Yet Another Cycling Forum

Off Topic => The Pub => Topic started by: Wowbagger on September 16, 2009, 09:39:45 pm

Title: Wearing a watch
Post by: Wowbagger on September 16, 2009, 09:39:45 pm
I've got a fairly battered Seiko watch which cost me about £70 15 or so years ago. It still works OK but I haven't worn it for a long time. These days I've nearly always got my mobile phone on me, the bike always has a Cateye and if I've got the Garmin I have the time permanently displayed above the map.

I've just noticed that my old Seiko has stopped and I was wondering whether to buy a new battery for it, but it hardly seems worth it.

Who else has given up watch wearing these days?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: clarion on September 16, 2009, 09:40:48 pm
Vladimir Putin?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: delthebike on September 16, 2009, 09:48:59 pm
The last time I wore a watch was around March/April 2004. Funnily enough it too is an old Seiko, an automatic model, that I bought myself as a 21st birthday present. It still works after a little wobblin' but it no longer winds up.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andygates on September 16, 2009, 10:21:05 pm
Watched have moved from timekeepers to art-fashion pieces.  Some of the contemporary designs are great - just look at watchisimo.com.  I crave a Russian 24-hour one, and some of the wacky handless Zen fests...


   Projects Past, Present, and Future designed by Daniel Will-Harris
 (http://www.watchismo.com/projectspastpresentfutureleather.aspx)


   Mr. Jones The Accurate "Remember you will die" Watch designed by UK artist Crispin Jones
 (http://www.watchismo.com/mr.-jones-the-accurate-watch.aspx)

My HRM also happens to be a watch; I don't wear it on non-training days.  :)

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Jaded on September 16, 2009, 10:28:27 pm
My watches are made by Apple and Garmin.

I do have a wrist watch too. In fact I have two. My favourite was given to my by Mrs Jaded on our wedding day. It has been washed once and still works. My other one I bought when I flew to the USandA two years ago. I didn't want to have my best watch stolen or inserted into a previously unknown body cavity by customs.

Actually I lied. I have four wristwatches.
I still have my first one, which glows in the dark and if you get too close to it your hair falls out.
I have my Dad's watch. It shows the phases of the moon. Watch menders drool over it.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: clarion on September 16, 2009, 10:31:30 pm
I have a couple of watches - Next ones - but I don't wear them.

I got out of the habit when packing trucks.  Getting a hand caught under an amp rack because you have a watchstrap in the way isn't funny.  The same reason I don't wear any jewellery.  But, even now I don't work there any more, I don't like having anything around my wrists.  I've tried wearing watches, but it never lasts.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Butterfly on September 16, 2009, 10:34:03 pm
I have a couple of watches - Next ones - but I don't wear them.

I got out of the habit when packing trucks.  Getting a hand caught under an amp rack because you have a watchstrap in the way isn't funny.  The same reason I don't wear any jewellery.  But, even now I don't work there any more, I don't like having anything around my wrists.  I've tried wearing watches, but it never lasts.
And when you spend a lot of time with someone who has 12 or so and is never without one, you don't need to worry so much :).
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: clarion on September 16, 2009, 10:36:15 pm
That's true.  :) :-*
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: MattH on September 16, 2009, 10:40:41 pm
I wear a watch most of the time, but take them off when doing manual stuff or sometimes when working on the computer. I have a nice Tissot chronograph for "best" - one of their cheapest models, so quite slim and understated rather than chunky and in-yer-face. I've also got a Pulsar kinetic that I tend to wear when doing stuff that might damage the Tissot, and a cheap Timex with webbing strap that I wear when doing long bike rides (as the metal bracelets on the other two can rub on rough roads).

I hate not having one on my wrist, even if I do always have other means of telling the time.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Wowbagger on September 16, 2009, 10:50:32 pm
Mrs. Wow still wears a Pulsar digital watch I bought for her when she was breastfeeding our younger son so that she could time each side to the second.

She has changed the battery once, when he was about 15. He's 25 next week so in another 5 years she might have to change it again.

And before anyone makes any comments about is he a prop forward and did she stick them through the school railings, no. She breast fed each of our 4 kids for about their first 6 months. I've had a monopoly since then.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Rob S on September 16, 2009, 10:53:41 pm
Ony time I don't wear a watch is in bed, in the bath and on my bike.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Sergeant Pluck on September 16, 2009, 10:57:19 pm
Who else has given up watch wearing these days?

Me. I've had a few nice watches, in another life:

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v138/Chickenhawk66/Watches1/f36a00d8.jpg)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v138/Chickenhawk66/Watches1/front1171.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Jaded on September 16, 2009, 10:59:50 pm
bitty...
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Rhys W on September 16, 2009, 11:10:01 pm
I like watches, but never got round to getting a nice one. I've had an entry-level quartz TAG since 1993 - I like it because it's not so big and I don't think I could carry off a big chunky thing with my little girly wrists. The unidirectional bezel is very useful for timing pasta. When/if I get a job I will have to check out a Speedmaster Professional... I've been thinking about it too long.

 Whenever I see somebody root around in their pockets to squint at a mobile phone, I think "no class..." And as for the Cateye - the clock on every one I've had has been laughably inaccurate.

 
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Basil on September 16, 2009, 11:47:16 pm
Funnily enough, I've recently started wearing a watch again after several years.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Mike J on September 17, 2009, 12:05:00 am
I usually wear a watch most days - find it strange not wearing one.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Speshact on September 17, 2009, 12:12:50 am
I want a wrist strap that I can attach my Cateye to, to use as a watch when I'm not riding the bike. In the meantime I wear a cheap Casio watch and bung the Cateye in a pocket.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: JohnP on September 17, 2009, 12:52:15 am
I seldom leave home without my watch.  On wrist unless cycling when it's in a pocket.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Valiant on September 17, 2009, 01:06:11 am
I like that past, present, future watch a lot! I haven't worn a watch for years!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Charlotte on September 17, 2009, 01:13:57 am
I've tried not wearing a watch.  It feels odd.

I don't have a posh watch and I'm not too concerned about that.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Gattopardo on September 17, 2009, 01:44:44 am
Well I started wearing a watch a year ago.

Didn't for years but had to start again.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: citoyen on September 17, 2009, 02:47:07 am
I don't wear a watch, haven't done for many years. I don't wear any jewellery - not even my wedding ring. Not for any practical reasons, I just don't like the feel of it.

Shame, cos a nice big chunky chronograph would be cool.

Not that I need one - I usually have several other devices that tell the time at my disposal, ie phone, computer, iPod etc.

d.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Gruff on September 17, 2009, 06:22:36 am
I like wearing a watch. For me, as a bloke, it's the only "jewellery" I would wear.

I have two posh watches, both of which I love.  I can only properly justify one of them, which is a design classic and I'd admired for years before I bought my own. The other one was entirely a vanity/ego purchase and I'm still a bit embarrassed about it, lovely watch though.

I also have two work watches, a Casio G-Shock and a CWC G10. I take an almost perverse pleasure in seeing just how much abuse these can take. The seals on the G10 gave up in 45 degree desert heat combined with choking humidity, so I retired it with honours. The G Shock has so far proved un-killable, despite my best efforts. The face on it currently feels like emery paper because of all the swarf embedded in it.

Watches are groovy.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Regulator on September 17, 2009, 07:12:29 am
I'm a watch addict.  I can't do without one - I feel naked and uneasy without a watch on.  And they have to be big - not flashy but big enough for you to notice that you're wearing it.

Watches are one of the things that I'll spend money on and I have quite a collection of expensive watches - including a rare Rolex that I inherited from my father and which forms part of my pension pot.  My current every day watch is a Hamilton automatic and I brought it as a treat when I was made redundant and got a big payout.

I blame my father for my watch addiction.  He knew a lot of the importers/retailers of the good brands and so had access to watches before they went on general release.  I have one of the first Seiko Kinetics ever made and it is on loan to the Seiko museum.

Mr R is the complete opposite.  He rarely wears a watch, instead relying on his mobile phone.  I bought him a lovely watch for his birthday a few years ago and it spends most of its time on the dressing table.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: mike on September 17, 2009, 07:17:21 am
I take mine off when I'm on holiday, it instantly relaxes me and is nearly as good as turning my blackberry off.  8 hours to go till I can take it off again for a week  :thumbsup:

I'm slightly very* OCD about being late for work stuff, so couldnt cope with not wearing one during the week.



* - edited when Mrs Mike read what I was typing and laughed at the 'slightly'.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: alexb on September 17, 2009, 07:27:44 am
I wear mine continuously, 24 hours per day for months at a time. It's a fairly mundane Animal sports watch which tells the date and has a uni-directional bezel, but it's pretty much spot on for a watch. I'd love it if it had an alarm, but I'm not especially bothered that it doesn't.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Gandalf on September 17, 2009, 07:30:50 am
My Timex Ironman has just packed up after a few year.  I now have a Sekonda.  I've always fancied a 'proper' watch but have never had the money really.  I quite like the look of those Citizen solar powered jobbies with the perpetual calendar.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: TimO on September 17, 2009, 07:43:52 am
I've got a watch somewhere, but I haven't worn it in a decade or more, so I suspect the battery has run down, wherever it is.

I gave up wearing watches when I realised I would glance at my watch to see what the time was, and ten seconds later not remember what it said. :o

If I need to know what the time is, I can check on any number of places, a PC obviously, the VCR, the cooker, the clock radio next to my bed, the GPS, the Cycle Computer, and any number of other places which I've probably forgotten.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: tiermat on September 17, 2009, 07:47:27 am
I always wear a watch, if strangly naked without one.  Just to be certain that I will have one that: a) looks good b) doesn't have a flat battery c) is relatively accurate I own 8 watches at the moment!

These are, in no particular order of preference:
1) A Briel Ducati Corse special
2) Rotary Elite (one of the ones with 2 faces, great for when wearing a suit as if one face doesn't go, just turn it around!)
3) 2 Animal watches
4) A Polar HRM watch
5) 2 Festina watches

Oh that's only 7, just remembered I gave my rose gold faced Festina to my mum last year, my wrists were getting too big for it....
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: nicknack on September 17, 2009, 08:23:43 am
It would feel very odd not to wear a watch. I could probably get into collecting flash watches, but at the mo it would seem a bit pointless since I always wear the Omega I was given as an eighteenth birthday present - 38 years ago. I also have my late brother's Tissot for the odd occasion when mine is in for a service.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Frenchie on September 17, 2009, 08:27:19 am
I like watches. They are, IMHO, man's "only" jewellery. I wear one pretty ,much 24 hours a day -- an old habit. I can have days  with a number of meetinghs and I don't like it being late and find it rude when people are. I currently have a simple army style Timex. I have at least one very nice watch, a present from my grandparents, which I, sadly, rarely wear because it is beautiful but thin and possibly ragile. Some of its parts would not be replaceable I would think now either.

Like Mike though I will take it off on holidays and when I want an easy WE. Makes me feel "off duty"!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Nuncio on September 17, 2009, 08:44:01 am
I couldn't tell you how long it's been that I've not been wearing a watch.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Woofage on September 17, 2009, 08:46:08 am
I recently went back to wearing a watch (there's a thread somewhere on this). Initially, it felt odd after a few years not wearing one but now it's the opposite as I feel strangely naked without it.

I'm not a watch addict, but I've had a few nice ones:
my dad's gold-cased watch from the 50s with Swiss movement
a Tissot automatic which sadly imploded (poss 18th present, can't remember)
a Raymond Weil which was a 30th present from Mrs Woofage
my current Citizen

I did get a cheap Kahuna (sp?) thing for wearing on the bike and as an everyday watch but the movement packed in. I may try to replace it one day for a bit of fun.

In my previous jobs, watches have been a bit inconvenient. They don't like magnets, y'see :(.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Rob S on September 17, 2009, 09:16:03 am
One of those threads that's nowt without pics!!

My bestest watch

(http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b363/rks040472/sinn8.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Regulator on September 17, 2009, 09:17:21 am
One of those threads that's nowt without pics!!

My bestest watch

(http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b363/rks040472/sinn6.jpg)

Oi!  You've nicked my watch!   >:(





 ;D
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: redshift on September 17, 2009, 09:41:11 am
Coming into TV and doing live transmissions I found it difficult to work without a watch, even though there are timecode-locked clocks everywhere.  What happens when the timecode generator is wrong?   :o

I went through a variety of Casio Databank watches, and currently have a Timex Ironman Datalink.  Everyone who sees it asks if it's a HRM, but it's not - it does however have a USB port on the side, and if I really wanted to I could play Space Invaders on it.  Mainly it stores lots of useful numbers, and acts as a stopwatch for timing inserts into shows.  Oh, it can tell the time too.

I don't have a posh watch, as the ones I do have tend to suffer damage at work.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Tom B on September 17, 2009, 10:41:39 am
Stopped wearing a watch 20+ years ago: wrist felt more comfy without so kept it in a pocket instead. Since I've done office jobs (10+ yrs now) there's always been the clock on the PC and outside the office I relish the sense of timelessness. It's less than 3 years since I got my first mobile 'phone and I must say I find the watch helpful. The clocks on cycle computers don't seem very accurate, AFAICT
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: nuttycyclist on September 17, 2009, 10:44:46 am
... I quite like the look of those Citizen solar powered jobbies with the perpetual calendar.

I got a Citizen Eco-drive in 1996.  I wear it daily and it's still working great  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andygates on September 17, 2009, 10:45:55 am
USB watch? You colossal nerd!  :thumbsup:  

My favourite watch was an old Fossil from way back when they launched, with a skeleton quartz movement in an overblown industrial-clockpunk frame of faux gears and stuff.  It chewed jacket linings but I wuved it!

Huge watches for the win.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Attitudeless Badger on September 17, 2009, 10:50:21 am
Got a casio Waveceptor last year.  Solar powered, so battery will never need replacing and picks up a time signal every night so always accurate.  Got the cheaper version with black resin strap, so fairly damage-proof too.

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: tiermat on September 17, 2009, 10:51:49 am
USB watch? You colossal nerd!  :thumbsup:  

My favourite watch was an old Fossil from way back when they launched, with a skeleton quartz movement in an overblown industrial-clockpunk frame of faux gears and stuff.  It chewed jacket linings but I wuved it!

Huge watches for the win.

And there is the eigth one I couldn't remember earlier :) I have Fossil Big-Tic.  It is large, rectangular faced and has a matrix styled background that can be switched on and off by a little button on the side of the watch...
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: perpetual dan on September 17, 2009, 11:06:02 am
I've not worn a watch for ages. I kept scratching the glass doing DIY / getting at computers under desks and decided I had enough other sources of the time around me most of the time.  In any case I tend to look at phone / PDA / computer to tell me the date as much as the hour, never mind the minute.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: MattH on September 17, 2009, 11:11:21 am
USB watch? You colossal nerd!  :thumbsup:  

That reminds me, I have the 64MB version of this kicking around somewhere - from a time when 64MB was actually quite a lot of memory.
LAKS USB Memory Watch 128MB: Amazon.co.uk: Electronics & Photo (http://www.amazon.co.uk/LAKS-USB-Memory-Watch-128MB/dp/B0000AIS1S/ref=pd_rhf_p_t_1)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: kcass on September 17, 2009, 12:18:58 pm
I stopped wearing one years ago and rarely have to ask anyone the time.

I still remember my first watch with luminous hands and numbers - the thrill of watching the hands go round in the dark. Simple pleasures.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Bledlow on September 17, 2009, 01:04:34 pm
bitty...
At least it's not nana bitty.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Bledlow on September 17, 2009, 01:08:36 pm
I'm a watch addict.  I can't do without one - I feel naked and uneasy without a watch on.  
Me too. I take it off in bed, bath, or shower. But otherwise unlike you. I want something readable, comfortable to wear & reliable. Someone here recommended my current main watch earlier this year -
(http://www.mondaine.com/assets/Pictures/Products/A658.30300.11SBB-CB.jpg)
Well, actually one of the cheaper slightly smaller (why I chose it - I have thin wrists) plated ones, but it has the same face (I love it - the simplicity & clarity), strap, & I think the same works.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Sergeant Pluck on September 17, 2009, 01:15:32 pm
The thing about mechanical watches is... cogs... springs... and general cleverness:

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v138/Chickenhawk66/Watches1/321.jpg)

Quartz just isn't the same:

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v138/Chickenhawk66/Watches1/resized_Img_1473.jpg)

But I did like that one - here's the front:

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v138/Chickenhawk66/Watches1/resized_Img_1391.jpg)

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: robbo6 on September 17, 2009, 01:19:57 pm
Being left handed I don't get on with wristwatches, so I have a Russian Orion pocket watch for everyday use and an Aerowatch which was a fiftieth birthday present for best.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: tiermat on September 17, 2009, 01:22:18 pm
This is my current day-to-day watch...

(http://www.wesellbreilwatches.co.uk/bw0162%20b.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Bledlow on September 17, 2009, 01:24:45 pm
Being left handed I don't get on with wristwatches,
Why not? The left/right-hand thing is only a problem if you're trying to wind or adjust it on your wrist.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: bobb on September 17, 2009, 01:43:40 pm
I could never leave the house without a watch on. It just feels wrong.

I don't care for flashy watches though. A watch is for telling time and an expensive one isn't going to tell it any better than a cheap one!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Rob S on September 17, 2009, 02:01:29 pm
The thing about mechanical watches is... cogs... springs... and general cleverness:


Of course the thread is about wearing a watch in general.......mechanical watches is a whole different subject....one I am very interested in.....it's not about the accuracy or the requirement to wind it....its cogs, springs, ticking, display backs, jewels, Geneva stripes and general cleverness. :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Moloko on September 17, 2009, 02:03:06 pm
The popularity of 'mobile phones' is a godsend.
Only once in a blue moon do I now get someone asking me for the time.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Regulator on September 17, 2009, 05:11:34 pm
I'm a watch addict.  I can't do without one - I feel naked and uneasy without a watch on.  
Me too. I take it off in bed, bath, or shower.

Last time I took my watch off was to have strap replaced.  Prior to that I was in hospital and going into theatre.

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Zoidburg on September 17, 2009, 05:29:48 pm
G Shock that has seen better days, it eats batteries so I don't wear it anymore.

Barometer/altimeter watch that I really like as it is acurate and you can replace the battery yourself via the big screw gate at the back, just like a G10 has.

Seiko 5 Automatic, the original pattern, not the fugly new one.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Tewdric on September 17, 2009, 05:35:09 pm
One of these - great for night riding!  :thumbsup:



(http://www.h3-watches.co.uk/images/blackstorm_pro_all.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Zoidburg on September 17, 2009, 05:38:17 pm
I like the tritium watches but what puzzles me is them being marketed as "tactical" when they constantly glow brightly in the dark.

Divers watch, not a sneaky beaky watch.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: redshift on September 17, 2009, 06:15:20 pm
USB watch? You colossal nerd!  :thumbsup:  

Not that kind of USB watch - this kind (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Timex-T53722-Unisex-Ironman-Watch/).  You're not telling me that your Suunto doesn't have a USB port to upload your stats are you?

Expensive watches?  How about the Horus Ultramarinum (http://watches.infoniac.com/horus-horological-expertize.html) Marine?   which apparently allows you to speed up or slow down the time readout using a Chadburn Lever (like a ship's dial annunciator).  Completely barking, and a snip at £337,397 +VAT  ;D
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andygates on September 17, 2009, 07:10:18 pm
Titanium tourbillon... hrr hrrr hrr....

(The Suunto has an optional wireless link; I don't have one)

Ulysse Nardin's Astrolabum has me moist with delight.  The only sadness is that I won't live long enough to see it all used to full extent - and nor will anyone, really!  991-22 • Astrolabium G. Galilei • Archive • Welcome to the Ulysse Nardin collection • Ulysse Nardin • Le Locle • Suisse (http://www.ulysse-nardin.com/watch.jsp?ID_Page=100016_10000A_10000S) - it's pretty, but read the blurb and it gets ridiculous.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Moloko on September 17, 2009, 07:24:39 pm

The Vulcania (http://www.wriststyle.com/entry/concept-turned-reality-vulcania-by-hd3-complication/) is steampunk at its very finest. I would absolutely love to own one.

Tag Heuer Monaco V4 Belt Driven Wrist Watch (http://www.wristdreams.com/archives/2004/05/tag_heuer_monac.html). Want!!! Nurse! Nurse!  It's starting again!

I just make do with four Formula 1 Tag Heuers, plus other watches.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: redshift on September 17, 2009, 07:57:59 pm
Trouble is, such things largely leave me a bit meh.  The Clock of the Long Now had the same effect on me.  Oh, I appreciate the artistry, and the engineering, but rather like overblown damascus knives, with damascus bolsters and blacklip scales, it's just too much.  As I get older, I find that what I want is really good engineering, high functionality, and simplicity of design.  Think 'Mora' or 'Fallkniven',  rather than some of the esoteric weird and wacky 'tactical' or 'art' stuff out there.  Hell, even when I'm out walking, I use paper maps, and even if I might use a GPS from time to time, I still try to keep my compass skills alive.

<satori>
Suddenly aware of an aesthetic I've been seeking for a while.  Will have to make something now.   :)
</satori>
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: rogerzilla on September 17, 2009, 08:13:33 pm
Being left handed I don't get on with wristwatches,
Why not? The left/right-hand thing is only a problem if you're trying to wind or adjust it on your wrist.

OK...who else is right-handed but wears their watch on the same hand?  I do, probably because my father does, and from rough observations over the years about 25% of people seem to wear a watch on their "writing" hand.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Jaded on September 17, 2009, 08:15:08 pm
I am left-handed and I wear a wrist watch on the proper hand.  ;)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: redshift on September 17, 2009, 08:15:34 pm
Lefthanded, wear my watch on the left.

Ok, so sue me for being confused.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Moloko on September 17, 2009, 08:17:39 pm
OK...who else is right-handed but wears their watch on the same hand?

Me, only 'cuz I have a large tattoo on the other arm and don't want the watch partly covering it.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: robbo6 on September 17, 2009, 08:18:20 pm
When I do wear a wristwatch I wear it on my left hand and take it off if I am working. I just can't get used to it on the right.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: folkdevil on September 17, 2009, 08:18:30 pm
I don't wear a watch, haven't done for many years. I don't wear any jewellery - not even my wedding ring. Not for any practical reasons, I just don't like the feel of it.

Ditto here - well, I wear my wedding ring but I couldn't stand wearing anything else. I have never got on with watches.  I find I am usually frighteningly accurate at estimating the time.  As backup I usually have my mobile to tell me the time - no class I'm afraid!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cunobelin on September 17, 2009, 08:27:57 pm
It is weird without one!

As part of the infection control programme we no longer wear watches, and it is amazing how much I used it. Trying to coordinate cameras and patients or even injection and scan without one was impossible, and I found that I was actually checking a watch every few minutes, and some times at intervals less than a minute.

Ended up buying a fob watch to replace the wrist watch!

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Martin on September 17, 2009, 09:04:11 pm
I have a Lorus Kinetic which was an Xmas pressie 6 years ago; all I've ever had to do is put it an hour forward and back once a year; it's ultra-accurate (I assume it's a Seiko in a cheaper case) it's also water resistant and has got a proper glass face.

My nicest watch (an Accurist moonphase with lotsa dials and my wedding pressie from Mrs Zoom) never gets worn*

I have a lovely Citizen automatic Divers which only ever gets used on holiday (and then does no more than snorkelling) as I CNBA to keep adjusting the time to ensure I catch my train the rest of the year.

I have a £5.99 Casio LCD which wakes me up every morning and occasionally gets worn when I cannot remember where I left the other 2. And also when out on the MTB. I've also got a proper Russian ""albatross" (according to someone who can read cyrillic) wind up military watch  (not bought in Russia; they were all really boring when i went there in 1990) looks almost exactly like this


(http://www.autosoviet.altervista.org/DSC00244.JPG)


and the obligatory Tenerife Tag

If I relied on my phone I would miss my train every day the clock's such rubbish (assuming the battery hadn't gone flat)

I've not owned a Swiss Watch since I was about 13 :(

*I also kill normal watch batteries by putting them on ???
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andrewc on September 17, 2009, 09:10:48 pm
2 dressy Omega's (not diver style), my grandfathers Bulova, a cheapish M&S quartz and a Suunto Altimax.

I'm spending a lot of hours drooling over watch porn on www.timezone.uk though,   one of these day's I'll pick up something from 1964, as old as me....
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: rusky on September 17, 2009, 09:25:05 pm
I find going without a watch is like forgetting my wallet or phone.

For those who like watches I give you Tokyoflash Japan: Home. Unique Japanese Watches. LED, LCD, PIMP, KISAI Watches (http://www.tokyoflash.com/en/)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Frenchie on September 17, 2009, 09:36:59 pm
Tag Heuer Monaco V4 Belt Driven Wrist Watch (http://www.wristdreams.com/archives/2004/05/tag_heuer_monac.html). Want!!! Nurse! Nurse!  It's starting again!

I like some of the Monaco Series; but could only wear them on occasions as I need something I can do pretty everything with (running, cycling, trails, work etc.).

I also like Oris watches. A lot.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: tonyh on September 22, 2009, 06:49:37 am
I have a £5.99 Casio LCD

The best. Does everything necessary!

I usually only wear it when riding, though. After all, there are only three clocks on my handlebars...

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Jacomus on September 22, 2009, 10:03:16 am
I've sadly had to stop wearing a Fossil watch that my first love bought for me, as my wrist is now just that little bit too big :(

I've got a Timex Ironman cheapish-a-mathingy that does exactly what I want - coutdown timer, stopwatch, couple of alarms and lets me tell the time in the dark.

I'm right handed and wear my watch on the left - less likely to get knocked / scratched

My requirements for a watch include it being tough enough that it survives never being taken off.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: mattc on September 22, 2009, 10:26:09 am
I have a £5.99 Casio LCD

The best. Does everything necessary!

Actually quite hard to find in 'real' shops. Loads of less reliable watches costing twice as much, with no extra useful functions.

Bought my last one on the web, which just seemed ridiculous ... :-/
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Manotea on September 22, 2009, 10:30:41 am
A Seiko with a titanium case, to match the bike which is yet to be...

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: LEE on September 22, 2009, 10:32:29 am
I love mechanical watches and find it hard to get even slightly excited about expensive quartz-movement watches.

For cycling I wear a crappy £10 Timex LCD digital with a long velcro strap (by "Animal") that allows me to wear it outside my jacket/jersey.

For every day wear I have my Timex Expedition.  It has "indiglo" backlight and an alarm.  It just survived a 40C wash and spin cycle (again) and much DIY.

For everything else I normally choose from a few old mechanical things I have picked up at boot sales and antique shops.

(http://i170.photobucket.com/albums/u249/freddered/watches.jpg)

I don't feel right without a watch and find myself glancing at a bare wrist too often.

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on September 24, 2009, 09:59:54 pm
Seiko 5 Automatic, the original pattern, not the fugly new one.
There havent been only two Seiko 5s. It's always been a range of watches. There have been hundreds of designs over the four decades or so. Currently there are at least 20 designs of Seiko 5 in production.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Zoidburg on September 24, 2009, 11:36:56 pm
I love mechanical watches and find it hard to get even slightly excited about expensive quartz-movement watches.

For cycling I wear a crappy £10 Timex LCD digital with a long velcro strap (by "Animal") that allows me to wear it outside my jacket/jersey.

For every day wear I have my Timex Expedition.  It has "indiglo" backlight and an alarm.  It just survived a 40C wash and spin cycle (again) and much DIY.

For everything else I normally choose from a few old mechanical things I have picked up at boot sales and antique shops.

(http://i170.photobucket.com/albums/u249/freddered/watches.jpg)

I don't feel right without a watch and find myself glancing at a bare wrist too often.


Bloody hell, you have more watches than a Russian soldier looting Berlin. You don't work as a paramedic or in a hospital do you?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: TheLurker on September 25, 2009, 08:48:02 am
<snip>
Who else has given up watch wearing these days?
Gave up wearing a watch getting on for 30 years ago.  It was just too damned tedious taking it off and putting it back on after washing my hands when I was in the lab.  Did carry one in my pocket for a few months after that, but abandoned that as a pain.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Greenbank on September 25, 2009, 10:06:57 am
When running, playing football, commuting on the bike or on a 200km Audax: Garmin Forerunner 405.

Only 8 hours battery life when running as a GPS but it can survive a 200km Audax with a recharge blast from a usb-battery-pack thingy at the lunch stop. Waterproof but the bezel controls go mental when it gets wet, rather annoying.

On longer Audaxes I wear a basic Polar HRM watch.

Tells me my HR (not that I ever change how I ride based on my HR), the time (as does my phone, GPS and cycle computer, so not really necessary) and works in the dark (again, so does the GPS and when it's dark I don't really care what time it is). Very waterproof, thankfully.

When not on the bike or doing some exercise I've got a Mondaine Swiss railway watch.

But not always, I often find I've left the house without a watch on and don't really care either way. Just not interested in dress watches (expensive or not).
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: HTFB on September 25, 2009, 10:43:40 am
Bloody hell, you have more watches than a Russian soldier looting Berlin. You don't work as a paramedic or in a hospital do you?
Some bastard nicked my grandfather's Rolex during his final stay in hospital. His will left keepsakes to all his grandchildren---the watch would have been my one.  :'(

Not that watches bother me much, beyond being present, legible and accurate: quartz for me. I upgraded to a solid steel Tissot, though, after my previous one ate the cuffs off an entire wardrobe of shirts. The base metal body of the watch, its steel backplate, and Honest Yeoman Sweat had formed a little battery, leaving the base metal corroded and abrasive. Suddenly it was obvious that a cheaper watch was a false economy...
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: woollypigs on September 25, 2009, 11:21:35 am
I love watches and used to wear one. But since my last one died, a Suunto, it just reset it self all the time so much for digital. I have been looking for one but can't decide. Though I did find a limited addition watch for 400.000 that looked pretty cool but that is a bit too much.

Though if only the design was a bit different I would love to have this watch Wrist Fashion &raquo; About Time (http://wristfashion.com/2006/01/about-time/) . Fuzzy time is just fun, you look at your watch and it tells you that it is "a bit to eight" or "just after two" :)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Malandro on September 25, 2009, 11:50:49 am
Not that watches bother me much, beyond being present, legible and accurate: quartz for me. I upgraded to a solid steel Tissot, though, after my previous one ate the cuffs off an entire wardrobe of shirts. The base metal body of the watch, its steel backplate, and Honest Yeoman Sweat had formed a little battery, leaving the base metal corroded and abrasive. Suddenly it was obvious that a cheaper watch was a false economy...

Yeah I thought that too and bought a solid steel Tissot that (I thught) would last for years.  It did last for 5 and then stopped.  The servicing cost more than half the original cost of the watch and even then I had to send it back a second time for them to do proper job.  Don't ever tell them how much it originally cost as I reckon they ramp up the servicing price...   
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: DuncanM on September 25, 2009, 11:55:20 am
I wear a Casio digital I got from argos.  I think the Animal watch strap cost slightly more. :)
It tells me the time (anyone else gets confused because it's 15 minutes fast. ;).

The last expensive one I had was a Rotary one that cost £80 and the second hand fell off after about 2 years.  I got fed up of having it then jam the other hands so it stopped or ran slow, and gave up on it.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on September 25, 2009, 02:53:00 pm
The last expensive one I had was a Rotary one that cost £80 and the second hand fell off after about 2 years. 

An £80 watch is a cheap watch not an expensive one.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: DuncanM on September 25, 2009, 03:46:50 pm
The last expensive one I had was a Rotary one that cost £80 and the second hand fell off after about 2 years. 

An £80 watch is a cheap watch not an expensive one.

My current watch is cheap.  It was £6. ;) 
That Rotary was at least 200% more than any watch I have owned before or since, so it counts as expensive to me. :)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: kyuss on September 25, 2009, 04:54:35 pm
I've got big hands and like a big watch, but most of the stuff in my budget tends to be fairly average sized. Big watches tend to cost big money. I'd love a Mont Blanc Timewalker one day.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: epa611 on September 25, 2009, 08:35:07 pm
My current day to day watch:

(http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d68/epa611/TagCalibre5.jpg)

 :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Rob S on September 25, 2009, 10:00:42 pm
I've got big hands and like a big watch, but most of the stuff in my budget tends to be fairly average sized. Big watches tend to cost big money. I'd love a Mont Blanc Timewalker one day.

Try looking at a TW Steel....the smallest they do is a 45mm and start at about £220.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: FatBloke on September 26, 2009, 12:10:12 pm
I feel naked without a watch.  These are the three that I currently wear most often. One is my best watch (cost £4,500), one my everyday watch (cost £200) and the other I wear only occasionally (cost £25).

(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2431/3955610520_c952080abf.jpg)

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Zipperhead on October 06, 2009, 12:15:45 pm
I just saw this:

(http://www.gizmag.com/pictures/gallery/wnjpg-5.jpg)

I want one!

Time to think globally - the wn-2 Earth watch (http://www.gizmag.com/wn2-earth-watch/13035/)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on October 06, 2009, 12:35:34 pm
I have a selection of watches including a rather nice Breitling (bought with a gift voucher for 15 years service at a company) but currently am very enamoured by this new Casio. Gshock and atomic time synch. Might have to get one:

(http://mygshock.com/pics/GW-2500-GShock-Review-Watch-Report.jpg)

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Greenbank on October 06, 2009, 12:43:19 pm
atomic time synch.

That's one benefit of a wearing a Forerunner 405 GPS as a watch, accuracy is pretty good. :)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Mr Larrington on October 06, 2009, 01:17:19 pm
I have a selection of watches including a rather nice Breitling (bought with a gift voucher for 15 years service at a company) but currently am very enamoured by this new Casio. Gshock and atomic time synch. Might have to get one:

It appears to have the same case and strap as my G-Shock.  In which case the latter will break after a year or two and a replacement will cost about half what the watch did.  Do not ask me how I know this ???

My other watch is an elderly Seiko quartz, which I acquired as a sixteenth birthday present.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andygates on October 06, 2009, 01:38:09 pm
I just saw this:

(http://www.gizmag.com/pictures/gallery/wnjpg-5.jpg)

I want one!

Time to think globally - the wn-2 Earth watch (http://www.gizmag.com/wn2-earth-watch/13035/)

Me too!  They need to do a Swatchy-cheap one!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: rogerzilla on October 06, 2009, 06:36:16 pm
Pfft.

Sundial for Travelling UK Nauticalia for Nautical Gifts and Boating Equipment UK (http://www.nauticalia.com/uk-info/product/4568.html?isource=GPD1)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on October 06, 2009, 07:53:53 pm
Lovely but in the UK you might have a small problem with that most of the time.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: bomber on October 08, 2009, 09:51:44 pm
Couldn't give up wearing a watch!  Feel naked without one.  My phone gets left at the bottom of a bag generally, my ipod doesn't have a screen and I don't bother with a cycle computer these days.  I'd be a full blown watch fetishist if I could afford to be, would love a Damasko chronograph.

Currently I have a green Seiko chronograph that gets worn for most things, a casio I bought for a round the world trip because it has built in world time zones and only cost £26, and a swatch skeleton I couldn't resist buying when I was in Switzerland this summer.

Love the Swatch but tend to find my wrist size seems to fluctuate a lot with temperature differences so the seiko with cloth strap gets worn a lot more.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y251/ailienated/watches.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on October 08, 2009, 09:54:40 pm
The Seiko is very nice.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andyoxon on October 10, 2009, 08:13:28 am
On the watches of people which have analogue hands, does the second hand align with the second/minute/5minute watch face markings.  

My casio watch strap is breaking & I recently looked at Casio Diver Watch in store http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Product/partNumber/2830728/c_1/1|category_root|Jewellery+and+watches|14416987/c_2/2|cat_14416987|Men%27s+watches|14417316.htm (http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Product/partNumber/2830728/c_1/1|category_root|Jewellery+and+watches|14416987/c_2/2|cat_14416987|Men%27s+watches|14417316.htm)
and was disappointed to see that although the watch had chronometer style markings the second hand indicated between the 'second' markings.  I looked at the display watches and many of them the second hand was misaligned, perhaps it's too much to ask sub £50...
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: rogerzilla on October 10, 2009, 08:59:38 am
It's pretty good on a Seiko Kinetic.  The early ones were known for not lining up, but these days they're fixed the problem.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Polar Bear on October 10, 2009, 10:47:03 am
My EcoDrive doesn't , but my Railway watch does.   

I think that on cheaper mechanisms that move 1 second at a time it's just pot luck if yours lines up.   On more expensive watches where I have noted five movements per second, then it's almost sweep and any variance is virtually impossible to observe.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andyoxon on October 11, 2009, 04:09:23 pm
I bought the casio divers in the end.  Have just bought one of these watch straps to try with it... Nato G10 Nylon Watch Strap (http://www.watchworx.co.uk/pages/lwb/MilitaryPop/G10PVD1.htm) less bulky and more comfortable I guess...
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: rogerzilla on October 11, 2009, 07:10:55 pm
My EcoDrive doesn't , but my Railway watch does.  

I think that on cheaper mechanisms that move 1 second at a time it's just pot luck if yours lines up.   On more expensive watches where I have noted five movements per second, then it's almost sweep and any variance is virtually impossible to observe.
Quartz mechanisms (including Kinetic) move one second at a time.  Mechanical mechanisms usually move at least 6 times per second.

FWIW you can buy the Seiko Kinetic 200m diver's watch for about £275; the automatic version, which looks almost identical, can be had for about £90.  Quartz isn't always cheap!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andyoxon on October 11, 2009, 07:53:19 pm
Re second hand movement, have a look at this pic, for a 1/30s single exposure I took earlier - notice something unusual?   :)

(http://inlinethumb50.webshots.com/39921/2857562970101458909S600x600Q85.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Mike J on October 11, 2009, 07:55:40 pm
Re second hand movement, have a look at this pic, for a 1/30s single exposure - notice something unusual?   :)

(http://inlinethumb50.webshots.com/39921/2857562970101458909S600x600Q85.jpg)

The date is at 4 instead of 3?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andyoxon on October 11, 2009, 07:57:32 pm
Re second hand movement, have a look at this pic, for a 1/30s single exposure - notice something unusual?   :)


The date is at 4 instead of 3?

No, I said re. second hand movement...  ;)  Actually date position is not that unusual AFAIA... Marathon SAR
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: rusky on October 11, 2009, 07:58:30 pm
Re second hand movement, have a look at this pic, for a 1/30s single exposure I took earlier - notice something unusual?   :)

(http://inlinethumb50.webshots.com/39921/2857562970101458909S600x600Q85.jpg)

Judging by the reflection, you have no trousers on!!!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andyoxon on October 11, 2009, 08:01:11 pm
I think you'll find that's my finger holding the lens away from the watch face  :)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Polar Bear on October 11, 2009, 08:05:10 pm
Your camera is borked?   ;)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Zoidburg on October 11, 2009, 08:07:03 pm
Are we observing a moment in quantumn physics?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andyoxon on October 11, 2009, 08:55:09 pm
OK, OK, I'll put you lot out of your misery.   ;)  The second hand must have moved from 13 to 14 at the exact moment I took the pic, and taken less than 1/30 to do so.  So not quantum physics so much as a lucky accidental capture of the SH in both positions.    :)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on October 12, 2009, 01:23:06 pm
My EcoDrive doesn't , but my Railway watch does.  

I think that on cheaper mechanisms that move 1 second at a time it's just pot luck if yours lines up.   On more expensive watches where I have noted five movements per second, then it's almost sweep and any variance is virtually impossible to observe.
Quartz mechanisms (including Kinetic) move one second at a time.  Mechanical mechanisms usually move at least 6 times per second.

FWIW you can buy the Seiko Kinetic 200m diver's watch for about £275; the automatic version, which looks almost identical, can be had for about £90.  Quartz isn't always cheap!

Too right try a Breitling Aerospace, that's quartz and you won't get much change out of £2000.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on October 12, 2009, 01:24:05 pm
OK, OK, I'll put you lot out of your misery.   ;)  The second hand must have moved from 13 to 14 at the exact moment I took the pic, and taken less than 1/30 to do so.  So not quantum physics so much as a lucky accidental capture of the SH in both positions.    :)

Second hand looks nicely aligned on that Casio. I nearly bought one of those a few months ago. Got a Timex diver instead.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: anth on October 12, 2009, 01:42:05 pm
Always feels odd when I can't wear a watch for whatever reason.

Day to day watch is a Swatch Irony that mel got me and is just simply understated. I've got an Oris at home that was a present for finishing uni(/guilt at the fact that it wasn't until I was leaving uni that my dad earned anything like the money to be able to buy me something like that) that's a lovely bit of kit, but the strap snapped so needs replaced.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on October 12, 2009, 01:48:39 pm
I am thinking of getting one of these Precista PRS-10 quartz watches:

(http://www.watcharoo.co.uk/revimages/prs-10/DSCN1000_resize.jpg)

It's based on the same MOD specification as the CWC that Charlotte wears but updated to be more water resistant.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andyoxon on October 12, 2009, 02:02:50 pm
OK, OK, I'll put you lot out of your misery.   ;)  The second hand must have moved from 13 to 14 at the exact moment I took the pic, and taken less than 1/30 to do so.  So not quantum physics so much as a lucky accidental capture of the SH in both positions.    :)

Second hand looks nicely aligned on that Casio. I nearly bought one of those a few months ago. Got a Timex diver instead.

I had a look at another nearby branch of Argos, and this time the second hand was aligned properly.  Seems well made.  It says 'stainless steel', do you reckon this would include the watch and bezel or just the back?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on October 12, 2009, 02:23:54 pm
I think the watch itself is stainless steel. The glass is a very high dome though which is what put me off. I got one of these instead. Steel and a flat glass. The indiglo is good and its very comfy to wear. The bracelet is steel on the outside but the black bit is some kind of rubber.

(http://www.nzwatches.com/image-remote/upload/product/sport%20watches/timex/t49615_01.jpg)

It's a nice do everything beater watch for holidays etc as you can swim or snorkel in it and not worry about it but still looks OK on an evening.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andyoxon on October 12, 2009, 03:12:04 pm
I think the watch itself is stainless steel. The glass is a very high dome though which is what put me off. I got one of these instead. Steel and a flat glass. The indiglo is good and its very comfy to wear. The bracelet is steel on the outside but the black bit is some kind of rubber.

...

It's a nice do everything beater watch for holidays etc as you can swim or snorkel in it and not worry about it but still looks OK on an evening.

Looks good.  Yes, I wondered about the casio convex glass, but a least it's mineral scratch resistant.  I had a pulsar with this SR glass, worn everyday for 3-4 years and I don't think I had one scratch on it.  But shouldn't speak to soon, as I have since developed habit of launching into DIY/cleaning jobs and wrecking good clothes/scratching plastic digital watch faces...
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Ian H on October 12, 2009, 03:43:53 pm
I've left mine in London.

Irritated of Devon.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andyoxon on October 13, 2009, 06:55:41 pm
I've just fitted my Nato G10 (black nylon) watchstrap that came today, so much more comfortable than the chunky resin one designed for gripping a wetsuit (I guess) that was fitted to the watch.  It looks good and seems very well made.   :)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Tewdric on October 13, 2009, 06:57:45 pm
Yep - I use a military nylon strap on my Traser - they are the way ahead if you're active.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: fuzzy (retd.) AAGE on October 13, 2009, 07:40:38 pm
I feel naked without a watch when I'm not in bed/ showering/ riding. My day to day watch is a Calypso steel braclet thing bought in Gibraltar several years ago. In the cabinet at home is a Seiko SWMBO bought as a wedding present- strap broke and I haven't yet replaced it and a Tissot 'Rockwatch'
(http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b360/mattlangridge/rockwatch.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: kyuss on October 25, 2009, 01:20:22 am
My dad gave me this a few weeks ago. He doesn't wear it anymore. I like it enough I've started wearing a watch again on a daily basis. The glass needs replaced (any idea how much this might cost?) but I'll do that when the battery needs replaced.

(http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b10/KeithSmith1974/seiko.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on October 26, 2009, 05:13:01 am
Watched have moved from timekeepers to art-fashion pieces.  Some of the contemporary designs are great - just look at watchisimo.com.  I crave a Russian 24-hour one, and some of the wacky handless Zen fests...
I have one of those Russian (Soviet, actually) 24-hour watches. Or at least, I used to have. In any case I haven't worn it for years - and to be honest the outer dial which allows you to compare time zones never worked well, anyway. It always slipped round. But if I still have it and can find it, well, I don't want it anymore, so I dare say it could find its way Gates-ward. But as I said, I'm not sure I still have it.

Oh, the watch I do wear has also lost its outer bezel - I think in my recent crash. And it's a Festina, so a kind of cycling connection there!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Manotea on October 26, 2009, 07:21:08 am
I've just had to change the time on my watch for GMT. That's old technology for you.

I do like the 'home and away' time setting options on my smartphone...
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: TimO on October 26, 2009, 11:27:25 am
I do like the 'home and away' time setting options on my smartphone...

My camera will do that now, and you can tell it what the date of your holiday is, and it will note the details in the EXIF data for those images only, as well as adjusting the time appropriately. :thumbsup:

It's a bit large to wear on your wrist though. ;D
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on October 28, 2009, 05:34:05 am
One of the landmarks on my walk to work in the morning is the beggar - perhaps I should call him a sadhu or some other sort of "holy man" - outside an ashram or math type place called the Oneness Centre. Despite being filthy, ragged, and holding out his hand for alms, he noticeably has a gold watch on his left wrist. I'm sure it's not actual gold, of course, but even so it looks flashy and somewhat out of place on him.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andrewc on November 04, 2009, 07:26:58 pm
I've a couple of nice dressy gold Omega's but wanted something a little chunkier, a bit of googling around the watch forums,  a swift visit to Ebay and one of these turned up in the lunchtime post......

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v411/kew/OrientMakoPepsi.jpg)

It's beautifully finished and I doubt you'd get better for £94 inc postage.  I took it to a local watchsmith to have some links taken out of the bracelet and he was quite familiar with the brand and rated them better than most of the Seiko divers costing several times the price. (Orient are owned by Seiko but not often sold in the UK)

Someone elses review here http://forums.watchuseek.com/showthread.php?t=302670 (http://forums.watchuseek.com/showthread.php?t=302670) 
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Zipperhead on December 09, 2009, 09:53:18 am
Resurrecting the topic again (I'm sure there's a joke about squirrels in there)

I'm not butch enough to wear this, the "Iron Samurai Watch"
(http://cache.gawker.com/assets/images/4/2009/12/500x_iron_samurai.jpg)

    [It has] blood red numerals encased in stark samurai sword steel like the final battle between all the forces of good and evil in the multiverse

    Yes, The Iron Samurai has been known to increase its wearers' strength, dexterity, constitution, intelligence, wisdom, and charisma by as much as 20 points each! Chuck Norris and Steven Seagal are said to be Iron Samurai owners, as is David Bowie and Brian Eno. In reality, this watch is perfect for Presidential dinner crashers, Facebook celebs with over 1000 fans, Youtube directors with over 2,000,000 views, anyone who can play the entirety of Neil Zaza's I'm Alright on electric guitar, iPhone 3Gs owners, or anybody who is a somebody.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Greenbank on December 09, 2009, 10:17:24 am
Chuck Norris and Steven Seagal are said to be Iron Samurai owners

Chuck Norris doesn't wear that watch on his wrist, he wears it on his fist so that you'll know what time he punched you.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Moloko on December 09, 2009, 12:06:29 pm

I like that "Iron Samurai Watch".
I'm also aware that I inherited a kitsch gene.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Regulator on December 09, 2009, 12:08:47 pm

I like that "Iron Samurai Watch".
I'm also aware that I inherited a kitsch gene.

That's not kitsch - it's camp!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Bledlow on December 09, 2009, 12:40:45 pm

I like that "Iron Samurai Watch".
I'm also aware that I inherited a kitsch gene.

That's not kitsch - it's camp!
Trying to justify your purchase? ;)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Moloko on December 09, 2009, 12:40:54 pm

I like that "Iron Samurai Watch".
I'm also aware that I inherited a kitsch gene.

That's not kitsch - it's camp!

Oh, that would explain why the digits glow.
So you can still see them with the closet door tightly shut.   ;D
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Legs on December 09, 2009, 12:59:17 pm
I wear my late grandfather's Omega Constellation, which is really nice.  I take it off at the weekends for DIY work and keep having to shake it and advance the date again on Monday mornings (because it's self-winding), but I absolutely love it.

(http://www.antiquewatchcouk.com/mywatches/omegaconstelsteel4.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Fab Foodie on December 09, 2009, 01:10:46 pm
Somewhere between Switzerland and here is an Oris automatic with my name on.

Mrs FF has a small faced Oris Big-Crown, tiz a lovely thing.  Like Oris watches a lot, excellent value and nicely made. 
Enjoy!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: LEE on December 09, 2009, 01:19:17 pm
I wear my late grandfather's Omega Constellation, which is really nice.  I take it off at the weekends for DIY work and keep having to shake it and advance the date again on Monday mornings (because it's self-winding), but I absolutely love it.

(http://www.antiquewatchcouk.com/mywatches/omegaconstelsteel4.jpg)

It's very, very nice.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Legs on December 09, 2009, 03:56:51 pm
Aye, a thing of great beauty! :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Welsh Man on December 09, 2009, 07:09:26 pm
I have about 4 I think it is , but they are seldom worn these days . As I tend to to use the phone .
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: redshift on December 09, 2009, 09:33:39 pm
Iron Samurai?

So it's made from ultra-expensive, tatara-smelted, hand-sorted tamahagane?

a) What a waste, and
b) You'll get rust stains as soon as you sweat.

More like stainless steel tosh, if you ask me...  ::-)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: rogerzilla on December 09, 2009, 09:49:50 pm
I wear one of these:

Seiko SKA369P1 Men's Dive Watch: Seiko: Amazon.co.uk: Watches (http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B000X791MI/ref=asc_df_B000X791MI502527/?tag=nextag141-21&creative=7966&creativeASIN=B000X791MI&linkCode=asn)

which has to be the heaviest wristwatch ever made  :o  I actually preferred the automatic version, but exactly a year after a £90 service by Seiko it started losing time again, and of course it wasn't very accurate and had to be worn every day to keep it wound.  The Kinetic one gains about 8 seconds per month and, once it's been worn for a few weeks, has a power reserve of six months.  After 10 years the titanium lithium ion battery sometimes needs replacing, or so they say.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Aidan on December 10, 2009, 07:38:12 am
I wear one of these:

Seiko SKA369P1 Men's Dive Watch: Seiko: Amazon.co.uk: Watches (http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B000X791MI/ref=asc_df_B000X791MI502527/?tag=nextag141-21&creative=7966&creativeASIN=B000X791MI&linkCode=asn)

which has to be the heaviest wristwatch ever made  :o  I actually preferred the automatic version, but exactly a year after a £90 service by Seiko it started losing time again, and of course it wasn't very accurate and had to be worn every day to keep it wound.  The Kinetic one gains about 8 seconds per month and, once it's been worn for a few weeks, has a power reserve of six months.  After 10 years the titanium lithium ion battery sometimes needs replacing, or so they say.


I wear an older version of this, which is a mechanical automatic rather than the Kinetic model.  Had it for years and worn it constantly.  It looks as good now as when I bought it and is absolutely bombproof.  If I ever lost it I'd get the nearest equivalent.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: 1gear on December 10, 2009, 08:57:46 am
Used to always wear one. Then i just stopped wearing it. Didnt like it on my wrist, got in the way. Never wore it when i cycled but when i was working it sometimes got in the way. So, i just stopped wearing one.
My mum wanted to get me a nice one for when i was 18, but i told her not to. I wouldnt use it and it would just go into some draw or on my desk and not really be used. I just use my phone when i want to know the time. When im in 6th form theres clocks in every room, if thats wrong ill either guess or get my phone out. When im out on my bike ive got clock on my computer. At home we have clocks. Out walking to wherever ive got my phone.
Ive guessed my GF has got me a watch for xmas though. Not sure why. I told her that i was telling my mum i didnt want one, and it would just go in a draw. Probably didnt know what other nice thing to get me.
Bloody women, never listen!!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Rhys W on February 20, 2010, 06:40:08 pm
For 15 years I've been wearing an entry-level TAG Heuer:

(http://homepage.ntlworld.com/rhys.llangefni/lluniau/tag.jpg)

It seemed to be the quintessential cyclist's watch at the time, mainly because they sponsored the 7-11 team and their riders were often pictured wearing them. Small (I have tiny wrists) and light, but the straps only last 3-4 years and they're expensive to replace. Not to mention having to send it back to TAG to change the battery (although they last 3-4 years as well).

I somehow stumbled upon Vostok Amphibia watches recently, and succumbed to a hankering for a ticking hunk of stainless steel on my wrist:

(http://homepage.ntlworld.com/rhys.llangefni/lluniau/vostok.jpg)

31-jewel automatic movement, 200m water resistance and I'm measuring it at between 3-6 seconds gained per day. The price for this marvel of mechanical engineering? £35. The Omega Speedmaster Professional will have to wait.  :thumbsup:

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Charlotte on February 21, 2010, 01:18:45 pm
Much as I love my G10 for outdoorsy stuff, can anyone reccommend a suitably classy ladies' dive-style watch that won't break the bank?  Things I like (not absolutely necessary, but nice to have):

Stainless chunkiness
Date window
Second hand/timer
Automatic movement
Miscellaneous geeky features
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on February 21, 2010, 01:58:13 pm
Roachman has a very good reputation and his web site has loads of Seiko and Orient ladies watches.

 Ladies watches (http://www.roachman.com/ladies.html)

Some nice ones from plain:

(http://www.roachman.com/ladies/orient/CNR1G001B.jpg)

To bling:

(http://www.roachman.com/ladies/orient/CNR1G005W.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andrewc on February 21, 2010, 02:27:53 pm
I'm very happy with the Orient Diver I bought last year from this chap on Fleabay http://stores.shop.ebay.co.uk/GMT-CLASSICS (http://stores.shop.ebay.co.uk/GMT-CLASSICS)

He also sells direct here http://www.orient-watches.co.uk/orient/ (http://www.orient-watches.co.uk/orient/)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Mike J on February 21, 2010, 02:37:01 pm
He also sells direct here http://www.orient-watches.co.uk/orient/ (http://www.orient-watches.co.uk/orient/)

One of the watches on the front page has a slide rule function  ::-)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Frenchie on February 21, 2010, 10:55:02 pm
I now wear a Seiko Arctura Kinetic, a lovely present from E.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: nicknack on February 21, 2010, 11:00:06 pm
I somehow stumbled upon Vostok Amphibia watches recently, and succumbed to a hankering for a ticking hunk of stainless steel on my wrist:

(http://homepage.ntlworld.com/rhys.llangefni/lluniau/vostok.jpg)

31-jewel automatic movement, 200m water resistance and I'm measuring it at between 3-6 seconds gained per day. The price for this marvel of mechanical engineering? £35. The Omega Speedmaster Professional will have to wait.  :thumbsup:



Do you mind me asking where you bought it from?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Rhys W on February 21, 2010, 11:38:28 pm
An ebay seller by the name of zenitar, aka some guy called Victor from Moscow. He's highly regarded in Russian watch geek circles, so I had no worries about buying off him.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Frenchie on February 21, 2010, 11:40:36 pm
I think you can get them form US websites too (?).

Edit: Oops, not quite, but Zenitar is the shop you can contact. Vostok Amphibia Review (http://www.russianwatchguide.com/review-vostok-amphibia.htm)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: LEE on February 22, 2010, 12:20:50 am
I have a selection of watches including a rather nice Breitling (bought with a gift voucher for 15 years service at a company) but currently am very enamoured by this new Casio. Gshock and atomic time synch. Might have to get one:

(http://mygshock.com/pics/GW-2500-GShock-Review-Watch-Report.jpg)



I'm sorry but that is about as horrible a watch as I have ever seen.



Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pumpkin on February 22, 2010, 10:50:02 am
I have a few nice and expensive watches but I never wear them now and will probably move some of them on.

www.chronomaster.co.uk has some nice/interesting models
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: nicknack on February 22, 2010, 11:02:11 am
An ebay seller by the name of zenitar, aka some guy called Victor from Moscow. He's highly regarded in Russian watch geek circles, so I had no worries about buying off him.

Sadly, the prices seem to have gone up somewhat since you got yours.

This place (http://www.russia4u.co.uk/categories.php?cat=7), somewhat closer to home, also does them at comparable prices.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Rhys W on February 22, 2010, 12:56:02 pm
Well, £35 to £37.62 isn't much, and it's probably because he prices them in $ in the first place. I really wanted one with Cyrillic script though, most of the watches on Stuart's sites aren't.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Frenchie on February 22, 2010, 12:58:23 pm
Well, £35 to £37.62 isn't much, and it's probably because he prices them in $ in the first place. I really wanted one with Cyrillic script though, most of the watches on Stuart's sites aren't.

What is your model? I couldn't find the same or a look-alike on Zenitar.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: nicknack on February 22, 2010, 01:03:33 pm
Well, £35 to £37.62 isn't much, and it's probably because he prices them in $ in the first place. I really wanted one with Cyrillic script though, most of the watches on Stuart's sites aren't.

The postage adds another tenner onto that. Do they come from outside Europe? Everything that does these days seems to have another £20 tacked onto it by the Post Office.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Rhys W on February 22, 2010, 02:33:44 pm
Postage was $15, which came out to be around £9. Total was around £45 compared to £54+£4 for the UK-based seller. It came from Moscow, no duty or any additional costs.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andyoxon on February 22, 2010, 04:18:42 pm
BTW I've been using a Nato G10 nylon watchstrap (on my Casio divers*) for 4 months or so now and it's - uber comfortable, & the black anodized stainless fittings showing no signs of wear yet;  still almost as good as new.  Heartily recommended - if the black nylon look appeals...  :)

Nato G10 Nylon Watch Strap - Superior Quality PVD Stainless Steel Hardware from Watchworx TSS UK (http://www.thestrapshop.co.uk/pages/lwb/MilitaryPop/G10PVD1.htm)

*& not managed to scratch the slightly convex glass on the watch either, despite wearing it everyday...this hopefully not 'famous last words'...
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: nicknack on February 22, 2010, 04:31:25 pm
Postage was $15, which came out to be around £9. Total was around £45 compared to £54+£4 for the UK-based seller. It came from Moscow, no duty or any additional costs.

Ta!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Zipperhead on March 05, 2010, 05:19:26 pm
(http://www.wired.com/images_blogs/gadgetlab/2010/03/manbox.jpg)

It's a little bright isn't it? (http://product-search.casio.jp/wat/g-shock/watch_detail.php?m=GA-110F-2JR&n=4513)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: bomber on April 21, 2010, 10:00:52 pm
Reminds me of the horrible VW polos that looked like they were assembled from leftover parts.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: bomber on June 27, 2011, 02:56:47 pm
Looks like I killed this thread :-[

Here's the latest addition after a recent trip across the Atlantic;

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y251/ailienated/IMG_2243.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: LEE on June 27, 2011, 03:17:55 pm
I have a selection of watches including a rather nice Breitling (bought with a gift voucher for 15 years service at a company) but currently am very enamoured by this new Casio. Gshock and atomic time synch. Might have to get one:

(http://mygshock.com/pics/GW-2500-GShock-Review-Watch-Report.jpg)



I'm sorry but that is about as horrible a watch as I have ever seen.





Revisiting this thread after looking in a jeweller's window at the weekend and seeing a Casio display.

It's fair to say I was shocked (G-Shocked ?) by the price of the watches on their display.  One of which was over £250

What special features did it have for such a price?

- It receives radio time signals.
- It's waterproof
- It has a stop watch
- Date

To me it's a £20 watch tops. 

In fairness it's a steel body & strap rather than typical plastic but Casio, more than any other "LCD" watch manufacturer seem to have been able to move out of the £10 LCD watch bracket and into the Jewellery display cabinets next to the Rolex's and Cartiers.

They still have plastic stuff that sells at over £100 though.

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Charlotte on June 27, 2011, 03:46:12 pm
After a little research into everything-proof divers' watches, I bought myself one of these (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Citizen-Womens-Eco-Drive-Professional-EP6000-07H/dp/B000EQR6SE) a couple of months ago:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/412E02L4MsL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

It is both bombproof and reasonably delicate for a ladies' watch and will never, ever need a battery.

At less than £150, it ought to be in The Incredibly Reasonably Priced Goods thread (http://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=49019.0).
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Woofage on June 27, 2011, 03:55:11 pm
Nice :thumbsup:.

I muchly like my Eco-Drive. For a very inexpensive watch it has a built like a brick outhouse feel with perfect timekeeping and no batteries or anything to wind 8).
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Biggsy on June 27, 2011, 03:56:07 pm
Is there a wrist strap for the Cateye Mity 3?  ;)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Polar Bear on June 27, 2011, 03:57:15 pm
I'm currently wearing a Seiko Daytona (http://www.creationwatches.com/watchblog/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/img_27861x1.jpg).
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: robgul on June 27, 2011, 04:27:21 pm
My 10 buck "rolex" bought from the guy on the corner of Wall & Pine, NYC in October 1990 has just had to have its third battery installed .. I'm losing money with all these new batteries  ;D

Rob
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Regulator on June 27, 2011, 05:13:10 pm
After a little research into everything-proof divers' watches, I bought myself one of these (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Citizen-Womens-Eco-Drive-Professional-EP6000-07H/dp/B000EQR6SE) a couple of months ago:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/412E02L4MsL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

It is both bombproof and reasonably delicate for a ladies' watch and will never, ever need a battery.

At less than £150, it ought to be in The Incredibly Reasonably Priced Goods thread (http://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=49019.0).

Nice.  I used to have a Citizen before I went over to using a dive computer.  That said, I still dive with a watch as well as the computer.

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Steve Kish on June 27, 2011, 08:56:30 pm
My small collection:-

Citizen 200m dive watch
Accurist 100m (looks like bit like a TAG SEL)
Square Armani (bought in Rome)
Navigator stopwatch (looks a bit like a Breitling Navitimer)
Pulsar titanium stopwatch / alarm
Genuine Japanese Rolex Explorer  ;D

As I've got fat wrists, I've put a deployment clasp on the Armani and Navigator, as over-sized straps are sometimes hard to find.

Apart from the automatic Rolex, all batteries were flat until last week, as I now don't seem to wear one whereas 5 years ago, I wouldn't be seen dead without one.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Gus on June 27, 2011, 09:03:39 pm
(http://www.wired.com/images_blogs/gadgetlab/2010/03/manbox.jpg)

It's a little bright isn't it? (http://product-search.casio.jp/wat/g-shock/watch_detail.php?m=GA-110F-2JR&n=4513)


That's allmost similar  to the watch I was given  for work by my employer  :)
No wonder we nicknamed them Disney watches  ;D
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Canardly on June 27, 2011, 09:13:45 pm
You posey lot. Last watch cost me £4.50 at local market working on replacement as strap is nearing end of life.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Polar Bear on June 27, 2011, 09:21:43 pm
All my watches bar one were purchased secondhand.   The 'new' one was a christmas present and was not an excessively expensive timepiece.   More function I would say in fact - a swiss railway clock style watch.   This is perfect for a man with limited vision.   My only wish is that they'd do a bigger version all waterproof with an alarm function. 
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: kyuss on June 28, 2011, 03:13:55 am
Looks like I killed this thread :-[

Here's the latest addition after a recent trip across the Atlantic;

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y251/ailienated/IMG_2243.jpg)

Now that's lovely.  :thumbsup:

Currently sporting a Swatch New Gent in Warm Rebel colour.
(http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b10/KeithSmith1974/NewGentWarmRebel.jpg)

It's nice enough, but it's a bit noisy, not just in the 'tick-tock' way (which is reassuringly loud), but it creaks as I move my wrist, likely because it's entirely plastic and rubber. Wasn't exactly expensive though so I shouldn't complain.

I quite fancy a Braun to replace it as my everyday watch though.
(http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b10/KeithSmith1974/Braun.jpg)
Mmmmmm, yummy!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pumpkin on June 28, 2011, 12:50:50 pm
Recently got rid of a number of expensive ones as I have stopped wearing them. So watches by Rolex,Panerai,JLC all got moved on. But I did keep a couple of Rolex, an IWC and have a Seiko auto for everyday use at work
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on June 28, 2011, 01:15:33 pm
I only wear a watch when at social occasions where checking mobiles would be passée.

It's a gold swiss wind-up watch that belonged to my grandfather. Doesn't keep time all that well (gains 1minute a day), but is slim and elegant.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andyoxon on June 28, 2011, 01:18:37 pm
After a little research into everything-proof divers' watches, I bought myself one of these (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Citizen-Womens-Eco-Drive-Professional-EP6000-07H/dp/B000EQR6SE) a couple of months ago:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/412E02L4MsL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

It is both bombproof and reasonably delicate for a ladies' watch and will never, ever need a battery.

At less than £150, it ought to be in The Incredibly Reasonably Priced Goods thread (http://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=49019.0).



I bought the  Casio divers (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Casio-MTD-1054-1AVEF-Resin-Strap-Analogue/dp/B000OHARAW/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1309262689&sr=1-1), which has been great, but I didn't get on well with the bulky 'wavy' strap - presumably for gripping a wetsuit.  So I bought one of these Nato G10 nylon (http://www.watchworx.co.uk/pages/lwb/NatoG10.htm) straps for ~£11, which has been really excellent.  Very secure/well made/ and comfortable, and has been sea/wetsuit tested a few times  :)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Jacomus on June 28, 2011, 01:29:09 pm
I've sadly had to stop wearing a Fossil watch that my first love bought for me, as my wrist is now just that little bit too big :(

I've got a Timex Ironman cheapish-a-mathingy that does exactly what I want - coutdown timer, stopwatch, couple of alarms and lets me tell the time in the dark.

I'm right handed and wear my watch on the left - less likely to get knocked / scratched

My requirements for a watch include it being tough enough that it survives never being taken off.

Seeing as this thread has come to life again, reminded me that this watch really is the best that I've had. (I also really like its looks :-[ :) )

(http://www.argos.co.uk/wcsstore/argos/images/299-2835479SPA71UC548128M.jpg)

I use a watch's timer and stopwatch function so often that fiddly buttons irritate me very quickly, the nice wide buttons on this watch are perfect and have enough resistance that don't suffer from accidental pressing. An alarm on a watch is also very handy in my opinion. I know that every weekday at 0700 my watch alarm will go off letting me know that I have 10minutes to leave the house, a nice little reminder.

I also think that the Indiglo system of lighting a watch display is the best out there, far better than lighting the whole display.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/0/09/Indiglo.jpg/180px-Indiglo.jpg)

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andyoxon on June 28, 2011, 05:15:11 pm
I also think that the Indiglo system of lighting a watch display is the best out there, far better than lighting the whole display.

I've had indiglo - and it's good.  My casio divers has a very bright double LED sidelight - that I sometimes use a makeshift torch  :)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: woollypigs on June 28, 2011, 05:37:20 pm
I'm right handed and wear my watch on the left - less likely to get knocked / scratched
I tried that trick too but still managed to scratch the unscratchable glass.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Steve Kish on June 28, 2011, 10:14:45 pm
With all my straps, I reverse them for the buckle to be at 6 o'clock.  This seems to keep the end of the buckle from catching on my bars..... even though I don't wear them on the bike any more. O:-)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Euan Uzami on May 28, 2012, 11:18:35 pm
Does anybody know of a make/model of watch that has a metal bracelet but of the non captive variety... i.e. where the two sides completely separate? All the ones nowadays seem to be of the fold-over deployment type, which won't fit over my hand when open if they are tight enough to go round my wrist.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Rhys W on May 29, 2012, 12:06:10 am
You can get a "diver's extension" which is like an extra hidden clasp that opens to allow you to close the main clasp over a thicker wetsuit-encased wrist. A side effect of this is that you have an extra clasp to open to give you more room to get your hand through.

I have this one (http://www.watchworx.co.uk/pages/mwb/stainPop/T20.htm) (albeit in 18mm width) - it's a very chunky and solid bracelet but I did have to take out all the removable links to fit over my wrist.

Incidentally, it's worth getting one of the blue plastic bracelet pin tools from ebay - you can get them for less than what a high street jeweller charges to adjust a bracelet, and they work just like a chain tool!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Woofage on May 29, 2012, 08:52:34 am
^ Thanks for that site info. I need a new strap for my watch and they have exactly what I've been looking for :thumbsup:.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Jacomus on October 08, 2012, 01:30:13 pm
I've sadly had to stop wearing a Fossil watch that my first love bought for me, as my wrist is now just that little bit too big :(

I've got a Timex Ironman cheapish-a-mathingy that does exactly what I want - coutdown timer, stopwatch, couple of alarms and lets me tell the time in the dark.

I'm right handed and wear my watch on the left - less likely to get knocked / scratched

My requirements for a watch include it being tough enough that it survives never being taken off.

Seeing as this thread has come to life again, reminded me that this watch really is the best that I've had. (I also really like its looks :-[ :) )

(http://www.argos.co.uk/wcsstore/argos/images/299-2835479SPA71UC548128M.jpg)

I use a watch's timer and stopwatch function so often that fiddly buttons irritate me very quickly, the nice wide buttons on this watch are perfect and have enough resistance that don't suffer from accidental pressing. An alarm on a watch is also very handy in my opinion. I know that every weekday at 0700 my watch alarm will go off letting me know that I have 10minutes to leave the house, a nice little reminder.

I also think that the Indiglo system of lighting a watch display is the best out there, far better than lighting the whole display.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/0/09/Indiglo.jpg/180px-Indiglo.jpg)


Ahh, poo. My watch is on it's last legs.

The Indiglo light is borked, meaning that if you press the light button, it just erases the display. Not very useful!

The normal operation of the watch is normal, however it has decided that every button press is you asking for the light. So, you can tell the time, so long as you don't press anything. This is a screw up internally as there is a 'nightmode' function that you can activate, whereby pressing any button operates the light as well as whatever function the button is for. If you turn this 'nightmode' on, it should turn sed mode off again after 10hrs. So, something is wrong inside. The watch has also started losing time, at the rate of about -1min per week, which is a bugger and half to deal with when you consider that every button press erases the display!

I thought about getting it fixed, but that would mean a long time without a watch and the annoyance of having to have it re-waterproofed. It would also mean that I miss out on the opportunity to buy a Casio G-Shock, which I have wanted for a long time now.

So, I have bought this:

http://www.watchshop.com/mens-casio-g-shock-g-rescue-alarm-chronograph-watch-g-7900-1er-p99932159.html

Casio G-Shock G-Rescue G-7900-1ER

My Timex was £35 when I bought it about four years ago, so I don't feel too hard done by, though I certainly wouldn't have minded it lasting until Santa could give me the G-Shock. It did good service and the velcro strap has remained surprisingly un-manky.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Regulator on October 08, 2012, 01:34:16 pm
I had to send my everyday watch off for servicing.  It'll be away for 4-6 weeks, as it has to go back to Switzerland for a complete strip down and rebuild.

I almost choked when they told me how much it would cost for the service  - plus I'm getting a new strap...
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: MattH on October 08, 2012, 01:59:28 pm
Go on, you can tell us  :)

The only time I've ever sent a watch off for non-warranty repair was an Accurist chrono that my wife my bought me to wear on our wedding day. As it was about 5 years old, needed a new battery and was getting scratched I sent it back to have the glass replaced, battery replaced and sealed.
The first time I wore it in water afterwards it filled up  :( It went back, came back supposedly sorted out and did exactly the same thing again. I sent it back, they replaced it with a new one that was slightly different and lost all sentimental value. When that died a few years later I just bought a different brand rather than trying to get it sorted out. It turned out to be just a flat battery as I resurrected it for my son last year (doing the battery change myself and not bothering about having it properly sealed).
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: tiermat on October 08, 2012, 02:01:07 pm
That reminds me I need to send my Rotary off for new batteries (yes plural, it has two, separately powered, faces).

And get new batteries in about 60% of my watches (I currently only have the use of 3 or 4 of them).
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Regulator on October 08, 2012, 02:05:04 pm
Go on, you can tell us  :)

The only time I've ever sent a watch off for non-warranty repair was an Accurist chrono that my wife my bought me to wear on our wedding day. As it was about 5 years old, needed a new battery and was getting scratched I sent it back to have the glass replaced, battery replaced and sealed.
The first time I wore it in water afterwards it filled up  :( It went back, came back supposedly sorted out and did exactly the same thing again. I sent it back, they replaced it with a new one that was slightly different and lost all sentimental value. When that died a few years later I just bought a different brand rather than trying to get it sorted out. It turned out to be just a flat battery as I resurrected it for my son last year (doing the battery change myself and not bothering about having it properly sealed).

The servicing alone (and this is just a standard service) is £195.  The new strap will be £115.   :-\
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Biggsy on October 08, 2012, 02:08:31 pm
Who wants a Rolex or a Rotary when you can have a 1980s Casio digital?!

Trouble is, I need to get the back off mine to change the battery.  A knife isn't working for me this time.  Help!  (A jewellers will be the last resort only).
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Charlotte on October 08, 2012, 02:16:25 pm
Get thee to a decent Maplins then Biggers - they sell specialist tools, watches for the opening of  :)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: rafletcher on October 08, 2012, 02:20:51 pm
I'm right handed and wear my watch on the left - less likely to get knocked / scratched
I tried that trick too but still managed to scratch the unscratchable glass.

Doesn't everyone who's right handed wear their watch on the left?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Biggsy on October 08, 2012, 02:22:19 pm
Get thee to a decent Maplins then Biggers - they sell specialist tools, watches for the opening of  :)

Ah Maplins, thanks.  Or eBay perhaps?  Might be cheaper to buy a replacement second-hand watch, but then it wouldn't feel like my watch.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Kim on October 08, 2012, 02:22:25 pm
Doesn't everyone who's right handed wear their watch on the left?

No.

(Not that I've worn one since the late 90s)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: MattH on October 08, 2012, 02:25:02 pm
The servicing alone (and this is just a standard service) is £195.  The new strap will be £115.   :-\

Ouch. My moderately-smart Tissot has a standard service charge of 70 CHF (about £45) to change the battery and reseal. I don't swim with it, so the last couple of times I've done the cheapskate option of a £2 battery and 30 seconds of my time.

Who wants a Rolex or a Rotary when you can have a 1980s Casio digital?!

I used to love mine, but the plastic straps always failed on them  :( I've probably still got one of the original G-Shocks kicking around somewhere, complete with broken strap.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Biggsy on October 08, 2012, 02:32:51 pm
My Casio W35 has a metal strap.  Blimey, someone has one in awful condition on eBay at $68!  http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/221135151566
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: MattH on October 08, 2012, 02:45:44 pm
I always had the cheapskate resin cased versions - but the same electronics. They were a great watch, and do have a retro-chic appeal nowadays.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: mike on October 08, 2012, 03:00:29 pm
Go on, you can tell us  :)

The servicing alone (and this is just a standard service) is £195.  The new strap will be £115.   :-\

dont... MrsMike bought me a lovely IWC as an anniversary present 5 years ago.  Its beautiful but keeps awful time and needs a service, it's going to be Four. Hundred. Pounds.  She'll kill me if I sell it, but that's bonkers.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: tiermat on October 08, 2012, 03:17:42 pm
I am currently trying my best to keep away from Costco, why is this here? They have a stock of the only TAG I would be seen wearing, that being a Monaco, and they being about £2K less than list!!!!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Jaded on October 08, 2012, 03:24:45 pm
Left handed and watch on the left.

That way I can tell the time if I am writing. Except that I don't wear a watch anymore and I rarely write.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: rogerzilla on October 08, 2012, 06:55:05 pm
Doesn't everyone who's right handed wear their watch on the left?
No.  Observation at meetings suggests only about a 3:1 split in favour of the non-writing hand.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Wombat on October 08, 2012, 07:05:15 pm
If you have a watch that ever needs any adjustment, you have to take it off to do that, if you wear it on your right hand.

On the subject of Rolexes, pile of poo!  Mrs W has one which is quite a few years old, an oyster perpetual date something or other, still allegedly worth thousands.  Doesn't keep particularly good time, looks lumpy, costs a fortune to service every few years, and after 15 years the bracelet disintegrated, and cost about £200 to replace.  One service for that, cost more than all the watches I've ever owned in my 60 years, put together.

I'm afraid I just don't "get" watch one-upmanship.  Its a tool for telling the time, I just can't manage to view it in the way I might a camera or a cycle.  It either tells the right time, or it doesn't.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Bledlow on October 08, 2012, 07:08:59 pm
I'm right handed and wear my watch on the left - less likely to get knocked / scratched
I tried that trick too but still managed to scratch the unscratchable glass.

Doesn't everyone who's right handed wear their watch on the left?
Since 100% of analogue watches I've seen are designed to be worn on the left wrist & wound or adjusted with the right hand, & winding or adjusting can easily be done with the non-writing hand, I don't understand why some people wear them on the wrong wrist. Why not use them in the way they're made to be used?

If you have a watch that ever needs any adjustment, you have to take it off to do that, if you wear it on your right hand.

I'm afraid I just don't "get" watch one-upmanship.  Its a tool for telling the time, I just can't manage to view it in the way I might a camera or a cycle.  It either tells the right time, or it doesn't.
1) Exactly!
2) Yup. I have a couple of watches (one bought, one a present from a former employer) which are smarter than the cheap Casio plastic watch I usually wear, & I wear one of them if I want to dress up. Otherwise, it's the Casio. It works in the rain & if dropped, keeps good time, & if it suffers an accident I can buy another one for £FEW.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Biggsy on October 08, 2012, 07:13:59 pm
I don't care if people stick their watches up their arses.  I'd imagine time runs more slowly up there, though.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: valkyrie on October 08, 2012, 07:17:30 pm
I wear my watch on my right wrist - not because I'm left-handed, but because when I was a kid I played the accordian and if I had a watch on my left wrist it used to catch under the strap. Last time I was in CDG airport in Paris I saw a lovely Chopard Mille Miglia that was left-handed, i.e. winder on the left not the right. Luckily the shop was closed so I was saved the battle of head v. heart.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: PeteB99 on October 08, 2012, 07:30:34 pm
I always had the cheapskate resin cased versions - but the same electronics. They were a great watch, and do have a retro-chic appeal nowadays.

The terrorist watch of choice   ::-)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Guantanamo_Bay_detainees_accused_of_possessing_Casio_watches (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Guantanamo_Bay_detainees_accused_of_possessing_Casio_watches)

I've got two  :(
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: rogerzilla on October 08, 2012, 07:42:05 pm
Since 100% of analogue watches I've seen are designed to be worn on the left wrist & wound or adjusted with the right hand, & winding or adjusting can easily be done with the non-writing hand, I don't understand why some people wear them on the wrong wrist. Why not use them in the way they're made to be used?
In my case, because my father does.  I don't know why other right-right people do it.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Wowbagger on October 08, 2012, 07:55:41 pm
I don't care if people stick their watches up their arses.  I'd imagine time runs more slowly up there, though.

Is that something to do with the Theory of Relativity and Black Holes?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: reddo on October 08, 2012, 08:37:58 pm
I wear a watch for work. (Have to).
I rarely wear a watch at home. Unless it's a Polar and I'm burning calories :D
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Regulator on October 08, 2012, 10:53:16 pm
If you have a watch that ever needs any adjustment, you have to take it off to do that, if you wear it on your right hand.

On the subject of Rolexes, pile of poo!  Mrs W has one which is quite a few years old, an oyster perpetual date something or other, still allegedly worth thousands.  Doesn't keep particularly good time, looks lumpy, costs a fortune to service every few years, and after 15 years the bracelet disintegrated, and cost about £200 to replace.  One service for that, cost more than all the watches I've ever owned in my 60 years, put together.

I'm afraid I just don't "get" watch one-upmanship.  Its a tool for telling the time, I just can't manage to view it in the way I might a camera or a cycle.  It either tells the right time, or it doesn't.

I have my father's Rolex he got back in the early 1960s.  It works like a dream...

I don't mind spending money on a watch.  I have to wear a watch and I never take them off (last time I was without a watch for any length of I think was for surgery) so they have to be able to take a lot of abuse.  I also used to dive a lot, so they had to be waterproof to 200m and robust enough to deal with getting knocked about.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Phil W on October 08, 2012, 11:04:31 pm
Gave up wearing a watch 18 years ago. Watch fell off rock climbing. Hadn't fixed it after 4 weeks;realised didn't need it. Like others say. Time shown everywhere you need it.  Where you can't see the time, probably not important
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Regulator on October 08, 2012, 11:08:03 pm
Mr R doesn't wear a watch (they're banned for clinicians who must be bare below the elbow).  He relies on his phone.

I can't get by without a watch.  I can't dive with a phone - or take one in the shower..  And you'd be surprised by how few clocks there are around these days.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Torslanda on October 08, 2012, 11:28:09 pm
I am currently trying my best to keep away from Costco, why is this here? They have a stock of the only TAG I would be seen wearing, that being a Monaco, and they being about £2K less than list!!!!

Oh FFS!!!!!!!!! Why did you have to go and mention THAT? Bollocks!

I have to go to Costco tomorrow!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Jaded on October 09, 2012, 01:05:04 am
Mr R doesn't wear a watch (they're banned for clinicians who must be bare below the elbow).  He relies on his phone.

I can't get by without a watch.  I can't dive with a phone - or take one in the shower..  And you'd be surprised by how few clocks there are around these days.

My kids ask me the time and are disappointed if I am more than 5 mins out. I once won a competition which involved counting to a minute, except I drew with someone else. So we had a penalty shoot out - counting to two minutes. I was spot on.

Who needs a watch if they are vey odd.  :smug:
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: fuzzy (retd.) AAGE on October 09, 2012, 08:35:57 am
Since 100% of analogue watches I've seen are designed to be worn on the left wrist & wound or adjusted with the right hand, & winding or adjusting can easily be done with the non-writing hand, I don't understand why some people wear them on the wrong wrist. Why not use them in the way they're made to be used?
In my case, because my father does.  I don't know why other right-right people do it.

SWMBO wears her watch on her right wrist (right handed) because, if she wears it on her left wrist it dies a strange and mysterious death (digital and analogue). I thought about burning her but, she might hold it against me.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Biggsy on October 09, 2012, 11:10:50 am
My kids ask me the time and are disappointed if I am more than 5 mins out. I once won a competition which involved counting to a minute, except I drew with someone else. So we had a penalty shoot out - counting to two minutes. I was spot on.

I did that once in the Cub Scouts (for one minute) and was accused of cheating!  I wasn't even counting.  Just stood up when it felt like a minute.  Perhaps I subconsciously got a clue from the face of the watch watcher?

Anyway, I missed my watch yesterday.  Sometimes you want to know the time without being seen to clock-watch.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: numbnuts on October 09, 2012, 03:15:17 pm
I very hardly ever wear a watch, I bought this Seiko Sports 100 as a present to myself when I left Australia in 1980 and it still very accurate.

(http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y31/YakDiver/SeikoSports100.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Jacomus on October 09, 2012, 05:25:00 pm
Wow, that was fast.

I ordered my new watch from www.watchshop.com yesterday at 1230hrs, it arrived (free delivery) today at 0945hrs!

It took a bit of fiddling to set up - the instruction manual is definitely required! But fortunately I'm a RTFM kinda guy.

(http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t299/jacomus-rides-Gen/IMAG0235_zps5c5fdf57.jpg)

It's cool! It is pretty large and in charge, but I was hoping for that as I thought my Timex was too small on my wrist.





http://www.watchshop.com/mens-casio-g-shock-g-rescue-alarm-chronograph-watch-g-7900-1er-p99932159.html
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Bledlow on October 09, 2012, 09:54:04 pm
Since 100% of analogue watches I've seen are designed to be worn on the left wrist & wound or adjusted with the right hand, & winding or adjusting can easily be done with the non-writing hand, I don't understand why some people wear them on the wrong wrist. Why not use them in the way they're made to be used?
In my case, because my father does.  I don't know why other right-right people do it.

SWMBO wears her watch on her right wrist (right handed) because, if she wears it on her left wrist it dies a strange and mysterious death (digital and analogue). I thought about burning her but, she might hold it against me.
First, throw her in the nearest body of water to see if she floats.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: ran doner on October 09, 2012, 10:23:11 pm
Went about 5 years without wearing a watch but then saw this beauty

(http://i714.photobucket.com/albums/ww143/benway_photo/c4.jpg)

Which i wear daily. Strap has been replaced with a non-standard steel bracelet mind.
I get to work and put it on my desk then put it back on when i leave  ???

Then i bought this for best

(http://i714.photobucket.com/albums/ww143/benway_photo/c8-1.jpg)
(http://i714.photobucket.com/albums/ww143/benway_photo/c8-2.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Regulator on October 09, 2012, 10:53:15 pm
Since 100% of analogue watches I've seen are designed to be worn on the left wrist & wound or adjusted with the right hand, & winding or adjusting can easily be done with the non-writing hand, I don't understand why some people wear them on the wrong wrist. Why not use them in the way they're made to be used?
In my case, because my father does.  I don't know why other right-right people do it.

SWMBO wears her watch on her right wrist (right handed) because, if she wears it on her left wrist it dies a strange and mysterious death (digital and analogue). I thought about burning her but, she might hold it against me.
First, throw her in the nearest body of water to see if she floats.

Funnily enough, I never used to be able to wear a nurses watch.  They always died on me.  Normal watches - no problem.

P.S.  I float...  ;)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Gruff on October 10, 2012, 12:01:12 am

On the subject of Rolexes, pile of poo!

I'm afraid I just don't "get" watch one-upmanship.  Its a tool for telling the time, I just can't manage to view it in the way I might a camera or a cycle.  It either tells the right time, or it doesn't.

It's not one-upmanship for everyone, some people just like the quality and aesthetics. You can say the same about all sorts of things: shoes, cars, rucksacks, houses. We all value these things differently.

Your cost objection is also a bit of red herring. I know it sounds odd, but you can own almost any of the Rolex tool watches (i.e. the sports models) for very close to bugger all...

I've just sold one of mine. Owned it for about 5 years, not been serviced in that time and had been worn plenty, so it was rather scratched and in need of good wash and brush up. Sold it for £5500, which was more than I paid for it retail. So, I've owned and enjoyed it for years, and now it has returned all my money to me. The one on my wrist is just the same, it's worth far more now than it cost me, so any time I want my money I can walk into the nearest dealer and get it all back on the spot.

You can't say the same about the cameras or bikes you mentioned you were happy to spend your hard earned on.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Rhys W on October 10, 2012, 09:19:47 am
The problem is finding the £5500 in the first place...

I'm still happy with my Vostok Amphibia. 200m water resistant, 31 jewel automatic movement. £36 (varies slightly due to exchange rate) from a guy called Viktor from Moscow on ebay.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: iainj837 on October 10, 2012, 09:45:39 am
I haven't worn a watch  in years, my time piece comes in the shape of  mobile  phone (@ the moment Nokia) or cateye or computer
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: fuzzy (retd.) AAGE on October 10, 2012, 10:07:42 am
Since 100% of analogue watches I've seen are designed to be worn on the left wrist & wound or adjusted with the right hand, & winding or adjusting can easily be done with the non-writing hand, I don't understand why some people wear them on the wrong wrist. Why not use them in the way they're made to be used?
In my case, because my father does.  I don't know why other right-right people do it.

SWMBO wears her watch on her right wrist (right handed) because, if she wears it on her left wrist it dies a strange and mysterious death (digital and analogue). I thought about burning her but, she might hold it against me.
First, throw her in the nearest body of water to see if she floats.

Funnily enough, I never used to be able to wear a nurses watch.  They always died on me.  Normal watches - no problem.

P.S.  I float...  ;)

She can't swim....
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Rhys W on October 10, 2012, 10:16:56 am
I find people taking a phone out of their pocket to check the time rather pathetic for some reason. Glancing discreetly at your wrist is much classier. I do judge people on this, for good reason - based on personal experience people who boast about not wearing a watch I've found to be unreliable and poor organisers of their own (and mine) time.

As for Cateye computers... out of all electronic gadgets that have a clock that is sometimes useful, the several Cateye computers I've owned have been so spectacularly bad at gaining/losing time as to be totally unusable.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Jacomus on October 10, 2012, 10:19:56 am
I find people taking a phone out of their pocket to check the time rather pathetic for some reason. Glancing discreetly at your wrist is much classier. I do judge people on this, for good reason - based on personal experience people who boast about not wearing a watch I've found to be unreliable and poor organisers of their own (and mine) time.

As for Cateye computers... out of all electronic gadgets that have a clock that is sometimes useful, the several Cateye computers I've owned have been so spectacularly bad at gaining/losing time as to be totally unusable.

As I pointed out to a friend of mine - sure, my phone can operate as a clock and a stopwatch... but it's a fragile, £450 timepiece that is less convinient to use than a watch ;D
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: LEE on October 10, 2012, 10:35:59 am

On the subject of Rolexes, pile of poo!

I'm afraid I just don't "get" watch one-upmanship.  Its a tool for telling the time, I just can't manage to view it in the way I might a camera or a cycle.  It either tells the right time, or it doesn't.

It's not one-upmanship for everyone, some people just like the quality and aesthetics. You can say the same about all sorts of things: shoes, cars, rucksacks, houses. We all value these things differently.

Your cost objection is also a bit of red herring. I know it sounds odd, but you can own almost any of the Rolex tool watches (i.e. the sports models) for very close to bugger all...

I've just sold one of mine. Owned it for about 5 years, not been serviced in that time and had been worn plenty, so it was rather scratched and in need of good wash and brush up. Sold it for £5500, which was more than I paid for it retail. So, I've owned and enjoyed it for years, and now it has returned all my money to me. The one on my wrist is just the same, it's worth far more now than it cost me, so any time I want my money I can walk into the nearest dealer and get it all back on the spot.

You can't say the same about the cameras or bikes you mentioned you were happy to spend your hard earned on.

A £5500 Rolex is functionally no better than a watch costing £100.  Nobody spends £5500 in the hope of better timekeeping.  Expensive watches are about:

1) Status
2) The love of fine craftsmanship
3) Investment
4) Any/All the above 

If it's an investment you are after then no, a bike is rarely a good financial investment but, if I want to go faster, then spending £5500 rather than £100 will achieve that.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Jacomus on October 10, 2012, 10:44:31 am

On the subject of Rolexes, pile of poo!

I'm afraid I just don't "get" watch one-upmanship.  Its a tool for telling the time, I just can't manage to view it in the way I might a camera or a cycle.  It either tells the right time, or it doesn't.

It's not one-upmanship for everyone, some people just like the quality and aesthetics. You can say the same about all sorts of things: shoes, cars, rucksacks, houses. We all value these things differently.

Your cost objection is also a bit of red herring. I know it sounds odd, but you can own almost any of the Rolex tool watches (i.e. the sports models) for very close to bugger all...

I've just sold one of mine. Owned it for about 5 years, not been serviced in that time and had been worn plenty, so it was rather scratched and in need of good wash and brush up. Sold it for £5500, which was more than I paid for it retail. So, I've owned and enjoyed it for years, and now it has returned all my money to me. The one on my wrist is just the same, it's worth far more now than it cost me, so any time I want my money I can walk into the nearest dealer and get it all back on the spot.

You can't say the same about the cameras or bikes you mentioned you were happy to spend your hard earned on.

A £5500 Rolex is functionally no better than a watch costing £100.  Nobody spends £5500 in the hope of better timekeeping.  Expensive watches are about:

1) Status
2) The love of fine craftsmanship
3) Investment
4) Any/All the above 

If it's an investment you are after then no, a bike is rarely a good financial investment but, if I want to go faster, then spending £5500 rather than £100 will achieve that.

I think there should be a number 5 - because you can, and you want to.

I don't see a problem with someone buying something, be it a watch, car or anything else just simply because that is the one that they want to have. There is often an attitude that is a competition to see who can spend the least amount of money on something, which can go so far as to miss the point. 'I spent £0.90 on a watch from a market traded, 20 years ago I did, always kept perfect time etc etc'

There is nothing wrong with that attitude, except when it cannot be accepting of the reply 'that's fine, but I wanted this £5,500 watch'.

The thing that really grates on me though is your number 1 - status, being flashy for the sake of it absolutely drives me up the wall!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Oaky on October 10, 2012, 10:48:46 am
I don't care if people stick their watches up their arses.  I'd imagine time runs more slowly up there, though.

Is that something to do with the Theory of Relativity and Black Holes?

Time doesn't actually run more slowly with a watch up your arse,  it just feels like it does.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Polar Bear on October 10, 2012, 10:49:11 am
I wear a watch mainly because there are times when I can only look at this, in court for instance.   Taking one's phone out is rather a giveaway.   However, given my very poor sight, I prefer to read my phone which has a much bigger display.   

Please don't judge somebody just because they use a phone for a timepiece - it's like judging somebody because thy're riding a shopper bike on an audax or using a camera phone instead of a bulky dslr imo.   The objective is simply to know the time and is wholly fulfilled.

My usual watch is a Seiko diver with a black face and big chunky hands - I have a slight chance of more or less working out the approximate time from further than 3 inches with that!   As for date windows - pffft!!!    :)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on October 10, 2012, 11:12:08 am
I like watches. I like expensive watches (I have one a Breitling Super Ocean), I like cheap watches (I have several Casios), I like tool watches (I have a Timex diver and a G-Shock), I like analogue and digital watches.  The ones I don't get are the middling expensive fashion watches, things like D&G or Fossil that cost over £100 but are just cheap quartz movements with a famous name from the fashion industry attached. The profit margin on these must be huge. I like a certain honesty in a watch, cheap and cheerful, hard as nails or expensive because of the man hours involved in making the thing. Oh I have one other rule, a watch must be legible or it's a fail. That's just me though and it's a free world. My favorite watch of all is this Seiko military that I wear a lot, automatic, legible and with the indestructible 21 jewel 7S26B movement:

(http://www.newturfers.com/mwf/attach/95/401795/SNX427K_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Bledlow on October 10, 2012, 11:42:56 am
I like watches. I like expensive watches (I have one a Breitling Super Ocean), I like cheap watches (I have several Casios), I like tool watches (I have a Timex diver and a G-Shock), I like analogue and digital watches.  The ones I don't get are the middling expensive fashion watches, things like D&G or Fossil that cost over £100 but are just cheap quartz movements with a famous name from the fashion industry attached. The profit margin on these must be huge. I like a certain honesty in a watch, cheap and cheerful, hard as nails or expensive because of the man hours involved in making the thing. Oh I have one other rule, a watch must be legible or it's a fail. That's just me though and it's a free world.
Naah. Your last rule is a given for watches. If it isn't readable, it's not a watch, it's just jewellery, & you might as well take out the movement & throw it away. To be a watch, rather than just an ornament, it must work as a watch, & that means it must be clear & easy to read.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: tiermat on October 10, 2012, 11:46:49 am
I like watches. I like expensive watches (I have one a Breitling Super Ocean), I like cheap watches (I have several Casios), I like tool watches (I have a Timex diver and a G-Shock), I like analogue and digital watches.  The ones I don't get are the middling expensive fashion watches, things like D&G or Fossil that cost over £100 but are just cheap quartz movements with a famous name from the fashion industry attached. The profit margin on these must be huge.

I can only assume it is, and the average Joe Public has bought into the hype, otherwise the manufacturers wouldn't bother making that dross, would they?

I would wear any clothing designed by a watch manufacturer (nor by most fashion houses, but that is another matter completely), nor would I even consider buying a watch "designed" by one of the big mass market fashion houses (though how much input they have beyond the signing off process is a mystery, but I am willing to bet a big fat NONE!)

Short and simple, buy things from people who have a reputation for making good items in that market (Land Rover/Porshe/Merc bicycle, anyone?).
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Arellcat on October 10, 2012, 12:22:29 pm
...nor would I even consider buying a watch "designed" by one of the big mass market fashion houses...

A case in point would be a (probably large) number of Emporio Armani watches that are advertised with three figure prices.  Admittedly I rather like the look of one or two of them, but open them up and you find a $10 Miyota 1L12 movement.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Regulator on October 10, 2012, 12:34:40 pm
I like watches. I like expensive watches (I have one a Breitling Super Ocean), I like cheap watches (I have several Casios), I like tool watches (I have a Timex diver and a G-Shock), I like analogue and digital watches.  The ones I don't get are the middling expensive fashion watches, things like D&G or Fossil that cost over £100 but are just cheap quartz movements with a famous name from the fashion industry attached. The profit margin on these must be huge. I like a certain honesty in a watch, cheap and cheerful, hard as nails or expensive because of the man hours involved in making the thing. Oh I have one other rule, a watch must be legible or it's a fail. That's just me though and it's a free world. ..

You are me AICMFP!  ;D
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: tiermat on October 10, 2012, 01:09:58 pm
My everyday watch is an Animal W003 SAS (Surfers Against Sewerage) special, my interviews/casual smart night out watch is a Seiko 7782-0al0 (bought in Aus for $not_a_lot, but genuine), one of two Briels (one Ducati and one normal, octagonal face) or my other, steel bracletted, Animal.  For formal occasions I have one of these:

(http://www.mcbroom.biz/PMWF/BFTQ/2011-04-11_R04-Rotary-Elite-SteveL.jpg)

I still hanker after a Tag Monaco or a Breitling though. 
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Rhys W on October 10, 2012, 02:32:42 pm
Please don't judge somebody just because they use a phone for a timepiece - it's like judging somebody because thy're riding a shopper bike on an audax or using a camera phone instead of a bulky dslr imo.   The objective is simply to know the time and is wholly fulfilled.

Fair point Mr Bear, I was basing my prejudice on a couple of people who like telling people that they don't like watches, and if the phone isn't within reach they forgot it was time to leave work and go home. Ties in with the "if you can't read it then it's useless" idea (like my Cateye computers - more convenient than taking off gloves and rolling up sleeves in winter, but useless because they don't keep time!) I find my iPhone useful to set my mechanical watch every few days, it appears to match the Greenwich Time Signal to the second.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Kim on October 10, 2012, 03:28:05 pm
I find a phone is less convenient than a watch, but more convenient than dermatitis...

I find the frequency with which I need to know the time when there isn't a clock within sight (either on a bike computer, or at the top of the screen, or on the wall) is fairly low, anyway.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Regulator on October 10, 2012, 05:14:15 pm
I find a phone is less convenient than a watch, but more convenient than dermatitis...

Nickel sensitivity?  The best thing I've found it to either get a watch made with one of the new low-Ni steels or coat the back with clear nail varnish (which has to be reapplied on an infrequent basis).
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: reddo on October 10, 2012, 06:14:38 pm
http://www.christopherward.co.uk aren't a bad deal. Posh mechanism in a sensible package. A colleague has one and he said their customer service is brilliant. (It had fault and there was no dispute, replaced without question)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: rogerzilla on October 10, 2012, 06:42:11 pm
Gosh - Vostok watches aren't the bargains they were!  New ones are about £400!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on October 10, 2012, 06:47:38 pm
Gosh - Vostok watches aren't the bargains they were!  New ones are about £400!

Don't know where your looking they are still about £60 here (http://www.russia4u.co.uk/products.php?cat=20)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Feline on October 10, 2012, 06:55:08 pm
I don't generally wear a watch from day to day, but I find I need one when I'm at work.

Taking pulses of animals in various places all the time means a second hand attached to me is vital. I don't want my iPhone in the large dog's kennels with me, it would get chewed or worse (covered in blood/vomit/shit/pee). I've tried the nurses type thing pinned to clothing but they always end up in the washing machine and dead.

I now have a solar charging titanium one Simon bought me for my last birthday  ;D
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: CrazyEnglishTriathlete on October 10, 2012, 07:11:36 pm
I "retired" 9 years ago when the partnership I was working for wished to dispense with my services.  Being somewhat young for a clock and not getting a "gift" from the partnership given the circumstances I decided to buy myself a "retirement" watch with some of the payoff.  Not a fan of bulky or heavy watches I settled on a Longines Grand Classique

http://www.longines.com/watches/la-grande-classique-de-longines/L4.766.2.11.7

which has so far accompanied me on a couple of PBPs, an LEL, 2 24 hour time trials and the Mille Miglia as well as other assorted cycling adventures and is far more pleasant to look at than the display on my various cycle computers that I always forget to adjust to the correct time in any case.

The only problem is the eyewatering cost of the replacement batteries every three years which are specially made for its slimline form. 
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Kim on October 10, 2012, 07:34:36 pm
Nickel sensitivity?  The best thing I've found it to either get a watch made with one of the new low-Ni steels or coat the back with clear nail varnish (which has to be reapplied on an infrequent basis).

I did the nail varnish thing for a while, but the best thing I've found was using the clock on my mobile phone instead (this was in the days when mobile phones had batteries that lasted a week and mono reflective LCDs that you could read the time off in standby mode, rather than this modern rubbish).

One less thing to remove while sticking your arm perilously close to live bussbars, too.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Rhys W on October 10, 2012, 08:14:29 pm
Gosh - Vostok watches aren't the bargains they were!  New ones are about £400!

No, they're Vostok Europe, a joint venture between Vostok and some Lithuanian company. They used to use the same movements in different casings, seems now they use Japanese movements.

Russian Vostok Amphibias are about £43 on ebay (http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_sacat=0&_nkw=vostok+amphibia&_frs=1).
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: rogerzilla on October 10, 2012, 08:18:19 pm
Yay for old Soviet technology!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Feanor on October 10, 2012, 08:26:31 pm
Yay for old Soviet technology!

<OT> My first forray into 35mm photography was with my dad's Zenith E SLR...   Weighed about half a ton.   
But then again, so does my Nikon F5.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Biggsy on October 10, 2012, 08:35:45 pm
Prof Brian Cox must've managed his time ok to get where he is today.  He uses a mobile phone as a watch (as well as a time travel machine, probably).

I rely on the clock on my Cateye Mity 3 for the time out on the road.  It's accurate to about 1 min/month; only takes a couple of button pushes to correct.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Kim on October 10, 2012, 08:49:08 pm
I rely on the clock on my Cateye Mity 3 for the time out on the road.  It's accurate to about 1 min/month; only takes a couple of button pushes to correct.

Synchronising my bike computer with the clock on my Garmin is one of those things I do to pass the time while waiting for trains and the like.  This seems to happen often enough that it's never more than a minute or so out.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Feline on October 10, 2012, 09:05:54 pm
Nickel sensitivity?  The best thing I've found it to either get a watch made with one of the new low-Ni steels or coat the back with clear nail varnish (which has to be reapplied on an infrequent basis).

I did the nail varnish thing for a while, but the best thing I've found was using the clock on my mobile phone instead (this was in the days when mobile phones had batteries that lasted a week and mono reflective LCDs that you could read the time off in standby mode, rather than this modern rubbish).

One less thing to remove while sticking your arm perilously close to live bussbars, too.

I can confirm that a watch made of titanium doesn't set off my nickel allergy. The disconcerting thing when the parcel arrived was that it felt like there was nothing in the box because the thing is so light.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: rogerzilla on October 10, 2012, 09:09:00 pm
I bought Mrs Z a Seiko titanium weatch a few years ago.  They have a design fault where the little hook on the clasp breaks.  This costs £35 to repair, and stocks of spares are beginning to run low as it's an oldish model.  After the second one broke I got a leather strap fitted.  She lost it a fortnight later  ::-)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Kim on October 10, 2012, 09:16:34 pm
I can confirm that a watch made of titanium doesn't set off my nickel allergy.

Lalalalalala not listening....
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: why1040 on October 10, 2012, 10:12:31 pm
I can confirm that a watch made of titanium doesn't set off my nickel allergy.

Lalalalalala not listening....

Ditto that.  Also watches with straps that run under the bezel.

I have one of each  :)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Arellcat on October 10, 2012, 10:28:41 pm
*turns away and whistles*

FFS.  You can't say anything in this place anymore without invoking a smirk and a raised eyebrow.  >:(
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Wombat on October 11, 2012, 08:21:11 am
My everyday watch is an Animal W003 SAS (Surfers Against Sewerage) special, my interviews/casual smart night out watch is a Seiko 7782-0al0 (bought in Aus for $not_a_lot, but genuine), one of two Briels (one Ducati and one normal, octagonal face) or my other, steel bracletted, Animal.  For formal occasions I have one of these:

(http://www.mcbroom.biz/PMWF/BFTQ/2011-04-11_R04-Rotary-Elite-SteveL.jpg)

I still hanker after a Tag Monaco or a Breitling though.

Now that watch pictured, is lovely.  Elegant and tasteful.  I would however point out that your Animal SAS watch is for Surfers against sewage, not sewerage, think about it... (i.e. the putting of sewage into sewers and dealing with it properly, being a good thing.  Sewage being the bad stuff, and sewerage being the system of dealing with said sewage).  in danger of getting tied up in knots, there  ;D

Don't get me wrong, I'm not condemning anyone else for having an interest or passion in fine watches, (unless it is for status, in which case, up yours, sunshine) its just that I do not get it.  I daresay a lot of forum members would not get all steamy about, well, a model steam engine, whereas I might well do so...  Show me a Moulton and I start dribbling!  I can hardly ride these days, but I still want one - illogical?, yes it is!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: tiermat on October 11, 2012, 08:31:22 am
Good point wombat, Sewage it is then :)

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: rogerzilla on October 11, 2012, 10:17:32 am
So it's a shit watch, but it's also good?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Regulator on October 11, 2012, 10:19:56 am
My everyday watch is an Animal W003 SAS (Surfers Against Sewerage) special, my interviews/casual smart night out watch is a Seiko 7782-0al0 (bought in Aus for $not_a_lot, but genuine), one of two Briels (one Ducati and one normal, octagonal face) or my other, steel bracletted, Animal.  For formal occasions I have one of these:

(http://www.mcbroom.biz/PMWF/BFTQ/2011-04-11_R04-Rotary-Elite-SteveL.jpg)

I still hanker after a Tag Monaco or a Breitling though.

Now that watch pictured, is lovely.  Elegant and tasteful.  I would however point out that your Animal SAS watch is for Surfers against sewage, not sewerage, think about it... (i.e. the putting of sewage into sewers and dealing with it properly, being a good thing.  Sewage being the bad stuff, and sewerage being the system of dealing with said sewage).  in danger of getting tied up in knots, there  ;D

Don't get me wrong, I'm not condemning anyone else for having an interest or passion in fine watches, (unless it is for status, in which case, up yours, sunshine) its just that I do not get it.  I daresay a lot of forum members would not get all steamy about, well, a model steam engine, whereas I might well do so...  Show me a Moulton and I start dribbling!  I can hardly ride these days, but I still want one - illogical?, yes it is!

Just to be uber-pedantic, 'sewage' and 'sewerage' can be used interchangeably to refer to the effluent and the infrastructure for carry it - although 'sewerage' is most often used to refer to the infrastructure (e.g. see the Cambridge English Dictionary).

But the group is definitely Surfers Against Sewage...
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: tiermat on October 11, 2012, 10:36:50 am
:) Good old YACF, the only forum I know where a thread about watches can descend into a discussion on shit and shit transport :)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: LEE on October 11, 2012, 10:51:32 am
:) Good old YACF, the only forum I know where a thread about watches can descend into a discussion on shit and shit transport :)

You can also guarantee someone will be checking this thread for the correct use of apostrophe's.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: LEE on October 11, 2012, 11:01:02 am
Wow, that was fast.

I ordered my new watch from www.watchshop.com yesterday at 1230hrs, it arrived (free delivery) today at 0945hrs!

It took a bit of fiddling to set up - the instruction manual is definitely required! But fortunately I'm a RTFM kinda guy.

(http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t299/jacomus-rides-Gen/IMAG0235_zps5c5fdf57.jpg)

It's cool! It is pretty large and in charge, but I was hoping for that as I thought my Timex was too small on my wrist.





http://www.watchshop.com/mens-casio-g-shock-g-rescue-alarm-chronograph-watch-g-7900-1er-p99932159.html

Each to their own.

The area given to displaying the actual time to total area of watch ratio is the smallest I've ever seen.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on October 11, 2012, 12:54:18 pm
Just to be uber-pedantic, 'sewage' and 'sewerage' can be used interchangeably to refer to the effluent and the infrastructure for carry it - although 'sewerage' is most often used to refer to the infrastructure (e.g. see the Cambridge English Dictionary).

The terms are not interchangeable when you work in the business.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: fboab on October 11, 2012, 01:21:00 pm
Nickel sensitivity?  The best thing I've found it to either get a watch made with one of the new low-Ni steels or coat the back with clear nail varnish (which has to be reapplied on an infrequent basis).
I used to wear plastic watches, lego were my favourite. Cheap enough that it doesn't matter if they don't last.
I wore my watch on my left wrist. I think we can safely say those days are not returning:
(http://i952.photobucket.com/albums/ae7/fboab/20121011_130757_zpsdd4e95cc.jpg)
Even seams on sleeves irritate it.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on October 11, 2012, 01:35:16 pm
I used to have a Vostok, a Soviet naval model that I bought in a Kiev department store around 1989. I paid more like 40 rubles than £40 but it never kept good time. Probably there was some simple remedial action that I should have taken as soon as I bought it, that every Soviet citizen would take for granted. The name, if anyone's interested, is Russian for East. The direction not the fashion house.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: barakta on October 11, 2012, 02:32:20 pm
Nickel sensitivity?  The best thing I've found it to either get a watch made with one of the new low-Ni steels or coat the back with clear nail varnish (which has to be reapplied on an infrequent basis).
I used to wear plastic watches, lego were my favourite. Cheap enough that it doesn't matter if they don't last.
I wore my watch on my left wrist. I think we can safely say those days are not returning:
(http://i952.photobucket.com/albums/ae7/fboab/20121011_130757_zpsdd4e95cc.jpg)
Even seams on sleeves irritate it.

If you haven't already been doing orthpod scar treatment trick number one, I recommend it.

Basically E45 (or equivalent), lots of it, at least once if not more times a day massaged in as firmly as you can stand it.  What happens is scar tissue can end up with this hypersensitivity and by massaging you break up the actual tissue so it heals better but also help the body learn to resolve pain signals from it.   

I did that to my not-so-huge scar (and all of my previous complex scars) and I've had physios and orthopod specialists asking me how I got it so good.  I started as soon as there was no broken skin. 

I also hear good things about the bio-oil (http://www.bio-oil.com/en/application/scars) or silica gel sheets (http://www.chemistdirect.co.uk/cica-care-silicone-gel-sheet-12cm-x-6cm_1_10991.html) which I've never managed to be organised enough to use but were recommended by wound-nurse woman who was 200% right on everything else she said to me. 
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: fboab on October 11, 2012, 02:46:46 pm
Thanks b. I did massage hand cream in when it was newer, but it makes me feel nauseous- the scar is right on top of a tendon. I'm allergic to bio oil. I'm tempted by the gel sheets, but isn't it too late? The scar is 6 months old now.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: why1040 on October 11, 2012, 03:08:09 pm
I used the gel type plastery thing on a scar I had several years after it first formed.  It has made a significant difference, despite the late treatment.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Kim on October 11, 2012, 03:40:56 pm
Yeah, 6 months is certainly still fresh enough for the gel to work reasonably well.

Barakta was going to use them on some scars from the 80s that were limiting the movement in her thumb, but it turns out that it's really annoying to precision-bandage between the fingers of your one good hand every night, and similarly annoying to get Kim to do it for you.  Fortunately the nice plastics guy sorted it surgically last year while they were jibbling her wrist.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: barakta on October 11, 2012, 08:44:33 pm
Nah, it's never too late to do scar jibbling, mine were 17yrs old when I was first recommended the silica sheet stuff.  It's expensive to buy initially but you use the same sheet for several months and it may well help with the sensitivity. I expect it'll flatten your scar which would be good as it looks quite lumpy in the pic.

I found the sensitivity in my latest scar from my late 2009 surgery did improve with the massaging and the electrical nerve nastiness is much better for it, but I do understand that nauseatingness.  Can be worth mentioning if you have any followup to see if they have any advice for you.

How's the use of the hand is that still affected?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: fboab on October 12, 2012, 10:59:23 am
Nah, it's never too late to do scar jibbling, mine were 17yrs old when I was first recommended the silica sheet stuff.  It's expensive to buy initially but you use the same sheet for several months and it may well help with the sensitivity. I expect it'll flatten your scar which would be good as it looks quite lumpy in the pic.

I found the sensitivity in my latest scar from my late 2009 surgery did improve with the massaging and the electrical nerve nastiness is much better for it, but I do understand that nauseatingness.  Can be worth mentioning if you have any followup to see if they have any advice for you.

How's the use of the hand is that still affected?
I'll give the silicon a go, thanks for the tip.
The hand is I think about 95% back to what it was before. Rowing is strengthening the wrist quite a lot, quite quickly, made a huge difference, and I'm doing without the support all the time. Longest ride is only about 60km, though, so we'll see if it stands up to 200km unaided this weekend.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Jacomus on October 12, 2012, 02:05:51 pm
Wow, that was fast.

I ordered my new watch from www.watchshop.com yesterday at 1230hrs, it arrived (free delivery) today at 0945hrs!

It took a bit of fiddling to set up - the instruction manual is definitely required! But fortunately I'm a RTFM kinda guy.

(http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t299/jacomus-rides-Gen/IMAG0235_zps5c5fdf57.jpg)

It's cool! It is pretty large and in charge, but I was hoping for that as I thought my Timex was too small on my wrist.





http://www.watchshop.com/mens-casio-g-shock-g-rescue-alarm-chronograph-watch-g-7900-1er-p99932159.html

Each to their own.

The area given to displaying the actual time to total area of watch ratio is the smallest I've ever seen.

Interestingly, the photograph of the watch on my wrist makes it look far more pronounced than it does in Real Life, though I do agree with you, it's a small numbers:face ratio. They are however, clear and easy to read and for me, easier than my previous watch due to being a little smaller - for some reason small text doesn't suffer from being Dyslexically re-arranged as much.

I have also discovered that the stopwatches, yes, there are two, will count to 1000hrs each! Techno-overkill, I love it!

There are 4 alarms, of which I have two set up at the mo - 0700 (10mins to leave the house) and 2150 (10mins to feeding the cat), the countdown timer is set for 2mins (perfect cup of tea).

The buttons are easy to press, though you definitely need to press On Purpose.

Two major things this watch is missing:
1) The ability to change the date layout to PROPER BRITISH LAYOUT
2) That, unlike my last watch, you must cycle through all the functions to return to the time display. On my Timex, once you had reached whatever function you wanted to stop on, the next 'mode' press would return you to the time.

If you can give a watch 4 5 alarms, one of which is a snooze alarm, and let you control whether they go off every day, once a week, once a month, or on a specific day... surely you can arrange the date properly! Not to mention 2 stopwatches, one of which you can set to give you an automatic 5sec countdown to start!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: mattc on November 05, 2012, 02:54:12 pm
If you haven't already been doing orthpod scar treatment trick number one, I recommend it.

Basically E45 (or equivalent), lots of it, at least once if not more times a day massaged in as firmly as you can stand it.  What happens is scar tissue can end up with this hypersensitivity and by massaging you break up the actual tissue so it heals better but also help the body learn to resolve pain signals from it.   

I did that to my not-so-huge scar (and all of my previous complex scars) and I've had physios and orthopod specialists asking me how I got it so good.  I started as soon as there was no broken skin. 

I also hear good things about the bio-oil (http://www.bio-oil.com/en/application/scars) or silica gel sheets (http://www.chemistdirect.co.uk/cica-care-silicone-gel-sheet-12cm-x-6cm_1_10991.html) which I've never managed to be organised enough to use but were recommended by wound-nurse woman who was 200% right on everything else she said to me.
4 weeks on, I can report positive feedback on the E45 massaging tip. Patient says "Thanks"  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Notsototalnewbie on January 16, 2013, 01:50:47 pm
I’m one of those people who feels very odd and lost without a watch. My watch (a Kahuna one from Argos) needs its strap replacing (it's now unwearable) and three separate places have told me that it’s impossible unless I send it back to the manufacturer and I really cannot be doing with that and I'm not even sure they'd do it anyway.

A couple of Christmases ago my mum presented me with a watch that is a) white and b) covered in sparkly rhinestones. As I’m supposed to be cutting back on unnecessary spending at the moment, I feel the sensible thing to do would be to just start wearing that; it’s sat in its box ever since. But it *really* isn’t me and I’m not sure I can bring myself to…

Curses.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Biggsy on January 16, 2013, 02:00:40 pm
I’m one of those people who feels very odd and lost without a watch. My watch (a Kahuna one from Argos) needs its strap replacing (it's now unwearable) and three separate places have told me that it’s impossible unless I send it back to the manufacturer

Must be a funny strap indeed if a jeweller can't replace it.  Not even with a different type of strap?  What model of Kahuna?  Got a photo?

You can find all lengths of strap pins on eBay, and you don't really need a special tool to remove and fit them.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: tiermat on January 16, 2013, 02:05:23 pm
Kahuna's are usually like Animal watches, in that the straps are webbing with or without fabric/rubberised material sewn on.

Replacement straps should be easy to get, really they should.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Notsototalnewbie on January 16, 2013, 02:34:28 pm
Will post a pic when I get home. Not sure what model it is; can’t find it online. I bought it about four years ago.

I don’t mind if it’s a different strap. It is currently a leather strap and it seems to be held on with four tiny screws in each corner on the back of the watch (sitting inside a little inset section), rather than the more traditional pins holding it on.

I tried an old-fashioned jewellers, a rough and ready cobbler type place, and Timpsons. They all said exactly the same thing. The cobbler place said the manufacturer had been ‘very cunning’!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Biggsy on January 16, 2013, 03:02:55 pm
Oh.  It doesn't sound like it's even worth posting a pic, let alone attempting a DIY strap replacement.  :(
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: tiermat on January 16, 2013, 03:11:31 pm
Does it look something like this?

http://www.hollinsandhollinshead.com/product/KUS-0052L/KAHUNA+KUS-0052L+Fancy+Leather+Strap+Ladies+Watch+RRP%3A+%C2%A335.00

If so I can see where the problem is.

Email Kahuna would be my best advice: http://www.kahuna.co.uk/contact-us2/
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Notsototalnewbie on January 16, 2013, 03:30:51 pm
Yes, my watch has the same arrangement as that one.

I’ll email them, thanks for that, but don’t hold out much hope considering it was around £30 originally.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: ferret on January 20, 2013, 09:45:55 pm
when my mum has found it, I shall be getting my Grandfathers pocket watch, which he was given on his 21st, from what I remember it's nothing fancy just a plain full face watch and chain with a six pence attached, he was given for good luck when he was called up. pictures to follow,
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: HTFB on November 23, 2013, 05:38:12 pm
Not that watches bother me much, beyond being present, legible and accurate: quartz for me. I upgraded to a solid steel Tissot, though, after my previous one ate the cuffs off an entire wardrobe of shirts. The base metal body of the watch, its steel backplate, and Honest Yeoman Sweat had formed a little battery, leaving the base metal corroded and abrasive. Suddenly it was obvious that a cheaper watch was a false economy...

Yeah I thought that too and bought a solid steel Tissot that (I thught) would last for years.  It did last for 5 and then stopped.  The servicing cost more than half the original cost of the watch and even then I had to send it back a second time for them to do proper job.  Don't ever tell them how much it originally cost as I reckon they ramp up the servicing price...   
Yes, well. Mine has done a bit better than that, in the end, making it to 13 years or so. The service was, I think, more pricey than the watch itself had been---though less than any current Tissot, what with the strong Swiss Franc---and it's died again six months later. Resurrection twice would be a triumph of hope over experience.

The replacement is another Tissot; this time a slightly grander model in titanium. I blame middle age. Close inspection of their website shows that the titanium version contains, inexplicably, a better quality of innards than the nominally equivalent steel or goldy-looking watches in the same range. So maybe this will last.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on November 23, 2013, 06:39:04 pm
Tissot are supposed to have a lifetime guarantee on even their cheapest models, which are about £99, but only if you get them officially serviced every 3 years. That the servicing costs nearly as much as a new watch would not surprise me.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: nicknack on November 24, 2013, 03:29:58 pm
My 42 year old Omega Seamaster (18th birthday present) ground to a halt recently after getting soaked in the rain. The bill for fixing it was £239. I know I could get a whole bunch of better timekeepers for that amount of money but I still paid it. They did a good job though - I haven't altered it or had to wind it (an automatic) in the 5 weeks since I had it done.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Canardly on November 24, 2013, 03:37:49 pm
My 42 year old Omega Seamaster (18th birthday present) ground to a halt recently after getting soaked in the rain. The bill for fixing it was £239. I know I could get a whole bunch of better timekeepers for that amount of money but I still paid it. They did a good job though - I haven't altered it or had to wind it (an automatic) in the 5 weeks since I had it done.

I have one in a drawer for that very reason and of a very similar vintage.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: nicknack on November 24, 2013, 03:39:52 pm
My 42 year old Omega Seamaster (18th birthday present) ground to a halt recently after getting soaked in the rain. The bill for fixing it was £239. I know I could get a whole bunch of better timekeepers for that amount of money but I still paid it. They did a good job though - I haven't altered it or had to wind it (an automatic) in the 5 weeks since I had it done.

I have one in a drawer for that very reason and of a very similar vintage.

Yup. My dad's and my brother's aren't, I'm afraid, going to get the same treatment.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: rogerzilla on November 24, 2013, 05:10:26 pm
Isn't it a bit of a FAIL if a diver's watch doesn't like the rain?  ;)

Presumably this is due to O-rings becoming hardened and dried out.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: nicknack on November 25, 2013, 08:54:39 am
Isn't it a bit of a FAIL if a diver's watch doesn't like the rain?  ;)

Presumably this is due to O-rings becoming hardened and dried out.

It was due to the glass being cracked.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: kombokim on November 29, 2013, 06:20:40 pm
Most of my youth was spent in a haze and I really had no time for time, so never wore a watch. I had a phase when they became digital that I wore a watch for a while but then decided I really hate wearing things, clothes excepted. I don't wear my wedding ring. Spent all day twiddling it, drove me mad.

Hang on...........I'm still mad?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: hairyhippy on December 01, 2013, 12:56:12 pm
I wish waist coats would come back into fashion so I could wear a pocket watch.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: woollypigs on December 01, 2013, 01:11:22 pm
Well Hairy I say start the fashion :)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Julian on December 01, 2013, 01:38:39 pm
I wear a waistcoat most days through the winter for work.  No pocket watch though.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Woofage on December 10, 2013, 06:10:04 pm
I often used to wear a waistcoat to work. This was several years ago mind. I've never owned a pocket watch though.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: kyuss on December 21, 2013, 02:28:45 pm
I got myself a cheap Timex a couple of months ago and finally got round to buying some leather work tools so made myself a new strap yesterday. Need a bit more practice on the stitching but it's a vast improvement on the cheap strap it came on. I'm quite chuffed with it for a first attempt.

(http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b10/KeithSmith1974/D1D4DC83-5821-4094-98E8-43A84E753227_zpsvlvueblm.jpg) (http://s16.photobucket.com/user/KeithSmith1974/media/D1D4DC83-5821-4094-98E8-43A84E753227_zpsvlvueblm.jpg.html)


(http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b10/KeithSmith1974/B8994F37-8804-436A-835A-D394D23D0AD3_zpsx2xhq05v.jpg) (http://s16.photobucket.com/user/KeithSmith1974/media/B8994F37-8804-436A-835A-D394D23D0AD3_zpsx2xhq05v.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Canardly on December 21, 2013, 02:32:50 pm
That very good. I wish I could do that.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Fab Foodie on December 21, 2013, 06:43:04 pm
Is it wrong to want one of these over the 'basic' model?

http://www.johnlewis.com/mondaine-a512-30358-16sbb-stop-2-go-unisex-leather-strap-watch/p592154
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Wobbly John on December 21, 2013, 08:11:31 pm
I wish waist coats would come back into fashion so I could wear a pocket watch.

Some of us have been known to wear wes'cots on forum rides, you know.  :smug:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/March%2012%20WARTY/wj.jpg)

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: clarion on December 22, 2013, 09:39:12 am
Very neat piece of work.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Wombat on December 22, 2013, 10:30:07 am
Hmm, £123.  tempting....
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Fab Foodie on December 22, 2013, 08:50:32 pm
Is it wrong to want one of these over the 'basic' model?

http://www.johnlewis.com/mondaine-a512-30358-16sbb-stop-2-go-unisex-leather-strap-watch/p592154

That's a Swiss Rail watch (SBB CFF FFS)... They're asking a crazy price considering you can get it from Swiss Rail here for less than half John Lewis' asking price:

http://www.sbbshop.ch/pub/index.php?page=goods&c=8&l=de&sbbsid=babf9af73eee4b84bc8151cbf6db576d&l=fr&l=de&l=fr&l=en

But, if you want a custom Swiss watch made in Martigny for less than that: http://www.121time.com/


The Stop 2 Go is 650 CHF, so JL's price is pretty good ... and I get a good discount :-)

http://www.sbbshop.ch/pub/index.php?page=goods-detail&id=258&c=1&sc=&sbbsid=pd4vaatgjqdi2eslvb0i9gfp10

Take a look at the video on the JL site.  I just like the way it mimics the real clock!

The regular ones start at about £150.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Charlotte on April 10, 2014, 12:29:47 pm
http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-26920782

Quote
The Bradley Timepiece, a watch designed for blind people and named after a Paralympian gold medallist who lost his sight in Afghanistan, is up for design of the year at London's Design Museum. But it's mostly being bought by sighted people.

(http://news.bbcimg.co.uk/media/images/74101000/jpg/_74101876_624-watch-lead.jpg)

http://eone-time.com/shop.php
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Vince on April 10, 2014, 02:14:06 pm
I seem to have acquired a small collection of watches. I wear a watch 24*7 regardless of what I'm doing.

An old dive watch that I had for 20 years. It died a couple of years after the numpty at the jewellers did the back up finger tight after a battery change and I noticed fogging after a session sailing1

An Eternal watch given to me to celebrate 15 years of service to my former employer. It died around the time I was outsourced, which seemed ironic.

My late father's Rotary watch which keeps good time but isn't waterproof, so it doesn't get used.

Currently using my late uncle's cheap2 Rolex presented to him in 1974 to celebrate 25 years with BP. It used to lose a minute a day. I took it to the watch shop to get a quote to have it cleaned and regulated. When I returned I was told it had been done and was charged 8 Euros! It now gains 2 minutes a day  :facepalm: A quote from a real watch repairer was a figure that would buy 10 good new battery watches.

1 If I had still been diving I would have had it pressure tested.
2 Cheap because it is a Rolex case, but with a cheap (and unreliable)  Tudor mechanism
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Kim on April 10, 2014, 02:39:51 pm
http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-26920782

Quote
The Bradley Timepiece, a watch designed for blind people and named after a Paralympian gold medallist who lost his sight in Afghanistan, is up for design of the year at London's Design Museum. But it's mostly being bought by sighted people.

I'm not surprised.  It's pretty, but blind people, like the rest of us are already carrying perfectly good multi-function gadgets to tell the time with.  Watches continue to be jewellery.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Canardly on April 10, 2014, 08:10:26 pm
Personally I think that there Bradley is wonderful.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: MattH on April 10, 2014, 10:50:33 pm
I've just seen one of those being worn by someone in real life. I was actually a bit disappointed with it; in the photos it looks very elegant, in real life it's a bit chunky and clunky. A shame, as from what I'd seen before I really liked it.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: bobb on April 11, 2014, 09:59:45 am
Watches continue to be jewellery.

If your wore a watch that didn't work and you knew it didn't work, it would be jewellery. Otherwise, it's functional gadget for telling the time...
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Jaded on April 11, 2014, 10:04:51 am
My blind acquaintance uses a watch with a flip-up glass to read the time with. I told him about the Bradley, but got the impression that he'd need to touch it to really pass judgement. It looks to me like it would collect all sorts of much and gunge in the grooves.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: LEE on April 11, 2014, 10:09:55 am
Watches continue to be jewellery.

If your wore a watch that didn't work and you knew it didn't work, it would be jewellery. Otherwise, it's functional gadget for telling the time...

I think once a functional gadget for telling the time costs upward of a thousand pounds then it may have crossed over the "jewellery threshold".

Functional gadgets for telling the time to within a second per week cost about £10.

Let's not pretend that the watch you choose to wear is just about telling the time.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Woofage on April 11, 2014, 10:22:05 am
Functional gadgets for telling the time to within a second per week cost about £10.

Indeed (for a similar amount of money you can get one that will also make phone calls). I think it's worth spending a little more in the hope of better robustness and hence long-term reliability.

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-26920782
Quote
The Bradley Timepiece, a watch designed for blind people and named after a Paralympian gold medallist who lost his sight in Afghanistan, is up for design of the year at London's Design Museum. But it's mostly being bought by sighted people.

A friend of mine once owned a watch (we're talking mid 80s) that would speak the time when the side button was pushed. The slight inconvenience was that you had to know the relevant Japanese to be able to understand it.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: LEE on April 11, 2014, 10:22:17 am
But, if you want a custom Swiss watch made in Martigny for less than that: http://www.121time.com/

I think to most people "Swiss Watch" implies a mechanical movement not Quartz/Battery.
I would always struggle to pay over £100 for a quartz movement because I can imagine the actual cost to make it would be nearer £1.
It's been Casio's greatest trick, to get people to pay hundreds of pounds for £5 watches.

I love the Mondaine face, it's the essence of clartity, but £450 for a quart movement, just because it has a wonky second hand?  I don't think so.

I'm fortunate enough to own my dad's old mechanical Mondaine.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Ruth on April 14, 2014, 09:04:33 pm
This is my watch, pretty much.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Casio-Stainless-Bracelet-LA670WEA-1EF-Countdown/dp/B008R52I1Y/ref=sr_1_22?s=watch&ie=UTF8&qid=1397505736&sr=1-22

My phone lives in my handbag with the old jelly babies and bits of dead skin and hair.  It's much easier to look at my wrist than furtle around in there.

For some reason, people tend to point at my watch in disbelief and say things like "are you stuck in 1984?  Who wears a digital watch?"

I do.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Kim on April 14, 2014, 09:09:27 pm
My phone lives in my handbag with the old jelly babies and bits of dead skin and hair.  It's much easier to look at my wrist than furtle around in there.

That's where you're going wrong.  You can't feel your phone in a handbag.  [Insert rant about women's clothing not having proper pockets.]
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Ruth on April 14, 2014, 09:12:47 pm
All my coats have holes in the pockets.  Not all the pockets, mark you, but all the coats.  The phone always lands in the pocket with the hole.  But there's no point fixing the hole when you're a lazy cow and you've got at least one perfectly good pocket with no hole.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Kim on April 15, 2014, 12:08:19 am
Ah yes, *memories of a particular well-loved coat where one of the pockets served as an access portal to all the useful stuff that had accumulated in the lining*
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Rhys W on July 01, 2014, 11:37:03 pm
After the Vostok Amphibian, I have developed another obsession with an inexpensive yet highly-regarded automatic timepiece, the Seiko "Sea Urchin":

(http://img-96.uamulet.com/auctiong/mPriceBayGImages/2012/1/31/87-U0005975-634636085395970000-1.jpg)

It's a bit of an homage to the Rolex Submariner without being a direct copy. The accuracy is stunning for a £130 watch - my Vostok was gaining over a minute a day but this gains about 4s a day, sometimes down to about 2s. I think I've got a good one as the specs are much looser than that.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Sergeant Pluck on July 01, 2014, 11:44:40 pm
Currently i wear this one:

(http://sergeantpluck.smugmug.com/photos/i-XxnWcXG/0/XL/i-XxnWcXG-XL.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: fields5069 on July 03, 2014, 10:15:38 am
I got a Zenith Chronomaster 15 years ago as an engagement pressie. I stopped wearing it first when the leather strap disintegrated, then I bought a strap and promptly managed to crack the crystal on the first day of wearing it again. It's been sat in a drawer for about 10 years. My wife won't let me sell it, and I can't (or won't) afford to have it cleaned and repaired.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Mr Larrington on July 03, 2014, 01:41:42 pm
My Casio G-Shock G-100 is slowly but surely dying on its arse.  The original rubber strap b0rked aeons ago, but the replacement webby velcro one is starting to look a bit secondhand too.  Plus it really needs a thorough cleaning, which would be easy enough if I could get it off without taking a hacksaw to the case.  Pressing the "Light" button renders the display invisible and the case is now held together with superglue - I don't think it ever recovered from the trike-rolling incident in Haywards Heath during the 2007 edition of El Supremo's 400.

Thus I have reverted to wearing a 34 year old Seiko quartz.  Yesterday someone told me the date was July 2nd.  Why, then, does the watch claim it's the 1st?  Oh, wait, these old-skool ones don't change gear automagically at the end of the month, do they :facepalm:

I may have to seek out a rufty-tufty replacement for the G-Shock when I go on my holibobs next month, but OTOH it's much easier to adjust the hands on the Seiko when having to deal with different time zones...
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Mr Larrington on July 03, 2014, 05:11:45 pm
In slightly less salubrious surroundings:

(https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3851/14379473087_3878675d21_c.jpg)

1972 Seiko automatic with non-original bracelet, 1980 Seiko quartz, ~2004 Casio G-Shock G-100
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Kim on July 04, 2014, 12:51:45 am
*twitches OCDishly about the lack of sync*
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: billplumtree on July 04, 2014, 05:59:17 pm
*sob*  After sliding up the road (with the rest of me attached) following an encounter with a diesel slick a while ago:

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-XsQ7fj-Ntpw/U7bbfRY-z6I/AAAAAAAAF5A/kqMtAv8Ly8E/s720/P1020027.jpg)

New glass and a bit of a clean, and it's as good as new nicely battle-scarred.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: jogler on July 04, 2014, 06:59:33 pm
I'm a little surprised to realize that I own 4 watches

a Scubapro divers watch
a Seiko gold plated dress watch
a Casio sports watch
a Polar heart monitor that can be worn with only the time being displayed

plus  of course a watch on the mobile phone;the latter now being the only one used.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Rhys W on July 04, 2014, 08:30:28 pm
*sob*  After sliding up the road (with the rest of me attached) following an encounter with a diesel slick a while ago:

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-XsQ7fj-Ntpw/U7bbfRY-z6I/AAAAAAAAF5A/kqMtAv8Ly8E/s720/P1020027.jpg)

New glass and a bit of a clean, and it's as good as new nicely battle-scarred.

No wonder your watch says FFS!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Fab Foodie on July 04, 2014, 08:38:06 pm
*sob*  After sliding up the road (with the rest of me attached) following an encounter with a diesel slick a while ago:

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-XsQ7fj-Ntpw/U7bbfRY-z6I/AAAAAAAAF5A/kqMtAv8Ly8E/s720/P1020027.jpg)

New glass and a bit of a clean, and it's as good as new nicely battle-scarred.
Just bought a Mondaine Stop2go .... it doesn't go out on the bike .... the Rolex GMT2 is for that!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: De Sisti on July 04, 2014, 08:41:02 pm

I have my father's Rolex he got back in the early 1960s.  It works like a dream...



Picture (please), or you haven't got it. ;)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Sergeant Pluck on July 05, 2014, 12:56:11 am
I've just had my Rolex Explorer II returned (yesterday) after a service and new dial.

I’ve always quite liked the Explorer II.

My (sadly now gone) 1665 Sea Dweller:

(http://sergeantpluck.smugmug.com/photos/i-RvQtC67/0/X2/i-RvQtC67-X2.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Mr Larrington on July 05, 2014, 01:39:08 pm
*twitches OCDishly about the lack of sync*

The two with flatteries are close enough for gubbinsment work.  The automatic was just fished out of a drawer and given a gentle shake and reset before heading back into the dark.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: TimO on July 05, 2014, 02:29:14 pm
I haven't worn a watch for a long time, there are far too many other ways to easily find out what the time is (PC display, front of Bluray player, cooker, mobile phone, GPS, bicycle computer etc).

On the other hand, Android Wear is tempting me to buy a new watch, just because of the lovely electronic geekery of it, but I think it needs to have a round face, like the Moto 360.  Most of the other Android Wear "watches" have square faces, which just look a bit like a shrunk mobile phone with a strap.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/02/Android_Wear_preview.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: De Sisti on July 06, 2014, 10:09:30 pm
I've just had my Rolex Explorer II returned (yesterday) after a service and new dial.

I’ve always quite liked the Explorer II.

My (sadly now gone) 1665 Sea Dweller:

(http://sergeantpluck.smugmug.com/photos/i-RvQtC67/0/X2/i-RvQtC67-X2.jpg)


How much did you sell it for?

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Mr Larrington on July 24, 2014, 07:47:33 pm
(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5566/14733076624_cdb9f67bdf_c.jpg)

Old & new G-Shocks.  New one is as near as makes no odds 50mm across :o. If my wrist were any smaller...
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: red marley on July 25, 2014, 01:43:00 pm
I've not been one for wearing a watch in the last couple of decades, but changes at work mean that I now spend much more of my time moving between meetings, so need to be able to glance at the time causally without making it look like I'm bored.

So I now have this wrapped around my feeble wrist. Very little in the way of frivels (https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=83966.msg1717555#msg1717555).

(http://staff.city.ac.uk/~jwo/acf/watch.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on July 25, 2014, 01:52:07 pm
^TMI!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: kyuss on July 25, 2014, 02:40:31 pm
Bought myself a couple of watches for my 40th a couple of months ago that I've not shown off yet.

First up a Citizen Promaster automatic diver. I'm not a fan of gold and two tone watches but I don't mind this one at all and the price was too good to pass on. Most comfortable watch I own and the dial is lovely. I might pick up the all stainless, blue dial version of this if I can find one at a decent price.
(http://i.imgur.com/r707vEF.jpg)

The next one is another Citizen, an Ecodrive pilot this time. The strap it came on was a horrible stiff canvas thing that was too small so out came the tools and I made a nice leather strap for it. Much better now.
(http://i.imgur.com/9Y3VsKD.jpg)

I've come to the conclusion that, as nice as automatics are, if you've got a few watches on rotation then Citizen's Ecodrive and Seiko's solar watches are fantastic.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Charlotte on July 28, 2014, 11:52:44 am
Oh, they're *lovely*!

I'm still well impressed with my Citizen Eco-drive divers' watch.  It's been faultless.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: matthew on July 28, 2014, 12:35:18 pm
Normally I do, however today my wrist is showing the tan mark to full effect as the plastic link between the bracelet and the body has failed and it had already fallen off twice before I got onto the 06:13 train this morning.  >:(
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Biggsy on August 08, 2014, 02:51:28 am
Time for a relaxing video on Setting and Regulating Pocket Watches:

http://youtu.be/qMQdXAZm044
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: LEE on August 08, 2014, 01:03:50 pm
From an aesthetic view I like a lot of the Skagen watches.  Normally simple and elegant.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: tiermat on August 08, 2014, 01:23:00 pm
Kyuss, that Ecodrive Pilot is lovely!

I am thinking I need to rationalise my watches, and maybe get one or two new ones.

First things first, though, I still need to send my Rotary back to the factory to have 2 new batteries fitted.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: TimO on August 28, 2014, 03:15:06 pm
...
On the other hand, Android Wear is tempting me to buy a new watch, just because of the lovely electronic geekery of it, but I think it needs to have a round face, like the Moto 360.  Most of the other Android Wear "watches" have square faces, which just look a bit like a shrunk mobile phone with a strap. ....

LG have released some details of their G Watch R, which is the second Android Wear watch with a circular face.  I think I prefer the Moto 360, although both watches are pretty damned big, a 1.5" face for the Moto 360 and 1.3" for the G Watch R (which also has a larger bezel than the Moto 360, so is physically about the same width).

(http://jakal.sp.ph.ic.ac.uk/~timo/xanthus/Random/LG_G_Watch_R.jpg)

The Moto 360 is due to be released next week, on the 4th of September, and currently we know that it's got a Gorilla Glass 3 face, uses Qi wireless charging, and may last as long as 2½ days between charging!  Additionally, IP67 waterproofing should ensure that it isn't killed whilst washing the dishes.  At a price of $249 and probably the other side of £175 in the UK, it's not going to be cheap, but certainly doesn't appear to be too excessively priced.  However, there has been the suggestion that it's 13.5mm thick, which is possibly a little bit too silly for a comfortable watch.

I'm slightly amused that both watches have higher resolution screens than the highest resolution graphics mode of my first home computer!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Riggers on August 28, 2014, 04:35:36 pm
Never done it before, but it's prompted me to measure the depth of my black Victorinox Swiss Army watch, which is 8mm deep.

Hhmmm, 13.5mm. That'll be like having a matchbox on yer wrist isn't it?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: T42 on August 28, 2014, 04:37:02 pm
Never been much of a watch fetishist.  On the bike I wear a 20-year-old plastic Casio digital with a photoelectric heart-rate monitor built it. Apart from that and telling the time, its main function is to time my tea-bag.  Off the bike I wear a Seiko Sportsmaster 150 chrono dating from the mid-80s. Quite nice but the plating is wearing thin. Can't hear the alarm any more.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: De Sisti on August 28, 2014, 06:43:01 pm
I've just ordered this one:
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7346/12261458103_2b531f3127_c.jpg)





(https://dub129.mail.live.com/Handlers/ImageProxy.mvc?bicild=&canary=IA3FgHuvO4QaHQZHWN8A1mROrM1RkjPnZ5BPyXN4fzk%3d0&url=http%3a%2f%2ffarm3.staticflickr.com%2f2846%2f12643627753_54dff8a9ba_c.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: MattH on August 28, 2014, 11:31:11 pm
Never done it before, but it's prompted me to measure the depth of my black Victorinox Swiss Army watch, which is 8mm deep.

Hhmmm, 13.5mm. That'll be like having a matchbox on yer wrist isn't it?

The Seiko SKX007 is 13mm, that doesn't feel huge on my wrist unless I'm on the motorbike, when it gets in the way of my gloves.  Those android watches are certainly  chunky rather than elegant, but not unmanageable.

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Mr Larrington on August 29, 2014, 01:20:39 am
I aten't got a ruler handy but my G-Shock is about the same thickness as my iPod, which is said to be 13.5mm.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Riggers on August 29, 2014, 09:20:14 am
Not exactly 100% the same, but here's a pic of mine, and dial is 35mm across, so nice and legible:

(http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b176/Riggers_1956/SwissArmyWatch_zpsef0bd5c1.jpg) (http://s19.photobucket.com/user/Riggers_1956/media/SwissArmyWatch_zpsef0bd5c1.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: LEE on August 29, 2014, 09:25:12 am
I've just ordered this one:
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7346/12261458103_2b531f3127_c.jpg)





(https://dub129.mail.live.com/Handlers/ImageProxy.mvc?bicild=&canary=IA3FgHuvO4QaHQZHWN8A1mROrM1RkjPnZ5BPyXN4fzk%3d0&url=http%3a%2f%2ffarm3.staticflickr.com%2f2846%2f12643627753_54dff8a9ba_c.jpg)

Not a brand I'm familiar with but some really nice watches on their website.

Thanks De Sisti...you may end up costing me a few hundred quid.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Regulator on August 29, 2014, 09:32:12 am
Never done it before, but it's prompted me to measure the depth of my black Victorinox Swiss Army watch, which is 8mm deep.

Hhmmm, 13.5mm. That'll be like having a matchbox on yer wrist isn't it?

I've just measured my Hamilton... 15mm.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Riggers on August 29, 2014, 09:50:18 am
Blimey! 15mm!!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Riggers on August 29, 2014, 09:58:20 am
This one (http://www.steinhartwatches.de/en/Nav-B-Uhr-VINTAGE-automatic,194.html) I'd have, but they're sold out. Oh, and I can't afford it either. Just as well.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Jaded on August 29, 2014, 11:39:29 am
My Torgoen is 15mm tall and 45mm wide.

PS I won it, I didn't buy it. But I quite like it.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Regulator on August 29, 2014, 11:40:16 am
My Torgoen is 15mm tall and 45mm wide.


How does you other half feel about that?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: rafletcher on August 29, 2014, 02:33:08 pm
Somewhat surprisingly, my cooking Seiko is 10mm x 40mm.  It's one of those "kinetic" ones. And a day/date, which for some reason I find indispensable, and as such my choices are slightly limited.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Bledlow on August 29, 2014, 04:56:58 pm
*sob*  After sliding up the road (with the rest of me attached) following an encounter with a diesel slick a while ago:

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-XsQ7fj-Ntpw/U7bbfRY-z6I/AAAAAAAAF5A/kqMtAv8Ly8E/s720/P1020027.jpg)

New glass and a bit of a clean, and it's as good as new nicely battle-scarred.
I have one of those, but I usually wear a <£10 Casio when cycling.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: De Sisti on August 29, 2014, 09:53:37 pm

@ Lee: Glad to be of service. ;)

This one (http://www.steinhartwatches.de/en/Nav-B-Uhr-VINTAGE-automatic,194.html) I'd have, but they're sold out. Oh, and I can't afford it either. Just as well.
Other brands have pilot watches that look similar. I have An  Aristo  (http://www.aristo-vollmer.de/aristo_flip_a/index.html#/4Aristo Pilot watch.) Pilot watch.
(Browse the catalogue in the link, pages 1-4, 8,9)



(https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3899/14737661051_5039ae9633_c.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on August 29, 2014, 10:08:07 pm
I like the Rolex Explorer homage on the right.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: De Sisti on August 29, 2014, 10:30:15 pm
I like the Rolex Explorer homage on the right.
It's a Zeno Explorer which cost me £145. Despite its small size I find it easy to focus on (with my dodgy eyesight)
It's on a black/gold nato strap as of last Monday and (imo) looks fab.


I did think about an Explorer I (back in 1994), but eventually went for the white dial Explorer II; to have something
completely different from the dials on my brothers' watches.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: TimO on September 05, 2014, 04:06:22 pm
The Moto 360 has been released now, and the numbers I've seen say it's 11.5 mm thick, so compared to some of the watches that people on here have measured, not too bad.

The articles I've seen so far have been generally positive, although they often caveat it with statements about it being early days for smart watches and Google Wear.

One of the guys who produces Click for the Beeb posted these two links:

  Motorola shows us its Moto 360 Android smartwatch - Wired UK (http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2014-09/05/moto-360)

  Motorola's long-awaited smartwatch is finally ready for your wrist - The Verge (http://www.theverge.com/2014/9/5/6108947/moto-360-review)

Which make for interesting reading.  The US price is $249, and apparently the UK price will be £199 (although it's unclear how certain that number is).

Several people have said that they are lucky to get much over 12 hours battery life out of it, but I wonder how much that's down to the inevitable fiddling, experimentation, and demonstrating that will happen?  It may well be that early, pre-release review models, have sub-optimal battery lifes.  With the device now out there, live on the streets, I guess time will tell if the hardware or software has improved upon this.  12 hours would be a mite on the useless side, 24 hours has often been quoted as the minimum practical battery life for a watch.

It's tempting, but I think I can forego that much expenditure, since I rarely wear a watch.  I may wait and see how the technology, both on the hardware, the Operating System, and the applications, improves.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Rhys W on September 05, 2014, 08:05:38 pm
The Moto 360 has been released now... Several people have said that they are lucky to get much over 12 hours battery life out of it...

A watch that's only usable for half a day? Sounds more of a Dumbwatch than a Smartwatch. One of many reasons why I will be wearing an automatic for the foreseeable future.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: tiermat on September 05, 2014, 08:47:40 pm
The Moto 360 has been released now... Several people have said that they are lucky to get much over 12 hours battery life out of it...

A watch that's only usable for half a day? Sounds more of a Dumbwatch than a Smartwatch. One of many reasons why I will be wearing an automatic for the foreseeable future.

The timing of the release is interesting, bearing in mind what I heard confirmed in a meeting yesterday. Trying to steala march springs to mind.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: TimO on September 07, 2014, 09:57:29 am
The timing of the release is interesting, bearing in mind what I heard confirmed in a meeting yesterday. Trying to steala march springs to mind.

Yes, it's been fairly widely quoted as being an attempt to take the wind out of Apple's sails.  If so, it'll be very interesting to see the iWatch, or whatever it ultimately ends up being called, assuming it exists!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: geraldc on December 14, 2014, 11:31:23 pm
Was in the garage last week, and I found my old Seiko Automatic in an old tool box. It hadn't been worn for 6 years, and I absent mindedly put it in my pocket. When I took it out again, it was working, so I've been wearing it for a week. Enjoyed wearing an automatic watch again so much, I've just ordered an Orient Mako automatic dive watch.

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: rusky on December 15, 2014, 07:43:26 am
I'm torn between the Moto G & LG G watch R
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: TimO on December 15, 2014, 10:39:17 am
I'm torn between the Moto G & LG G watch R

I'm guessing you mean Moto 360, since I'm not aware of a Moto G watch.  Personally I think the thin bezel of the Moto 360 looks better, and could live with the slight abbreviation at the bottom, compared to the LG G Watch R.

However, given the combination of cost, and minimal battery life, which to be fair, isn't dramatically different from other less elegant smart watches, I think I'm going to continue to wait, and let manufacturers perfect their designs.  It wasn't that long ago that mobile phones were brick sized, so I suspect that the technology will improve dramatically in a relatively short time.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: rusky on December 15, 2014, 01:40:10 pm
Yup, the Moto 360.

I was toying with the pebble but not sure as the cost of the latest ones seem to be getting towards the Android Wear level.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: perpetual dan on December 15, 2014, 05:39:23 pm
I'm contemplating the new FitBit watch, as something I might actually wear other than for the data it creates.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: tiermat on April 14, 2015, 02:00:36 pm
Following a discussion on Saturday, I find myself needing to buy either a) a watch box to hold 20 watches and a winder for 2 watches or b) a watch box that will hold the same and has a winder for same number (2) built in.

Any suggestions.

Before anyone says "Have fewer watches", I will point out that N+1 applies to watches, too :)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Regulator on April 14, 2015, 02:07:03 pm
Following a discussion on Saturday, I find myself needing to buy either a) a watch box to hold 20 watches and a winder for 2 watches or b) a watch box that will hold the same and has a winder for same number (2) built in.

Any suggestions.

Before anyone says "Have fewer watches", I will point out that N+1 applies to watches, too :)

Something I simply cannot get Mr R to understand - in relation to bikes or watches...
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: woollypigs on April 14, 2015, 02:09:14 pm
Never heard about that before, am I getting this right it's a automatical apparatus that wind up your watch?

Hmm, I always felt that is the main part and the enjoyment of wearing a watch that needs to be hand, well rather fingers, wound up.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: tiermat on April 14, 2015, 02:24:19 pm
If you have an automatic, and don't wear it that often, the life is prolonged by using and automatic winder, basically your watch sits in a small circular thing which revolves and keeps the action going.

I have 2 now, one pukka Seiko that belonged to my late Uncle and a Breitling replica that Mrs T brought back from Bahrain.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: T42 on April 14, 2015, 02:27:12 pm
If you have an automatic, and don't wear it that often, the life is prolonged by using and automatic winder, basically your watch sits in a small circular thing which revolves and keeps the action going.

When I'm away cycling I put mine on the missus.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Ham on April 14, 2015, 02:29:35 pm
Never done it before, but it's prompted me to measure the depth of my black Victorinox Swiss Army watch, which is 8mm deep.

Hhmmm, 13.5mm. That'll be like having a matchbox on yer wrist isn't it?

I've just measured my Hamilton... 15mm.

I missed that back then  ;D

I confess, I have been tempted to get my vanity plate watch for many a year, just never succumbed.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andyoxon on August 13, 2015, 12:12:29 pm
Just bought this one from Argos for £13.50 (reduced)

Always find Casio reliable, and this one has a bi-directional rotating bezel (smooth / no-clicks), 100M water resist, and nice and lightweight.  The plastic/glass face is 3.1cm in diameter.  No LED illumination though, but for the price...

(http://argos.scene7.com/is/image/Argos/9025873_R_Z001B?$TMB$&wid=312&hei=312)

Luminox for 1/100 the price?   ;)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Bledlow on August 13, 2015, 12:34:55 pm
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41OcUnVz8hL._SY300_.jpg)
£7, more or less. Wear one for all those things where a watch might get damaged, such as decorating or  gardening. Well, most of the time, really, & put the nice one on only when I remember to smarten up a bit.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: tiermat on October 20, 2015, 10:39:12 am
Found these:

http://www.avi-8.co.uk/

The MSRP is a bit steep, but joining SportPursuit does have it's uses as they are a 1/4 of the price therein.

I am seriously considering buying the Hawker Hunter black face with red hands.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Legs on October 20, 2015, 02:05:43 pm
I've got my grandfather's (pretty old) Omega Constellation in the safe at home - I believe it's quite valuable (£800ish).  I wore it for a good few years but the self-winding stopped working and I don't trust / haven't trusted any of the jewellers in my locale to get it fixed.  Now I just wear my Garmin Forerunner all the time.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Jaded on December 29, 2015, 06:55:45 pm
Been fettling today. Well a jewellers has.

First a new battery for this baby. The last jewellers it visited said that the watch was F ukd. It isn't. It is nice to see it working as it was a prize; it flew in next to the Vulcan, flying with Andy Hill, who then presented it to me, and also who sadly has appeared on an aviation thread recently.

(http://www.alfiecat.co.uk/yetacf/IMG_8115.jpg)

Secondly a new strap for this one. My grandfather's watch. Butchered by an Edinburgh jewellers 40 or so years ago, who removed the secondhand spindle rather than fix it. I wasn't given the second hand, or the spindle. Which, according to my local watch guy, means a rather hopeful eBay search for the part. The mechanism is standard, but the added moon/date/month/day bits mean that the some parts are very rare.

(http://www.alfiecat.co.uk/yetacf/IMG_8109.jpg)

(http://www.alfiecat.co.uk/yetacf/IMG_8102.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: ElyDave on December 30, 2015, 07:31:48 am
Haven't counted, but I probably own eight or ten watches from a very cheap swatch, Casio digital job, through my most often used citizen eco drive which looks more expensive than it is.

My favourites though are the mechanical watches inherited from my granddad, most of which need a good service and which I wouldn't risk at work.

And the of course there's the very functional garmin 920.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Tigerrr on December 30, 2015, 08:44:58 am
I also have a citizen. It sports a commando logo and I like to imagine gives me a certain special forces like attitude, and commands respect. A manly timepiece.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Canardly on December 30, 2015, 10:36:26 am
Looked up the service cost for a 40 odd year old Omega I have. Don't think I will be bothering.  :jurek:   I could buy a couple of Seiko/Citizen chronographs instead.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on December 30, 2015, 11:06:17 am
You do not own a citizen, you are one for the good of the nation.

Or something like that. It seems an odd name to choose for a watch.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Ham on December 30, 2015, 11:25:55 am
Looked up the service cost for a 40 odd year old Omega I have. Don't think I will be bothering.  :jurek:   I could buy a couple of Seiko/Citizen chronographs instead.

I can't quite recommend as I haven't got my four old watches back yet (1 x 40, 1 x 30 year old Omega, 20 year Longines, 1 other), but Brendan at http://webwatchmaker.com/ is worth a call, I found him very sympatico; there are other independent watchmakers out there who will do a reasonable job.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Mr Larrington on December 30, 2015, 11:48:25 am
Lt. Col. Larrington (retd.) took his Rolex into the jewellers for a service a while back, but they refused to touch it as "you haven't got the receipt and it might be stolen".  Since he bought it in Aden en route to failing to quell the Mau Mau Uprising finding the receipt was always going to be a problem but he managed to unearth the paperwork from the last time it had been serviced, via the offices of the same jewellers, which seemed to placate them.

He hasn't got it back yet, though.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: David Martin on December 30, 2015, 05:29:34 pm
I like a nice watch but I dislike wearing one. Just gets in the way, catches on stuffs etc.
Unfortunately I was bought one for christmas (not a good one, i hope he didn't pay much for it) and will ahve to wear it on New Years day to ensure people are happy.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on December 31, 2015, 12:09:57 pm
Perhaps you need a pocket watch?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Feline on January 06, 2016, 01:57:13 am
I've never really worn a watch. But I do wear my Apple watch  ;D
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: asterix on January 06, 2016, 07:39:40 am
Did anyone watch that programme about what the elite super-rich spend their money on?

Among other things,old watches apparently.  Some fetch millions.

Check your sock drawers!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: T42 on January 06, 2016, 11:09:26 am
Every so often the INYT runs a watch supplement under the heading "A Cut Above".  I'd stop the bloody thing if they didn't have the funnies.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on January 06, 2016, 11:29:37 am
I have acquired two new watches in December ! Had multiple straps fail over the last few months and that plus the battery going in one watch and the Seiko automatic deciding suddenly to gain an hour a day meant that although I have nine watches none of them were serviceable bar the Breitling which I don't like to wear all the time. Trip to local jewellers ensued but the guy who changes the batteries and straps was on holiday so an emergency Casio was bought from Amazon.

(http://www.casio-europe.com/resource/images/watch/AQ-S810W-1AVEF.jpg)

Solar powered, five alarms, changes easily to different timezones plus its easy to read without glasses on (well the analogue bit is anyway). Whats not to like for £30. Lume isnt great but at that price it never is,

Then for Christmas Mrs Pcolbeck but me an analogue G-Shock. A stealth model.

(http://www.casio-europe.com/resource/images/watch/GA-150-1AER.jpg)

Very readable analogue display to say the markers are grey on black background. The reversed LCD is unredable except under a desk light though. I love it.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: tiermat on January 06, 2016, 12:37:59 pm
Much to Mrs T's dismay I bought a new watch, just before Christmas.

This one is great for on the bike wear, it being big, waterproof and high contrast:

(https://bilablau.co.uk/media/catalog/product/cache/18/image/350x350/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/s/p/sp-5029-04.jpg)

It's aSpinnaker Dynamic, cost me ~£70
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: contango on January 06, 2016, 11:23:47 pm
Did anyone watch that programme about what the elite super-rich spend their money on?

Among other things,old watches apparently.  Some fetch millions.

Check your sock drawers!

Or your lockups. You never know, you might have the watch like Del Boy had kicking around gathering dust.

I've got a box full of watches, so if any billionaires are reading this I'm open to offers. Most of them work. Some of them are even made of metal rather than plastic.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Zipperhead on January 13, 2016, 05:11:13 pm
How about printing your own watch? The First 3D-Printed Mechanical Watch Is an Intricate Plastic Masterpiece (http://gizmodo.com/the-first-3d-printed-mechanical-watch-is-an-intricate-p-1752690777)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Pancho on March 15, 2016, 07:53:44 pm
As Mrs P and I are off on an Adventure, we've bought new (sacrificial) watches. Remember these? £6 on Amazon.

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/96/Casio_F-91W_5051.jpg/200px-Casio_F-91W_5051.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Mr Larrington on March 15, 2016, 08:19:17 pm
Had one of them once.  Cost about two quid and you got a cycling magazine thrown in :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on March 15, 2016, 08:21:59 pm
Back when everything matt black was COOLas an 8 on its side.  8)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Kim on March 15, 2016, 09:54:59 pm
As Mrs P and I are off on an Adventure, we've bought new (sacrificial) watches. Remember these? £6 on Amazon.

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/96/Casio_F-91W_5051.jpg/200px-Casio_F-91W_5051.jpg)

Erm, you do realise that our ape-descended security services are so amazingly primitive that they still think that F91W-based detonators are a pretty neat idea?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casio_F-91W#Claimed_use_in_terrorism
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Polar Bear on March 15, 2016, 10:03:12 pm
Take a fiver Pancho?   ;)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Pancho on March 30, 2016, 10:10:22 pm
As Mrs P and I are off on an Adventure, we've bought new (sacrificial) watches. Remember these? £6 on Amazon.

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/96/Casio_F-91W_5051.jpg/200px-Casio_F-91W_5051.jpg)

Well, it worked. Even forgot to take it off for snorkling - which really should have killed it. But despite uncertainty about its water resistant-ness, no sign of leaks.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: BrianI on April 07, 2016, 09:17:09 pm
One of these might be handy for nibbles on an audax:

(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1669/25693030603_038956473f.jpg)

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Phil W on April 07, 2016, 10:33:26 pm
Not since 1995 when it released from my wrist mid move up a rock climb.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: rogerzilla on April 12, 2016, 10:34:45 pm
I have seen a few Apple Watches around work.  They look even crappier than in photos, especially on old men in suits.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Biggsy on April 13, 2016, 02:17:57 pm
How about a new Nixie watch?  https://youtu.be/7T22CdK4MDQ

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pumpkin on April 13, 2016, 03:38:07 pm
I have seen a few Apple Watches around work.  They look even crappier than in photos, especially on old men in suits.

The watch which requires you to carry a phone (with time on it) to utilize its functions
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Kim on April 13, 2016, 03:42:13 pm
I have seen a few Apple Watches around work.  They look even crappier than in photos, especially on old men in suits.

The watch which requires you to carry a phone (with time on it) to utilize its functions

Smart watches are best thought of as accessibility add-ons for smartphones, rather than stand-alone devices.  They seem eminently useful if they enable you to know when your phone is notifying you of things, or when all your interaction with the device is through audio rather than the screen.

If enough nerds and willy-wagglers buy them to keep them viable as a mainstream product, then it's a win.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Auntie Helen on April 26, 2016, 12:36:27 pm
My father loved watches and had a good collection. He sold the Breitling when he knew he had a terminal illness but kept a very nice Omega Automatic which we are keeping.

I have decided I want to buy myself a nice decent automatic watch as a memorial to him which will hopefully last me decades. I'm thinking of spending up to £2,000 and am after a Swiss or German movement. I need a large face (not a lady's watch) as I am big, but don't like fussiness. I would like date and maybe day of the week, but no complicated chronograph options.

Current shortlist of manufacturers (from whom I have requested catalogues) are Sinn, Mühle Glashütte and Momos Glashütte. Oris don't seem to have a catalogue option.

Can anyone offer any other recommendations?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on April 26, 2016, 12:49:09 pm
Sinn would be a good choice. Tutima make some nice watches as well.
Maybe Eterna ? I always wanted an original Eterna Kontiki as worn by Thor Heyerdahl.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andrewc on April 26, 2016, 12:59:41 pm
Stowa make some nice ones, or the new Tudors ?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: T42 on April 26, 2016, 01:03:04 pm
Smart watches are best thought of as accessibility add-ons for smartphones, rather than stand-alone devices.  They seem eminently useful if they enable you to know when your phone is notifying you of things, or when all your interaction with the device is through audio rather than the screen.

Now that's an idea. The missus never hears her phone.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Pancho on April 26, 2016, 02:25:29 pm
Smart watches are best thought of as accessibility add-ons for smartphones, rather than stand-alone devices.  They seem eminently useful if they enable you to know when your phone is notifying you of things, or when all your interaction with the device is through audio rather than the screen.

Now that's an idea. The missus never hears her phone.  :thumbsup:


Now she can never hear her watch instead!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: T42 on April 26, 2016, 03:00:15 pm
Aye but it could zap her wrist or something.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Kim on April 26, 2016, 03:03:47 pm
That's the idea.  The watch vibrates against your wrist where you can feel it, rather than in your bag where you can't.  [Insert rant about women's clothing having crap pockets.]
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on April 26, 2016, 03:07:54 pm
Yesterday I saw a bloke walking along holding his smart watch to his mouth, off his wrist, and talking into it like a phone.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Biggsy on April 26, 2016, 04:02:07 pm
I'm getting urges.  Might wait for the Sony SW4.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: T42 on April 26, 2016, 05:57:57 pm
That's the idea.  The watch vibrates against your wrist where you can feel it, rather than in your bag where you can't.  [Insert rant about women's clothing having crap pockets.]

Of course she'd still have to put it on... she's not fond of big clunky watches. Hard sell.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Kim on April 26, 2016, 06:53:10 pm
I heard that some of those Fitbit things can do notifications over bluetooth, though haven't really looked into it.  It's the sort of thing that baratka would find useful, but her left wrist is tiny (her left hand lacks the dexterity to operate a digital watch, so it would have to go on her left), so a chunky smartwatch wouldn't really work.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Biggsy on April 26, 2016, 07:49:29 pm
I'm hoping the next Sony smartwatch will be more compact than most.  I'll enjoy seeing notifications of my wrist to save getting my phone out.  That is if I fancy wearing a watch again at all.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Ham on May 13, 2016, 10:16:46 am
I wonder - would it be nifty or naff for me to wear a Hamilton watch (my RL first name)? I confess I have been considering this for 50+ years, since the first time I saw them advertised, and done nothing about it.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Jakob W on May 13, 2016, 10:42:08 am
So long as it's a nifty model, nifty; both they and you have been using the name for a while.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Ruthie on May 13, 2016, 10:46:47 am
If you've been thinking of it for over fifty years I would suggest you JFDI and anyone who thinks it's naff is a big poo.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Jakob W on May 13, 2016, 10:49:46 am
Of course the niftiness quotient would be at super-frosty levels if you could find a vintage one appropriate to your age.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Auntie Helen on May 13, 2016, 11:49:17 am
My watch arrived today - A Mühle Glashütte Antaria Tag/Datum.

(http://www.watchtime.net/magazine-de/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/M%C3%BChle-Glashuette_Antaria_Tag-Datum_silberfarben.jpg)

In lots of lights it has a slightly gold tinge to the face. The photos all look silver.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Polar Bear on May 13, 2016, 12:10:52 pm
I wonder - would it be nifty or naff for me to wear a Hamilton watch (my RL first name)? I confess I have been considering this for 50+ years, since the first time I saw them advertised, and done nothing about it.

Nifty.   I am yet to find a Polar Bear branded timepiece, or anything else that I might want for that matter.    :(
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Ham on May 13, 2016, 12:33:14 pm
I wonder - would it be nifty or naff for me to wear a Hamilton watch (my RL first name)? I confess I have been considering this for 50+ years, since the first time I saw them advertised, and done nothing about it.

Nifty.   I am yet to find a Polar Bear branded timepiece, or anything else that I might want for that matter.    :(

(http://www.polar.com/sites/default/files/product2/intro/polar_a300_intro_hero_3.png)

HTH
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Polar Bear on May 13, 2016, 01:33:06 pm
Close but no cigar bear!   :D

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: T42 on May 13, 2016, 01:43:15 pm
My watch arrived today - A Mühle Glashütte Antaria Tag/Datum.
....

As me da would have said, health to wear it.  Beautiful watch.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: PaulF on May 13, 2016, 02:49:17 pm
My watch arrived today - A Mühle Glashütte Antaria Tag/Datum.

(http://www.watchtime.net/magazine-de/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/M%C3%BChle-Glashuette_Antaria_Tag-Datum_silberfarben.jpg)

In lots of lights it has a slightly gold tinge to the face. The photos all look silver.

That's very nice!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on May 13, 2016, 04:21:50 pm
That's a nice classic design Helen. I'd prefer it with a dark face but that's just my personal preference, some people like white faces and some black on watches. It will never date.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Auntie Helen on May 13, 2016, 05:36:54 pm
The dark face looked wrong on me. I prefer metal straps as I sweat a lot at the wrist and so leather goes smelly but the metal bracelet looked too masculine.

It's beautifully clear to read and the second hand does 5 movements per second so is very nice to watch!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: sg37409 on May 14, 2016, 12:42:30 am
White face and dark hands == readable upon wakeup for my eyes.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: rogerzilla on May 14, 2016, 10:19:09 am
I don't especially like metal bracelets (they're a bit nasty in summer) but I have to have a waterproof watch because I cycle to work in the rain and get in the shower without taking the watch off.  A leather strap wouldn't work well for that.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Polar Bear on May 14, 2016, 10:40:55 am
White face and dark hands == readable upon wakeup for my eyes.

It's completely the other way round for me.   
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Dibdib on February 09, 2017, 10:55:13 am
I've been out of the habit of wearing a watch for a while now, but I've finally found the correct-shaped Tuits to get my watches fixed - new mechanisms in both, just from neglect, and then last night a new strap on the leather one.

Sadly the closest matching strap the bloke in the teeny-tiny-Timpsons box outside Sainsburys had wasn't quite right - plain leather rather than the crocodile texture of the original, and it's too dark a shade of brown - but as he did it for a fiver I can't really complain.

From a bit of googling, a replacement Hugo Boss-branded strap is the pointy end of fifty quid! So I'm more inclined to order a cheap spring bar tool from Amazon and try to source a more comfortable/suitable strap myself. Any suggestions for good sources?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: rafletcher on February 27, 2017, 03:36:20 pm
I've worn a watch every day for as long as I can remember.  The last few years it's been a Seiko Kinetic day/date. All my watches for the last 40 years (which means in practice a Tissot and two Seikos!) have been analogue with day/date.

I'm approaching my 60th, and my wife has offered to buy me a watch - up to £2000. What a lot of choice! First World Problem indeed.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andrewc on February 27, 2017, 03:49:35 pm
I've been out of the habit of wearing a watch for a while now, but I've finally found the correct-shaped Tuits to get my watches fixed - new mechanisms in both, just from neglect, and then last night a new strap on the leather one.

Sadly the closest matching strap the bloke in the teeny-tiny-Timpsons box outside Sainsburys had wasn't quite right - plain leather rather than the crocodile texture of the original, and it's too dark a shade of brown - but as he did it for a fiver I can't really complain.

From a bit of googling, a replacement Hugo Boss-branded strap is the pointy end of fifty quid! So I'm more inclined to order a cheap spring bar tool from Amazon and try to source a more comfortable/suitable strap myself. Any suggestions for good sources?

https://www.watchobsession.co.uk/ have a good selection of straps & tools. 
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: mike on February 27, 2017, 07:45:30 pm
I used to have an IWC but bastardburgler helped himself to it.  After the insurance company eventually coughed up I bought one of these:
(http://i.imgur.com/5b0rRdO.jpg)
(plus a sofa and an armchair)

It's a Stowa with a rubber strap.  I wanted something non-flash and love not having a logo, the rubber is because leather ones always get stinky on me in the summer. It keeps better time than the IWC too.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Jaded on February 27, 2017, 07:49:17 pm
leather ones always get stinky on me in the summer.

Try this (http://bootsandflatsinuk.com/sting-in-the-tail-football-boot-deodoriser-100ml/)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Canardly on February 28, 2017, 10:00:09 am
My watch arrived today - A Mühle Glashütte Antaria Tag/Datum.

(http://www.watchtime.net/magazine-de/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/M%C3%BChle-Glashuette_Antaria_Tag-Datum_silberfarben.jpg)

In lots of lights it has a slightly gold tinge to the face. The photos all look silver.

That is lovely.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Jakob W on February 28, 2017, 03:05:25 pm
I used to have an IWC but bastardburgler helped himself to it.  After the insurance company eventually coughed up I bought one of these:
(http://i.imgur.com/5b0rRdO.jpg)
(plus a sofa and an armchair)

It's a Stowa with a rubber strap.  I wanted something non-flash and love not having a logo, the rubber is because leather ones always get stinky on me in the summer. It keeps better time than the IWC too.

Ooh, I like that a lot - what size is it? I find a lot of the B-Uhr-styled watches are just too massive for my weedy wrists. As I'm a fan of the MOD stubby hour hands, and am never going to be able to afford an IWC mk XI (even mk XIVs are silly money these days), I have a lovely Timefactors Speedbird III (the older version with the sterile dial), which is what I wear most days.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Dibdib on February 28, 2017, 03:06:21 pm
Re-reading this thread, I am very tempted to treat myself to a Vostok and a NATO strap. Think it might make a nice smart-casual daily wearer, and I can keep the others - which aren't expensive but have some sentimental value - at home.

I'd love an automatic Swiss railway watch but I doubt the budget can stretch to that :(

As a watch novice, any other affordable and relatively stylish/minimal-ish automatics I should consider?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on February 28, 2017, 03:14:02 pm
Ooh, I used to have a Boctok. Small, dark blue dial. It ran exceedingly badly, on the rare occasions it ran at all.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: De Sisti on February 28, 2017, 05:15:42 pm
I used to have an IWC but bastardburgler helped himself to it.  After the insurance company eventually coughed up I bought one of these:
(http://i.imgur.com/5b0rRdO.jpg)
(plus a sofa and an armchair)

It's a Stowa with a rubber strap.  I wanted something non-flash and love not having a logo, the rubber is because leather ones always get stinky on me in the summer. It keeps better time than the IWC too.


My Aristo (2nd right) looks just like your Stowa:
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/2/1689/24769911370_de035fb27a_b.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andrewc on February 28, 2017, 06:05:06 pm
Stowe make some nice stuff.   https://www.stowa.de/en/shop/ (https://www.stowa.de/en/shop/)


I'm quite taken with this Partitio,  a nice legible dial & good lume.


(https://www.stowa.de/cosmoshop/default/pix/a/n/Partitio_schwarz_front_2600.jpg)
Chris, head over to http://www.creationwatches.com/products/orient-watches-252/ (http://www.creationwatches.com/products/orient-watches-252/) and take a look at the Orient line.  I've got 2 and they are excellent vfm.  Creation are in Singapore, but quick delivery & I've never been done for import charges.


Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: LEE on March 02, 2017, 09:41:10 am
The stuff we accumulate

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/bmkGrfNS8x5XNXeQFjhgMmgw2Ky08w7Dt_7Oo_cA2qjMHdI5EHa3uq15RjHYmlOxBmSmRbLewfXGt_Zbe2nH14Wuyy6pubRKnQfdaxxNaH2hEup5F76Kdh-VBfubID4iQZXzKc5o28cOjUpee8tq4U-rER0bpJW5ovsoD5_iY5PxKcy1U3sOLpVAM6V64scGqYLCWmEMk3_zK97UxA8OYpQjjm8R-WpmvuPiSAL79vTWoO1br9bZDz4e9u7DcL0yBExR3e5KipeaIHPIvJ8yo9KPbgNTprZJ_WvuVWAzVupZve7bCbuEiV2bvE6Bh0F_hfgLnjv3mpG1NMQOm5J2sBaVnLgwsEhiQr4c-BXZy7YnhvGjtS7Csk3R843QEOkz8n1M137RPUmR45STE4U6Du9sgRyeCtjtJq6KpHzh7YfljyRBKl1wwL5gpmUxMDJfEUwbe7mG_9p2jV9DZjrKDjG0lGYID5GjyRhlVsSmAJ5Nx9dIgwQoXM0gQgZIaHSTaqTK0Tv37N0qghXjLYXak2SQkkfzYiyoU1gPRfMyEzexrkEj6Ca5vrudrQlLrF-h6v-rUN-9J68pDrIkhPxeelxV8t9_C04z4UwCqnFpwJqNp1xWUNQM=w762-h950-no)

Bigger (https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/bmkGrfNS8x5XNXeQFjhgMmgw2Ky08w7Dt_7Oo_cA2qjMHdI5EHa3uq15RjHYmlOxBmSmRbLewfXGt_Zbe2nH14Wuyy6pubRKnQfdaxxNaH2hEup5F76Kdh-VBfubID4iQZXzKc5o28cOjUpee8tq4U-rER0bpJW5ovsoD5_iY5PxKcy1U3sOLpVAM6V64scGqYLCWmEMk3_zK97UxA8OYpQjjm8R-WpmvuPiSAL79vTWoO1br9bZDz4e9u7DcL0yBExR3e5KipeaIHPIvJ8yo9KPbgNTprZJ_WvuVWAzVupZve7bCbuEiV2bvE6Bh0F_hfgLnjv3mpG1NMQOm5J2sBaVnLgwsEhiQr4c-BXZy7YnhvGjtS7Csk3R843QEOkz8n1M137RPUmR45STE4U6Du9sgRyeCtjtJq6KpHzh7YfljyRBKl1wwL5gpmUxMDJfEUwbe7mG_9p2jV9DZjrKDjG0lGYID5GjyRhlVsSmAJ5Nx9dIgwQoXM0gQgZIaHSTaqTK0Tv37N0qghXjLYXak2SQkkfzYiyoU1gPRfMyEzexrkEj6Ca5vrudrQlLrF-h6v-rUN-9J68pDrIkhPxeelxV8t9_C04z4UwCqnFpwJqNp1xWUNQM=w762-h950-no)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Ham on November 12, 2017, 04:02:13 pm
I wonder - would it be nifty or naff for me to wear a Hamilton watch (my RL first name)? I confess I have been considering this for 50+ years, since the first time I saw them advertised, and done nothing about it.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/FUcjVFm7hq0fwlAxnq0jFEYimTMf8Q2jm3PB7Hxi2BpGGi2PL9IG9Z3Cg_ZRet2sbAK0jfO4tOO_tuc2V8R5-n-ww-twQRuS2Zm2BQ9TAvzSca3gSmGHheKeD4A7ZZZCzpkoAg5daB_6iUk0tZ6MlCM18dvf_Fy9kvK2x2iDY9PYBJ_VTnkIh_N5hL-lYUhT-gsuXbBgYwwxyUNG3Q19fBLc25m6mdUbDSJOof9PLbNqsmtIk5K81MQLgq7vAm1-KC5Xme41YwTaETvpN59Em30W3m4r_gq0rXPgDigSGcSVncnKlcHHFldpI3vcF8W58mvzl_kDYWDKzMg9vFENRQ8YTYQASy035zep8ZMPPolzv3MvPFCxrn67tz6GrPMQeMfYgYTOy6p-SQ9OgbXBCGhe5Z-_-34bm0mJULf5qbaGkK0K8QOlleDlA5jK8F6R87-l_tnE0VjGC9Nbv78HnlROSA1cF7v-WnwckqbbCOoVyonEXvHHckhsyz7qmQ8PuV_DMSfG08XhDniaTn-k80jqFxiZebJtkLJ6gXLmOHjUzaaayT43DtDv-3Ea6Sy8v0t_Lu3sTKT5LKEA6wue4Cu4RRoWMFpXzRZfoOOfQnM=w612-h816-no)

 ;D
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Auntie Helen on November 12, 2017, 08:43:55 pm
Today we drove through the town of Glashütte near Dresden. It‘s a centre of watchmaking excellence (and where my Mühle Glashütte watch came from(. Fascinating to see 8+ different specialist watchmaking companies there.

Dresden was heaving with jewellers and expensive watches, many from Glashütte. We saw one watch with a price of 102,000€  :o
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Polar Bear on February 25, 2018, 11:10:48 am
Has anybody here seen a Bradley Eone in the wild?   I think that it would be a really good choice for me. 
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Jaded on February 25, 2018, 12:25:13 pm
No, but I know someone with total loss of sight who uses a watch. I'll as him what he uses.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Jaded on March 02, 2018, 10:39:39 pm
He uses an RNIB approved watch. He says he’s not interested in the looks, but the practicality and its ability to withstand knocks etc.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: rogerzilla on March 03, 2018, 09:27:08 am
He uses an RNIB approved watch. He says he’s not interested in the looks, but the practicality and its ability to withstand knocks etc.
I misread that as RSPB approved, and assumed it was matt black to make it less attractive to magpies.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Polar Bear on March 03, 2018, 09:37:45 am
The RNIB approve and sell the Bradley.   What appeals to me about it is being able to tell time silently.  The fact that it looks interesting means very little to me but we all tend to like 'nice' things.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: HTFB on July 08, 2018, 12:42:51 pm
I see the TdF coverage on ITV4 has sponsors aiming squarely at the posters on this thread. They clearly know their market.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: TigaSefi on July 08, 2018, 03:27:33 pm
Got bored shitless of watchfinder last year. I hoped they were gone this year!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pumpkin on July 10, 2018, 02:09:40 pm
I see the TdF coverage on ITV4 has sponsors aiming squarely at the posters on this thread. They clearly know their market.

They do. Apparently a good firm to deal with although they are expensive but they sell hard to get watches which command a premium
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Wowbagger on October 12, 2018, 02:31:23 pm
Having not worn a watch for years, this has all changed suddenly and this arrived today:

(https://b34959663f5a3997bd0d-2668915a1d3a077262c88fab6aa0aa02.ssl.cf3.rackcdn.com/17401003_1_640.jpg)

https://www.goldsmiths.co.uk/Seiko-Solar-Mens-Watch/p/17401003/

Of course, being an environmental geek I had to have a solar powered one. Years ago - late 1980s I think -  I had a cheap, digital Casio solar powered watch. When I worked at HMCE it used to spend all day in the winter in the south-facing window next to my desk as otherwise the display would fade away. This one claims that 2 hours outside on a sunny day is sufficient to charge it for 10 months. That's impressive if true given that this has moving parts to shift about and the Casio didn't.

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Wowbagger on October 12, 2018, 11:10:06 pm
And it looks as though it has to go back. Date & day changing randomly. I'll let it sit for a couple of days to see if it settles down, but I think that's unlikely. Bugger.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: PeteB99 on October 13, 2018, 12:18:46 pm
Is that the Titanium version? If so I have a 15 year old model which is still working fine.
After its first 'charge' it's never needed any special treatment to maintain the battery.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: rafletcher on October 13, 2018, 12:59:35 pm
Being an engineer, I wear an automatic watch. With a ceramic case and strap. Brilliant in that it’s virtually scratchproof. Timekeeping’s ok too now it’s run in. Not as good as electric watches of course, but I’m astounded how good it is, maybe a minute a fortnight? 
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Wowbagger on October 15, 2018, 08:40:09 pm
Is that the Titanium version? If so I have a 15 year old model which is still working fine.
After its first 'charge' it's never needed any special treatment to maintain the battery.

No, it's steel.

I tried setting it up again this afternoon and things appeared to be OK for a couple of hours, but then it advanced from 15th to 19th in about 5 minutes. I suppose I could be a time lord...
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Kim on October 15, 2018, 08:43:39 pm
Try setting the sonic screwdriver to reverse the polarity of the neutron flow...
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on October 15, 2018, 08:49:40 pm
It would stand to reason. I've always suspected your beard is larger on the inside than the outside.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: hatler on October 15, 2018, 08:59:42 pm
A Mech Eng here (and a fan of all things mechanical), and I've got thoroughly pissed off with a couple of slim, plain quartz watches. Batteries last no time at all. I was given a Seiko automatic when I was 18 and some bastard at Uni nicked it from my car when I was either underneath it changing the starter motor or (more likely) when I popped into my room to get something. Bastard.

Roll on a few years and cheap Casio plastic strapped watches came to the fore for all our sailing. The Sea Pathfinder (https://www.watchshop.com/mens-casio-sea-pathfinder-alarm-chronograph-watch-sps-300c-1ver-p30490.html) is brilliant. It shows moon and tide condition and does all the yottie countdown things.

However, the itch was still there to get another automatic, so as a reward to myself for reaching a significant birthday and surviving the bastards that were my previous employers, and getting out with my mind still intact, I treated myself to an automatic Tissot, which is a delight to wear but so beautifully unobtrusive that no-one I know has spotted it. I'm well impressed with how accurate it is for a bunch of gears and springs. It's accurate enough to make sure I get to work on time.

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: De Sisti on October 16, 2018, 02:48:28 am
These are my watches. I tend to wear a different timepiece every day. The Suunto (extreme left)
is used for cycling and circuit training. I'm thinking of selling the Rolex Explorer II. Watchfinders has
provisionally offered me between £3050 - £3300. That would fund the purchase of a Rolex Explorer I.



(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1689/24769911370_de035fb27a_b.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Samuel D on October 16, 2018, 05:33:08 am
I like the pilot’s watch with the big crown second from the right, a Vollmer I think. Which model?

That’s also a nice box you have for them to call a home.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on October 16, 2018, 07:29:51 am
These are my watches. I tend to wear a different timepiece every day. The Suunto (extreme left)
is used for cycling and circuit training. I'm thinking of selling the Rolex Explorer II. Watchfinders has
provisionally offered me between £3050 - £3300. That would fund the purchase of a Rolex Explorer I.



(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1689/24769911370_de035fb27a_b.jpg)

What's the one on the right that looks like a Rolex Explorer 1 ?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: De Sisti on October 16, 2018, 08:02:41 am
It's a Zeno Explorer (https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=zeno+explorer&oq=xeno+expl&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0l5.37059j0j4&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8). I bought mine in 2006 for £149. It has a Swiss ETA2824-2 movement
rather than a Japanese Miyota variant.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Wowbagger on October 16, 2018, 06:52:08 pm
Well, after posting the malfunctioning Seiko back to Goldsmiths for a refund, I made the mistake of visiting Ernest Jones' shop in Saarfend.

Where they had this:

(https://b34959663f5a3997bd0d-2668915a1d3a077262c88fab6aa0aa02.ssl.cf3.rackcdn.com/17360919_1_640.jpg)

They don't have it any more.

I blame Hatler.  :D

One thing that struck me throughout this process is that watches have increased in size in the same way that cars have. It's not possible to appreciated this just by looking at pictures on a screen. Apart from its sheer elegance (I think it is anyway) its face is rather smaller than a lot of modern watches. I wonder how long they have had it in stock? The guy gave me a 10% discount from the RRP and I paid less than anywhere I've seen it on the internet.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Samuel D on October 16, 2018, 07:03:48 pm
That looks distinctly more expensive than the Seiko.

How big is the case? I’m also a fan of small faces for my own watches, in part out of necessity: I have very slim wrists for a man. But big is brash and many watch fans are brash.

As you might suppose from my one-bicycle stance, I’m a one-watch kind of guy. I have a silver Stowa Antea Kleine Sekunde with a 35.5 mm diameter case, although the face looks bigger because of the simple design. Lug to lug size is 44.6 mm. Sadly it’s currently in need of repair after I dropped it.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: hatler on October 16, 2018, 08:27:56 pm
I blame Hatler.  :D
Sorry !
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: kyuss on October 16, 2018, 10:33:19 pm
My collection so far.

(https://i.imgur.com/3Huxuma.jpg)

Clockwise from top left:
Timex Expedition Field Chrono, originally black PVD but stripped it back to brass
Citizen Ecodrive Avion. One of my favourites
Porsche 911 Essential. I know, fashion watch (it was a gift) but it actually wears quite well. You'd be mental to buy though. Much better watches out there for the money
Emporio Armani, another overpriced fashion watch (and gift). Gets worn with a suit, so basically never
Sinobi Diver Aliexpress special. No water resistance to speak of and while it's massive it wears okay (I've got big wrists and hands)
Citizen NY0045. The only automatic in the collection. Love this thing but the gold is hard to pull off. Would love to get the NY0040-19L version of this with the all steel case/bezel and blue dial at some point
Another Sinobi Aliexpress thing. Basically a quartz ripoff of an Oris Aquis. Got this and the other Sinobi as cheap disposables to practice reluming on when I get round to it
Casio Rangeman. If I had to keep one watch, it would probably be this. I know it's not only quartz, but digital, but it's just so comfortable and damn useful on a daily basis.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Wowbagger on October 17, 2018, 12:09:30 am
That looks distinctly more expensive than the Seiko.

How big is the case? I’m also a fan of small faces for my own watches, in part out of necessity: I have very slim wrists for a man. But big is brash and many watch fans are brash.

As you might suppose from my one-bicycle stance, I’m a one-watch kind of guy. I have a silver Stowa Antea Kleine Sekunde with a 35.5 mm diameter case, although the face looks bigger because of the simple design. Lug to lug size is 44.6 mm. Sadly it’s currently in need of repair after I dropped it.

The face diameter seems to be 33mm.

Yes, it was a lot more expensive than the Seiko. I doubt that I will ever buy another watch though.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on October 17, 2018, 09:17:00 am
One thing that struck me throughout this process is that watches have increased in size in the same way that cars have. It's not possible to appreciated this just by looking at pictures on a screen. Apart from its sheer elegance (I think it is anyway) its face is rather smaller than a lot of modern watches. I wonder how long they have had it in stock? The guy gave me a 10% discount from the RRP and I paid less than anywhere I've seen it on the internet.

This is definitely a thing. Watches used to be 37mm or so forever with sports watches being maybe a bit bigger. Then in the late 90s some went up to 40mm then 44mm and now some look like people strapped a station clock to their wrist.

Personally I like the smaller ones, maybe up to 40mm best. Probably just because I am old.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: ian on October 17, 2018, 10:00:07 am
Isn't watch inflation a bloke thing? Like big cars and basically all stupidly oversized shit? There should be a name for blokes making stuff unnecessarily bigly. It's too early in the morning to invent one.

I think I'd like a mechanical watch (now I know they still exist, I assumed they'd gone the way of the dinosaur). I like the idea of clockwork and winding stuff up. Seems an antidote to modern life and time servers and satellite and accuracy and precisions measured down to microseconds. Plus my-watch-stopped is a brilliant excuse for being late.

I honestly don't get paying thousands of pounds for a watch though (or jewellery etc.)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on October 17, 2018, 10:21:13 am
I've also noticed that watches have got bigger, along with cars, phones, mugs and, ooh, people. But I don't think it's specifically a man thing. At least not in general – might be for watches specifically (has women's jewellery got bigger?) – you see plenty of women drinking from a litre-cup of coffee while driving a Mitsubishi Potemkin.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: ian on October 17, 2018, 10:37:51 am
Outliers, I still think bigly is a blokeish phenomenon. Girls wear teeny watches usually (it sometimes goes too far, you need a microscope to see the face on some of my wife's watches) whereas blokes wear those enormous hunks of metal the weight of small cars (some of them might actually be small cars). Over time it stretches their arms till they have the appearance and gait of lopsided orangutans.

And what's with all the dials?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on October 17, 2018, 10:50:45 am
Multidials is, I grant you, a masculine fashion thing. Says "I'm an athlete, a scientist, an engineer, a submariner, an aviator and a high court judge." Okay, perhaps not the high court judge, or not necessarily.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: ian on October 17, 2018, 10:59:00 am
From a couple that I've just looked at I'm not sure how you're supposed to extract the actual time from the whirling orrery of hands. What time is it? I'd panic. Three seconds past two, I think.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on October 17, 2018, 11:01:06 am
Perhaps one of those dials is for the high court judge? Indicating the length of sentence to be passed.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Beardy on October 17, 2018, 11:31:23 am
https://share.icloud.com/photos/05CpW9JlyQomtBy9r-LuqwGBA#Home (https://share.icloud.com/photos/05CpW9JlyQomtBy9r-LuqwGBA#Home)
Let’s see if I can post a picture first.
(https://share.icloud.com/photos/05CpW9JlyQomtBy9r-LuqwGBA#Home)
(https://www.photobox.co.uk/my/photo?album_id=5440787289&photo_id=501164465639)
(https://www.photobox.co.uk/my/photo/full?photo_id=501164465639)
(https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipO0BV2ZvWzo5FCl6HkV224mepHEfCQS77RQnlHv7o1Y6V_2bIQJxzYUNYftf2q0AA/photo/AF1QipNoDTE4STICBj170KRFMnasUnrEJemdPPiWECzE?key=MUppVXpkNDl0bGNiZkN4blF0OWJVV1pEM1RISXFB)
(https://photos.app.goo.gl/FU5vhCei2fQ3FmKX6)
(https://www.dropbox.com/s/p3j6pgo5f8xyg4p/IMG_0207.JPG?dl=0?raw=1)
Can anyone see a picture here? I’ve tried 9 different links and it would seem all to no avail.  :(
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andrewc on October 17, 2018, 12:07:04 pm
For serious watch nerdery try https://forum.tz-uk.com/forum.php (https://forum.tz-uk.com/forum.php)


There are some people on there with far too much disposable income.


Having said that Rolexes in particular seem to be a good investment, older models in good condition are worth serious money, and they restrict the availability of new models which means they’ll frequently sell for more than the retail price.


I’ve slightly fallen out of love with my chunky Omega divers watch & am currently wearing a 1960s gold Seamaster De Ville which is much slimmer & lighter.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: ian on October 17, 2018, 12:18:39 pm
When I googled 'mechanical watch' the first suggestion was £213,350, the second £38,500.

I presume they come with a helicopter or something.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Samuel D on October 17, 2018, 12:20:33 pm
Girls wear teeny watches usually

The ones I see by and large don’t. Most of them now wear big watches like men. My girlfriend’s watches are a lot bigger than my Stowa.

If you want your watch to be seen, it follows that big is useful. This, alongside the fact that no-one in the microchip age is impressed by the miniaturisation of clockwork (that drove the impossibly small watches of the 1800s), is the reason for the trend. It takes an experienced – not to mention biologically sound – eye to identify what someone is wearing at a few paces. Extend that by 40% and the catchment area of your status symbol doubles.

My watch is particularly unostentatious because I particularly dislike status symbols. It was a gift from my girlfriend for my 30th birthday, though she had the sense to let me choose it. I think it was about €570 back then (2012). I don’t consider that obscene for something that will last a long time. That said, I’ll need to spend about €200 to fix it, which has apparently thwarted me for a while now. I still like it very much and intend to do it some day soon.

On watches generally, you’d have to have a heart of stone not to find something like this (http://www.ninanet.net/watches/others09/Mediums/momega1894.html) beautiful (ignore the glaringly inappropriate Comic Sans if you can; isn’t it odd how aesthetic appreciation can be so limited in scope? I hope I’m not that ignorant of things beyond my immediate interests).
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Kim on October 17, 2018, 12:28:18 pm
Isn't watch inflation a bloke thing? Like big cars and basically all stupidly oversized shit? There should be a name for blokes making stuff unnecessarily bigly. It's too early in the morning to invent one.

Brunel's law, innit.

(http://sydneypadua.com/2dgoggles/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/brunelslaw.jpg) (https://sydneypadua.com/2dgoggles/pocket-universe-pocket-guide/)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Beardy on October 17, 2018, 12:34:56 pm
(https://www.dropbox.com/s/xnasqge3ansrh0g/IMG_0207%20%281%29.jpg?raw=1)
This is my current watch. It has to be wound up manually everyday, though it has a 40hr reserve, so it isn’t critical to what time of day. I think of it as the antithesis to an Apple Watch.

I like watches, and would collect them, but I tend to buy a watch and wear it constantly until it dies. Taking an Omega Constellation skiing though, was not a sensible move. It has been serviced since, but needs a new bracelet and omega want something like £500 for a replacement.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on October 17, 2018, 12:50:25 pm
Must say the only people I know with Apple watches, or similar, are girls. Well, women. Old ladies even (one of them is 74 – though I very much doubt she'd call herself a lady!)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on October 17, 2018, 12:52:59 pm
Isn't watch inflation a bloke thing? Like big cars and basically all stupidly oversized shit? There should be a name for blokes making stuff unnecessarily bigly. It's too early in the morning to invent one.

Brunel's law, innit.

(http://sydneypadua.com/2dgoggles/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/brunelslaw.jpg) (https://sydneypadua.com/2dgoggles/pocket-universe-pocket-guide/)
Nah, if Brunel had made watches, they'd be vacuum-powered, run backwards and require a staff of hundreds to grease them with whale oil. But they would keep perfect time!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: ian on October 17, 2018, 12:54:28 pm
In addition to my fine collection (two) from Decathlon's sub £7.99 range, I do have Timex Indiglo which goes as far as a second hand but now fails to glo (and a battered Timex Expedition, which does glo). I bought the indiglo twenty-odd years ago – my first ever watch – bought to grimly acknowledge that from that point onwards life would demand I occasionally have reference to the actual time. Previously as a researcher, I really only needed chronological precision to the nearest day.

The problem with the Timexes is that my wife hides them because she hates ticking.

I believe I have documented my indecision over Apple watches. I like the idea but really I can't be bothered enough to find a use. I'm more mechanical, I think. I still use a fountain pen. I'm still not sure I can get my head around paying £300+ for a watch though. My wife just shakes her head at my parsimony.

Right, I'm off to stare at women's arms to verify whether or not their watches are smaller. It's not wrong, it's science.

(Actually, my colleague, a girl with the appropriate bumps and all, has an Apple watch.)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Kim on October 17, 2018, 12:57:45 pm
Most of the people I know of with Apple watches are either disabled people using them as assistive tech, or Apple fanboys with more money than sense.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on October 17, 2018, 01:23:03 pm
Most of the people I know of with Apple watches are either disabled people using them as assistive tech, or Apple fanboys with more money than sense.

I work in IT and nearly everyone seems to have an Apple Watch. I don't.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on October 17, 2018, 01:26:07 pm
In addition to my fine collection (two) from Decathlon's sub £7.99 range, I do have Timex Indiglo which goes as far as a second hand but now fails to glo (and a battered Timex Expedition, which does glo). I bought the indiglo twenty-odd years ago – my first ever watch – bought to grimly acknowledge that from that point onwards life would demand I occasionally have reference to the actual time. Previously as a researcher, I really only needed chronological precision to the nearest day.

Indiglo is brilliant (well not literally - ist a sort of soft light). I tend to like Casios better as cheap watches but their lighting is rubbish compared to Timex Indigo.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Nothereforafasttime on October 17, 2018, 01:29:11 pm
I've got a fairly battered Seiko watch which cost me about £70 15 or so years ago. It still works OK but I haven't worn it for a long time. These days I've nearly always got my mobile phone on me, the bike always has a Cateye and if I've got the Garmin I have the time permanently displayed above the map.

I've just noticed that my old Seiko has stopped and I was wondering whether to buy a new battery for it, but it hardly seems worth it.

Who else has given up watch wearing these days?

On the bike - no as like you say Garmin tells me the time right infront of me.  Failing that when I'm at a cafe stop I've got my phone.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Legs on October 17, 2018, 01:32:37 pm
Garmin Forerunner 230 here.  It looks mahoosive on this young demoiselle's wrist, but I don't think it's excessively big on my spindly arms.
(http://thefitnesstracker.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/garmin-forerunner-230-on-hand.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: ian on October 17, 2018, 03:10:03 pm
In addition to my fine collection (two) from Decathlon's sub £7.99 range, I do have Timex Indiglo which goes as far as a second hand but now fails to glo (and a battered Timex Expedition, which does glo). I bought the indiglo twenty-odd years ago – my first ever watch – bought to grimly acknowledge that from that point onwards life would demand I occasionally have reference to the actual time. Previously as a researcher, I really only needed chronological precision to the nearest day.

Indiglo is brilliant (well not literally - ist a sort of soft light). I tend to like Casios better as cheap watches but their lighting is rubbish compared to Timex Indigo.

Almost as though shamed by reading this thread the broken indiglo - despite not working for years — has unbroken. Glow restored!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Greenbank on October 17, 2018, 03:54:08 pm
Garmin Forerunner 230 here.  It looks mahoosive on this young demoiselle's wrist, but I don't think it's excessively big on my spindly arms.

Fitness watches are a separate breed of bigly oddness.

I wear a Garmin Forerunner 935 all the time (even whilst sleeping) and it's a similar size to the 230 above (48mm watch face according to my measurements). Some people say it looks a bit big but I'm used to it now (it's certainly smaller than the 920xt that I used to wear).

The only other watch I own is a Mondaine but I rarely ever wear it.

On women most sports watches look bonkersly big. From a few blogs/twitters I follow:-

DC Rainmaker's wife: https://www.dcrainmaker.com/2018/10/the-girls-2018-swim-bike-run-gear-i-use-list.html

Kate Carter (who used to do the running blog in the Grauniad): https://twitter.com/katehelencarter/status/1049613480616189952
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Kim on October 17, 2018, 04:07:54 pm
Barakta uses a Garmin fitness watch to feel Android notifications (seeing as women's clothes don't have pockets and she can't usefully hear ringtones).  Nearly all of them are far too big for her left wrist.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on October 17, 2018, 04:17:14 pm
Barakta uses a Garmin fitness watch to feel Android notifications (seeing as women's clothes don't have pockets and she can't usefully hear ringtones).  Nearly all of them are far too big for her left wrist.

Kim the new FitBit Charge 3 does Android notifications and isnt massive, plus its cheap (compared to an Apple watch) at about £130. Mrs Pcolbeck has tiny wrists and wears a FitBit Charge 2 and that looks fine.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Kim on October 17, 2018, 04:46:25 pm
Barakta uses a Garmin fitness watch to feel Android notifications (seeing as women's clothes don't have pockets and she can't usefully hear ringtones).  Nearly all of them are far too big for her left wrist.

Kim the new FitBit Charge 3 does Android notifications and isnt massive, plus its cheap (compared to an Apple watch) at about £130. Mrs Pcolbeck has tiny wrists and wears a FitBit Charge 2 and that looks fine.

Her Vivosmart whatever it is is a similar size (possibly slightly narrower).  It's not quite small enough for the diameter of her left wrist (there's a gap where the body of the unit is too long to conform properly), but it's close enough for government work.  Being able to know when something happens on her phone when out and about is a game-changer.  As she has titanium pins through her ulna instead of a radius I doubt that anything's going to be better, unless it was designed to fit small children - and those won't have the required features, even if they are available in colours other than camo and PINK.

Good to see that FitBit are now doing notifications properly though.  Last time we looked it was the better Garmins or the full-on smartwatches that could do arbitrary notifications, with FitBit only doing phonecalls and music or something useless.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: mattc on October 17, 2018, 06:31:10 pm
If you want your watch to be seen, it follows that big is useful. This, alongside the fact that no-one in the microchip age is impressed by the miniaturisation of clockwork (that drove the impossibly small watches of the 1800s), is the reason for the trend. It takes an experienced – not to mention biologically sound – eye to identify what someone is wearing at a few paces. Extend that by 40% and the catchment area of your status symbol doubles.

I can't fault your logic, but my thinking is that this is purely a fashion thing. Despite knowing way less than the next bloke my (advanced) age about fashion, I'm prepared to wager that big watches won't be The Thing in 20 years time.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: D.A.L.E. on October 17, 2018, 06:50:52 pm
If you want your watch to be seen, it follows that big is useful. This, alongside the fact that no-one in the microchip age is impressed by the miniaturisation of clockwork (that drove the impossibly small watches of the 1800s), is the reason for the trend. It takes an experienced – not to mention biologically sound – eye to identify what someone is wearing at a few paces. Extend that by 40% and the catchment area of your status symbol doubles.

I can't fault your logic, but my thinking is that this is purely a fashion thing. Despite knowing way less than the next bloke my (advanced) age about fashion, I'm prepared to wager that big watches won't be The Thing in 20 years time.

TBH, it's not The Thing now - A couple of years ago your footballists and mumble rappers and what not were walking around with dinner plate sized watches, like ridiculously huge, but they're much more conservative now. I.e. Lil Yachtys $100,000 Patek - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zwuHHhX10Ec
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on October 17, 2018, 08:23:30 pm
We actually saw the opposite with phones. Pre-smartphone mobiles got smaller and smaller as a sign of blingness, until they started sending emails and youtubing and stuff, when we needed bigger screens – so in that case it was small for bling, large for function. Now it's all large and, yes, combines bling and function. If we start watching movies on our watches, they'll end up as big as, well, current phones – probably. But otherwise, I reckon MattC is right and in the swing of fashion they'll get smaller again. And then bigger and then...
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: D.A.L.E. on October 17, 2018, 08:35:22 pm
(https://i.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/original/001/134/723/e93.png)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on October 17, 2018, 08:36:32 pm
So the size of watches could be linked to the availability of wrist porn? Oh, hang on...
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Ham on October 18, 2018, 06:34:59 am
Would work well for automatic watches
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: ian on October 18, 2018, 07:41:02 am
Having spent yesterday staring at wrists, I have deduced the following.

1. Watch size for men tends to correlate with age and apparent financial status (accounting for wishful thinking)
2. Most men wear middling watches. Very few 'smart watches.'
3. Women don't like middling sized watches – it's either very small bracelet watches or oversized ones. Surprisingly, far more women in 'smart' watches – Apple or Fitbity things.

I'm in Paris though, and things might be different here.

I will test my deductions in London. If I don't get arrested first.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Wowbagger on October 21, 2018, 02:51:39 pm
It seems that there are a lot of "le Locle" style watches about which bear the legend "AUTOMATIC" whereas mine says "POWERMATIC 80". I googled the difference and found a rather interesting piece about watch movements, accuracy and shock resistance. Apparently "Powermatic 80" has only become available since 2012. The claim is that the watch, although automatic, will carry on working for 80 hours without being worn. Apparently Tissot achieved this by means of reducing the number of oscillations of the balance wheel from 4 to 3 per second, so that the single spring can last longer than normal. It wasn't immediately apparent to me why other watches with a lower hertz rating could not also do this, but it seems that it's the first time this has been achieved within this price range.

My watch seems to be losing about 3 seconds a day, which is perfectly acceptable given that it will need a manual adjustment at least 7 times a year - once for every month of less than 31 days, and again for the annual time changes in March and October.

https://quillandpad.com/2016/09/03/measuring-time-seconds-truth-behind-high-frequency-movements/
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: hubner on October 27, 2018, 12:58:12 pm
Years ago I bought a cheap black plastic Casio watch (would be about £10 now), the strap broke fairly quickly and I haven't worn a watch since then until about a year ago when I bought about 10 analogue quartz watches from Ebay for about £1 to £3 each. All of them work and keep good time.

When the first one stopped working, I put that aside and got the next one out and wore that. After I got to the fifth one, I bought some new batteries and all the ones that stopped working are now working after a change of batteries.

On the other hand the cheap Casio copies I got from Ebay were crap.

I know someone on min wage and works 12 hours 6 days a week who got a Tissot watch for about £300, it stopped working, took it back to the shop, stopped working again, couldn't find the receipt, and AFAIK it's still not working.

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/oct/19/luxury-watch-industry-survive-digital-age

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/jan/26/swiss-watch-sales-fall-10-per-cent-china-corruption-crackdown
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Samuel D on October 27, 2018, 01:12:41 pm
I'm in Paris though, and things might be different here.

I will test my deductions in London. If I don't get arrested first.

You’ve left us on tenterhooks. What is the fashion in London?

By the way, I have a standing offer to anyone to join me for a few laps of Longchamp (on a bicycle, not a horse) if they’re visiting Paris and have some time to kill.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on October 27, 2018, 10:01:13 pm
https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/oct/19/luxury-watch-industry-survive-digital-age
Quote
As one of Tom Stoppard’s characters put it in his 1982 play The Real Thing, “It looked all over for the 15-jewel movement. Men ran through the marketplace shouting ‘the cog is dead!’”
The cog is dead, long live the sprocket!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on October 27, 2018, 10:56:39 pm
I also like that the watch Jose Mourinho was given was called the Special One!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Ham on October 28, 2018, 07:05:31 am
I wonder, does anyone else here recognise The Omega Incabloc Oyster Accutron 72? (without Google, that is)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Poacher on October 28, 2018, 08:58:33 am
It's the only wristwatch for a drummer.

Clive James lyric for Pete Atkin.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Blodwyn Pig on October 28, 2018, 03:37:24 pm
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1935/43782303780_3cc9838e11_k.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/29GTKyy)IMG_0320 (https://flic.kr/p/29GTKyy) by mark tilley (https://www.flickr.com/photos/yo_stumpy/), on Flickr

watch #1 CWC 'L'


(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1946/44875216664_989d93d55c_k.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/2bntdu9)IMG_0322 (https://flic.kr/p/2bntdu9) by mark tilley (https://www.flickr.com/photos/yo_stumpy/), on Flickr

watch #2, Pulsar kinetic, (special'Guardian readers offer watch, ..........its never wrong, and it has 2 LEFT hands). Now 18 years old, and extreemly battered, but keeps perfect time.Still available, now £70ish
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: De Sisti on October 28, 2018, 05:32:42 pm
I had the mechanical version of this model. It looked too small on my wrist, so I eventually sold it.
I like the simplicity of the dial.

(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1935/43782303780_3cc9838e11_k.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Ham on October 28, 2018, 09:35:06 pm
It's the only wristwatch for a drummer.

Clive James lyric for Pete Atkin.

I suspected I wouldn't be quite alone here. I sometime wonder what would have happened if I discovered him only recently, I suspect it wouldn't have as much impact as it did finding him in my 20s

For those that are in blissful ignorance, I give you a few lines of a verse that often runs through my head when I'm on a bike

Quote
Perfect Moments
Perfect moments have a clean design
Scoring edges that arrest the flow
Skis cut diamonds in the plump of snow
Times my life feels like a friend of mine

Perfect moments wear a single face
Variations on each other's theme
Renoir's mistresses in peach and cream
Rembrandt's mother in a ruff of lace

Perfect moments bear a single name
They're placed together though they never meet
Charlie Chaplin policing Easy Street
Charlie Parker playing My Old Flame

Perfect moments should redeem the day
Their teeming richness ought to be enough
To take the sting out of the other stuff
A perfect bitch it doesn't work that way



(Clive James/Pete Atkin
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Wowbagger on October 28, 2018, 09:49:43 pm
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/Pw0d5KFbyJj0RS0eBNFKTK2BlpT_8ds5WbVOaygtfmoZ0ZYNamyaj_ZaWEQd8YS7ONNcQALT1MJYS403eHcW1ESuOImSKesuz9S-osAJGRKDyZyHo7xII0uJ9juqjnMld_g4VlOOrNT_ztxTflad3Ss7Cb0h27Giyz6q0bdgmnq9lgsYbaCgu1xcJ96zszx1wiyuuiSLBzs_QGSn0DsIO2ofzRvywfO8LSHRDP1ikiB7GfylYV5Xt7xfD4Owqxp68-Pbjj-bjdFGVU8u2uH6fxU9xTocWII1xVhbg39taFDMqtArk30ar_TUc3AETwiqtpXWwza__rL_YerljxmhECH0iRLfjP6kQN33jYlmRPkXK-RSJMaecZN21C0JKQ34BDFz8hRS93rsC3T_K-V88WqWKDsN4w9tfkB7SjpWS-_-d1r9TAFPUQ39mzilL_06PRBmOAaQ10tP_Q-ujfuf5qxnYWyTyhOgFu55AqdBM59O0pMMiNWxsbZh3dDWvK589R_zAwOviGCjI8Ldn1Td0NU72bPIwbyJQf6DtFAvOtvh1o85WESS9WaYDZg1FS5mV479RHhKOIBDQ0hiZXWx9SuF1Ij3kpRSZfrac_U8oyorsc7XbMHuU7-HK_NM6xumLAIInABWvjc1Ckoo0eAwqYZbA22fL94iRRdIfoq-UrfGQpm-szxuV4_iMyELtY1v8v1R5PGIop31lmuDgA=w1263-h947-no)

That's my Tissot.

I've decided that it's too expensive to risk a nasty crash on the bike, so I've also bought a cheap Casio F-91W for £5.99 off Ebay. That should arrive tomorrow or Tuesday.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/112668886151
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Mr Larrington on October 29, 2018, 12:46:29 pm
Prodded the buttons to make my G-Shock go back an hour.  The digital bit did as it was told, but no amount of button-jibbling has yet persuaded the hands to point to the correct time.  I have had to set the digital side ten minutes slow, so now it goes "beep" at ten past the hour.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: hubner on November 03, 2018, 02:32:16 pm
A few of my Ebay specials:

(https://preview.ibb.co/fZnRQ0/IMG-0532.jpg)

£1-3 each. All quartz.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Wowbagger on November 10, 2018, 11:52:35 pm
Any space enthusiasts on here with a few bob to spare?

http://www.sothebys.com/en/auctions/ecatalogue/2018/space-and-exploration-n09897/lot.177.html?cmp=syndication_N09897_barnebys_177_29-nov-2018&utm_source=auctions&utm_medium=www.barnebys.co.uk&utm_content=space-exploration&utm_campaign=barnebys
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Jaded on November 11, 2018, 12:09:59 am
So it didn’t go to the moon.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on November 21, 2018, 09:42:36 am
So it didn’t go to the moon.

Nope. NASA famously used Omega Speedmasters from the Gemini days through to the Space-shuttle. You can still buy them new from Omega today. A really nice watch and functional not flashy like that Rolex.

(https://www.omegawatches.com/media/gene-cms/s/p/sp_moonwatch_prof_31130423001005_fuitev2_large.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pumpkin on November 21, 2018, 10:19:49 am
these were NASA issue whereas the Rolex is a personal watch. he would have bought it back in the day prob overseas when on deployment. these luxury watches were a lot cheaper back in the 60s as there wasn't the same cachet on branding. Rolex Submariners were standard issue to RN divers for a while and in the US Navy, Tudor or Rolex were issued or were available from the P/X
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: fuzzy (retd.) AAGE on November 21, 2018, 10:35:23 am
There are some cracking lots in that auction!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: De Sisti on November 21, 2018, 12:19:46 pm


A really nice watch and functional not flashy like that Rolex.

(https://www.omegawatches.com/media/gene-cms/s/p/sp_moonwatch_prof_31130423001005_fuitev2_large.jpg)

Not flashy? Of course it is. Just look at how much information is on the dial.


This is not flashy:
https://images.rolex.com/catalogue/images/upright-bba-with-shadow/m214270-0003.png?impolicy=upright-majesty (https://images.rolex.com/catalogue/images/upright-bba-with-shadow/m214270-0003.png?impolicy=upright-majesty)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on November 21, 2018, 01:29:36 pm

Not flashy? Of course it is. Just look at how much information is on the dial.


This is not flashy:
https://images.rolex.com/catalogue/images/upright-bba-with-shadow/m214270-0003.png?impolicy=upright-majesty

It isnt flashy its a tool. When you want to time a re-entry burn a stopwatch and a tachymeter are kind of useful.

The Explorer 1 is lovely as well. Single function though, which isnt a problem so long as you only need that single function.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: ian on November 21, 2018, 01:29:43 pm
I still don't know what all those dials do?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Kim on November 21, 2018, 01:32:23 pm
If you're timing re-entry burns with a Rolex, you know you're in trouble.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on November 21, 2018, 02:10:24 pm
If you're timing re-entry burns with a Rolex, you know you're in trouble.

Jack Swigert did exactly that with his Omega Speedmaster on the famous Apollo 13 mission. They definitely knew they were in trouble though :)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: De Sisti on November 21, 2018, 03:40:01 pm
Mind you, there are many Rolex homages look-alikes nowadays.

Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: ian on November 21, 2018, 04:45:55 pm
If you're timing re-entry burns with a Rolex, you know you're in trouble.

Could I estimate the weight of an elephant by precisely timing how long it takes the elephant to run 100 metres with one of those of those watches though?

That's my primary (and I suspect most other peoples') use case.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Torslanda on November 21, 2018, 04:50:49 pm
Course you couldn't. The elephant would break it.

Don't you know *anything*...?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: De Sisti on November 21, 2018, 04:51:24 pm
If you're timing re-entry burns with a Rolex, you know you're in trouble.
(https://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/NTAwWDM5MQ==/z/CcsAAOxy4dNS-tH6/$_35.JPG?set_id=2)

(https://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/NTAwWDM5MQ==/z/BJ8AAMXQVERS-tGU/$_35.JPG?set_id=2)

Cheaper multi-dial watches are available.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on November 21, 2018, 04:57:17 pm
If you're timing re-entry burns with a Rolex, you know you're in trouble.
https://www.rolex.com/watches/cosmograph-daytona/m116503-0004.html (https://www.rolex.com/watches/cosmograph-daytona/m116503-0004.html)


Cheaper multi-dial watches are available.

The Rolex Daytona costs three times as much as the Omega Speedmaster. I'd rather have the Omega.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on November 21, 2018, 04:59:40 pm
Given a choice of all the space watches though I would probably go for the Sinn 140:

(https://www.fratellowatches.com/wp-content/uploads/Sinn-140-St-S-004C.jpg)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: ian on November 21, 2018, 05:03:55 pm
Course you couldn't. The elephant would break it.

Don't you know *anything*...?

I've never seen an elephant wearing a watch. Which begs the question, how do they know what time it is?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on November 21, 2018, 07:37:26 pm
Course you couldn't. The elephant would break it.

Don't you know *anything*...?

I've never seen an elephant wearing a watch. Which begs the question, how do they know what time it is?
By the colour of the car they've most recently washed.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Torslanda on November 21, 2018, 09:29:15 pm
Of course you're not going to see an elephant wearing a watch .

They can't fasten the bracelet.







Don't think you've got a monopoly on this crap ...
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: fuzzy (retd.) AAGE on November 22, 2018, 11:25:38 pm
If you find a nelaphant that can wear a watch, it can be any time the nelaphant wants it to be.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andrewc on November 28, 2018, 12:08:24 am
My sister asked me what I wanted for my Christmas Birthday present, so I dropped a subtle hint,  https://www.jaeger-lecoultre.com/eu/en/watches/reverso/reverso-classic-large-duoface/3832420.html


Her response was rather negative & quite rude  :jurek:
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pumpkin on November 28, 2018, 11:25:46 am
I had the smaller one  - The Night and Day. Quite stunning in its detail. Re Rolex daytonas - v.few of them are actually used for timing anything. they were and still are a statement watch particularly the steel models which command a high premium and a long wait list (unless you are famous)
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: hatler on November 28, 2018, 08:15:03 pm
My sister asked me what I wanted for my Christmas Birthday present, so I dropped a subtle hint,  https://www.jaeger-lecoultre.com/eu/en/watches/reverso/reverso-classic-large-duoface/3832420.html


Her response was rather negative & quite rude  :jurek:
Strewth !!  The strap for that is £310.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andrewc on November 28, 2018, 08:19:06 pm
Yes, if you like your shoes, belt & watch strap to match then it’s quite a consideration...
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Wowbagger on November 28, 2018, 08:35:57 pm
Do they do a matching sporran as well?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: ian on January 20, 2019, 05:14:48 pm
In my tenure as chief surveyor of wrist-based accoutrements, I'm making it official, the big watch wins. Primarily for girls, but also for boys, but the girls are winning more. I'm unsure about the weird double wrist-band thing I've seen on a few occasions, it's like a very non-committal form of BDSM, and really doesn't seem very practical. Why not tie your watch to your wrist with a bit of old twine? Designer twine.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on August 05, 2019, 05:05:33 pm
Just ordered a new watch for holidays. Requirements were:


I nearly went for a Timex Expedition Scout (love Indiglo):

(https://www.timex.co.uk/dw/image/v2/BBDM_PRD/on/demandware.static/-/Sites-timex-master-catalog/default/dw494a28de/images/TW4B01900.jpg?sw=900&sh=900&sm=fit&sfrm=png)

But in the end went for replacing my Casio AQ-S810W with a new one just the same:

(https://www.casio-europe.com/resource/images/watch/zoom/AQ-S810W-1AVEF.jpg)

I have had the old one for about three years and worn it nearly all of the time so its been battered whilst doing DIY and spannering. The case is scratched and the lettering wearing off. The crystal is fine though and the thing works perfectly. Just wanted s new one so it would be smarter. These things really are amazing value at <£40 for a solar powered watch with analogue and digital functions, world time, countdown and several alarms. Utterly reliable and no batteries needed ! I have a draw full of Casio's and Timex that need new batteries.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on August 05, 2019, 06:25:52 pm
I normally only wear a watch while kayaking.

However, we were on holiday and keeping an eye on the time was sometimes important (ferry times), and sometimes we just wanted to know what time it was without pulling out a phone. Sometimes we were swimming or on the beach and phones were (shocker) off.

So I wore my Timex ironman for most of the holiday. I'd forgotten how useful it is to have a timepiece on one's wrist. MrsC was constantly asking me the time.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Ham on August 05, 2019, 06:33:33 pm
I have a draw full of Casio's and Timex that need new batteries.


You do realise the expedition takes a standard 2025?
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on August 05, 2019, 07:18:29 pm
I have a draw full of Casio's and Timex that need new batteries.


You do realise the expedition takes a standard 2025?

Yes. I have plans to buy a cheap watch fettling kit so I can change all the batteries. £10 to change the battery on a £40 watch doesn't make much economic sense.
I like the new Expeditions but the price is a bit high at the moment. Thye go on special offer quite a lot. I'll pick one up next time they are on offer.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Mr Larrington on August 05, 2019, 08:30:00 pm

(https://www.casio-europe.com/resource/images/watch/zoom/AQ-S810W-1AVEF.jpg)


That looks like it might make a worthy successor to my old G-Shock which firstly forgot how to cope with BST and then died altogether.  At the moment I'm back using a near forty year old Seiko which doesn't change date at the right time any more.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on August 05, 2019, 08:34:07 pm
Good travelling watch as well as it does World Time. Press the top two buttons together and it swaps between two selected timezones. The hands and the digital display basically swap. When you get back to your home timezone do it again and they swap back. It has DST as well.

What I want is the functions of the Casio in a watch that looks like the Timex (plus a small digital display obviously).
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Mr Larrington on August 05, 2019, 09:22:46 pm
Just crossed the Mega-Global Big River Corporation of Seattle USAnia's palm with silver plastic.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Martin on August 09, 2019, 01:23:41 pm
I'm one of those people for whom mechanical watches die (automatics are OK but lose too much time) and battery watches run out after about 2 weeks after having replaced the original.

I have a Seiko Kinetic which is fab but too expensive to wear out cycling and a Citizen Eco-Drive, both keep perfick time
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andrewc on November 10, 2019, 11:12:59 pm
https://forum.tz-uk.com/showthread.php?460804-Now-that%92s-how-you-do-a-special-edition!-(VC-for-Harrods)


I must pop into Harrods next time I'm in London.  That's rather lovely. 
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Wowbagger on November 10, 2019, 11:52:01 pm
I'm one of those people for whom mechanical watches die (automatics are OK but lose too much time) and battery watches run out after about 2 weeks after having replaced the original.

I have a Seiko Kinetic which is fab but too expensive to wear out cycling and a Citizen Eco-Drive, both keep perfick time

I think for £75 that's hard to beat as an everyday watch. I bought one a year or so ago. It's correct to 1 second a month, but has the option of correcting itself every night if you want it to. My only problem with it is that the date is in MMDD format.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Mr Larrington on November 11, 2019, 02:00:26 am
I borrowed an old Citizen Eco Drive off Lt. Col. Larrington (retd.) for a while but it couldn't get enough light to keep it in electricity and kept stopping.  My fault for not going out enough, perhaps, but the solar-propelled Casio wot I have now seems happy with living indoors.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on November 11, 2019, 09:04:53 am
I borrowed an old Citizen Eco Drive off Lt. Col. Larrington (retd.) for a while but it couldn't get enough light to keep it in electricity and kept stopping.  My fault for not going out enough, perhaps, but the solar-propelled Casio wot I have now seems happy with living indoors.
The capacitor is supposed to store enough energy for the watch to run 6 months in total darkness, so that's odd. Do capacitors degrade over time? I suppose they do.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on November 11, 2019, 09:25:13 am
I borrowed an old Citizen Eco Drive off Lt. Col. Larrington (retd.) for a while but it couldn't get enough light to keep it in electricity and kept stopping.  My fault for not going out enough, perhaps, but the solar-propelled Casio wot I have now seems happy with living indoors.

ECO drives need a proper charging if they have been allowed to run flat. You need to leave it in the sunlight for 24 hours and after that it should be able to trickle charge itself OK.

Charging guide:

https://www.citizenwatch.com/us/en/recharging-guide.html
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on November 11, 2019, 09:43:32 am
I bought a Timex Ironman for, well stopwatch duties and keeping track of time when kayaking. It is an ugly lump of waterproof plastic.

Since buying it, I've started wearing it now and then, just because it has reminded me how convenient it is to be able to check the time with a glance at your wrist (vs dragging a phone out of pocket, squint at screen, oh, I have to unlock it etc).

My daughter commented on "what a nice watch you are wearing". Shows how modern aesthetics have changed. Chunky lumps are 'nice'.

It is a butt-ugly lump. To a young person's eyes, it is an attractive watch.

Functionally, it is a bloody bargain. Easy-to use buttons, good backlight, actually waterproof for swimming down to a reasonable depth. Under £30.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: fuzzy (retd.) AAGE on November 11, 2019, 09:47:56 am
I bought a Timex Ironman for, well stopwatch duties and keeping track of time when kayaking. It is an ugly lump of waterproof plastic.

Since buying it, I've started wearing it now and then, just because it has reminded me how convenient it is to be able to check the time with a glance at your wrist (vs dragging a phone out of pocket, squint at screen, oh, I have to unlock it etc).

My daughter commented on "what a nice watch you are wearing". Shows how modern aesthetics have changed. Chunky lumps are 'nice'.

It is a butt-ugly lump. To a young person's eyes, it is an attractive watch.

Functionally, it is a bloody bargain. Easy-to use buttons, good backlight, actually waterproof for swimming down to a reasonable depth. Under £30.

It takes the young a few years of living to develop an appreciation for true beauty and style....
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Mr Larrington on November 11, 2019, 12:23:14 pm
I borrowed an old Citizen Eco Drive off Lt. Col. Larrington (retd.) for a while but it couldn't get enough light to keep it in electricity and kept stopping.  My fault for not going out enough, perhaps, but the solar-propelled Casio wot I have now seems happy with living indoors.

ECO drives need a proper charging if they have been allowed to run flat. You need to leave it in the sunlight for 24 hours and after that it should be able to trickle charge itself OK.

Charging guide:

https://www.citizenwatch.com/us/en/recharging-guide.html

It used to spend its not-being-worn time at Fort Larrington in the bathroom, which has one of them light pipe things in it, and was thus in receipt of plenty of photons.  Didn't take long to stop when it was on my wrist, though, so I reckon it's probably fuXX0rd.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: pcolbeck on November 11, 2019, 01:33:29 pm
I borrowed an old Citizen Eco Drive off Lt. Col. Larrington (retd.) for a while but it couldn't get enough light to keep it in electricity and kept stopping.  My fault for not going out enough, perhaps, but the solar-propelled Casio wot I have now seems happy with living indoors.

ECO drives need a proper charging if they have been allowed to run flat. You need to leave it in the sunlight for 24 hours and after that it should be able to trickle charge itself OK.

Charging guide:

https://www.citizenwatch.com/us/en/recharging-guide.html

It used to spend its not-being-worn time at Fort Larrington in the bathroom, which has one of them light pipe things in it, and was thus in receipt of plenty of photons.  Didn't take long to stop when it was on my wrist, though, so I reckon it's probably fuXX0rd.

Yes sounds borked.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Salvatore on November 11, 2019, 01:54:36 pm
I borrowed an old Citizen Eco Drive off Lt. Col. Larrington (retd.) for a while but it couldn't get enough light to keep it in electricity and kept stopping.  My fault for not going out enough, perhaps, but the solar-propelled Casio wot I have now seems happy with living indoors.

ECO drives need a proper charging if they have been allowed to run flat. You need to leave it in the sunlight for 24 hours and after that it should be able to trickle charge itself OK.

Charging guide:

https://www.citizenwatch.com/us/en/recharging-guide.html

It used to spend its not-being-worn time at Fort Larrington in the bathroom, which has one of them light pipe things in it, and was thus in receipt of plenty of photons.  Didn't take long to stop when it was on my wrist, though, so I reckon it's probably fuXX0rd.

Yes sounds borked.

Yup.

I've only once had to charge my ECO drive, and that was when it was new. I put it in direct sunlight in my car window while driving west along the M4 one summer's evening, so it must have been a long time ago, because I haven't had a car for over 10 years. It recently spent a month or so in a rucksack pocket and didn't require any charging. And that month without a wristwatch convinced me of the convenience of being able to know the time with a glance at my wrist.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Kim on November 12, 2019, 12:25:22 am
Do capacitors degrade over time? I suppose they do.

Depends on what they're molished from, but most electrolytics (which is what I'd expect in this sort of application) do.  They also don't like temperature extremes, and various forms of electrical abuse that aren't likely to happen in a watch.  The market was flooded with dodgy ones in the early noughties, as anyone who replaced motherboards will testify, which might be relevant.

ETA: But it appears that these watches use Lithium-titanate rechargeable batteries, instead.  Better energy density than a capacitor, and good for many more charge cycles than the usual Li+ chemistries, but they will deteriorate over time.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Kim on November 12, 2019, 12:25:48 am
You need to leave it in the sunlight for 24 hours

That sounds ...challenging.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: De Sisti on November 12, 2019, 04:42:04 am

I'm one of those people for whom mechanical watches die (automatics are OK but lose too much time) ..
Not all mechanical watches lose too much time. If you service your watch regularly it should
fairly accurate.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on November 12, 2019, 08:30:31 am
You need to leave it in the sunlight for 24 hours

That sounds ...challenging.
It wasn't specified that the hours had to be continuous.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on November 12, 2019, 08:32:09 am

I'm one of those people for whom mechanical watches die (automatics are OK but lose too much time) ..
Not all mechanical watches lose too much time. If you service your watch regularly it should
fairly accurate.  :thumbsup:
I don't recall the mechanical watches I've owned in the past being noticeably inaccurate but they did all die or reach a point where the work needed to keep them going was more than I was prepared to invest in time, money and inconvenience.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: De Sisti on November 12, 2019, 02:32:59 pm

I'm one of those people for whom mechanical watches die (automatics are OK but lose too much time) ..
Not all mechanical watches lose too much time. If you service your watch regularly it should
fairly accurate.  :thumbsup:
I don't recall the mechanical watches I've owned in the past being noticeably inaccurate but they did all die or reach a point where the work needed to keep them going was more than I was prepared to invest in time, money and inconvenience.
My longest owned mechanical watch was purchased in 1993 and sold in February 2019 (for more
than twice it's cost price). Serviced every 4 - 5 years it was very accurate (+3 seconds per day).
Its successor gains +2 seconds per day. The other 4 mechanical watches I own (purchased
between 2007 and 2016) are all accurate up to > + 7 seconds per day. As with any mechanical
device, they need to be service on a regular basis.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andrewc on November 12, 2019, 03:27:47 pm
I’m wearing a 1960’s  hand wound Omega Seamaster, which I’ve had for 34 years.  It’s been serviced once in that time. Probably overdue some TLC!
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: andytheflyer on November 13, 2019, 03:33:52 pm
My Citizen EcoDrive (my 3rd) just works.  No need to put it anywhere bright, ever.  It just, well, works........

Brilliantly.
Title: Re: Wearing a watch
Post by: nextSibling on November 13, 2019, 11:23:34 pm

I'm one of those people for whom mechanical watches die (automatics are OK but lose too much time) ..
Not all mechanical watches lose too much time. If you service your watch regularly it should
fairly accurate.  :thumbsup:
I don't recall the mechanical watches I've owned in the past being noticeably inaccurate but they did all die or reach a point where the work needed to keep them going was more than I was prepared to invest in time, money and inconvenience.
My longest owned mechanical watch was purchased in 1993 and sold in February 2019 (for more
than twice it's cost price). Serviced every 4 - 5 years it was very accurate (+3 seconds per day).
Its successor gains +2 seconds per day. The other 4 mechanical watches I own (purchased
between 2007 and 2016) are all accurate up to > + 7 seconds per day. As with any mechanical
device, they need to be service on a regular basis.

My current everyday watch is a Seiko 5 automatic I've grown rather fond of. Simple, not flashy, understated, utilitarian, good value. It gains 1-2 seconds per day. In my experience, for best accuracy, automatics need daily wearing. The stop/start of occasional use results in reduced accuracy.