Yet Another Cycling Forum

General Category => The Knowledge => Health & Fitness => Topic started by: mrcharly-YHT on January 21, 2010, 03:07:57 pm

Title: Blood donation
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on January 21, 2010, 03:07:57 pm
First time back for years.
   
Not much changed, apart from using a wierd swipey thing to clean your arm.

Blimey! I don't remember the needle hurting like that!

I *definitely* don't remember getting 'blowback' round the needle. Nope, blood donation sessions didn't involve blood running down my arm before.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Moloko on January 21, 2010, 03:21:29 pm
Bah! No chance of a "blowback" at my blood drop-in.
You'd be lucky to even get a cup of tea and a poxy digestive out of them.

Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: CommuteTooFar on January 21, 2010, 03:22:33 pm
Well done for doing it.  At my place of work (15 people) I am the only one who is willing to donate. (One is forbidden due to health reasons).  Unfortunately the last 5 times the vampires have stopped locally I have had a cold.  I think it is not a coincidence that the office installed air conditioning around the same time.

Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on January 21, 2010, 03:32:38 pm
I used to be a frequent donor. Stopped when I started cycling so much, as it always takes me a while to recover.

So this was my 23rd donation (but the 19th on their records; records used to be regional).

I'm going to look into blood component donation. Should have less of an impact on my health than whole blood.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Wowbagger on January 21, 2010, 05:14:34 pm
They don't want mine and I don't care!
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Greenbank on January 22, 2010, 03:46:08 pm
Blimey! I don't remember the needle hurting like that!

That'll be the alcohol from the wipey thing going in with the needle. Suprised me just how much it did hurt (donation #1 two months ago, no previous donations due to anti-inflammatory drugs, visits to Malarial countries and, more often than not, apathy). Appointment #2 is booked though.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: saturn on January 22, 2010, 08:32:42 pm
You'd be lucky to even get a cup of tea and a poxy digestive out of them.

Blimey, mine have started offering cakes in addition to the biscuits  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on January 23, 2010, 05:51:44 pm
Blimey! I don't remember the needle hurting like that!

That'll be the alcohol from the wipey thing going in with the needle.

I think it was the clumsiness of the woman who put in the needle. I don't normally ever bruise, and my elbow is gradually turning black.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Speshact on January 23, 2010, 06:11:33 pm
As I go through the tick list before you are allowed to give blood I always wonder what percentage of the population is actually eligible to give....and whether I live too unadventurous a life
The National Blood Service - Can I Give Blood (http://www.blood.co.uk/can-i-give-blood/donor-health-check/)
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: rogerzilla on January 23, 2010, 06:13:10 pm
I had to stop when I started cycling a lot.  I need every corpuscle I can lay my hands on, just to get over the hill halfway to work.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Polar Bear on January 23, 2010, 06:19:30 pm
As I go through the tick list before you are allowed to give blood I always wonder what percentage of the population is actually eligible to give....and whether I live too unadventurous a life
The National Blood Service - Can I Give Blood (http://www.blood.co.uk/can-i-give-blood/donor-health-check/)

Interesting that test.   My specific exclusion is not included.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Sergeant Pluck on January 23, 2010, 06:34:45 pm
It's quite a long list of exclusions.

Quote
Have you had a serious illness or a procedure in the past or are you on medication at present?

For this one, a yes gets you rejected - all medications?? How far back? I don't take any meds but I have had meningitis as an infant. If I include that, I'm out.

Quote
Have you been outside the UK (including business) in the last 12 months?

What, away from the UK at all?

Quote
If you have travelled outside Europe or to Ravenna province in North-east Italy, then you may not be able to give blood. For more information please call our 24 hour Donor Helpline

What's the problem with Ravenna, out of curiosity?

Quote
Have you ever stayed outside the UK for a continuous period of 6 months or more?

Another "no thanks" for me there.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Kathy on January 23, 2010, 06:43:24 pm
It's quite a long list of exclusions.

Quote
Have you had a serious illness or a procedure in the past or are you on medication at present?

For this one, a yes gets you rejected - all medications?? How far back? I don't take any meds but I have had meningitis as an infant. If I include that, I'm out.

Quote
Have you been outside the UK (including business) in the last 12 months?

What, away from the UK at all?

Quote
If you have travelled outside Europe or to Ravenna province in North-east Italy, then you may not be able to give blood. For more information please call our 24 hour Donor Helpline

What's the problem with Ravenna, out of curiosity?

Quote
Have you ever stayed outside the UK for a continuous period of 6 months or more?

Another "no thanks" for me there.

Answering "yes" to any of those questions doesn't automatically lead to an exclusion. Mostly it's for common-sense reasons - f'rinstance, they want to know if you've had any medications in the last five days so that if you've taken paracetamol they mark your donation accordingly so that it doesn't go to a person who has a paracetamol allergy.

Similarly, tell 'em that you've been outside the UK, and all they'll do is ask "where?" and check it off on their list of "places to watch". Most places are absolutely fine (Ravenna had a problem with Chikungunya Fever, according to Mr Google).

 :)
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Adam on January 23, 2010, 06:46:50 pm
It's quite a long list of exclusions.

Quote
Have you had a serious illness or a procedure in the past or are you on medication at present?

For this one, a yes gets you rejected - all medications?? How far back? I don't take any meds but I have had meningitis as an infant. If I include that, I'm out.


They wouldn't reject you automatically just for answering yes, as it all depends exactly what you've had and when.

On their FAQs (http://www.giveblood.org/index.php?page=faqs), about half way down there's a link for a list of medications to check if they'd stop someone donating.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Greenbank on January 23, 2010, 06:51:38 pm
It's quite a long list of exclusions.

They aren't exclusions, only questions that need following up and discussion with someone knowledgeable. Something that can't be assessed with a simple yes/no on a website.

I've had a skin graft and been on heavy anti-inflammatories that previously excluded me from donating (15 years ago). I've lived outside the UK for longer than 6 months in one go (lived in the US in 2001). I'd also been out of the UK in the last 12 months (France).

Most importantly I'd spent 2 months traveling around South America in the last 12 months (Chile, Argentina and brief visits to Uruguay and Brazil). The Brazil trip took me into a malarial zone.

So that was 3 or 4 questions that get me "rejected" according to the online test.

All this triggered was someone asking me about it in person, asking if I'd had any problems, or slept in mud huts (Chagas disease and Malaria) and then deciding that it was still ok since it been 10 months since I'd been back from S America with no problems. They just submitted an extra sample of my blood for a Malaria test (as well as the usual things they test for).
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Sergeant Pluck on January 23, 2010, 07:00:27 pm
They aren't exclusions, only questions that need following up and discussion with someone knowledgeable

Thought that might be a possibility. I tried putting in the "wrong answers" for most questions, out of curiosity, and I'm sure the wording of some of the rejections might put some people off investigating further:

Quote
Thank you for your time... but it seems that you are not able to give blood
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: fboab on January 24, 2010, 03:21:48 pm
They wont take mine. Not only do I need it more, but it's contaminated with drugs.

My dad's given around 80 pints. I reckon he's done my duty.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Tewdric on January 24, 2010, 03:29:57 pm
The vampires of the Gwasanaeth Gwaed Cymru had another pint of mine on Thursday.  

I try to give them a pint every time they come over this way and never feel any ill effects.  They do very good tea and as many good quality biscuits as you can eat, and unlimited Kit Kats!  :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: FatBloke on January 24, 2010, 05:03:55 pm
   
Blimey! I don't remember the needle hurting like that!



They used to give you a bit of local anaesthetic before putting the big needle in. They stopped that about 6 years ago.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Kathy on January 24, 2010, 05:15:59 pm
   
Blimey! I don't remember the needle hurting like that!



They used to give you a bit of local anaesthetic before putting the big needle in. They stopped that about 6 years ago.

Depends on location. I've been giving blood for about ten years, and have never been offered an anaesthetic.

Worst donation I ever made was in a mobile unit. The nurse attending was so busy gossiping that she spilled someone else's blood everywhere (which she mopped up with a tissue - the part of me that used to work in a haematology department in a hospital winced at that), and then forgot to wire up my needle correctly so that instead of draining my blood, she forced air into my veins. Which was excruciating. I've refused to go to the mobile units ever since.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on January 24, 2010, 05:31:25 pm
They still do give the anaesthetic if you ask for it. I haven't bothered for about the last 20 donations.

I now have a small cyst-like lump on the tendon near the needle site. I'm wondering if the nurse totally missed the vein first time and jabbed the needle into my tendon.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Androcles on January 27, 2010, 10:55:01 pm
Due to go next week.  Not been for a year or so, seem to be stuck at 40something donations for ages now, seems like I'll never get to the 50.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on January 28, 2010, 09:41:27 am
I bow in respect to your blood donating-fu.

40 is quite an achievement. Aiming for 50 is definitely black-belt territory.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: matthew on January 28, 2010, 09:50:39 am
They seem to think I am already past 50, but I recon 7 years at 3/year and 4 years at 6/year* puts me just shy.

*That was 4 years in Birmingham going to the permenant centre and component doning, 1 + 1, platelets and red blood so the 4monthly visit counted twice.

Unless something goes horribly wrong, or they find an alternative tech, I should have another 30+ years of donations to go.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: tatanab on January 28, 2010, 10:00:58 am
I went last night for number 22.  I started in 1984 because I needed to know my blood group.  The low number is explained by years out of the country followed by years of always seeming to have a cold when the blood bus came around.  Never had an anaeshetic but procedures have changed over the years; the most recent being to invite you to drink a big glass of water while you are waiting.

Tonight I will go for a ride to meet the Thursday pub ride to replenish some more liquid.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: TheLurker on January 28, 2010, 12:19:13 pm
Well, assuming the Hb isn't low again (twice in the last 18 months) I'm expecting them to take No. 45 from me next Friday.  We'll see.

I am however getting a little bit narked (but not rant level narked) with being chased by them when they told me very clearly to, "Go away and rest for a wee while to get the Hb levels back up before you make another appointment."  Yes I know ORh+ is very useful because, as it happens, I do remember my O level biology and all that 'universal donor' / 'universal recipient' guff. 

Sometimes one wonders if the left hand knows what the right hand is doing. Hey ho. Smile and wave, smile and wave.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: hulver on January 28, 2010, 03:09:01 pm
Yes I know ORh+ is very useful because, as it happens, I do remember my O level biology and all that 'universal donor' / 'universal recipient' guff. 

I thought it was ORh- that was the universal stuff, because you can't give Rh+ to an Rh- person.

Or have I got it the wrong way around?
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on January 28, 2010, 03:18:46 pm
afaik, all Rh+ people can accept blood from ORh+

Rh- needs Rh-
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Moloko on January 28, 2010, 03:26:02 pm
and then forgot to wire up my needle correctly so that instead of draining my blood, she forced air into my veins. Which was excruciating.

Halfords are now doing blood donation?
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Martin on January 28, 2010, 03:27:32 pm
Yes I know ORh+ is very useful because, as it happens, I do remember my O level biology and all that 'universal donor' / 'universal recipient' guff.  

I thought it was ORh- that was the universal stuff, because you can't give Rh+ to an Rh- person.

Or have I got it the wrong way around?

ooh work related question makes a change having been off for a month;

group O can be given to anyone; otherwise you cannot give A to someone who is not A etc (apart from AB who can have anything)

Rh is a bit different (top marks too for calling it Rh not Rhesus the connection between the blood group system and monkeys was disproved decades ago but it persists in terminology)

Rh is one of the most immunogenic of the other systems; nobody is born with antibodies to Rh but if an Rh - person has contact with Rh+ red cells thru either pregnancy (across the placenta) or transfusion they are likely to form anti-Rh antibody (most commonly anti-D but there are 4 other antigens in the system)

anyone still awake?

so if you give Rh+ blood to an Rh- male (or female beyond child bearing age) they may make antibodies which will require them to receive Rh- blood for life; no big deal ( all blood is screened for these antibodies before a transfusion is given and if they are found the appropriate negative donor blood is selected; there are dozens of other systems but they mostly behave just like Rh)

but if it's a woman who then becomes pregnant they will pass the antibody across to the foetus via the placenta; if the foetus is Rh+ (having got the gene from dad; 85% of the UK possess the Rh or D antigen) it can cause jaundice and general bad things even requiring intra uterine (or soon after delivery) transfusion, phototherapy; plasmapheresis of mum to get the antibody level down etc.


so we try to match Rh to Rh whenever possible but big Rh- bleeds who will not have babies go to Rh+ to conserve stocks of Rh-

we would normally only give out O Rh- to a non O Rh- in a dire emergency when we did not know the patient's blood group (usually A/E situations) as it takes about 30 mins to determine blood type and antibody status. We can get the blood group from a blood sample in a couple of minutes if they are gushing.

Rh- to Rh+ is fine (apart from cases of anti-c but you don't wan to know about that)

ps anybody know how long major surgery bars you for? just had my call up and it doesn't say.

Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on January 28, 2010, 03:41:12 pm
major surgery? If you've *received* a transfusion, I think you are barred for life.

"You should NOT give blood if . . . . .
You have received blood or think you may have received blood during the course of any medical treatment or procedure anywhere in the world since 1st January 1980."
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Martin on January 28, 2010, 03:43:19 pm
major surgery? If you've *received* a transfusion, I think you are barred for life.

"You should NOT give blood if . . . . .
You have received blood or think you may have received blood during the course of any medical treatment or procedure anywhere in the world since 1st January 1980."

I checked; I didn't receive any. Still had a large hole dug out though.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: matthew on January 28, 2010, 05:54:45 pm
Martin, I suspect you will be caught by the waiting for a medical appointment other than a dental check-up. Which will prompt them to ask you more questions and probably send you to the long grass until your surgeon signs you off as fully recovered.

ps I think it was about 10 weeks from my orthopedic surgery to the next 1+1 donation. I was definately still in the physios care.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Martin on January 28, 2010, 06:09:46 pm
given that they found quite a lot of the red stuff when they opened me up (not including what inevitably comes out in ops) I think I'll just voluntarily defer for several months. A diet of pizza curry pasta and no meat doesn't help/

I think after 77 units I'm allowed a break
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Palinurus on January 28, 2010, 06:38:31 pm
Think I must've done 40 or so by now, cycling gets in the way quite often- I'm going to donate in the gap between the last 'cross race and the first TT.

I'll donate close to work, are the blood service ever funny about people riding to and from the venue? normally I walk back to work and change into my lycra so they never know- this time the venue is a bit further away so it makes more sense to ride and go straight home.

I don't have a problem with riding, wondering if they might.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Chris S on February 01, 2010, 03:16:33 pm
Just got back from #9. Cue the dozies for the rest of the day... :)

There was a bleeder today - poor chap; blood everywhere  :thumbsup:.

So that's one bleeder and one fainter I've seen in nine sessions.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Gatlow on February 01, 2010, 03:44:02 pm
I'm off to number 4 this Sunday.

The first time i went there was one person that fainted and at the second donation there was a claret fountain incident during tea and biscuits.

These seem like anomalous occurrences after reading the statistical info at the beginning of the session.  But after reading about Chris S's experience perhaps its just that the bleeders and fainters just don't get recorded very often.

Data recording's a bit slack..

How long do people take to pump a pint?  4 minutes and 8 seconds is my current record...
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Chris S on February 01, 2010, 03:47:26 pm
I've never timed mine, but they often remark how quick it is. It's because I cycle to the session (10km each way) so I'm all pumped up and raring to bleed.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: matthew on February 01, 2010, 06:14:20 pm
Think I must've done 40 or so by now, cycling gets in the way quite often- I'm going to donate in the gap between the last 'cross race and the first TT.

I'll donate close to work, are the blood service ever funny about people riding to and from the venue? normally I walk back to work and change into my lycra so they never know- this time the venue is a bit further away so it makes more sense to ride and go straight home.

I don't have a problem with riding, wondering if they might.

I used to be quite open about my plan to ride the A38 from the centre of Birmingham back to the University campus in Edgbaston. It's only about 3 miles but full on urban duel carriageway for the whole trip and not entirely flat.

They were quite happy from the donating front but always doubted my sanity about the route.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Palinurus on February 01, 2010, 07:49:12 pm
Ta,

I'll ride then.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Chris S on February 01, 2010, 07:52:02 pm
Bloody Hell!

A blood donation when well into a weight loss phase is a shock.

I'm wiped! Mrs S had to cook extra pasta tonight.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: arabella on February 03, 2010, 10:44:16 am
I rang up to make an appointement in Nov and got told I'd be turned away if I turned up, without even a having the Hb test done ('cos I 'failed' it 10 days after LEL).  So I'll wait for them to summon me again, presumably next August.  Knock on is I won't try so hard to get to 100 as if low Hb can happen once etc. (only forty mumble at the moment anyway, about where I should be given my age and being out of UK/gynacological banned for approx 9 years at various times).

Wonder why surgery is 10 weeks whereas even a natural birth is 1 year.  Oh well, it  would have been difficult donating with a very small person in tow anyway.

edited to remove possibly misleading figure
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: hellymedic on February 03, 2010, 01:30:55 pm
Arabella, it's a question of iron reserves. Even if you don't bleed much when giving birth, a small person has been formed, consuming much 'slack in the system'. The small person will have made itself a liver and all other organs out of you or your food.
After the small person escapes, you need to rebuild your reserves.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: noggy on February 03, 2010, 07:17:22 pm
No 90 today - the century is in sight(2 1/2 years away)
HGb level 15.9 (Vs 13.5 "pass mark")
Had daily Ferrograd for last 5 days
and yummy black pudding and extra helpings of green veg over last few days
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Martin on February 03, 2010, 07:24:21 pm
Wonder why surgery is 10 weeks

where did you hear that?

being O neg (rr K- CMV- to boot; prime baby blood material) I get badgered all the time; they rang a couple of days ago so I told them my recent woes and they said "that's OK as soon as the hospital sign you off come in and roll up your sleeve"

Fortunately I can test myself at work before the next time; Hb any less than 14.0 and it's no show
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: arabella on February 04, 2010, 11:08:38 am
Wonder why surgery is 10 weeks

where did you hear that?

Hmm, must have made it up, will edit to not confuse anyone.

Thx for explanation, Helly.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Karla on February 04, 2010, 12:25:59 pm
Most importantly I'd spent 2 months traveling around South America in the last 12 months (Chile, Argentina and brief visits to Uruguay and Brazil). The Brazil trip took me into a malarial zone.

All this triggered was someone asking me about it in person, asking if I'd had any problems, or slept in mud huts (Chagas disease and Malaria) and then deciding that it was still ok since it been 10 months since I'd been back from S America with no problems. They just submitted an extra sample of my blood for a Malaria test (as well as the usual things they test for).
Whereas whenI tried (back in 2004) less than 6 months after I'd been to Kenya, I was rejected out of hand.  It's perfectly understandable, but is an interesting inconsistency with your treatment. 

A year later, I received transfusions and now I can't donate.  It's quite annoying actually, I feel like I'm in a debt that I can never pay back.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Paul on March 02, 2010, 01:08:21 pm
Blimey! I don't remember the needle hurting like that!

That'll be the alcohol from the wipey thing going in with the needle. Suprised me just how much it did hurt

I'm not sure that it's just the alcohol. I gave on Sunday, and it was by far the most painful donation in the last 10 years. I told the nurse so, and (in addition to the alcohol thing) she said that they had concerns about the quality of the kits/packs they are using. Specifically, they think the needles aren't as good as they have had in the past. Their concerns were initially ignored, but she said that she thinks a review might be on the cards now.

I've emailed the blood service to complain. I think that if I'm giving up my time and my blood, foc, then they could at least make the process as painless as possible. If others have noticed a deterioration, can I suggest that they also email the service?
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Paul on March 02, 2010, 01:09:50 pm
No 90 today - the century is in sight(2 1/2 years away)

Chapeau.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Tom M on March 02, 2010, 03:34:06 pm
Might have just been unlucky and hit a nerve? Could be less sharp needles though I guess.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: David Martin on March 02, 2010, 04:14:47 pm
Left a pint under the table at lunchtime.. You know when the session is about to start cos all the nurses stop smoking outside and head back to their stations. They have a new machine that weighs and beeps and moans if the flow is too slow or too quick.

This time I will not be out doing the club hilly chain gang in the evening. I learned my lesson last time.

Bit weary, but the needle wasn't too bad. apparently my Iron level is a little above average but in the normal range (15.5)
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: nicknack on March 02, 2010, 11:01:02 pm
Interesting. The last time I gave blood (a couple of months ago) was the first time in over 60 visits that I remember it hurting, and continuing to hurt for a couple of days afterwards.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Chris S on March 02, 2010, 11:06:11 pm
It hurts me nearly every time. Just not that much - enough to wince, but that's about it.

On about 50% of donations, I end up with a bruise at the extraction site.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Palinurus on March 03, 2010, 07:20:58 pm
I was supposed to be going this evening but there was an estimated 45 minute wait for those with appointments so I left (forgot paperback and didn't fancy sitting in a corridor on one of those orange plastic chairs without one)

I'm disappointed, haven't earned my Guinness.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: David Martin on March 03, 2010, 09:09:41 pm
Well, this time I feel so much better. Not going out and riding the club hilly chain gang that evening was definitely a smart move (once bitten, twice shy) and the run in this morning was fine - took it quite leisurely.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Aidan on March 05, 2010, 06:35:50 pm
Just done number 20. I'm having cake as a treat now :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Wowbagger on March 05, 2010, 07:50:36 pm
I gave blood yesterday. Mine never gets given to anyone else though.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Aidan on March 05, 2010, 07:52:37 pm
I gave blood yesterday. Mine never gets given to anyone else though.

Why?
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Wowbagger on March 05, 2010, 07:55:00 pm
My arthritis is an auto-immune condition and they don't let the likes of me give blood. My "blood donation" was a mere couple of phials to see the state of my disease.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Aidan on March 05, 2010, 08:00:08 pm
Not a pint then!
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Greenbank on March 05, 2010, 08:58:03 pm
They don't take a full pint, only about 470ml.

Have an appointment for next weekend, let's see if I can shift this cold sore before then (skiing and dehydration don't help).
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: djmc on March 06, 2010, 07:32:19 pm
I once gave blood just after coming back from the Alps and having a cold sore. They took my blood after checking with the doctor in charge. The next time after 6 months they were specifically requesting that they wanted blood with antibodies to Herpes simplex, I said that I regularly used to get cold sores after being exposed to light and that I had recently had quite a bad cold sore. They looked at their records and found that 6 months earlier I had given blood with a cold sore, they said thank you very much and took my blood again. Here in France they won't let me give blood as they think I might be contaminated with CJD.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Greenbank on March 28, 2010, 02:16:30 pm
Have an appointment for next weekend, let's see if I can shift this cold sore before then (skiing and dehydration don't help).

Cold (and cold sore) now shifted so I'll look to book something local soon (St Georges Hospital are open all day for blood but next really local appointment is in July). They also park a mobile unit outside work but there's no info on the internal wiki about how to book for it...

Registered for online appointment booking system (via the Government Gateway) and it looks very useful. I can see donation history, book and cancel appointments without having to speak to someone or wait for a letter, etc. Nice.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Chris S on July 08, 2010, 09:08:02 pm
Woo Hoo!

What do pints make? Prizes - pints make prizes. I got a Bronze today for my 10th donation.

I celebrated when I got home by almost passing out in the shower  :thumbsup:. I was dashing about like a mad thing after cycling back from the session; and had to nip downstairs to find a clean towel for a shower. I ran back upstairs, got to the bathroom and realised I was right on the brink of keeling over. I had to have an emergency sit down on the loo with my head between my legs. What a wally  :facepalm:.

All better now.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: hellymedic on July 08, 2010, 10:29:39 pm
BTDT. Ended up buying a big bottle of fizzypop and sitting on the shop floor drinking it when I 'came over queer' cycling through Sheepscar in Leeds immediately after blood donation.
Well done on your Bronze. I think I had mine by 1980...
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: pixieannie on July 08, 2010, 10:32:17 pm
Oh my.  Head between your legs, what a sight :demon:  Seriously though, well done on your achievement. :-*
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: simonp on July 08, 2010, 11:07:21 pm
"Have you had complicated dental work?" Yes.

Not very clear though that question.  Impacted wisdom teeth and GA to remove 'em.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Wowbagger on July 08, 2010, 11:12:07 pm
One of the more ... err .. interesting evenings of my life occurred at college when I was in my 3rd year I think. The blood donation van turned up the same day as the Scottish and Newcastle freebies van. I gave one pint but consumed several.

They won't let me give blod any more. I think I just about got to 10 sessions when my arthritis bit. Because it's an autoimmune disease they don't want my nasty blood tainting anyone else's.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Martin on April 26, 2011, 10:21:43 pm
just given for the first time in 2 years now donation #78; I decided to wait at least a year to get my Hb back up after my prang and op (neither of which needed blood) also my local sessions are usually always on Friday which is not the best thing to do before a 200km (or more)

It's a bit like turning up at Wembley without a ticket these days; everyone seems to book an appointment and any waifs and strays like me who just turn up (despite having been sent a letter and questionaire beforehand) are made to go and sit in the corner for an hour while they bleed those who have got their act together (I made an appt for next time now watch some bastard organise a 200  ;))

note; if you've been in Greece Italy the US or Canada 28days before donating don't bother; something to do with West Nile Fever  ???
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: saturn on April 26, 2011, 11:50:29 pm
I'm afraid I wasn't too keen on the 2nd class donor feeling I got last time I turned up without an appointment - you see your form placed at the bottom of the pile from where it seems only to make any progress towards the top if further non-conformists happen to turn up after you.  I find it difficult to predict more than a day or two in advance when I'll be able to attend (by which time all the slots are booked or it's too late to book) so I normally just drop into one of a number of local centres when I can. This used to work just fine but they seem to be finding it increasingly difficult to handle these days. It was probably disgraceful ageist stereotyping of me to observe that almost all of the other donors present with appointments appeared to be elderly retired types that quite possibly weren't in desperate need of a quick turnaround. I waited patiently and didn't complain of course but by the time I finally progressed to the blood test stage I was beginning to doubt the accuracy of the "our stocks are low, we really need your blood" adverts that were running on the radio at the time.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Martin on April 26, 2011, 11:57:28 pm
Mrs Zoom (who's been turmed down several times in the last few years for a low Hb) was more or less told to piss off tonight having done the same as me; and as she didn't have a current blood MOT did just that  >:(


It was probably disgraceful ageist stereotyping of me to observe that almost all of the other donors present with appointments appeared to be elderly retired types that quite possibly weren't in desperate need of a quick turnaround.

It was; the regulars at my session tonight were all ages and one poor kid who looked about 15 had the screens round him for the whole time I was there after feeling faint;

I can't help thinking with today's Whatever generation that they'll be having to pay them in years to come  :facepalm:
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Chris S on November 12, 2013, 05:27:57 pm
My first time with the new flippy space-age chairs. Kewl! Waaay better than the rickety  folding "beds".

I failed the CuSO4 test again  :facepalm:. Last time was two days after riding a 600, and I didn't bother with the proper test, but perhaps I should have; I let them test me today and it was fine (145g/L), so got to donate after all.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: AndyMorris on November 18, 2013, 02:28:09 pm
My first time with the new flippy space-age chairs. Kewl! Waaay better than the rickety  folding "beds".

They are quite fun aren't they?

Somewhere over 50
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on November 18, 2013, 02:36:54 pm

I can't help thinking with today's Whatever generation that they'll be having to pay them in years to come  :facepalm:

Stop doing them down!

Stepdaughter (17) donated for her second time last week.

Tattoos are a problem. Piercings and tattoos are frowned on by NBS, so every time someone gets a tat, they can't donate for 4 months.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: saturn on November 18, 2013, 07:09:45 pm
My first time with the new flippy space-age chairs. Kewl! Waaay better than the rickety  folding "beds".

My first experience of them today, I guess too many people couldn't manage the sit-up at the end since they introduced the requirement to do that while doing the 3 finger gauze pad hold  ::-)
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Wowbagger on November 19, 2013, 11:37:23 pm
My lifetime ban still hasn't been lifted.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Eccentrica Gallumbits on November 20, 2013, 12:41:03 pm
Tattoos are a problem. Piercings and tattoos are frowned on by NBS, so every time someone gets a tat, they can't donate for 4 months.
It's a year in Scotland.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: nicknack on November 20, 2013, 12:42:34 pm
My lifetime ban still hasn't been lifted.

Not dead yet then?
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: fboab on November 20, 2013, 02:44:47 pm
Tattoos are a problem. Piercings and tattoos are frowned on by NBS, so every time someone gets a tat, they can't donate for 4 months.
It's a year in Scotland.
I read mrc's post and thought "it was a year when I had mine done, they must be more desperate these days".... but I was in Scotland then.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: zigzag on December 18, 2014, 08:00:36 pm
did my first donation couple of days ago (a combination of non-cycling season, blood.co.uk leaflet through the door and a bloodmobile nearby), all went fine. the next time they are around is in april, but i haven't promissed them on that.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: saturn on December 21, 2014, 10:14:06 pm
I'm really struggling these days and I've just about given up trying. I can't book sessions far in advance because I'm not normally sure where I'll be working on any given day until a few days before, maybe a week at most. My attempts during the last couple of years at booking an appointment this far in advance have been unsuccessful due to all appointments being booked. Twice I've attended a session anyway and it was most unsatisfactory, I felt like a second class donor with my form firmly at the bottom of the pile with everybody who had appointments going on top. The reason this happens is because at each session people come to donors having their drink and biscuit inviting them to book an appointment in 3 or 4 months time. So, all the appointments are filled long in advance, possibly in many cases by people who have more flexibility about when they donate.

I've given this feedback to the service and I was phoned back but they're unable to offer a solution and frankly don't seem too bothered. Happily, it must mean they're not as short of donors as their adverts sometimes suggest. Hopefully I'll be able to start donating again when I retire.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: matthew on December 22, 2014, 10:59:33 am
Thanks for the prompt, I had forgotten when I last donated and found I am now due to give again.

As I have moved house I have had to search for the next appropriate and accessible session, looks like the 24th on my way home from work.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Salvatore on January 05, 2015, 09:35:42 am
A case of the coughs, snuffles and sneezes means I've had to cancel this afternoon's appointment.

I seem to be stuck on 25. I couldn't donate in the autumn because of the heart palpitations in Germany in the summer. Or rather because of the time to check that the Herzrythmusstörungen shouldn't stop me donating. The NHSBT had to consult my GP and she (and they) had to refer to report from the Stadtkrankenhaus in Brilon, or rather my translation of it, which says I am perfectly healthy as far as their extensive tests could determine*. Anyway, eventually they decided I can donate and I have a letter which says so.


*coincidentally the report from the German hospital says the same thing
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: zigzag on January 29, 2015, 06:51:45 pm
received a letter today stating that i apparently am "uniquely valuable as a platelet donor" due to my a- group. i did some reading upon that and it's a more complex process of draining, processing and transfusion of blood. the nearest platelet centre is 12 miles from my home. any platelet donors here?
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Séamas M. on January 29, 2015, 08:35:28 pm
That's interesting, I'm A-ve too and I'd never heard anything about platelets.

My donation last Tuesday takes me to 30.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Mike J on January 29, 2015, 08:59:55 pm
I've considered it but the platelet centre is too far to get to easily on a regular basis unfortunately.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: matthew on January 29, 2015, 09:26:16 pm
When I was a student, and local to the nearest platelet donor centre, I was a 1+1 donor. Basically a unit of plasma and a unit of red blood separated at the point of donation. It's slightly slower than normal but the chairs are more comfortable and it will always be by appointment so that there is a machine available.

Platelet donors need to be tested for their platelet count to be suitable. Its an extra vial when you give an ordinary donation. Because they are not taking whole blood a platelet donor can be more frequent than the 12 weeks for men.

The 1+1 is also the reason why I am nearly 70 donations, as for 4 or 5 years in Birmingham every donation counted as two, one red blood and one plasma.

ETA: unfortunately my nearest centre is now ~40 miles away so no go there.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: PeteB99 on February 02, 2015, 10:55:49 am
I used to be a platelet donor in the late 80's (it was called white cell donation then and as far as I remember was mostly O- people). It involved spending a couple of hours lying down with blood bring removed from one arm, processed through an IBM separator and the unwanted fraction put back into the other arm. Most of the afternoon off work and a couple of nurses to chat to, what's not to like?
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: hellymedic on February 02, 2015, 12:14:21 pm
White cells are not platelets!
Platelets are not cell but are needed for blood to clot.
White cells are mainly involved in fighting infection.

I think platelet donation is more common and possibly less time-consuming.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: PeteB99 on February 02, 2015, 01:09:23 pm
Ta for the correction. It was a long time ago!
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: offcumden on February 05, 2015, 04:08:03 pm
I'm booked in for my first platelet donation in a couple of weeks' time, having been assured that 'creaming off' part of my vital juice does not constitute a threat to my status as a highly-tuned athlete  ;D

We shall see.

btw - to those above who complained of the needle insertion being more painful than formerly - I noticed the same thing a few years ago when they stopped routinely using an anaesthetic.  Apparently you can now request an anaesthetic, but who wants to appear a wimp ;)
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: tatanab on February 05, 2015, 04:14:55 pm
I've been a donor for 30 years and never been offered an anaesthetic.  I have noticed trends that appear and disappear.  A few years ago you were encouraged to use alcohol wipe stuff on your hands, just before you picked up the centuries old magazines  - that's gone now.  In the last year or two I've been frowned at severely for refusing their offer of a large drink of water before giving blood - I hope that disappears or they stop frowning at me.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: jsabine on February 05, 2015, 04:21:08 pm
I'm fairly sure our lot threaten to not let you donate if you don't take the drink.

(Not a problem for me - I normally neck it, then get funny looks from the staff when I want another. The blood does seem to come out in double-quick time when you're well hydrated though, so I tend to make sure I've had a couple of big mugs of tea before going to donate as well.)
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: matthew on February 05, 2015, 04:32:48 pm
I got odd looks on Christmas eve when they saw my cycling clothing, shoes, helmet etc. Before they stuck the needle in the the duty nurse was summoned to confirm he was happy. His face when I explained it was a 6 mile ride home and taking it easy I would be home inside 40 minutes...

I had to reassure him that I have previously utility cycled after giving blood without ill effect before they would proceed.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: jsabine on February 05, 2015, 04:39:31 pm
The staff in the local mobile units recognise me now - last time they looked at the funny shoes a bit oddly, then looked at me, nodded and said "you've done this before, haven't you?"

I tend not to mention distance, just stick to "oh, it's only 20 or 25 minutes - I'll take it easy."
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: offcumden on February 05, 2015, 04:46:57 pm
When I asked about the need to have a large drink beforehand I was told it was not about being well-hydrated but to fill your stomach, which apparently helps to ensure there's a good blood flow by increasing pressure in the abdomen, or something.  Related to the buttock-clenching advice, I suppose!
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: matthew on February 05, 2015, 04:48:50 pm
The staff in the local mobile units recognise me now - last time they looked at the funny shoes a bit oddly, then looked at me, nodded and said "you've done this before, haven't you?"

I tend not to mention distance, just stick to "oh, it's only 20 or 25 minutes - I'll take it easy."

I'd just moved house so it was my first donation at that location...
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: seasider on February 05, 2015, 06:52:29 pm
I'm a platelet doner in Lancaster and usually attend every month.It takes a little longer than just blood circa 90 mins .The time passes quite quickly (read a book, watch afternoon telly, you are in a reclined position) .The staff are pleasant, thankful and keep you supplied with drinks and snacks .The feeling that you have done a sick person a favour is worth the time spent travelling etc.The Blood people are looking out for fit people to donate.Seems like a no brainer for cyclists.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: arabella on February 06, 2017, 09:30:29 pm
younger guy just made his first donation.

I am A+.  one child is A- and the other is O+, so I can have their blood but they can't have mine.  This seems wrong, somehow.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: TPMB12 on February 13, 2017, 08:08:29 am
I'm o pos, a useful blood to have since it can go in a lot of people. I got told 83% of uk population but that sounds a bit high to me.

Not sure of the number of donations but I've got a 25 to 49 card for a long time now. Stopped donating because of difficulty getting in. Appointments fill up and I've even been turned away once with an appointment. I'm afraid I've become annoyed with the service near me. Nothing to do with a case of stitched without anaesthetic giving me a phobia over needles at all. I have given blood a few times after that fear kicked in. Have never even flinched at having needles stuck into me until those stitches, even fought a nurse to watch a cannula going in. Nurses shouldn't slap your face away several times when you're a kid right? Still i got to watch the needle going in.

Anyway, what do you think the service should do in busy donation centres? Appointments for almost all so those who cannot guarantee being free have to make sure they're first in or no donation. What would you suggest they do? No appointments? Guaranteed donation even if they have to b stay late? More sessions in busy areas? More donation beds and staff? they've lost me years ago because of this. I wasn't even 40 years old so had potentially 30 plus years of donation left in me back then. At 3 times a year that's 90 pints.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: barakta on February 13, 2017, 11:11:19 am
It sounds like they made more appointments than they could honour. I agree messing donors around should be a last resort as it is people giving up blood, time and putting up with some hassle for a good reason.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: jsabine on February 14, 2017, 01:00:15 pm
I've never (36 last week) been turned away having made an appointment, and I've only once been turned away at the door having gone there on spec, though I've had to wait for 90-odd minutes once or twice when I've not had one. I've found appointments with just a few days to go several times, presumably because someone has cancelled - fairly sure the sessions had been fully booked when I'd checked online a little earlier.

They've just got rid of the bloodmobiles round our way though, so just waiting to see what the knock-on effect on session availability is.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: TPMB12 on February 14, 2017, 09:24:48 pm
I once booked for the next session while sat at tyre refreshments. I booked for a time about 1 hour into the session. I got there 15 minutes early and prepared to wait. I waited almost 2 hours.

The session before i turned up at the same time and didn't take any longer time to get through the system.

Perhaps I'm at an over subscribed session or a town which is busy enough to warrant additional sessions but isn't given any. Whatever the issue they need to sort it out. It's not just me who has an issue with these sessions, I've heard other donors complaining quite loudly at most sessions I've been to.

Whatever the cause I've given up giving blood. I'll possibly give it another go every few years to see if it's any better. If not then i disappear for a bit longer. Shame since i believe everyone who can should give blood. A civic duty.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: SoreTween on February 16, 2017, 12:23:04 am
It sounds like they made more appointments than they could honour. I agree messing donors around should be a last resort as it is people giving up blood, time and putting up with some hassle for a good reason.
This. 
Respect the people giving up their time, effort and blood.  Make less appointments so that when someone walks in with an appointment they sit down and get on with it.  I resent waiting 45 minutes to start the process when I have shown you the respect of turning up at the agreed time.  Where the centre is large enough have a separate stream of beds for walk ins.

Have less variation in the main donation centres.  Some main donation centres you can walk in (e.g. Horsham), others you cannot (e.g Gloucester) and there is sod all in the web site to tell you which is which.  Horsham it is pointless booking, you just join the same queue as the walk ins, Gloucester you can't walk in, it is appointments only.  To me the permanent locations should be more focussed on the drop ins, the mobile events should be geared towards maximum convenience for the donor.   What is the point of the mobile service if not to attract those that cannot spare the time to get to a fixed location centre?

Take the narrow minded prongs who schedule locations round the back of the barn with one round chambered.  I've ranted about this before but really, scheduling all the donations in a given locale on the same day of the week?  FFS.  They work on priority 1) convenience for office based salaried scheduling staff.  2) Convenience for the salaried donation staff. 3) venue availability 4) the unpaid volunteers without whom there'd be no damn service in the first place.  It's Tuesday or FO round our way.  I have now FOd & donate in Wales.

I don't do it for the thank you letters, the SMS messages, the cards or the X donations trinkets.  Bin all that crap and spend the money running one more vampire bed per county.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Kim on February 16, 2017, 12:48:06 am
I've never been allowed to give blood, so I've never had the experience to compare.  It sounds like they're operating as if there is a donor shortage, when that isn't actually the limiting factor (I assume because of budget cuts).

Trinkets and cards probably do have some effect on average, even if it's just reminders, otherwise they wouldn't bother.  Again, makes sense if donors are the bottleneck.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Dibdib on February 16, 2017, 09:11:22 am
I don't think donors are the bottleneck, even though there's a near-constant shortfall. I've been getting a lot of reminders lately, more so than usual. It's just that (IMO) the funding provided is an even tighter bottleneck.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on February 16, 2017, 09:20:03 am
I bet that staffing is the bottleneck, that is, funding for staffing is the issue. Same as hospital A&E etc.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Dibdib on February 16, 2017, 09:26:28 am
Exactly. I occasionally get a bit woozy after donating, and while I don't mind it - me feeling light-headed for ten minutes versus a potentially life-saving transfusion for someone isn't really an inconvenience - the staff have told me in the past that they just don't have the resource available to deal with regular fainters, as it's time spent not getting someone else through the process.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: trekker12 on February 16, 2017, 10:07:27 am
I haven't given blood for some years now. I nearly fainted the last time I gave blood and they were very good about it but it left me holding up the bed for a further ten minutes or so. I guess it can cause a bottleneck.

The last time I tried I wasn't allowed in as I have eczema on my hands and that day was particularly bad so they saw it as an open wound. I guess it's fair enough but I didn't particularly like the attitude from the nurse running the desk but I understand she has a fairly hectic job. I could have bandaged up my hands and gone back in I suppose.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: TPMB12 on February 17, 2017, 12:02:03 am
If it's a funding issue then why did it all go wrong under Labour when the NHS was getting a lot of money thrown at it and there wasn't a crisis?

Round here i was nearly turned away one time before appointments. The next donation session i got told about appointments. Took one and it took just as long to get through. Then a few sessions down the line you couldn't get in without an appointment. Then appointments got taken so you couldn't get in unless you're in when they open up each session

Stuff that!

I don't mind the inconvenience of turning up and waiting a couple of hours. I hate doing that when I've got an appointment. Scrap appointments. Give everyone a number and they get called up in turn. That's fair and egalitarian IMHO.

Still giving blood is a good thing to do
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: jsabine on February 17, 2017, 12:41:59 am
Strikes me that there must be a lot of local variation in, well, something, because although I'm quite happy to whinge about bits of the service round here (SE London/NW Kent), it seems fundamentally OK.

My experiences are clearly at odds with those of other posters, but I'm reasonably happy with everything from finding convenient sessions to making appointments and being seen in a timely manner. The past couple of sessions,  it's been about an hour from walking in to leaving, having eaten my fill of biscuits; the session before that took a bit longer, but that was down to a backlog caused by about three donors in a row having health problems which meant they each needed an extended phone consultation with the offsite doctor, and meantime were occupying the privacy cubicles so no-one else could be processed ... 
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on February 17, 2017, 08:01:09 am
If it's a funding issue then why did it all go wrong under Labour when the NHS was getting a lot of money thrown at it and there wasn't a crisis?

Your experience is completely at odds with mine. I was a regular donor back then and never had those problems.

Can't donate anymore, my blood is contaminated with strange drugs.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: TPMB12 on February 17, 2017, 08:30:53 am
At odds with your experience but still a valid question. Even if it wasn't going wrong in your venue/area it's been poorly managed in my area. Funding, IMHO, seems to be an easy excuse for mis-management. It won't be that simple.

BTW with one communication you're getting letters saying your donation is so very important because your blood can be used in 83% of recipients then another communication over the phone saying there's no appointments left so try your luck on the day. The way the blood service person n said that left me in no doubt the person didn't expect I'd make a donation if i turned up. Then i get turned away. Then i get another letter telling me i had missed a session there's another one on such a date...

Sorry but IMHO they need to consider the donor more. Right now it's hard to free up the time to make the sessions. I have a young child with about an hour at night to see him. He sometimes doesn't get up to see me off in the morning. It's a big deal for me to give up spending time with him for an extra 24 hours to make the session. At the time of my last successful donation i had to drop work to make one of the very first appointments. Then pressure at home too...i mean family life is more important than blood donation to my partner.

Anyway, sorry about the rant. It's just that the way it got here and hearing that it's going ok elsewhere just set me off. It must just be my poorly run area. I can easily understand a poor manager at some level results in poor service but that should really get reported back by donation staff and be rectified. Adding another session, perhaps on a first come first served basis? It can't be that hard to sort out surely?
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: barakta on February 17, 2017, 11:14:21 am
Sounds like your area is especially poorly run. Labour did put money into the NHS but they also did constant changes and it may well have been those trickling down and management somewhere in your area being bad for a long time.

Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: TPMB12 on February 19, 2017, 08:45:54 pm
Don't get me started about Labour and the NHS. Something scary i got told involved the very expensive appointments computer system. Since waiting times was part of Labour's imposed targets the software gave priority to new referrals to clinics. In the cardio department this resulted in a patient with worrying results needing further investigations and consultant appointment. Since his appointment delay had no negatives in terms of targets he didn't get the follow-up within 2 weeks like he would have under the old system. By the time he got his follow-up his condition had deteriorated beyond the point that simple drug regime could sort out. Resulted in a hastily arranged surgery during which he died.

The computer system was later turned off and scrapped quietly. The case i heard about wasn't the only one just the most severe. All because Blair's target culture led to blind focusing on a limited metrics. Clinical need sometimes came second. This case just makes me think the NHS isn't safe under any political regime.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Greenbank on February 21, 2017, 04:01:09 pm
Labour & NHS: P&OBI --------------->

They've just got rid of the bloodmobiles round our way though, so just waiting to see what the knock-on effect on session availability is.

That's what's done it for me. I used to be able to sneak out of work for 45 minutes with a bloodmobile about a 5 minute walk away (back of County Hall).

Now that's gone there's nothing I can get to in a short enough time to justify doing it on a work day, and the donations local to home clash with something else.

It's also quite incompatible with running training except for a rare rest (or at least low mileage) week.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: ian.r.mcdonald on February 21, 2017, 06:37:46 pm
my experience is reasonable in Stoke with the only issue when I used one of the travelling centres rather than my normal trip to the donor centre.

the staff are trying their best and the possible effect of taking a ( perfectly reasonable) choice of stopping donations could result in a patient in danger

use the occasional grief as a badge of honour to feel good about donating!
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: TPMB12 on February 21, 2017, 10:26:12 pm
Grief? No grief here i just can't get in unless I've booked an appointment at a previous session whilst sat around the refreshments. So I didn't book a session because I knew I'd be away. The session after i turned up with my form only to be told it was full. I phoned up to book an appointment at another session once i received a session letter/form but there were no more appointments left at a time i could get there by. IIRC I'd have to be at the session at the time i leave work which was half an hour ago.

So I am no longer a donor. So no grief here. I'll try again one day but not fit for awhile. Give it a few more years to get better.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Phil W on February 21, 2017, 10:44:39 pm
I used to be a regular donor. A blood wagon used to park outside office. Advertised in advance. Could make appointments or turn up.  Didn't have to wait long, if busy could return later. Done in work time and work didn't mind if you were gone for a while to give blood. Wagons withdrawn. Advertising posters no longer sent or put up. Several mix ups with my details. Weekday I can no longer give blood as just doesn't work. Several poor experiences of weekend attempts that felt like the old waiting in all day for a delivery etc. So I no longer give blood.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Martin on February 21, 2017, 10:52:28 pm
younger guy just made his first donation.

I am A+.  one child is A- and the other is O+, so I can have their blood but they can't have mine.  This seems wrong, somehow.

well actually the A- can have your A+ if he's male; but correct the O+ can never have yours;

the reason all this incompatibility exists is due to bacteria in our guts which have molecules on their surface very similar to blood groups on our red cells; and we form antibodies to the molecules we don't possess. We were never evolved to share blood so it only became apparent from 1900 onwards. Although mothers and babies have had blood incompatibility since the start; and still do have but we are now a lot more geared up to prevent it and deal with it when it happens.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Greenbank on February 22, 2017, 09:49:28 am
The online booking system (https://www.blood.co.uk) is great (I used to use it when it was protected by the Government Gateway credentials rather than email/password credentials).

I used to have at least two sessions booked in advance (more than 12 weeks apart obviously) and after a donation I'd make my next appointment (24+ weeks ahead) as required. This meant I always got the appointment I wanted that suited me.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: jsabine on February 22, 2017, 12:22:34 pm
That's fine (and similar to what I do, though I'm not quite so organised), but only works if you've either got certainty about what you're doing three or six months in the future, or enough flexibility to plan your life around the appointment. You also need a reasonable choice of sessions.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: rogerzilla on February 28, 2017, 09:20:17 pm
My mother is almost up to 75 donations, at which point they give you a statuette of Nosferatu or something.  She reckons she might stop there.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: offcumden on February 28, 2017, 09:51:47 pm
Platelet donation is the way to go if you have an audax-like tendency to collect points. Each donation counts as two (your platelets can be shared around, or summat), and you can donate monthly instead of 3-monthly. After many years of giving full blood I got my certificate for 50 donations, but since I changed to giving platelets a couple of years ago I've raced to over 100.  Or, in AUK terms, since I started the RRTY I've become a sort of Ultra Ran-donor  ;D   My collection of certificates, pens, gongs etc seems likely to outstrip my AUK goodies. And all it takes is a couple of hours a month in a chaise-longue being attended to and fed tea and biccies by nice nurses. What's more, people I tell seem far more impressed than they ever did when I spent my weekends riding silly distances.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: arabella on March 14, 2017, 09:06:46 pm
I went this evening.  It seems there are now 2 types of appointment - normal ones and provisional ones which aren't really appointments at all 'cos you have to go and make an appointment as well.  Or something.

There was a long queue, so possibly I wasn't the only person to be caught.  And there were 2 trainees, I got one of them, it seems she put the needle in a bit skewed as the blood came out at snail speed (usually I'm done in about 5 mins, this time I was still going slow at 7-8 mins...)

I feel stuffed, I'm sure I didn't use to.  Only another 5 years to my next medal.

A note on platelet donation - the lower weight limit is about 9 stone, ie higher than for blood donation.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: SoreTween on May 12, 2017, 06:16:58 pm
Failed the haemoglobin test today :-(  That's an unwelcome first.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: offcumden on May 12, 2017, 07:05:34 pm
I've been turned away from sessions 3 or 4 times over the years, usually in the summer when I'm doing more riding.  It seems this may be something called 'athletic anaemia'.  Some explanation to be found here (and elsewhere on the web): https://breakingmuscle.com/fuel/what-athletes-need-to-know-about-iron-deficiency.  I do sweat a lot, thereby losing iron apparently, and endurance exercise is supposed to increase your plasma stores, which has the effect of 'diluting' haemoglobin.

I've tweaked my veggie diet a bit to include fish, and more greens and dried fruit. Although I've been happy to do this, I find the advice to avoid tea and coffee around main meals a bit of a pain. My Hb levels do seem to be keeping up though, so maybe it works.

Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: SoreTween on May 13, 2017, 01:51:32 pm
Thank you for that link, I had no idea it took so long to improve iron levels.  This is my first attempt at donation since I started going to the gym, the amount I sweat there is way above anything I do in the real world.  I'm not saying it is that, there's a few other things mentioned for me to think about and the Welsh blood service have a high threshold for the test.  The gym could be the proverbial straw, thinking back it was a slow sink last time.

I'll see what the test results show.  (Do they do a blood test if you fail in England?)
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: offcumden on May 13, 2017, 07:57:17 pm
I'm not really sure of the threshold levels, but it's certainly true that they are higher than those that would cause concern at a routine blood test at the doc's.

My last experience of this was about 11 or 12 months ago at a platelets session. When my blood drop failed to sink convincingly enough at the initial pin-prick test, they tested it with a portable piece of kit, which I believe gave a reading of 132 (mmols?), which was just acceptable.  However, a few days after my platelet donation I received a call to say that, on more thorough testing, I registered 129, and I was asked not to donate for 3 months; it's usually monthly for platelets. I'd been every month for nearly 2 years, which can lead to Hb levels falling but, as in my previous post, I think there may have been more to it than that.  After 3 months, and some dietary adjustment, it was up again (134?). 

It's a few years since I gave 'full blood', so things may have changed but, if you failed the drop test, I seem to remember that you were just asked to miss that one session.  Of course, full blood is only taken at 3 or 4 month intervals anyway.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: SteveC on May 13, 2017, 08:11:15 pm
We had a long discussion about this some time ago when I wasn't allowed to donate.

https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=5624.msg96269#msg96269 (https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=5624.msg96269#msg96269)
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: hellymedic on May 15, 2017, 12:11:32 am
Haemoglobin is measured in grams per litre.
Men average around 150 and women around 135 g/l.

Blood banks have different rules for men and women.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: slowfen on December 22, 2017, 01:51:18 pm
Got my emerald award today.  :)
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Salvatore on December 22, 2017, 02:42:22 pm
Got my emerald award today.  :)

Congratulations (from a mere silver)
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: zigzag on December 22, 2017, 08:50:56 pm
the last time i went (about a month ago) a young chap couldn't pierce my vein. after some probing he asked me to arrange another appt once it fully heals. a bit of waste of my time, and a learning opportunity for him.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Jasmine on December 25, 2017, 07:49:48 pm
Got my emerald award today.  :)

Nice.  Congratulations.  About 6 months ago I was at a platelet session where one of the other donors was at 997.  The staff were planning a celebration for hitting the big one. Anything over 15 shows quite a lot of commitment, but that was something else.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Wowbagger on December 26, 2017, 09:50:14 am
I got to about 10 donations before I wsa told they didn't want my blood any more (rheumatoid arthritis, an auto-immune condition).
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: hellymedic on December 26, 2017, 01:42:08 pm
I got to about 10 donations before I wsa told they didn't want my blood any more (rheumatoid arthritis, an auto-immune condition).

I had my Silver (I think I'd made 33 donations) before MS was diagnosed and I had to stop.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: runsoncake on December 27, 2017, 12:16:42 am
Did about 18 donations but was rejected due to borderline anemia and then various medications/health concerns. Still at least in Wales I'm a presumed organ donor😁
Any bits you want? (Apart from missing ball bladder!)

Free to good OR bad home. NSA.

Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: runsoncake on December 27, 2017, 12:59:36 am
*ball bladder* ffs . Right autocorrect! That's it! I've told you before (insert rest of rant, I can't be arsed!)
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: hellymedic on December 27, 2017, 01:04:35 am
*ball bladder* ffs . Right autocorrect! That's it! I've told you before (insert rest of rant, I can't be arsed!)

'ball bladder' did make I larf...

Then I thought foopball originated by kicking a filled animal urinary bladder...
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: runsoncake on December 27, 2017, 01:10:47 am
*ball bladder* ffs . Right autocorrect! That's it! I've told you before (insert rest of rant, I can't be arsed!)

'ball bladder' did make I larf...

Then I thought foopball originated by kicking a filled animal urinary bladder...
To someone who has experienced the fun and mirth of epididymitis this is a less than joyful imagining young Helly 😨😨
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: hellymedic on December 27, 2017, 01:47:08 am
Apologies!

I am sure the bladders' erstwhile owners were beyond pain before they were repurposed.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: arabella on January 03, 2018, 12:43:21 pm
Got my emerald award today.  :)
Congratulations!

Nice.  Congratulations.  About 6 months ago I was at a platelet session where one of the other donors was at 997.  The staff were planning a celebration for hitting the big one. Anything over 15 shows quite a lot of commitment, but that was something else.
they count them both together then?
I don't qualify for anything other than the 3 whole bloods/year (lightweight and female) so aiming for 100 (whatever that is), or to donate 1 arabella weight of blood, or at least a hundred weight (cwt).  Emerald is next but not for another 5 years or so.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: offcumden on January 03, 2018, 03:56:56 pm
Reaching 1000 is pretty extraordinary - well done, that person!

Platelet donation makes point-chasing easier, with at least 2 for each session, and the possibility of monthly, or even fortnightly, donations - depending, I believe, on your platelet level. Also, they've recently started asking people to donate plasma at the same time (making 3 points a session), and are talking about bringing this up to 4 by taking red blood corpuscles(?). So, you could theoretically accumulate 100 a year, and qualify for some sort of PDRTY award ;D
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: TPMB12 on January 04, 2018, 12:04:47 am
OK I'll ask, what does PDRTY stand FOR? Google didn't find anything about what this means. Why use acronyms like that? If ppl can't understand or translate it then there's no communication. No communication then what's the point?
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Auntie Helen on January 04, 2018, 05:20:58 am
I guess he was coining an Audax-style ‘Platelet Donation Round The Year’ award.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: offcumden on January 04, 2018, 09:53:04 am
I guess he was coining an Audax-style ‘Platelet Donation Round The Year’ award.

Yep.

Sorry if it was confusing, but I'd mentioned points-chasing earlier in this thread, and assumed, perhaps wrongly, that readers would be familiar with AUK acronyms.  I often have to look up stuff like DAMHIKT - which is within the ken of google - but I can't expect it to know what I'm thinking.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: SoreTween on May 25, 2018, 04:40:11 pm
Woo hoo! Blood sufficiently magnetic to donate today  :) Just over a year since I failed the test. I had another go 9 months ago and failed there too. Happy.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Greenbank on June 11, 2018, 06:23:39 pm
Blood drop failed the copper sulphate solution test but came out as fine (156g/L) when tested with the little red machine that goes *ping*.

Need to arrange next one but I think I'll wait until a few weeks after Swim Serpentine as I'll inevitably have a cold for a couple of weeks after that...
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Greenbank on September 17, 2018, 08:14:24 pm
Need to arrange next one but I think I'll wait until a few weeks after Swim Serpentine as I'll inevitably have a cold for a couple of weeks after that...

On cue they've been badgering me by email and phone. (I could have donated from the 16th). Have arranged next appt for early October which should give me time to recover from drinking some of the Serpentine.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Greenbank on October 07, 2018, 11:48:11 am
#16 tick.

Next date I can donate is 30/12 but I'll leave it until after the New Year. I'll also be starting the 16 week marathon training programme around then so I need to work it in to that schedule.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: slowfen on October 11, 2018, 04:56:20 pm
First failure, blood stopped flowing after 290 ml :'( :'(
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: ElyDave on October 11, 2018, 08:00:56 pm
I'm not allowed - T1D

Don't see why not really as it's not catching  ;D
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Kim on October 11, 2018, 08:10:10 pm
First failure, blood stopped flowing after 290 ml :'( :'(

That sounds a lot worse than your posting on here would suggest...   :o

(Pardon my ignorance, I've never been allowed to give blood.)
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Feline on October 11, 2018, 08:13:15 pm
I give blood pretty regularly and they asked me to go to the main Bristol donor centre this week to see if I could be a platelet donor. I am A negative which is the universal donor type for platelets, and they are trying to recruit 50 more donors in the area. Unofrtunately although my blood was great, they don’t like the look of my veins very much so had to reject me  :-[

Apparently the platelet harvesting machine things puts your blood back into you under fairly high pressure and if you don’t have a big central vein in your elbow it can go horribly wrong (well big bruise and knackered vein kind of wrong). So they won’t take the chance. Its a shame as I would have been very happy to go regularly for it. They took my blood anyway, and were glad to get is as A- stocks are very low.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Gattopardo on October 11, 2018, 08:36:09 pm
I'm not allowed - T1D

Don't see why not really as it's not catching  ;D

It is because you are on Insulin and the effects it can have on you.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: ElyDave on October 11, 2018, 08:43:09 pm
that's the theory, yet to be proven.

It was also problematic pre T1D when I was travelling to Indonesia and Vietnam every 6 months, apparently just being there, even with no open wounds, no IV drug use and no unprotected sex, I was a high risk.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: hellymedic on October 11, 2018, 10:24:01 pm
First failure, blood stopped flowing after 290 ml :'( :'(

That sounds a lot worse than your posting on here would suggest...   :o

(Pardon my ignorance, I've never been allowed to give blood.)

I've had blood stop half way. No underlying health issue, just red stuff went from slow trickle to slower trickle to stop.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: quixoticgeek on October 11, 2018, 10:30:51 pm

Not allowed to give blood in the UK, the same reason I can't in the UK doesn't apply in the Netherlands. Went to see about donating blood here, only to find that cos I grew up in the UK in the 80's and 90's, I can't give blood here. Turns out they are scared of BSE/vCJD.

Noone wants my blood...

J
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Auntie Helen on October 12, 2018, 05:08:33 am
Same here QG.

I couldn’t give blood in the UK because I had cancer (25 years ago now) but I can’t give blood in Germany because of the mad cows.

I haven’t even done one donation in my life, and it is something I am quit sad about.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Kim on October 12, 2018, 02:08:55 pm
I bet the USAnians would have it.  They're notoriously non-fussy about such things.   >:(

Similarly, as a recipient of a transfusion in the 80s, I'd love to be able to donate.  I make do with encouraging other people to, and hope that if it comes to it they might be less fussy about organ donation.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: hellymedic on October 12, 2018, 02:13:38 pm
AIUI the USAnians won't take blood from those who ate BRITISH beef in the '80s.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: ElyDave on October 12, 2018, 02:46:03 pm
I bet the USAnians would have it.  They're notoriously non-fussy about such things.   >:(

Similarly, as a recipient of a transfusion in the 80s, I'd love to be able to donate.  I make do with encouraging other people to, and hope that if it comes to it they might be less fussy about organ donation.

I'm on the register, they can take any bits they want
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: quixoticgeek on October 12, 2018, 02:52:36 pm

Thats a point, if I snuff it on Dutch soil, will they accept my Organs... I should investigate...

J
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Kim on October 12, 2018, 03:45:39 pm
I reckon that most people in need would leap at a chance of receiving a healthy heart/lungs/liver from someone with a vanishingly small chance of carrying CJD.  You might get a bit more fussy about less critical organs like corneas.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: ElyDave on October 12, 2018, 05:22:09 pm
In my case I'm not sure what effect T1D has on acceptability of body parts
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Kim on October 12, 2018, 05:54:36 pm
In my case I'm not sure what effect T1D has on acceptability of body parts

They probably don't want your pancreas.   ;D
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: ElyDave on October 12, 2018, 06:40:21 pm
In my case I'm not sure what effect T1D has on acceptability of body parts

They probably don't want your pancreas.   ;D

That's fine, nor do I  :P
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Greenbank on October 12, 2018, 08:48:34 pm
AIUI the USAnians won't take blood from those who ate BRITISH beef in the '80s.

Indeed. I couldn't give blood in the US when I lived there in the late 90s, despite being able to give blood in the UK with no problems.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: hellymedic on October 12, 2018, 09:08:20 pm
AIUI the USAnians won't take blood from those who ate BRITISH beef in the '80s.

Indeed. I couldn't give blood in the US when I lived there in the late 90s, despite being able to give blood in the UK with no problems.

Not just the USAnians either; my brother, who is O Rh- ('universal donor'), can't give blood in Israel, where he lives.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Tim Hall on October 13, 2018, 04:03:04 pm
Just on my way back from donating platelets.

"Have you done anything strenuous today?"
" I rode my bike last night." An FNRTTC is exactly strenuous, more drawn out. The large breakfast took a bit of eating mind.

Normally they take two bags but apparently my platelet level is down, so they only took 9ne. They don't normally bother if it's just one bag but I'm A neg so am a wanted man.

There's a column on their paperwork for haematocrit. Mine is 46 so I explained to the crool nurse I was ok to race my bike.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: phantasmagoriana on November 19, 2018, 02:42:35 pm
I've never donated blood, to my shame, but been meaning to for a while. Just found out they're coming round here tomorrow and I could pop out in my lunch break. I actually have no idea what my blood type is, but I'm eligible to donate according to the website so I assume they should be able to take some.

I normally go to a spin class straight after work on a Tuesday evening - if I donate at lunchtime, would that be likely to cause any problems? (Or is this one of those "it depends on how you react" things...?)
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: zigzag on November 19, 2018, 03:05:02 pm
spinning class should be fine, especially when you can turn the resistance knob to any suitable intensity. for me i feel it takes 1-2weeks to be back at 100%.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: bludger on November 19, 2018, 03:10:26 pm
I've never donated blood, to my shame, but been meaning to for a while. Just found out they're coming round here tomorrow and I could pop out in my lunch break. I actually have no idea what my blood type is, but I'm eligible to donate according to the website so I assume they should be able to take some.

I normally go to a spin class straight after work on a Tuesday evening - if I donate at lunchtime, would that be likely to cause any problems? (Or is this one of those "it depends on how you react" things...?)

I think you need to register first. The NHS are picky about whose blood they take so best to do as much in advance as you can

https://my.blood.co.uk/preregister

There is also a very good app on the smartphone appstores just called 'NHS blood.'

I am personally donating tomorrow can't wait to smash some.oreos  ;D
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: sib on November 19, 2018, 03:10:44 pm
@phantas

I think the volume is replaced quite quickly but the red blood cells take weeks to regenerate. This might leave you more breathless for the same effort.
The instructor may decline you (if you tell them). Personally I'd leave it 24hrs.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: hellymedic on November 19, 2018, 03:45:45 pm
As others have posted, you make up the volume PDQ but make sure you do drink a decent volume after donating.

I used to feel under par for the first 48 hours and take 10-14 days to feel fully 'back to normal'.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Jasmine on November 19, 2018, 04:11:17 pm
I believe the policy now is that you get a pint of liquid (water or squash, not hot drinks) before donating, which has been shown to be more effective for keeping blood volume up and having issue free donations. Plus the drinks and biscuits afterwards.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: hellymedic on November 19, 2018, 04:47:10 pm
Makes sense, given the minor issues I had in the past!

Set off at high speed en vélo, felt faint, went to shop, bought BIG bottle of pop, sat on floor, drank it then set off...

...no issues thereafter....
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Greenbank on November 20, 2018, 10:34:37 am
I normally go to a spin class straight after work on a Tuesday evening - if I donate at lunchtime, would that be likely to cause any problems? (Or is this one of those "it depends on how you react" things...?)

They don't recommend it: https://www.blood.co.uk/news-and-campaigns/the-donor-magazine-autumn-2017/before-you-donate/

Quote
Exercise – don’t do any vigorous exercise or heavy lifting the day of your donation, either before or afterwards. Keeping your body rested helps it to replenish lost fluids.

I used to donate at lunchtime and then 35 minute cycle home later that evening (which felt harder work than normal) and then play an hour of 5-a-side football later that evening (again it felt harder than normal). Never had a problem but I guess I could have just been lucky, I'm reasonably fit so I may not be affected by it as much as some.

If you ask anyone today (Blood Nurse or Spinning instructor) they'll almost certainly err on the side of caution and say no, and to take it easy for 24h.

(The mobile donation truck stopped coming so I have to go elsewhere to donate now and can't fit in with work.)
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: whosatthewheel on November 20, 2018, 10:46:40 am
There are two positive outcomes of donating blood

1) it's good for others and society

2) you get regular blood checks

Everything else about it is not particularly good.
I belong to the 5% of "selfish blood owners", my AB+ is not particularly desirable and anyone with my blood type can take any other type, which makes it next to useless

So I never bothered
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Greenbank on November 20, 2018, 12:19:12 pm
Everything else about it is not particularly good.
I belong to the 5% of "selfish blood owners", my AB+ is not particularly desirable and anyone with my blood type can take any other type, which makes it next to useless

There are lots of non-clinical uses for donated blood: https://www.blood.co.uk/why-give-blood/how-blood-is-used/non-clinical-use/

I belong to the 5% of "selfish blood owners", my AB+ is not particularly desirable and anyone with my blood type can take any other type, which makes it next to useless

Without enough "not particular desirable" blood there may not be enough for all of the non-clinical requirements given that the really desirable blood would go for clinical usage as a priority. Them having too much blood is not going to be a problem.

It is a free choice at the end of the day though, doing it or not doing it is up to you.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: whosatthewheel on November 20, 2018, 12:34:07 pm
Actually 2.5% of the population in the UK... much more common in Korea, apparently

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_type_distribution_by_country
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: hellymedic on November 20, 2018, 12:44:38 pm
I can't remember ever transfusing blood of the 'wrong' blood group in any non-(DIRE)emergency.

I think there are reasons why this is the case, though I don't remember them accurately.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: phantasmagoriana on November 20, 2018, 02:40:23 pm
Well, it didn't happen after all! The pop-up blood donation place near work was too busy, and the only time they could fit me in was too late. :( Might give the permanent place in town (where it's possible to actually pre-book appointments) a go.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Adam on December 01, 2018, 06:34:16 pm
There are two positive outcomes of donating blood

1) it's good for others and society

2) you get regular blood checks

Everything else about it is not particularly good.
I belong to the 5% of "selfish blood owners", my AB+ is not particularly desirable and anyone with my blood type can take any other type, which makes it next to useless

So I never bothered

I'm AB+, and several times when I've been donating, the nurses have commented about how pleased they were someone with that blood type was donating, specifically due it being rare.  Over the years I think I've also had 2 or 3 pleading letters asking me to specifically make a donation due to them wanting more AB+.


I can't donate any more, so there's a vacancy. ;)
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Salvatore on December 01, 2018, 07:10:35 pm
AB- "One doesn't like to hog it all"

https://youtu.be/zcZChdM0OiI?t=160
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: whosatthewheel on December 02, 2018, 07:35:59 am

I can't donate any more, so there's a vacancy. ;)

I cycle 25-30 miles a day to work and back... it's not a doddle ride at 10 mph around the flat streets of the capital. I can't really afford to have a couple of weeks of being tired and out of breath.
Slowing down means my commute becomes more dangerous, as more cars would take their chances at overtaking around bends... if I keep 20-25 mph they seem to be OK to wait until they find a suitable gap.

The vast majority of people out there do nothing physically demanding and could probably afford to donate blood more than I can.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Adam on December 07, 2018, 08:44:41 pm

I can't donate any more, so there's a vacancy. ;)

I cycle 25-30 miles a day to work and back... it's not a doddle ride at 10 mph around the flat streets of the capital. I can't really afford to have a couple of weeks of being tired and out of breath.
Slowing down means my commute becomes more dangerous, as more cars would take their chances at overtaking around bends... if I keep 20-25 mph they seem to be OK to wait until they find a suitable gap.

The vast majority of people out there do nothing physically demanding and could probably afford to donate blood more than I can.  :thumbsup:

Fair enough - that sort of speed you'll need all your blood.  At 15 mph commuting & doing long rides a few days later, I didn't really notice much effect.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: whosatthewheel on December 08, 2018, 03:09:12 pm
Fair enough - that sort of speed you'll need all your blood.  At 15 mph commuting & doing long rides a few days later, I didn't really notice much effect.

There's more... my dad became a donor and a couple of years later he developed a heart enlargement that doctors could not explain. Eventually with therapy things improved, but it changed his life.
Sometimes I have this simplistic view of the circulatory system as "basic plumbing" and I can see how suddenly removing a large quantity of fluid from the system can damage a pump...

It's stupid, but it's there at the back of my mind
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Tim Hall on December 08, 2018, 03:35:30 pm
Fair enough - that sort of speed you'll need all your blood.  At 15 mph commuting & doing long rides a few days later, I didn't really notice much effect.

There's more... my dad became a donor and a couple of years later he developed a heart enlargement that doctors could not explain. Eventually with therapy things improved, but it changed his life.
Sometimes I have this simplistic view of the circulatory system as "basic plumbing" and I can see how suddenly removing a large quantity of fluid from the system can damage a pump...

It's stupid, but it's there at the back of my mind

Seems unlikely as there are thousands of donors and millions of donations are year.  If it does worry you, go and donate platelets. It takes longer but they put most of the blood back and you'll need to find a platelet donation centre.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Kim on December 08, 2018, 03:35:43 pm
Sometimes I have this simplistic view of the circulatory system as "basic plumbing" and I can see how suddenly removing a large quantity of fluid from the system can damage a pump...

It's not a closed system thobut:  Blood vessels change volume all the time to regulate pressure and body temperature.  Kidneys remove fluid to regulate the concentration.  The digestive system adds fluid as it becomes available in the bowel.

AIUI, never having given blood, the idea is to only take what can be compensated for by the normal mechanisms without affecting the blood pressure.  They get more than a bit twitchy if you exhibit signs of hypotension (as some people are apt to do at the sight of needles, irrespective of any change in blood volume).
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Feline on December 11, 2018, 05:33:14 pm
Fair enough - that sort of speed you'll need all your blood.  At 15 mph commuting & doing long rides a few days later, I didn't really notice much effect.

There's more... my dad became a donor and a couple of years later he developed a heart enlargement that doctors could not explain. Eventually with therapy things improved, but it changed his life.
Sometimes I have this simplistic view of the circulatory system as "basic plumbing" and I can see how suddenly removing a large quantity of fluid from the system can damage a pump...

It's stupid, but it's there at the back of my mind

As Kim said, it's not that simple.

Assuming you've not had a splenectomy your spleen will contract after a donation to replace a bunch of the red blood cells you donated. Your kidneys will hang on to a bit more of the water you drank before and after the donation to replace total body water lost, some of which makes up blood volume. All you're really missing then is some white blood cells and platelets that your bone marrow makes pretty quickly, and some blood proteins that your liver makes. Any weakness you felt exercising would be very temporary as the body homeostatic mechanisms put all this right very quickly.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: arabella on March 31, 2019, 07:47:04 pm
Meanwhile it becomes ever more difficult to book a donation slot, unless you do it w-a-a-a-y in advance - which assumes no changes to plans etc. which is why I am trying to rebook.
It's reminiscent of getting a slot for a driving test.

edit: new personal best donation time: 4:41
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Greenbank on May 22, 2019, 07:19:45 pm
Blocked for a year due to terbinafine. Boo.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: FifeingEejit on May 22, 2019, 07:30:35 pm
The stock level page for the Scottish Transfusion Service shows what's in stock here
https://www.scotblood.co.uk/about-blood/current-blood-stock-levels/

A+ is the most common and we're short of it.
I'm A+ but have issues with getting to donate, last time I managed to keep my sinuses clear and otherwise be not fatigued and went along they wanted me to tank up on liquid and sugar both before and after, as both help with the donation process.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: slowfen on May 23, 2019, 01:15:59 pm


No 80 :)
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: hellymedic on May 23, 2019, 01:50:23 pm
No 80 :)

Well done! Great that you're fit enough to achieve this!
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: phil w on May 23, 2019, 06:49:12 pm

Not allowed to give blood in the UK, the same reason I can't in the UK doesn't apply in the Netherlands. Went to see about donating blood here, only to find that cos I grew up in the UK in the 80's and 90's, I can't give blood here. Turns out they are scared of BSE/vCJD.

Noone wants my blood...

J

Well hopefully you do ;D
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: phil w on May 23, 2019, 06:53:51 pm
Haven't given blood for ages. Mostly because they no longer come round with the blood waggon to near our work place. They removed  the ability to just walk in, and made getting an appointment difficult. They no longer email reminders of when sessions are on. I'm somewhere between 40-50 donations but have lost track it's been so long.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: slowfen on May 24, 2019, 08:19:17 am
No 80 :)

Well done! Great that you're fit enough to achieve this!

Thanks

I’m about 10 behind where I wanted to be (life etc). The aim was 100 before 60.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: hellymedic on May 24, 2019, 03:56:01 pm
I got about ⅓ of the way there before MS.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Johnny Faro on May 24, 2019, 04:15:43 pm
I need to book in. I'm O- so they love me and I can get special appointments apparently. Didn't miss one for about first eight years from 16 but then had jobs where couldn't book in as never knew what time I would leave work. Know lucky enough to have them visit a football stadium 5 minutes from my work so book in around lunchtime


I love the appointment scheme, I realise it's hard for those with less predictable schedule as you can't get a walk in anymore but means I can allow and hour and it takes less rather then sometimes being around 2 hours
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Salvatore on May 24, 2019, 05:36:19 pm
I like the text you now get a week or so after donation.

(https://i.imgur.com/9yYqmfWm.png)
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: Wowbagger on May 26, 2019, 11:52:31 pm
It's more than 12 years since I gave blood. Rheumatoid arthritis means they don't want my blood any more. Autoimmune disease.

When I was at college, there was a very poor juxtaposition of visiting vehicles one day: the blood service, asking for students' blood, and the Scottish & Newcastle Brewery's mobile bar, giving away free beer. I gave a pint of blood and then had 5 pints of something. Not to be recommended.
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: slowfen on August 15, 2019, 03:52:40 pm

Blood given today, but, currently the coffee they are doing is de-caff
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: hellymedic on August 15, 2019, 04:00:38 pm
Is the tea also de-caff?
Title: Re: Blood donation
Post by: slowfen on August 16, 2019, 07:33:37 am
Didn’t look as don’t drink it. Will try the hot chocolate next time for the sugar hit