demanding their favourite lunchable.
Title: Re: Tinned potatoes
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on August 14, 2019, 06:08:12 pm
French tinned food update...

Last week me and Oaky OTP enjoyed pork products with lentils. In fact so keen were we to eat it we forgot to take photos. Next up I have a tin of rabbit with something I can’t identify from the picture on the tin. Might this be a step too far...?
Depends. If the unidentifiable thing turns out to be Mr McGregor, then maybe...