Yet Another Cycling Forum

Off Topic => The Pub => Food & Drink => Topic started by: Adam on September 13, 2009, 05:14:14 pm

Title: Saithe & chips
Post by: Adam on September 13, 2009, 05:14:14 pm
Following trips to Ramsgate, we'd noticed signs in the fish & chip shop to Saithe and Adrian had encouraged me to try some.

(http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a239/FlyingDodo/Sandwich%20Fish%20and%20Chip%20Tour%20September%202009/DSCF0082.jpg)

At £1.90 compared to £3.25 for Hake or £3.50 for a large cod it seemed a bargain.

A bit of googling shows that it's also known as pollock or coley.

Once it's cooked, it looks like any other fish cooked in batter.

(http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a239/FlyingDodo/Sandwich%20Fish%20and%20Chip%20Tour%20September%202009/DSCF0081.jpg)

although there was some dark skin on the edge. 

After a bit of probing with the wooden fork, it fell apart like any other fish cooked in batter.

However where is differed was that it was very tasty, and to be honest it seemed to have more flavour than cod.

So a big thumbs up to the humble saithe.



Title: Re: Saithe & chips
Post by: cpjmathieson on September 14, 2009, 03:56:30 pm
Following trips to Ramsgate, we'd noticed signs in the fish & chip shop to Saithe and Adrian had encouraged me to try some.

(http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a239/FlyingDodo/Sandwich%20Fish%20and%20Chip%20Tour%20September%202009/DSCF0082.jpg)

At £1.90 compared to £3.25 for Hake or £3.50 for a large cod it seemed a bargain.

A bit of googling shows that it's also known as pollock or coley.

Once it's cooked, it looks like any other fish cooked in batter.

(http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a239/FlyingDodo/Sandwich%20Fish%20and%20Chip%20Tour%20September%202009/DSCF0081.jpg)

although there was some dark skin on the edge. 

After a bit of probing with the wooden fork, it fell apart like any other fish cooked in batter.

However where is differed was that it was very tasty, and to be honest it seemed to have more flavour than cod.

So a big thumbs up to the humble saithe.





No to mention it is more substainable than Cod which is in decline in decline by 96% according to:

http://www.scienceagogo.com/news/20050201233950data_trunc_sys.shtml (http://www.scienceagogo.com/news/20050201233950data_trunc_sys.shtml)
Title: Re: Saithe & chips
Post by: Ariadne on September 14, 2009, 06:24:18 pm
I think it needs careful cooking though - I've had it and really enjoyed it, but other times it's been really mushy and woolly.
Title: Re: Saithe & chips
Post by: redshift on September 15, 2009, 03:47:56 pm
Pollachius virens, as opposed to pollachius pollachius.  I catch pollack on a reasonably regular basis in north Wales, but coalfish is rarer where I fish.  Pollack is greenish, bronze or brown depending upon it's living habitat.  Coalfish tends to be darker green or brown - almost black, hence the name.  Pollack's lower jaw protrudes, whereas coalfish's doesn't, except maybe in exceptionally large animals.  Certainly as a shore angler, I've never caught a coalfish with a protruding lower jaw.

Pollack is best served very fresh.  It is a delicate flesh, and straight from the sea there's an elusive hint of pepper about it.  A quick coating of flour, and then flash fry it.  It needs no more than that.  I find the flakes are generally thinner than other gadiforms, and compared with haddock the flesh is quite 'weak' looking.

The pollack caught commercially as 'Alaskan Pollack' is the same family (Gadidae) but a different genus (Theragra), so it's as distant from our local pollack as pollack is from Cod!
Title: Re: Saithe & chips
Post by: citoyen on September 17, 2009, 10:53:18 am
Hey, I know that chippy! My mates and I used to sneak out of school at lunchtime to sample its wares then go into the neighbouring amusement arcade. Don't remember saithe being on the menu back then.

I've also been known to sample the wares of the Belgian bar next door to the chippy (as a grown-up - it wasn't there when I was a schoolboy).

d.