Yet Another Cycling Forum

Random Musings => Gallery => OT Gallery => Topic started by: Woofage on April 28, 2011, 01:18:41 pm

Title: Readers' Instruments
Post by: Woofage on April 28, 2011, 01:18:41 pm
Sparked by this (and other) posts, I'm starting the instrument pr0n thread.

Here's my bass:

(http://www.woofage.co.uk/images/bass_1.jpg)

No frets on that bitch ;).
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: Woofage on April 28, 2011, 01:43:31 pm
More string loveliness:

(http://www.woofage.co.uk/images/violin.jpg)

German-made, decent quality violin. Bought it at an auction and had it restored. Nice tone, much better than the dodgy one I passed my Grade 8 on :).
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: interzen on April 28, 2011, 01:47:04 pm
The Axe Of Disharmony:

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5304/5664056363_2d921e6054.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/interzen/5664056363/)
Yamaha BB404 fretless bass (http://www.flickr.com/photos/interzen/5664056363/) by interzen (http://www.flickr.com/people/interzen/), on Flickr
No speed bumps on that biatch, either ;)

My 'other' instruments (and some Angry Birds) :)

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5186/5664061223_e75f3a0e0c.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/interzen/5664061223/)
P1000216 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/interzen/5664061223/) by interzen (http://www.flickr.com/people/interzen/), on Flickr
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Hot Flatus on April 28, 2011, 02:11:07 pm
Sparked by this (and other) posts, I'm starting the instrument pr0n thread.

Here's my bass:

(http://www.woofage.co.uk/images/bass_1.jpg)

No frets on that bitch ;).

That's beautiful. No idea what it is, a custom jobbie?
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Tourist Tony on April 28, 2011, 02:12:45 pm
And here are three of mine
(http://i954.photobucket.com/albums/ae29/cyclisttony/063.jpg)

Edit: fiddle. mandolin and ocrave mandola with two bottom courses strung in octaves, two upper courses in unison.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Woofage on April 28, 2011, 03:58:54 pm
That's beautiful. No idea what it is, a custom jobbie?

Not custom, no. It's a Vintage V1004. They're very good value at typically a smidge under £400 (I bought mine s/h recently). I think there's a 5 string version as well.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: interzen on April 28, 2011, 04:15:08 pm
That's beautiful. No idea what it is, a custom jobbie?

Not custom, no. It's a Vintage V1004. They're very good value at typically a smidge under £400 (I bought mine s/h recently). I think there's a 5 string version as well.
If it sounds half as good as it looks, I might have found my next axe - it also appears that Gear4Music have them in stock, and they're only a few miles from here. Hmm. :)

The 5-string version is the V1005. Sadly, they don't appear to do a 6-string.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: LEE on April 28, 2011, 04:18:56 pm
The Axe Of Disharmony:

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5304/5664056363_2d921e6054.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/interzen/5664056363/)
Yamaha BB404 fretless bass (http://www.flickr.com/photos/interzen/5664056363/) by interzen (http://www.flickr.com/people/interzen/), on Flickr
No speed bumps on that biatch, either ;)

My 'other' instruments (and some Angry Birds) :)

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5186/5664061223_e75f3a0e0c.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/interzen/5664061223/)
P1000216 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/interzen/5664061223/) by interzen (http://www.flickr.com/people/interzen/), on Flickr

Yesterday I wouldn't have known that was a Behringer Mixing console but I just took delivery of my Son's birthday present (from me to him) ..a Behringer Xenyx 1222USB.  I wouldn't know what to do with it but it looks like the sort of thing that every chap should own (lots of knobs and sliders).
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: ravenbait on April 28, 2011, 04:31:59 pm
(http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z155/ravenbait/IMG_4407.jpg)

It's a Suzuki: a very, very old one. Looks battered, sounds divine.

Sam
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Rhys W on April 28, 2011, 04:54:20 pm
Telecaster:

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5253/5468916603_5fc3163a5d.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/14289721@N03/5468916603/)
IMG_0208 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/14289721@N03/5468916603/) by rhys_caerdydd (http://www.flickr.com/people/14289721@N03/), on Flickr

Stratocaster:

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5065/5664324083_ed117e8a91.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/14289721@N03/5664324083/)
IMG_2475 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/14289721@N03/5664324083/) by rhys_caerdydd (http://www.flickr.com/people/14289721@N03/), on Flickr

Epiphone Dot (with a few cosmetic tweaks to make it look more like a Gibson):

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5149/5664896168_616311ce17.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/14289721@N03/5664896168/)
IMG_2498 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/14289721@N03/5664896168/) by rhys_caerdydd (http://www.flickr.com/people/14289721@N03/), on Flickr

Fender "Squier Series" Jazz Bass, a £100 wreck bought off ebay as a restoration project:

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5217/5469507442_35a0deec08.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/14289721@N03/5469507442/)
IMG_0205 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/14289721@N03/5469507442/) by rhys_caerdydd (http://www.flickr.com/people/14289721@N03/), on Flickr

And for those "bashing out Neil Young songs" evenings, sounds nice and mellow now after 10 years:

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5261/5664329951_683e0de4de.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/14289721@N03/5664329951/)
IMG_2494 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/14289721@N03/5664329951/) by rhys_caerdydd (http://www.flickr.com/people/14289721@N03/), on Flickr
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bobb on April 28, 2011, 04:57:55 pm
I've whored a couple of my guitars in other threads, but here's my Maton acoustic.

Lovely to play, beautifully made, sounds great and doesn't have loads of fancy bollocks all over it. There are plenty of trees in Queensland to chop down and make these  :P

(http://www.zaribor.com/raz/pics/maton/m1.jpg)

(http://www.zaribor.com/raz/pics/maton/m2.jpg)

(http://www.zaribor.com/raz/pics/maton/m3.jpg)

(http://www.zaribor.com/raz/pics/maton/m4.jpg)

(http://www.zaribor.com/raz/pics/maton/m5.jpg)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: interzen on April 28, 2011, 05:08:49 pm
I've whored a couple of my guitars in other threads, but here's my Maton acoustic.
Got to say, that looks bloody gorgeous.
Their MS500 electric looks mighty fine too: Maton Guitars - Superb acoustic, electric and custom built guitars - Australia's own guitar maker (http://www.maton.com.au/electrics/ms500.html)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: nicknack on April 28, 2011, 11:20:28 pm
Ok, so everyone's a bleedin' guitarist.  ::-)

Here's a couple of proper instruments:

Yanagisawa B900 baritone sax
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y289/nicknacknick/meandbari-1.jpg)

Keilwerth Shadow tenor sax
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y289/nicknacknick/maidstoneriverfestival2008011.jpg)

and another guitar
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y289/nicknacknick/yam.jpg)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Oaky on April 28, 2011, 11:33:52 pm
My humble collection:-

(http://www.oakden.eclipse.co.uk/mark/bike/yacf/pics/guitars.jpg)

Bottom is a 1980s Washburn G2V with their own "Wonderbar" locking trem.  Top is a much more recent Washburn WI65 (if I'd had more patience, I could have bought the natural wood finished equivalent that they brought out about 9 months later).
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: YahudaMoon on April 28, 2011, 11:37:22 pm
Heres mine

(http://www.zvukozavr.ru/data/big/hohner_big_river_harp_590_20_c_m590016.jpg)

I don't play or own any other instuments
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Tourist Tony on April 29, 2011, 07:55:50 am
Ok, so everyone's a bleedin' guitarist.  ::-)



No I am bleedin' not!  ;D
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: nicknack on April 29, 2011, 09:04:24 am
Ok, so everyone's a bleedin' guitarist.  ::-)



No I am bleedin' not!  ;D

Oops. Sorry, you old plucker and scraper (and to Woofage too).
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Tourist Tony on April 29, 2011, 09:26:59 am
The fiddle I have had for 41 years, the mandolin for three. The latter has a nice bright tone and works well for little tinkly fills around others' playing. The octave mandola has a really solid bottom to it (the jokes have already been made) and a lot of volume, courtesy of the large body. For those who aren't into that family of instruments, while the body is that of a mandola, normally tuned a fifth lower than a mandolin (CGDA as opposed to GDAE), this one is an octave mandolin/mandola. It is tuned GDAE, but an octave below a mandolin. The lower pairs of strings are further mucked about with, so that each pair is tuned an octave apart. That gives a bouzouki-like jangle to the sound, and, of course, everything resonates all over the place.
Nice!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: ravenbait on April 29, 2011, 10:27:47 am
I'll take a picture of the didg later. The sop recorder isn't very photogenic.

Sam
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bobb on April 29, 2011, 02:30:56 pm
Some instruments I put in my mouth:

(http://www.zaribor.com/raz/pics/maton/mouth.jpg)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on April 29, 2011, 03:48:56 pm
I've whored a couple of my guitars in other threads, but here's my Maton acoustic.

Maton does very nice work but I reckon you'd really like a Chris Melville. I've only come across a couple of acoustics that sound better than any of the four Melvilles I've heard.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Rhys W on April 29, 2011, 03:54:47 pm
I have a couple of moothies as well, mainly so I could record a version of my favourite Neil Young song. I wish I had the motivation to put some hours in to learn some bluesy things on them.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Woofage on April 29, 2011, 04:02:57 pm
(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5304/5664056363_2d921e6054.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/interzen/5664056363/)
Yamaha BB404 fretless bass (http://www.flickr.com/photos/interzen/5664056363/) by interzen (http://www.flickr.com/people/interzen/), on Flickr
No speed bumps on that biatch, either ;)

What strings do you use? Flats or rounds?
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: interzen on April 29, 2011, 05:31:04 pm
(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5304/5664056363_2d921e6054.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/interzen/5664056363/)
Yamaha BB404 fretless bass (http://www.flickr.com/photos/interzen/5664056363/) by interzen (http://www.flickr.com/people/interzen/), on Flickr
No speed bumps on that biatch, either ;)

What strings do you use? Flats or rounds?
Flatwounds - currently light gauge LaBella "Deep Talkin'" (0.039,0.056,0.077,0.096).
I always use stainless steel strings, mainly 'cos I have a nickel allergy.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Auntie Helen on April 29, 2011, 10:09:39 pm
I blow too:
(http://www.opakovanie.sk/naviac/lester/yacf/miyazawa.jpg)
an open hole flute - are they much different?
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: interzen on April 29, 2011, 10:25:30 pm
Some instruments I put in my mouth:

(http://www.zaribor.com/raz/pics/maton/mouth.jpg)
I've got an ocarina kicking about somewhere - sounds really, erm, interesting if you run it through enough effects ;D
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: road-runner on April 29, 2011, 10:27:35 pm
an open hole flute - are they much different?

No, not really. I have heard that in orchestra (classical) circles that open holes can be a snobbery thing. One benefit of a closed hole flute then is that you cannot make the mistake of not covering the hole properly.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Palinurus on April 30, 2011, 02:57:14 pm
76/77 Fender P, pretty beaten up. I've had it about 18 years.

(http://i287.photobucket.com/albums/ll155/Mister_Penguin/RIMG0053-1.jpg)

This is new- a "Vintage" fretless jazz copy (it has fret markings). Cost just over £200 (new), plays and sounds very nice considering. Recently I've used nothing else for rehearsal and recording, I'll use it at our next gig too.

(http://i287.photobucket.com/albums/ll155/Mister_Penguin/RIMG0051.jpg)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Palinurus on April 30, 2011, 05:33:04 pm


Fender "Squier Series" Jazz Bass, a £100 wreck bought off ebay as a restoration project:

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5217/5469507442_35a0deec08.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/14289721@N03/5469507442/)
IMG_0205 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/14289721@N03/5469507442/) by rhys_caerdydd (http://www.flickr.com/people/14289721@N03/), on Flickr



I like the look of that.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Rhys W on April 30, 2011, 09:22:38 pm
There's something about an offset-body in yellowed Olympic White paired with a tortoiseshell pickguard I find irresistible. There's no way I'd find a Jazzmaster for £100, and I could use a bass, so... If you click on the flickr set you can see its progress from the ugly duckling it originally was.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: RW on April 30, 2011, 11:05:28 pm
My favourite fiddle

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5027/5673253841_81ea2095bc.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/rwpd/5673253841/)
fs 001 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/rwpd/5673253841/) by RWPD (http://www.flickr.com/people/rwpd/), on Flickr

It's a bit rough in places - it's been repaired with super glue

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5063/5673254647_776c945000.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/rwpd/5673254647/)
fs 005 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/rwpd/5673254647/) by RWPD (http://www.flickr.com/people/rwpd/), on Flickr

and has a crack on the front very near the sound post

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5106/5673944348_25d1a97458.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/rwpd/5673944348/)
fs 004 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/rwpd/5673944348/) by RWPD (http://www.flickr.com/people/rwpd/), on Flickr


Very nasty transfers on the back

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5270/5673377811_ed2f4d8d22.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/rwpd/5673377811/)
fs 009 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/rwpd/5673377811/) by RWPD (http://www.flickr.com/people/rwpd/), on Flickr

I bought it as a disposable fiddle to go busking with, but it's become my number 1.  I think it's a German 19th century factory made fiddle, but I could be wrong. 
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: kyuss on May 02, 2011, 04:22:36 pm
Some lovely guitar porn here. That Yamaha SG in particular is lush. Always loved those. A goldtop Yamaha SG is at the top of my list of dream guitars.

In the meantime I'll have to make do with these budget offerings.

Epiphone Thunderbird. Note the extra strap button (there's another extra one on the heel of the neck). Thunderbirds are notoriously neck heavy, but a simple re-positioning of the strap buttons fixes that. Why Gibson don't put them there in the first place I don't know. Sorts the balance right out.
(http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b10/KeithSmith1974/thunder.jpg)

Just fitted some new pickups to my latest acquisition, a Hofner Colorama II. The thing weighs a ton, more than the Thunderbird in fact, but I do love it, especially with those new P90's in there.
(http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b10/KeithSmith1974/hof2.jpg)

(http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b10/KeithSmith1974/hof1.jpg)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bobb on May 03, 2011, 02:11:44 pm
Lots of YACF bass action going on. Here's my Dean Edge 4:

(http://www.zaribor.com/raz/pics/bass/d1.jpg)

(http://www.zaribor.com/raz/pics/bass/d2.jpg)

(http://www.zaribor.com/raz/pics/bass/d3.jpg)

I disturbed the cat taking the last one. He was under the duvet!

(http://www.zaribor.com/raz/pics/bass/d4.jpg)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: interzen on May 03, 2011, 04:45:30 pm
Here's my Dean Edge 4:

That is a stunning quilt finish (to the Dean, not the duvet).
They're really nice to play, too - I've got an Edge fretless on my bass 'n+1' list, along with many other guitars which I'll never be able to afford in a month of Sundays ;)

I used to have one of these: Peavey Cirrus 6 fretless Pictures - TalkBass Forums (http://www.talkbass.com/forum/f8/peavey-cirrus-6-fretless-pictures-269611/) until I had to flog it after getting turfed from my last job  :'(
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Tourist Tony on May 03, 2011, 05:41:33 pm
I went with a friend to look at an electric-acoustic bass for her son, and played it to see what the action was like. Buzzy as all hell.

"Oh, that's what all basses do" said the salesman.

Yeah mate, course they do.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Woofage on May 04, 2011, 11:10:39 pm
Flatwounds - currently light gauge LaBella "Deep Talkin'" (0.039,0.056,0.077,0.096).
I always use stainless steel strings, mainly 'cos I have a nickel allergy.

I've just put a set of Rotosound TruBass (http://www.rotosound.com/tru_88.php) nylon-wound strings on. Wow, what a sound! Gone is the metallic twang which has been replaced with a really solid bottom end thump (ooh, er, missus). The total slipperiness will take some getting used to, however, but they are surprisingly easy to play for such a heavy string.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: IanDG on May 12, 2011, 11:12:38 pm
Nothing special - an ES335 copy and a Headliner Djembe

(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2368/5713897793_aec4ccc5e7.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/acf_windy/5713897793/)
instruments (http://www.flickr.com/photos/acf_windy/5713897793/) by windy_ (http://www.flickr.com/people/acf_windy/), on Flickr
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Jurek on May 13, 2011, 01:24:32 pm
(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2182/5715901310_33ce3af31f_b.jpg)


IGMwhiteC
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: RJ on May 13, 2011, 08:44:34 pm
(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2182/5715901310_33ce3af31f_b.jpg)


IGMwhiteC
:-X
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Tourist Tony on May 16, 2011, 11:29:15 pm
'Is it safe?'
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: mcshroom on May 07, 2014, 08:44:41 pm
My cello, restored after 9 years languishing in my parents loft :D
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/oNypttKphNpUkeArNbQqYYE0FStx9sw1MIO9D_oqhyI=w415-h553-no)

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-zZoPieZa2UA/U2qLi48cZgI/AAAAAAAAF44/xgFAf3QTHgo/w415-h553-no/IMG_20140507_203540)

The restorer's done a very good job. He's filled in the lumps I knocked out of it lugging it backwards and forwards to school and revarnished the body, fitted a new spike and plug to the bottom, re-strung it and fitted a new bridge.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Mrs Pingu on May 07, 2014, 09:53:13 pm
Wonders what sort of state my school clarinet is in after 22 years sitting in the loft.
I should really sell it and let someone have the use of it, but as my parents bought it after much saving for my older brother I expect my name would be mud.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: phantasmagoriana on May 07, 2014, 10:11:03 pm
Yay, cello! Cellos are good. Almost as good as double basses, though not quite. :D

Nice purple walls, too.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Andrij on May 07, 2014, 10:15:59 pm
*photo deleted for decency sake*

IGMwhiteC

The horror!  :o
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: David Martin on May 07, 2014, 11:20:36 pm
Well my old school clarinet (a wooden Boosey and Hawkes Regent which is about a dozen years older than me) is doing fine, though with a perspex barrel made by a friend as the original one has hairline cracks that render it unplayable.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Woofage on May 08, 2014, 09:54:31 am
Electric DB:

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5189/14133283892_2a5ea2fe9a_o.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/nwULUu)
1079036_10151812889989994_1015798856_o.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/nwULUu) by pencyclist (https://www.flickr.com/people/38357939@N02/), on Flickr

Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Woofage on May 08, 2014, 11:37:50 am
How does it sound? Awesome! Like a deep, slightly growly fretless bass (guitar) but not really like a proper acoustic DB. I'll qualify this statement by adding that it's the only one I've ever tried. I had a modest windfall last year so I bought it on a bit of a whim. Love it though so don't regret the purchase. There's a piezo pickup under the bridge and a pre-amp built in. You can also just plug in headphones and play without an amp.

How does it play? Well, I'm really a beginner so probably not qualified to do a proper review. A friend plays DB in the orchestra I'm in and her acoustic instrument is a bit easier to play in terms of string tension and/or action so mine would definitely benefit from a better setup and I suspect that the strings are not the best they could be. When I'm feeling flush again I'll invest in some better strings (they're over £100 per set :o). That said, it's not difficult to play at all and, unlike a proper db, it has side dots to help you navigate. Need to learn to bow though. I thought that as a violin player bowing would be easy but it seems that it's almost like I've never used one! Luckily when I was taught to play the bass guitar I learned the 3 finger (Simandl) technique so this translates directly to upright.

Overall it was good value. I paid about £350 new which although well into very decent bass guitar territory uprights are relatively uncommon so have prices to match. Apparently it's very similar to the Aria which is about double the price new.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: phantasmagoriana on May 08, 2014, 11:46:27 am
Ooh,I like the electric double bass. Doesn't take up much space, either...
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Woofage on May 08, 2014, 12:01:26 pm
Ooh,I like the electric double bass. Doesn't take up much space, either...

Mrs W has almost banned me from owning an acoustic db. Master W had db lessons for a term (before he saw the light and took up saxophone) and even a little one was too much of a PITA for her. Not sure our current car would fit one either. The electric is perfect as I can just fold down the middle rear seat and slide it in (phnaar phnaar).
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: billplumtree on May 08, 2014, 12:55:59 pm
Oh, it's an electric double bass?  I wondered what that thing was, getting in the way of the interesting-looking piano...
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Barry on May 09, 2014, 11:38:42 pm
I play a variety of peculiar and odd looking instruments, none of them it has to be said, particularly well. I'm in a band called "What's That Dreadful Noise?". This is my old battered brass helicon. I also have a Martin Horn and a set of bagpipes which I made myself from bits found in the cupboard beneath the kitchen sink and the syphons from a tropical fish tank cleaning kit.   

(https://scontent-b-lhr.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc3/t1.0-9/206484_1016435845190_395_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Barry on May 10, 2014, 01:52:22 pm
Here are my bagpipes

(https://scontent-b-lhr.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/t1.0-9/p417x417/10294357_324002784418098_3209144899159394476_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on May 10, 2014, 06:06:37 pm
My mandolin:

(http://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h82/Paul_Fulford/1745BFAD-79C7-4B5F-BE6F-F762EFCA9260_zpsosam99dc.jpg) (http://s62.photobucket.com/user/Paul_Fulford/media/1745BFAD-79C7-4B5F-BE6F-F762EFCA9260_zpsosam99dc.jpg.html)

Although I'd describe myself as an owner rather than a player ???
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: phantasmagoriana on May 10, 2014, 08:54:24 pm
Here are the ones I can be bothered to take pics of...

My main violin: sadly underused these days (I seem to spend my free time riding bikes instead...). French, c.1840.

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7349/13967542187_f060a12f86_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/nhgiET)

My spare violin: Romanian student instrument from the 1990s. Hasn't been played in a long time.

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7354/13967562178_275cc9d468_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/nhgpBy)

Main viola: this is the only one that sees any action at the moment, in a local amateur orchestra. It's a Gliga from 2004, and I've owned it from new.

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7297/14150860421_3cc11e4bc6_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/nysRN6)

Spare viola (yes, this n+1 thing applies to more than bikes :-[): Czech, c.1930.

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7441/14131020106_7531d249d5_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/nwHaXG)

Flute: basic Yamaha student model. Shiny.

(https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2928/13967497047_7f459e729f_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/nhg5fB)

Clarinet: Boosey & Hawkes Edgware. Wooden.

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5152/14130982946_908d71563e_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/nwGYV1)

Alto sax: Another Yamaha student model. Very shiny. I think it's shinier than the flute, but it might just look that way because it's bigger.

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7379/14174219113_d228381151_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/nAwzwa)

The latest acquisition: a Cort T34 bass. Bought this recently because it is sparkly and I didn't have a bass.

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7409/13967515777_4e61128244_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/nhgaPx)

Can't really photograph the sparkles, but it looks really lovely when the sunlight hits it - there are rainbow flecks in the paintwork. I'd like a bike frame in this colour.

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7315/14154326804_3bbcc531e1_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/nyLCej)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: hellymedic on May 10, 2014, 09:41:49 pm
Boosey & Hawkes clarinets were made in a factory near my school. One of my classmates' mothers worked there as did one of my colleagues at Edgware Hospital and a lady I sometimes see at Edgware CTC.
Site of the factory is now a residential development named 'Symphony Court'.
The musical instrument collection was rehoused in the Horniman Museum.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: phantasmagoriana on May 10, 2014, 09:53:06 pm
Ooh, I'd love to live in an old instrument factory! :D

Thanks for the info on the Horniman Museum: a quick Google led me to this (http://www.horniman.ac.uk/media/_file/bandh_handlists_web.pdf) list of serial numbers. Turns out my clarinet's a 1972 model.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Barry on May 11, 2014, 12:06:01 am
Has anyone ever seen a Martin Horn before?
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: hellymedic on May 11, 2014, 12:07:52 am
Symphony Court is all new build. The old factory was demolished.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: hellymedic on May 11, 2014, 12:09:23 am
Ooh, I'd love to live in an old instrument factory! :D

Thanks for the info on the Horniman Museum: a quick Google led me to this (http://www.horniman.ac.uk/media/_file/bandh_handlists_web.pdf) list of serial numbers. Turns out my clarinet's a 1972 model.

That's when my schoolmate's Mum worked there...
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: David Martin on May 11, 2014, 12:43:38 am
Mine is 1957 if I remember correctly. Wooden Regent. The later ones were plastic, but the old ones sound nice and mellow.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: hellymedic on May 11, 2014, 10:59:10 am
We had someone from the factory speak to us about the clarinets which were made from 'African Blackwood' (ie ebony). Would have been around 1970.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: David Martin on May 11, 2014, 03:19:48 pm
Thats the ones.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: billplumtree on May 11, 2014, 03:48:28 pm
I used to play in a brass band...

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-VtBhreEKcwQ/U2-VJybVzqI/AAAAAAAAFsE/k5BBiWZidWY/s800/crop-1010901.jpg)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Tod28 on May 11, 2014, 05:11:36 pm
African Blackwood is African Blackwood (Dalbergia melanoxylon), not ebony which is a few species from the Diospyros genus, and in the same genus as Brazilian Rosewood (Dalbergia nigra)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Woofage on May 12, 2014, 09:01:08 am
Mrs W has a clarinet somewhere. I'll have to dig it out and post the details.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Andrij on May 15, 2014, 11:58:31 am
Bandura - 'Chernihiv' style
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-WqzP9oBmO18/U3ScMY1uHHI/AAAAAAAACJk/6xNRgKth534/s800/chernihikva.jpg)

Bandura - 'Poltava/Kharkiv' style
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-CQZ5mFOSI5M/U3ScLi0V2tI/AAAAAAAACJc/0G_gMi5bOsM/s800/poltavka.jpg)

I also have a 3/4 size 'Poltavka' for teaching children, but that's with my parents, which is also where my hammered dulcimer resides.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Andrij on May 15, 2014, 12:17:18 pm
Andrij, the pictures are not displaying for the rest of us. I think you mean these two:

{snip}

Thanks, now fixed (I hope!)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: clarion on May 15, 2014, 03:40:26 pm
Is that thing loaded?
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Vince on May 19, 2014, 03:04:37 am
For your amusement, I present the Crapocaster

(http://i159.photobucket.com/albums/t140/VinceHall/DSC04362_edited.jpg)

The neck is from an Eko acoustic, free from a car boot sale. The body from a 2by4 and the hardware from Ebay.

I also have a Fender Telecaster and a Washburn acoustic, but they are less interesting, though more predictable to play!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bobb on December 16, 2016, 04:26:00 pm
My latest guitar:

(http://www.zaribor.co.uk/raz/pics/tele.jpg)

I built it myself  :)

I have over 400 captioned photos of the build process. I know many of you have seen them on Facebook, but even if you don't have a Facebook account you should be able to view them all here (https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10153671728298131.1073741830.724283130&type=1&l=1bb3f0f762)

Edit: Non Facebook version: here (https://zaribor.co.uk/guitars/telecaster)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Jurek on December 16, 2016, 04:33:30 pm
That looks lovely, bobb - all those tools yours? (They're lovely too)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bobb on December 16, 2016, 04:39:25 pm
Yup. I spent a fortune on tools. I could have phoned the Fender custom shop and asked them to build me a one off Tele and it would have cost less  ;D

But I have them now. I will start another build in the new year  :)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Dibdib on December 16, 2016, 05:24:29 pm
Bloody hell Bobb, that's [string of expletives deleted --ed] fantastic. Unbelievable craftsmanship.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bobb on December 16, 2016, 05:57:10 pm
Unbelievable craftsmanship.

I'm not sure I'd go that far!

Sometimes my tendency to be obsessive can be a curse, but for something like this, it's extremely useful!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Hot Flatus on December 16, 2016, 06:35:18 pm
Make this one next, I double dare you...

(http://proguitarshop.com/media/cms/blog/abstract-symbol-01.jpg)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bobb on December 16, 2016, 07:05:01 pm
I can't believe I actually spent a couple of minutes thinking about how I would construct that monstrosity!  ;D
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Hot Flatus on December 16, 2016, 07:15:19 pm
 ;D ;D

Its a must for a pub band
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Torslanda on December 16, 2016, 10:40:35 pm
NAH!!!!!!!!!!!!! This (http://This) is your next project . . . !
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Steph on December 18, 2016, 09:55:57 pm
Here's my current stable of strings
(http://i954.photobucket.com/albums/ae29/cyclisttony/IMG_0219%201.jpg) (http://s954.photobucket.com/user/cyclisttony/media/IMG_0219%201.jpg.html)




And here, to go with the curly axe topic, is the cello played by Hannah Miller of Moulettes. built IIRC by her Dad.
(http://i954.photobucket.com/albums/ae29/cyclisttony/IMG_0103%201.jpg) (http://s954.photobucket.com/user/cyclisttony/media/IMG_0103%201.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on December 19, 2016, 08:43:27 am
I'm just getting back into music after a pause of ~20 years
(http://www.pbase.com/johnewing/image/163032022.jpg)

El cheapo cittern & electric uke (now donated to er-um in law)
(http://www.pbase.com/johnewing/image/163037557.jpg)

The only kind of harp I'll ever manage
(http://www.pbase.com/johnewing/image/163312584.jpg)

Plus three guitars and a guitarita.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on December 19, 2016, 08:51:37 am
I have over 400 captioned photos of the build process. I know many of you have seen them on Facebook, but even if you don't have a Facebook account you should be able to view them all here (https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10153671728298131.1073741830.724283130&type=1&l=1bb3f0f762)

I already have most of the tools (though my bandsaw is on the phutz) and I'm planning to get into that game in the new year.  Mind if I occasionally pick your brain?
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Steph on December 19, 2016, 11:40:24 am
Always fancied a cittern....
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bobb on December 19, 2016, 01:07:56 pm
I have over 400 captioned photos of the build process. I know many of you have seen them on Facebook, but even if you don't have a Facebook account you should be able to view them all here (https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10153671728298131.1073741830.724283130&type=1&l=1bb3f0f762)

I already have most of the tools (though my bandsaw is on the phutz) and I'm planning to get into that game in the new year.  Mind if I occasionally pick your brain?

Not at all! What are you thinking of building?
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on December 19, 2016, 01:31:45 pm
Cheers! Probably a Strat, there are lots of plans on the go.

I'm currently lusting after that Triton router.  I already have a big Metabo and a small Bosch but the Triton looks much more versatile.

I use a drill stand instead of a column drill - works quite well.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: pcolbeck on December 19, 2016, 03:06:24 pm
Here you go T42 and Bobb. Something for inspiration. Martin's show guitar to commemorate them having now made 2000,000 guitars.

https://youtu.be/uNDiuwNhkMU

Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bobb on December 19, 2016, 03:10:51 pm
Probably a Strat

If you're going to build a Strat, then this video series will tell you everything you need to know:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZSDzBv_rIA&list=PLNBP5jXjfxM3WoWeK7NWEyZN7u4dqNQKR
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on December 19, 2016, 03:44:37 pm
Always fancied a cittern....

Mine's a plywood horror from China, bought on Amazon Returns for 100-odd €, mostly out of curiosity. A bit like an Irish bouzouli with an extra course.  Blame this fellow:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHY8ZZfqoFU

Funny thing about mine is that there's a bit of plastic foam under the bridge, which I suspect was intended to allow it to slide more easily when they were getting the intonation right.  You can get them new from Hobgoblin.


Here you go T42 and Bobb. Something for inspiration. Martin's show guitar to commemorate them having now made 2000,000 guitars.

https://youtu.be/uNDiuwNhkMU

Gawd.  I don't reckon the vibration would do the movement any favours, though.

Probably a Strat

If you're going to build a Strat, then this video series will tell you everything you need to know:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZSDzBv_rIA&list=PLNBP5jXjfxM3WoWeK7NWEyZN7u4dqNQKR

Ta.  I've been watching the Crimson Custom Guitars videos on & off for a month, too, in particular the series where he takes a cheap kit and turns it into something not bad at all.  I do rather fancy doing it all myself, though.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bobb on December 19, 2016, 03:51:07 pm
Yeah, I love Crimson. I'm subscribed to just about every luthiery channel on YouTube  :)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: pcolbeck on December 19, 2016, 03:57:19 pm
Here you go T42 and Bobb. Something for inspiration. Martin's show guitar to commemorate them having now made 2000,000 guitars.

https://youtu.be/uNDiuwNhkMU

Gawd.  I don't reckon the vibration would do the movement any favours, though.

Yeah. Somehow I doubt that it will actually get played much.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on December 19, 2016, 04:46:54 pm
Yeah, I love Crimson. I'm subscribed to just about every luthiery channel on YouTube  :)

What makes me spit now is that I sold my woodworking combo three years back.  I had a bad fall from the bike in 2002 that stopped me lifting 3-metre flitches of oak, and it stood pretty well unused for 10 years. I had a thicknesser, jointer, spindle shaper and circular saw and they're gone. Ah well.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on December 19, 2016, 04:57:01 pm
And if you're as confused as I was about the difference between mandolins, citterns, mandalas and octave mandolins this article http://www.ceolas.org/instruments/cittern.html (http://www.ceolas.org/instruments/cittern.html) explains it nicely
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on December 20, 2016, 03:04:09 pm
"Cittern" seems to cover several sizes of instrument from mandolinish to bouzoukiish. The stringing doesn't seem to be constant either: this roguish gent has a 9-string:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ujr5liAH56E
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Steph on December 21, 2016, 12:41:23 am
T42, my axes, L to R, are:
Mandolin, arch body, spruce and maple, really nice bright tone. Very fond of it.
Octave mandolin, bottom two courses octave pairs, flatback and top, loud with a sweet sounf up the neck and very jangly low down.
Fiddle, cheap Chinese, owned and played for 48 years
Mandolin, second-hand electro-acoustic (pick up jack through strap button). Bioat keel neck (rounded V cross section) with a very sweet sound, plays very nicely. Flatback and top.
Mandola, cheapo flatback plywood thing, no truss rod (guitar style build), heavy action but a good loud session instrument, and I like it.
Mandolin, very cheap arch top and back, bought as a cheap spare. Heavy action, but what the hell, I won't cry if I sit on it in a pub.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on December 21, 2016, 08:01:53 am
Lovely collection, too.  I tried a Neapolitan mandolin years ago but I couldn't manage an even tremolo for more than 30 seconds together, and TBH the instrument's convexity was mirrored by my own at the time and it kept trying to slope off kneewards.  I eventually passed it on to my son.

Speaking of sitting on mandolins, my first steps in lutherie will involve extracting the bent truss rod from my daughter's old bass guitar, which got stood on during a removal.  Not looking forward to that.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Vince on December 21, 2016, 09:16:58 am
Probably a Strat

If you're going to build a Strat, then this video series will tell you everything you need to know:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZSDzBv_rIA&list=PLNBP5jXjfxM3WoWeK7NWEyZN7u4dqNQKR
Thanks for that Bobb ( a couple of hours lost so far! :) ) I had wondered how the frets get in the right position. Previously I had been frightened by tables of fret spacing based on thousandths of an inch.
The problem with these videos, is that they can justify the cost of the specialist tools in a workshop, whereas you could buy a good guitar for the cost of the tools. The Crapocaster would have been much better if I had stumped up for proper fret and nut files.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: De Sisti on December 21, 2016, 09:47:37 am
Ooh,I like the electric double bass. Doesn't take up much space, either...

Mrs W has almost banned me from owning an acoustic db. Master W had db lessons for a term (before he saw the light and took up saxophone) and even a little one was too much of a PITA for her. Not sure our current car would fit one either. The electric is perfect as I can just fold down the middle rear seat and slide it in (phnaar phnaar).
I could fit my double bass in my previous car; a SEAT Arosa.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on December 21, 2016, 11:41:10 am
Probably a Strat

If you're going to build a Strat, then this video series will tell you everything you need to know:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZSDzBv_rIA&list=PLNBP5jXjfxM3WoWeK7NWEyZN7u4dqNQKR
Thanks for that Bobb ( a couple of hours lost so far! :) ) I had wondered how the frets get in the right position. Previously I had been frightened by tables of fret spacing based on thousandths of an inch.
The problem with these videos, is that they can justify the cost of the specialist tools in a workshop, whereas you could buy a good guitar for the cost of the tools. The Crapocaster would have been much better if I had stumped up for proper fret and nut files.

Yeah. After looking at umpteen videos on Crimson Guitar, then Bobb's pics and then this I had a gander round my own workshop and reckoned that in spite of having built a stack of furniture I'd need a few hundred euros to get kitted out.  But then I could make N guitars, and maybe an electric double bass for my son.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Plug1n on December 21, 2016, 11:55:40 am
The mention of B&H and Edgware a few days back prompted me to take this:

(https://v9kznq-dm2305.files.1drv.com/y3mgSGWuPo5wr5gox_Vl2USMTpw0bmsXfKVZZG601o5Gm0nbu4atBs_8k29ZaKrRjF20JiKFUhEjhgraoBKYWEcy0FUU3vMdI8kedYjA1tOx07W-EvS0-sBj9wloySJ4PHn-TsgccCC2qjm-PPbKiauJxHAcGkRUclivBpZR_6v0c0?width=660&height=371&cropmode=none)


Briefly from left to right:

1. Pre-war B&H 1010 B flat with articulated g# and forked B flat
2. Pre-war B&H 1010 A
3. Pre-war B&H 1010 B flat
4. Pre-war B&H 1010 A
5. 80s Eaton B flat
6. 80s Eaton A
7. Yamaha German Boehm B flat
8. Yamaha German Boehm A
9. Late 60s B&H Imperial E flat
10. Yamaha E flat

While bikes come in n+1, clarinets generally come in n+2 :)


Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: De Sisti on December 21, 2016, 05:42:33 pm
Recently put on some new Helicore strings.
(https://c4.staticflickr.com/6/5603/30977948363_c3afaee96b.jpg)


(https://c3.staticflickr.com/1/285/31640398282_8e041f302d.jpg)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: BrianI on December 21, 2016, 05:52:55 pm
My latest guitar:

(http://www.zaribor.co.uk/raz/pics/tele.jpg)

I built it myself  :)

I have over 400 captioned photos of the build process. I know many of you have seen them on Facebook, but even if you don't have a Facebook account you should be able to view them all here (https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10153671728298131.1073741830.724283130&type=1&l=1bb3f0f762)

Impressive build, Bobb!   :thumbsup: I wish I had a workshop and woodworking tools like that.  Have you been able to capture the guitar being played, yet?
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bobb on December 21, 2016, 06:07:36 pm
Not yet I'm afraid. But all in good time....

It's actually in pieces at the moment. With all this lutherie talk, I decided to take the neck off and redo the frets. It's something I've been meaning to do for a while. Should finish it off tomorrow....
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: The French Tandem on December 22, 2016, 08:16:12 am
The mention of B&H and Edgware a few days back prompted me to take this:


1. Pre-war B&H 1010 B flat with articulated g# and forked B flat
2. Pre-war B&H 1010 A

While bikes come in n+1, clarinets generally come in n+2 :)

Pre-war!! Can you still play them? In my (very limited) experience, clarinets tend to age very poorly!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on December 22, 2016, 09:08:23 am
Son bought a Xaphoon when they were being heavily plugged a while back, and is well pleased.

https://www.thomann.de/intl/xaphoon_del_xaphoon_standard.htm?ref=search_rslt_xaphoon_114668_2

He's one of  those irritating people who can play just about anything they get their hands on.  I have trouble with door-bells.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Plug1n on December 22, 2016, 11:10:19 am

Pre-war!! Can you still play them? In my (very limited) experience, clarinets tend to age very poorly!

Absolutely, as long as there are no mechanical show stoppers or leaks, but they can all be fixed.  It helps to have a good repair person and they are very rare.

#3 & #4 are in perfect condition and even came with an original pre-war mouthpiece which is a true delight to play.  B&H seemed to loose that part of their manufacturing skill set after the war, sadly.

I could go on.......

Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Woofage on December 22, 2016, 01:52:53 pm
Tweeter jnr plays alto sax (he's just passed grade 6 Jazz Saxophone) and his instrument is a c. 1941 King "Zephyr" by HN White. We bought it cheap at an auction just for fun but when he started having private lessons we were faced with either buying a £Nk Yamaha or similar but instead had the Zephyr overhauled. Although this cost as much as a s/h student instrument it was well worth it as it's a top-quality instrument with sub-zero cool factor compared with what others of his age group play. Plus our local instrument repairer loves it so there'll be no problem with its maintenance. I'll post some pics soon.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: David Martin on December 22, 2016, 02:06:11 pm
my 1950's B&H regent (when they were African Blackwood rather than plastic) was awful to play until I got a mouthpiece that was playable (5RV, which I like). It does have a crack in the barrel so I had a friend run up a perspex  one on a lathe. it is a fraction of a mm too long though so I will get him to rework it at some point so I can play in tune. Lovely sound though. The clarinet I have at work is also wooden - the clarinet of a late friend of my father who had had it since the 60's/70's. Again wooden and a Buffet I think.

The keys on the Regent are rather poor quality, they give cheese a bad name.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Plug1n on December 22, 2016, 04:01:52 pm
Cracks in a barrel are not necessarily fatal.  The rings should hold the thing together and bees wax can fill any small crevices, depends how bad it is though.

Key work on the mid to higher end Booseys was intended to survive trips around the empire, better keys are drop forged rather than cast.  Also longer spindles rather than the pointed pivots favoured by the French makers tend to degrade more benignly at the cost of some extra friction.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: LEE on December 22, 2016, 04:54:06 pm

The only kind of harp I'll ever manage
(http://www.pbase.com/johnewing/image/163312584.jpg)



I can honestly say I've never seen a Harmonica with a HeadUp Display before.  Did you get the idea from the US Airforce F16?

Here's T42 playing harmonica on his way to Afghanistan
(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/bb/1d/32/bb1d32323592689d84771b3870d290fc.jpg)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: LEE on December 22, 2016, 05:09:00 pm
For you guitar-heads out there....

My best friend from school plays in a few bands and has clearly developed an EBay guitar habit.  His son makes videos and put this very short video together of "me mate" Andy.

60 Guitars (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_pxwcIfuhA)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: David Martin on December 22, 2016, 09:12:43 pm
Cracks in a barrel are not necessarily fatal.  The rings should hold the thing together and bees wax can fill any small crevices, depends how bad it is though.

Key work on the mid to higher end Booseys was intended to survive trips around the empire, better keys are drop forged rather than cast.  Also longer spindles rather than the pointed pivots favoured by the French makers tend to degrade more benignly at the cost of some extra friction.

I think mine dates from the '50s. The barrel is kind of mixed. I'll find some more beeswax and see if I can improve the sealing.

Never played an A clarinet. Maybe that is something to try at some point. I've played Bass though. And Soprano -> Baritone sax though I only have an alto now (and my old one which needs a touch of repair)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on December 23, 2016, 08:11:07 am

The only kind of harp I'll ever manage
(http://www.pbase.com/johnewing/image/163312584.jpg)



I can honestly say I've never seen a Harmonica with a HeadUp Display before.  Did you get the idea from the US Airforce F16?

Here's T42 playing harmonica on his way to Afghanistan
(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/bb/1d/32/bb1d32323592689d84771b3870d290fc.jpg)

That looks more like the chromatic version, whereas mine is the asthmatic.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: firedfromthecircus on December 23, 2016, 02:05:07 pm
For you guitar-heads out there....

My best friend from school plays in a few bands and has clearly developed an EBay guitar habit.  His son makes videos and put this very short video together of "me mate" Andy.

60 Guitars (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_pxwcIfuhA)

Nicely made little video. Interesting to see such a variety of instruments of differing values. I wonder if he has a favourite?

I have a few instruments.

Fender American Standard Strat.
Fender cheap acoustic.
Simon and Patrick 12 string acoustic.
Korg Minilogue.
Roland TB-03
Roland TR-09
Yamaha Trumpet
Hohner Cross Harp
Kintail Bagpipes

The electronic stuff is new but I've played the rest on and off for years. Funnily the only one I have ever been good at is the bagpipes, and I don't play them at all now. I wasn't even all that good on them!  :P

Anyway, everyone loves a picture so here is the strat.

(https://c7.staticflickr.com/1/314/31450457630_aea9259a8c_k.jpg)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on December 25, 2016, 04:15:43 pm
Missus gave me a Strat for Christmas, just a Squier to see if I would enjoy it. Definitely going to have a go at building one now. :D

Have to panel the hall first, of course... :(
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Andrij on December 25, 2016, 04:56:32 pm
Bandura - 'Poltava/Kharkiv' style
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-CQZ5mFOSI5M/U3ScLi0V2tI/AAAAAAAACJc/0G_gMi5bOsM/s800/poltavka.jpg)


Not good.  :'(

(https://c3.staticflickr.com/1/765/31495491810_b316c3720e_b.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/PZ9CqS)
Poltavka (Vetzal) - crack (https://flic.kr/p/PZ9CqS) by Andrij (https://www.flickr.com/photos/bebchenko/), on Flickr
click to embiggen
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bobb on December 25, 2016, 05:06:27 pm
Restringing that must be fun  :P
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Andrij on December 25, 2016, 05:12:56 pm
Restringing that must be fun  :P

Thankfully I've never had to completely restring it.  IIRC, the most was three.  Tuning can be a pain if it's been a while, but usually takes less than five minutes.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bobb on December 26, 2016, 12:10:09 pm
Missus gave me a Strat for Christmas

Let's see it then!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on December 27, 2016, 10:20:55 am
Will do presently. I want to do a group photo of the lot and I'm lazy.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bumper on December 28, 2016, 03:59:51 pm
My Goodtime2, Scruggs style but much slower and now trying clawhammer.

I can play a few tunes now, about 6 that aren't too bad and a few that aren't as good ;D

currently trying to learn Thunderstruck by ACDC and Blackbird by The Beatles :facepalm:

(https://c5.staticflickr.com/1/778/31098551604_64363f73e6_k.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/Po5cWd)

(https://c6.staticflickr.com/1/463/31938223485_ee95fdcde8_k.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/QEgK8B)

(https://c6.staticflickr.com/1/279/31821918941_147fa5f2ec_k.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/QtZDQR)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on December 29, 2016, 10:29:41 am
Mine's a straight Goodtime. I had to buy the arm rest as an extra.  Like US Grant I know two tunes: one of them's Cripple Creek and the other one ain't.  Guitars keep interfering.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bumper on December 29, 2016, 01:44:12 pm
Only having the single instrument gives me only one choice for tunes. Are you clawhammer or 3 finger style on the open back?

I almost had the open back but wanted the extra volume and twang of the resonator. I didn't know at the time that there is a resonator conversion kit for the open back giving you the best of both.

My wife would've preferred I had the open back when I'm playing ;D
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on December 29, 2016, 04:23:54 pm
Mine's an open-back which I "play" 3-fingered, usually with picks but also without.  I do have a resonator 6-string but the sound is horrible even with good strings. The Deering is much more pleasant to listen to and the big tall frets much easier to finger.  My fingers are too short to stretch some of the basic chords quickly, though, which is aggravating.

My wife claims to like the sound but I don't believe her.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bumper on December 29, 2016, 05:34:18 pm
The Goodtime series sound more expensive than they actually are, I played a few brands before buying and nothing comes close unless you start to increase the spend. I may invest in an open back eventually. Wouldn't touch a 6 string, that's why I dumped the guitar about 25 years ago. I've only got 5 fingers on each hand not 6 :P

When I started on the banjo, I struggled reaching certain chords. The problem, I was holding it like a guitar. I then changed the position pointing it more upwards and setting my strap right. This has dropped my wrist more and pointed my fingers very slightly down towards the pot giving more reach. Holding the neck like a guitar also didn't help me. The narrow necks/close strings for me are also a slight issue, fat ended fingertips tend to hit more than string inventing new chords! I also play better standing up than sitting down for some reason. I think I slouch with it when I sit down and it throws my hands out slightly, I've just changed to angled picks and it's helped me to play better when seated.

I've found a couple of teachers close by (within 30 miles ). I may take up lessons in the spring. I don't fancy online lessons, prefer a teacher in person. Self taught is okay but I can imagine that I've started a few bad habits already.

My wife thought it was fun to try and guess the tune I was learning. Then I learnt duelling banjos and played it over and over and over. She now closes every door when I play ;D ;D

Had a try at clawhammer today, don't think I'll take to it. I think it's for singalong folks, I'd have my balls cut off i started to sing too!!!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bumper on December 29, 2016, 06:51:48 pm
This is how I held my guitar, maybe a few degrees more towards the horizontal. Definitely horizontal when sitting.

I hold my banjo like this standing and sitting, approx 1-2 o'clock with my thumb centered behind on the back of the neck. I find this angle keeps my picking fingers clear of the strings when needed and my left wrist has more flexibility for stretching the fingers out for chords. Keeping the thumb in that position also gives me more reach with my fingers and raises them off the strings when I'm stretched on certain chords.

I started without a strap, that didn't help. Since using a strap, I can keep the banjo in position and not take any weight on my hands. Allowing me to drop my wrist as the pic.

(http://cdn.bluegrasstoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/ashley.jpg)

I've only been playing a few months, it may be right or wrong but it works great for me. Look at the wrists in the photos.

I don't look as good as her when I play though. A few years older, fatter and way uglier :-[
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bumper on December 29, 2016, 06:57:59 pm
and another showing the angle difference. It's easier for me to drop my wrist with the banjo at 2 o'clock.

(http://www3.pictures.zimbio.com/gi/Shannon+Campbell+Ashley+Campbell+Inside+Night+eesE1OrqGkXl.jpg)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bumper on December 29, 2016, 07:14:08 pm
and let's not forget Dave Hum.

I always fancied playing Banjo but saw Dave in Chester a few years ago and was hypnotised by his playing. My wife carried on shopping and I stood for over an hour watching him. Another taken too early, RIP Dave.

Hope the pics have helped some :thumbsup:

(https://i1.ytimg.com/vi/4GH8LGlELtE/hqdefault.jpg)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bobb on December 29, 2016, 09:39:13 pm
When playing a guitar or similar, you should never ever consider what is comfortable. The only thing that is important is whether or not you look fucking cool. Once you have perfected this, you modify your technique accordingly.

Actually, I suppose this is irrelevant if you're playing a banjo, so as you were...   :P
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bumper on December 29, 2016, 10:03:09 pm
bobb, it's still cooler than being a drummer  :o  wondering how many yacfers I've just insulted ;D


road-runner, that's about where mine ends up. I can also see what my fingers are picking when needed too. I don't bother trying to silence mine, I let everyone suffer.
That's a nice banjo, some nice and fancy inlays and headstock. How long have you been playing?

Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bumper on December 30, 2016, 05:50:40 am
Banjo & drums, oh dear.

I knew really, your kit's on another page :P
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on December 30, 2016, 08:15:39 am
Good old Remo drumheads.  One of my favourite anachronisms to spot in films is supposedly pre-WW2 kit sporting Remo drumheads, which hardly pre-date Fender by 10 years.

I wasn't aware of angled picks. Since one of my problems is the string slipping over the side of the pick and catching on the nail, they sound like something I could use.  Are they just for fingers or thumbs too?

One of my other problems is that my 3rd & 4th fingers are too short to sit comfortably on the head (why does that sound nautical?) while the other two are picking, so my hand is never anchored for long. Doesn't help.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on December 30, 2016, 09:28:09 am
Banjo.  I keep my right-hand nails longish for the guitar - not good for cyclists, too bad.

Anyway, the Dunlop NS pick you show is the same as I already use: I understood "angled" to refer to a lateral twist out of the axis of the finger, but I gather now that that's not the case. The Dunlops are twistable anyway.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bumper on December 30, 2016, 09:34:50 am
I use these in no.1 and no.3. No.1 is very slightly more twangy when picking. If the straight finger picks aren't sitting at good angle, just twist only the blade section to get a better angle on the string.
http://www.eaglemusicshop.com/prod/banjo-picks-plectrums/ProPik-Fast-Picks-Split-Wrap.htm

The plastic thumb picks can be angled or even adjusted with hot water if desired. I've tried various thumb picks but now favour the ones below. The plastic set of 3 are vary in thickness and sound. The propik is very comfy and adjustable, the medium and large size adjust to thumb size easily but have different length picks.
http://www.eaglemusicshop.com/prod/banjo-picks-plectrums/fred-kelly-picks-set.htm
http://www.eaglemusicshop.com/prod/banjo-picks-plectrums/ProPik-Good-Grips-Metal-Plastic-Thumb-Pick.htm
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on December 30, 2016, 09:50:55 am
So they are angled sideways. Thanks, I'll try those, they'd probably work better than twisting straight ones.

I use a cheap plastic thumb-pick, it grips better than the Dunlop NS one.

I need to cobble some concentration together now and practise, between my wife's father dying and all the crap connected with closing our company I've been pulled every which way since September.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bumper on December 30, 2016, 11:34:43 am
download  a couple of tabs and have an hour. It'll take your mind off all of the crap that's going on ;)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on December 30, 2016, 02:15:10 pm
Yeah. That's what tablets were made for, after all.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bumper on December 30, 2016, 03:49:28 pm
those type of tabs may be better than my suggestion ;D
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Maverick on December 30, 2016, 04:49:43 pm
Thought I should add my bit of guitar porn.

(http://i703.photobucket.com/albums/ww37/martinbe/Guitar%20Pic%20%201_zpsmmqxu0h0.jpg)

From the age of 12 I struggled along with cheap guitars - although cheap guitars did improve dramatically as time went on. About 20 years ago I was in a position to buy a decent electric guitar. I was a huge fan of the sound of the Les Paul and thought that was what I wanted. I was wrong, it was too heavy and I found it difficult to play. After a while I gave up on it and bought a Stratocaster - a 1996 Strat Plus which has served me well. It has been upgraded over time and is still the guitar I pick up most often. It has been joined over time by a Les Paul Junior, Epiphone Dot and a HSS Stratocaster.
When the PRS 594 came out this year I fell in love with the vintage Les Paul tones from this guitar. I took a long trip down from Scotland to try one out and was bowled over - the sound I had in my head all those years ago without the difficulty of playing. This guitar really does sound like a vintage Les Paul but plays like a Stratocaster. So this one came home with me. Yes it was expensive but I didn't have to sell any body parts or children to purchase it. It lives in its case rather than the guitar rack so isn't my 'go to' guitar but it does get regular outings.

(http://i703.photobucket.com/albums/ww37/martinbe/Guitar%20Pic%20%205_zpsgj1233sn.jpg)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Jurek on December 30, 2016, 05:12:43 pm
I'm not a guitarist.
I'm a maker, by nature.
That's a lovely looking instrument.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bobb on December 30, 2016, 05:24:00 pm
Very nice  :)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on December 30, 2016, 05:38:19 pm
Beauty.  I'm not a big fan of the brindled look but this one is great.

download  a couple of tabs and have an hour. It'll take your mind off all of the crap that's going on ;)

Alas no. 20 minutes in my daughter phones up: her partner's computer won't boot and she wants 500€ to get him a new one. Plus: his PhD thesis is on it and he has no backups. Help, Daddy, help!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bobb on January 13, 2017, 01:03:14 pm
Some things arrived for me today  :)

(https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/409/32244549666_dc77527826_z.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/409/32244549666_dc77527826_b.jpg)

So... At the top we have a maple neck blank and a maple fretboard blank. Below those is a fret slotting jig. It works by locating a pin in the slots of the ruler thing. Then it just acts as a mitre box for getting accurate fret slots. This should help as it's a pain in the arse doing it just by measuring. Also it should help keeping the slots perfectly vertical.

The reason for the above is so I can make another neck for my Tele. There isn't really anything wrong with the existing one other than it isn't quite perfect enough. So a new one it is. Also, I want to practice making another neck before moving on to my next project....

... which is where the two other fretboard blanks come in. The top one is Rosewood and the bottom one is Ebony. Yes I know - that's a bit naughty, but this will be the one and only time I buy such woods. The company I bought them from have been even more naughty, as new CITES (https://cites.org/eng/new_CITES_trade_rules_come_into_effect_as_2017_starts_02012017) laws came into effect at the beginning of the year. What I bought was sent across international borders and certainly the Rosewood should have had some documentation. No idea why Ebony isn't included as that can often be sourced poached from areas where it is endangered.

Anyway - new neck first then onto my next project  :)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on January 13, 2017, 02:08:18 pm
Here's my current stable of strings
(http://i954.photobucket.com/albums/ae29/cyclisttony/IMG_0219%201.jpg) (http://s954.photobucket.com/user/cyclisttony/media/IMG_0219%201.jpg.html)




And here, to go with the curly axe topic, is the cello played by Hannah Miller of Moulettes. built IIRC by her Dad.
(http://i954.photobucket.com/albums/ae29/cyclisttony/IMG_0103%201.jpg) (http://s954.photobucket.com/user/cyclisttony/media/IMG_0103%201.jpg.html)

Steph, what are the 2 at the back?
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on January 13, 2017, 03:39:20 pm
Some things arrived for me today  :)

(https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/409/32244549666_dc77527826_z.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/409/32244549666_dc77527826_b.jpg)

So... At the top we have a maple neck blank and a maple fretboard blank. Below those is a fret slotting jig. It works by locating a pin in the slots of the ruler thing. Then it just acts as a mitre box for getting accurate fret slots. This should help as it's a pain in the arse doing it just by measuring. Also it should help keeping the slots perfectly vertical.

The reason for the above is so I can make another neck for my Tele. There isn't really anything wrong with the existing one other than it isn't quite perfect enough. So a new one it is. Also, I want to practice making another neck before moving on to my next project....

... which is where the two other fretboard blanks come in. The top one is Rosewood and the bottom one is Ebony. Yes I know - that's a bit naughty, but this will be the one and only time I buy such woods. The company I bought them from have been even more naughty, as new CITES (https://cites.org/eng/new_CITES_trade_rules_come_into_effect_as_2017_starts_02012017) laws came into effect at the beginning of the year. What I bought was sent across international borders and certainly the Rosewood should have had some documentation. No idea why Ebony isn't included as that can often be sourced poached from areas where it is endangered.

Anyway - new neck first then onto my next project  :)

Very nice, esp the slotting jig.

My 2016 German-made 12-string has rosewood fingerboard, back & sides, and I think all my guitars have rosewood fretboards.

Anyway, my new bandsaw arrived today, and after the I've done the domestic project I "need" it for I'll be hewing necks* out of local pearwood and fingerboards out of Ugandan mahogany harvested in the late 50s. The missus's folks brought a bunch of furniture back from there, all built by a Chinese carpenter working from the G-Plan catalogue for a tenth of the price. It's pretty ugly and they gave it to me as raw material 25 years ago.  I'm just wondering if I haven't got a chunk that'd do for a thinnish body.

Pearwood's nice - light pink that will probably deepen nicely under finish.

*plural, yet! Ever the optimist.   Hewing necks sounds Caligulesque.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Steph on January 13, 2017, 04:54:30 pm
PaulF:
The two at the back: biggest one there is a rather nice octave mandolin, and the decorated one is a mandola. Mandola is tuned same as a viola, CGDA, one fifth down on a mandolin. The octave is exactly that, tuned one octave down from a mandolin, GDAE, with the G and D courses as octave pairs (one thicker string and one thinner for each)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on January 13, 2017, 05:04:25 pm
PaulF:
The two at the back: biggest one there is a rather nice octave mandolin, and the decorated one is a mandola. Mandola is tuned same as a viola, CGDA, one fifth down on a mandolin. The octave is exactly that, tuned one octave down from a mandolin, GDAE, with the G and D courses as octave pairs (one thicker string and one thinner for each)

Thanks! Is the octave mandolin "easier" to play than a regular mandolin? I find my fingers to big to easily play the mandolin :( Or maybe I just need to practice more
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Mr Larrington on January 13, 2017, 05:45:21 pm
Pearwood's nice - light pink that will probably deepen nicely under finish

Just make sure it's not sapient pearwood, coz that'll have your fingers off!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Steph on January 13, 2017, 10:03:44 pm
PaulF:
The two at the back: biggest one there is a rather nice octave mandolin, and the decorated one is a mandola. Mandola is tuned same as a viola, CGDA, one fifth down on a mandolin. The octave is exactly that, tuned one octave down from a mandolin, GDAE, with the G and D courses as octave pairs (one thicker string and one thinner for each)

Thanks! Is the octave mandolin "easier" to play than a regular mandolin? I find my fingers to big to easily play the mandolin :( Or maybe I just need to practice more
If you have bigger hands, I would assume so. The scale length of the fingerboard/spacing of the frets is bigger. Much like a bouzouki.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on January 15, 2017, 10:30:06 am
Pearwood's nice - light pink that will probably deepen nicely under finish

Just make sure it's not sapient pearwood, coz that'll have your fingers off!

That's how it gets a nice deep red finish.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: hellymedic on January 22, 2017, 08:33:56 pm
This might interest some of you...
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/video_and_audio/headlines/38712423 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/video_and_audio/headlines/38712423)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on February 25, 2017, 09:30:51 am
PaulF:
The two at the back: biggest one there is a rather nice octave mandolin, and the decorated one is a mandola. Mandola is tuned same as a viola, CGDA, one fifth down on a mandolin. The octave is exactly that, tuned one octave down from a mandolin, GDAE, with the G and D courses as octave pairs (one thicker string and one thinner for each)

Thanks! Is the octave mandolin "easier" to play than a regular mandolin? I find my fingers to big to easily play the mandolin :( Or maybe I just need to practice more

Well I'm about to find out :) pictures to follow
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Vince on February 26, 2017, 10:25:09 pm
Some things arrived for me today  :)

(https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/409/32244549666_dc77527826_z.jpg) (https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/409/32244549666_dc77527826_b.jpg)

So... At the top we have a maple neck blank and a maple fretboard blank. Below those is a fret slotting jig. It works by locating a pin in the slots of the ruler thing. Then it just acts as a mitre box for getting accurate fret slots. This should help as it's a pain in the arse doing it just by measuring. Also it should help keeping the slots perfectly vertical.


Bobb, what make is the slotting jig? I've looked at the StewMac ones and found them to be ver nice, but expensive.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on February 27, 2017, 04:57:21 pm
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2578/32995644922_b19513ea2a_k.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/SgHiFG)FullSizeRender.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/SgHiFG) by paulfulford (https://www.flickr.com/photos/paul_fulford/), on Flickr

n+1, not just for bikes ;D
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Steph on February 28, 2017, 05:50:58 pm
That looks more like a bouzouki in neck length! How does it play?
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on February 28, 2017, 07:13:04 pm
That looks more like a bouzouki in neck length! How does it play?


Given my capabilities it sounds really nice, it only arrived yesterday but haven't had a chance to properly play. Really pleased so far. Still need to get used to the longer neck compared with the mandolin. Neck's 23" by the way.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Steph on February 28, 2017, 11:44:00 pm
You will find that you can get some really sweet sounds when you play up around 10th fret onwards. Have you got octave pairs for the G and D strings, or are they unison? Assuming octave mandolin tuning, of course.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on March 01, 2017, 07:20:09 am
Thanks, I'll experiment there a little.

Tuning is mandolin so G, D, A, E. Strings are in unison although octave pairs sound interesting. May try when I'm a little more capable.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bobb on March 01, 2017, 07:54:52 am
Bobb, what make is the slotting jig? I've looked at the StewMac ones and found them to be ver nice, but expensive.

It's from Guitars and Woods (https://guitarsandwoods.com/tools/fretting/miter-box.html?limit=100)

It's not much cheaper than the one from StewMac. I'm happy with it, but the StewMac one has two little clamps to hold the fretboard in place whereas with this one I've had to improvise:

(http://www.zaribor.co.uk/raz/pics/fsj-small.jpg) (http://www.zaribor.co.uk/raz/pics/fsj-large.jpg)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Charlotte on March 01, 2017, 01:58:35 pm
Here are my two main instruments these days:

(http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b187/vicechair/Guitars_zpseatwes8f.jpg)

On the left is an all-carbon Emerald X5-OS electro-acoustic.  The guitar on the right is a Martin LX1E.  They're both small-bodied, short scale instruments because I rather like the slightly lower string tension and overall tone and playability of smaller guitars.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Steph on March 02, 2017, 05:17:40 pm
Thanks, I'll experiment there a little.

Tuning is mandolin so G, D, A, E. Strings are in unison although octave pairs sound interesting. May try when I'm a little more capable.
You can also get different sounds depending which side of the strings you strike first, up or down, so lots of possibilities!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Maverick on May 14, 2017, 03:36:58 pm
If you don't like guitars with fancy tops, look away now. This is a 2012 Collings I35 Deluxe Custom in tiger eye burst.
I have wanted a Collings I35 after I had the opportunity to play one a few years ago. A lot of people think they are just an upmarket ES335 and get disappointed when they don't sound like one. They fit into the 335 class of guitars in that they are semi-hollow with a maple centre block - that's where the similarity ends. Body is machined out of a single peice of mahogany, maple block added and then a carved maple top added. This one is fitted with Jason Lollar low wind humbuckers. The sound is a little darker than a 335 but the real difference is the string seperation and attack - every note sands out, even when overdriven and the note attack is fast. Not a guitar for the faint hearted as there is nowhere to hide with this.
I found this one second hand at less than half the price of a new one, dead chuffed. Plays like a dream and sounds wonderful into my Tone King Imperial amp.


(http://i703.photobucket.com/albums/ww37/martinbe/Guitars/Collings/collings-1_zps9kkjrq1w.jpg)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bobb on May 14, 2017, 06:39:41 pm
I have just come in my pants  :P
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Peter on May 14, 2017, 07:18:17 pm
Down, Tiger!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on May 14, 2017, 07:42:53 pm
I like that. But not as much as bobb does!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Maverick on May 15, 2017, 09:00:10 am
Thanks RR, your Ibanez looks really nice - love the burst on the pickguard. The I35 certainly has its own take on the 335 sound. I always think of the semi-hollow thinline, humberbucker guitar as the workhorse of the guitar world - you can dial in just about any sound you need (apart from full on metal). The I35 is no exception but does so with astonishing articulation and clarity. It's not everyones cup of tea though - it has been described as too 'hi-fi' and even sterile by some. I think they miss the point - you can use this characteristic as the guitar responds faithfully to every naunce of your playing ( and every fluff and mistake) - changing pick can have a big effect and finger style you can get a huge range of tone out of it. I've spent the last week lost in this guitar, it is really difficult to put it down once you start playing. If you are ever up in Scotland message me, you would be welcome to come and spend a little time playing it.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: firedfromthecircus on May 16, 2017, 04:29:44 pm
MMmmmmmmmm, Tone King!  :-*
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: menthel on May 25, 2017, 12:49:23 pm
Off to Eagle Music this Saturday to scope out a banjo shaped 40th present. Might come back with something worthy of pictures...
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on May 25, 2017, 01:13:56 pm
Off to Eagle Music this Saturday to scope out a banjo shaped 40th present. Might come back with something worthy of pictures...

I don't trust myself there
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on July 06, 2017, 04:29:41 pm
I didn't mean to buy a new instrument.

Honest!

But I played one of these in a shop and when I saw that I could get it for 30% off list price I had to have it!

(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4141/35626754241_2c1da57858_c.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/WhdqPt)Octave Mandola (https://flic.kr/p/WhdqPt) by paulfulford (https://www.flickr.com/photos/paul_fulford/), on Flickr

It was supposed to have "minor" cosmetic damage but seems to be unblemished and still had the inspection tags and paper protecting the strings.

Shorter neck for Steph :-) 
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on July 06, 2017, 05:01:01 pm
:thumbsup:
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Steph on July 06, 2017, 06:08:55 pm
That looks like the same make as mine. Ashbury? Lovely action!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on July 06, 2017, 07:20:58 pm
Steph, yes it's an Ashbury. Looks similar to yours bar the tailpiece.

Mine needs a little work on the action but I wasn't expecting Amazon to do great job ;D
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Steph on July 07, 2017, 05:09:26 am
They 'ring' well, and have reasonable sustain.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on July 26, 2017, 05:39:56 pm
Trauma ward:

(http://www.pbase.com/image/165904196.jpg)

Both basses, both my daughter's.  The one in the foreground I found stashed in our loft, the one in the background was trodden by her swain getting out of bed, and is awaiting a new neck. Been waiting a good while, now.

She has never mentioned that 5-string so I think I'll keep it. <evil grin>  The break wasn't entirely clean so the lettering is out of line by a tiny fraction of a millimetre. If it's too embarrassing I'll take a V-gouge down the entire length of the joint and fill it with something black: bug into feature.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Peter on July 27, 2017, 02:11:15 pm
Excellent picture.  However, man who treads on guitar should also need new neck.

(I have one of those clamps, which I got for repairing guitars when I was teaching evening class pupils, decades ago.  I think it was from a German mail order craft firm.)

Peter
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on July 30, 2017, 02:05:35 pm
Yes, they're German - Klemmsia. I bought these years ago, along with two extra-long ones.

Anyway, the head now looks like this:

(http://www.pbase.com/image/165926492.jpg)

And I'm trying to decide what to do with it: slap veneer either side or treat the fault line as a feature and just varnish it.  Veneering could be a bit of a bore because of the curve up to the fretboard.  The rest of the guitar is a somewhat scratchy mess, or rather I think it will be once I've got the grime off it, so the crack wouldn't be entirely out of keeping.

Anyway, spalted wood it wouldn't look all that different. ;)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: menthel on November 13, 2017, 10:14:06 am
Now have my filthy mitts on my Deering Sierra, will have to take some photos and share. Its so lovely...
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on January 06, 2018, 10:20:02 am
My new (to me) Paul Hathway mandolin.

(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4736/38824395064_b208dc35ac_c.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/229Mb2N)IMG_2464 (https://flic.kr/p/229Mb2N) by paulfulford (https://www.flickr.com/photos/paul_fulford/), on Flickr

Just need to improve my playing so I don't let it down
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on January 06, 2018, 03:34:07 pm
:thumbsup: Pretty!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on January 06, 2018, 03:45:42 pm
Thanks!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: pcolbeck on January 07, 2018, 02:13:14 pm
Some inspiration for you PaulF

https://youtu.be/7ptRHuewL44
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on January 07, 2018, 03:09:44 pm
Some inspiration for you PaulF

https://youtu.be/7ptRHuewL44

Thanks! Wish I could be on hundedth as good as Chris Thile!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on January 08, 2018, 08:26:57 am
That's rather splendid. Ta!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on January 08, 2018, 09:00:47 am
Now have my filthy mitts on my Deering Sierra, will have to take some photos and share. Its so lovely...

Well?

We can't wait forever you know!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: menthel on January 08, 2018, 11:56:22 am
Now have my filthy mitts on my Deering Sierra, will have to take some photos and share. Its so lovely...

Well?

We can't wait forever you know!

I thought of this just yesterday as I played it. I will take a picture tonight. ;)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Steph on January 08, 2018, 04:18:41 pm
Some inspiration for you PaulF

https://youtu.be/7ptRHuewL44

Thanks! Wish I could be on hundedth as good as Chris Thile!

This is more my sort of aspirational playing. So utterly joyous, and the grace notes and ornamentation are stunning. Pete will be at Shrewsbury this year, with Gigspanner, along with Steeleye themselves.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D-mix36SjZY
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Ham on January 11, 2018, 08:47:05 am
Machine heads now fixed, I might even pick it up from time to time (more than I've done for the last 20 years)

(https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-JnlQmcnte2g/Wlcj7TqYFUI/AAAAAAABEuQ/k4J3IZyH168uU1ggCMEDItGtu46mx-lGQCKgBGAs/s1024/IMG_20180110_152205.jpg)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: menthel on January 28, 2018, 10:51:14 am
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4761/39232492004_336e830ed1_k.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/22LQM2W)Banjo! Deering Sierra. (https://flic.kr/p/22LQM2W) by Jim Swales (https://www.flickr.com/photos/menthel/), on Flickr

Finally the banjo.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on January 28, 2018, 11:18:49 am
Very nice! Is that another one on the left?
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: menthel on January 28, 2018, 11:28:33 am
Yep, my bog standard cheapo Pilgrim openback. It is difficult to go back to! I also have a travel size Gold tone too. Not that I can play any of them decently!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: pcolbeck on February 13, 2018, 09:54:10 am
Yep, my bog standard cheapo Pilgrim openback. It is difficult to go back to! I also have a travel size Gold tone too. Not that I can play any of them decently!

I bet a travel banjo makes you a really popular neighbour when staying in a hotel :)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on February 13, 2018, 10:14:06 am
Know the feeling when you go back to a “starter instrument. I felt the same when I tuned up the mandolin I learnt on and compared it to my current one. Almost felt guilty selling it but hopefully it will start someone else on a musical path
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: menthel on February 14, 2018, 10:11:05 am
I only take the travel banjo to places where I know I won't torture people. Or at least only torture my family. The Broads cruiser and the hippyish campsite were the two that stood out.

And yes, I have retuned the beginner banjo but it still sits there. I would rather retune the Deering and play that when necessary! ;)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on February 14, 2018, 10:45:02 am
I only take the travel banjo to places where I know I won't torture people.

You've played the banjo on the moon? ;D
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: menthel on February 14, 2018, 11:08:53 am
I only take the travel banjo to places where I know I won't torture people.

You've played the banjo on the moon? ;D

How very dare you! ;)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: road-runner on February 14, 2018, 11:43:52 am
Two recent acquisitions:

(https://i.imgur.com/h9q72uX.jpg)

First a Kala u-bass which is quiet enough acoustically to play at home yet surprisingly full-sounding when amplified (check out the sound in this video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xqo_6g8KRXo)). I quit the band I was playing bass in so I haven't had the opportunity to try it out for real yet.

(https://i.imgur.com/zcQmocQ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/mjQmKck.jpg)

Second, a Tama snare to go in my hybrid kit at church. This video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DAFu6Kru_d0) nicely demonstrates it.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Mr Larrington on February 14, 2018, 12:33:07 pm
Brian Ritchie of the Violent Femmes used to play an acoustic-stylee mariachi bass; this Unit can confirm it was plenty loud enough ;D
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bumper on February 14, 2018, 03:21:03 pm
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4761/39232492004_336e830ed1_k.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/22LQM2W)Banjo! Deering Sierra. (https://flic.kr/p/22LQM2W) by Jim Swales (https://www.flickr.com/photos/menthel/), on Flickr

Finally the banjo.

lush 8)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: andytheflyer on February 19, 2018, 08:14:55 pm
Yamaha 280.  Started learning the sax 2 years ago. Grade 1 this summer!  (Well, I'm "over 60" and have not picked up an instrument for 50 years, so what do you expect?)

https://flic.kr/p/GneG4d
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: road-runner on February 19, 2018, 10:28:42 pm
Nice one, Andy.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: nicknack on February 19, 2018, 11:32:49 pm
Yamaha 280.  Started learning the sax 2 years ago. Grade 1 this summer!  (Well, I'm "over 60" and have not picked up an instrument for 50 years, so what do you expect?)

https://flic.kr/p/GneG4d
:thumbsup:
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: andytheflyer on February 20, 2018, 08:28:19 am
Thx road-runner and nicknack.

My son (who's now 38!) played alto sax in his school jazz band, and they were quite good, and famous locally.  He went off to Uni, leaving behind the sax, and never came home (funny that, I seem to recall doing the same  many years previously). 

I retired in 2016 and knew I needed a mental challenge, and some daily structure, having worked in environmental and civil engineering for 40 years as an engineering geologist.  I'd always liked jazz and the sound of the sax in particular, so I had his sax serviced (a Buescher) and found a teacher, who also plays in a Big Band.

I absolutely love it, but I did treat myself to that new Yamaha a few months in.  I love practice and I can see myself gradually improving, and I like the cause and effect you get from learning new skills, driven by a brilliant teacher.  She says I'm a bit 'mechanical' rather than 'musical', but I'm working on that too - maybe to be expected of an engineering education and career!.

I get a real kick out of playing a duet with her in lessons and hopefully in a few years I'll be good enough to get into a local band.  Been working on some Glenn Miller classics, and can do a passable American Patrol, and getting to grips with In the Mood atm. 

My only regret is that I didn't start this years ago, as you never know how much time you have left.  But I suppose loads of UK and international travel for work, and long periods overseas in hotel rooms would have made practice impossible, and lessons out of the question.  So, maybe, it's just that my time has come, and I'm giving it a thorough go.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: David Martin on February 20, 2018, 11:44:48 pm
Probably enough for a YACF jazz band (to drown out the mandolin and banjo players)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: andytheflyer on February 21, 2018, 08:07:43 am
Probably enough for a YACF jazz band (to drown out the mandolin and banjo players)

 ;D

That'll be why I'm banished to the conservatory to do my practice, while SWMBO gets a nice warm bedroom for her flute practice......
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on February 21, 2018, 08:16:12 am
Probably enough for a YACF jazz band (to drown out the mandolin and banjo players)


By the time the jazz crowd have finished stroking their beards, adjusting their berets and agreeing what key to play in the folkies will have finished their set and be at the bar - except the banjo that's still trying to tune up ;D
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on February 21, 2018, 08:29:42 am
Probably enough for a YACF jazz band (to drown out the mandolin and banjo players)


It actually takes very little to drown out a mandolin...



Of course I could always deploy this:

(http://www.thewuffler.f9.co.uk/vee11.jpg)




Apparently it goes all the way up to 11

Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on February 21, 2018, 09:09:13 am
I retired in 2016 and knew I needed a mental challenge, and some daily structure, having worked in environmental and civil engineering for 40 years as an engineering geologist.  I'd always liked jazz and the sound of the sax in particular, so I had his sax serviced (a Buescher) and found a teacher, who also plays in a Big Band.

Yeah...  Two years ago, being off the road for a couple of months, I dug out my old 12-string, which I had passed to my daughter 20 years earlier. She too had subsequently buggered off to uni etc., leaving it in her bedroom, where it had lain for 10 years at least.  I brought it downstairs, cleaned it up, put new strings on, and started to get acquainted again, not having played much since the 90s and not having replaced the 12.

Two weeks later, she and her partner came for lunch. She saw the 12 all bright and shiny, said "cool" and walked off with it.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on February 21, 2018, 09:11:05 am
Probably enough for a YACF jazz band (to drown out the mandolin and banjo players)


It actually takes very little to drown out a mandolin...


And a banjo is like a woman*.

* q.v. Otis Lee Crenshaw
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Steph on February 21, 2018, 05:28:33 pm
No it isn't. Nobody cries when you cut up a banjo.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: andytheflyer on February 21, 2018, 06:18:04 pm
Two weeks later, she and her partner came for lunch. She saw the 12 all bright and shiny, said "cool" and walked off with it.

Son (and family) came over from Alberta for Christmas, and I hoped that he'd be persuaded to get his old sax out and play some duets with me.  No chance as it turned out, which was a pity as he is Grade 5 sax and seems to be able to play any instrument/tune he picks up.  Annoyingly..... (but at least I have a spare sax for when my Yamaha goes for service :)  But maybe I should buy a tenor sax as well.....  Does the n+1 rule apply to instruments?)

He did, however, dig out a cheapy acoustic guitar that he took with him on his world trip a few years ago and regale us with some rock classics, so I was partly recompensed.  He doesn't do Steve Hackett or Daryl Stuermer though, so Clapton and Jimmy Page had to suffice.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: phantasmagoriana on February 21, 2018, 06:29:21 pm
But maybe I should buy a tenor sax as well.....  Does the n+1 rule apply to instruments?)

But of course. Even more so than with bikes! :facepalm:
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: nicknack on February 21, 2018, 06:34:21 pm
But maybe I should buy a tenor sax as well.....  Does the n+1 rule apply to instruments?)

But of course. Even more so than with bikes! :facepalm:
Yup. I've got 12.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: menthel on February 21, 2018, 07:22:55 pm
No it isn't. Nobody cries when you cut up a banjo.

I wouldn't cry. I might hurt people.

(Or more likely cry...)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: David Martin on February 21, 2018, 10:32:56 pm
Hmm.. 2 wooden clarinets (Both Bb), two alto sax, one in need of repair. A few recorders and penny whistles. Would like a tenor or baritone sax. Not sure I can justify it. (failed grade 5 because I was a poor student and tried to sight read the study - I considered a 3 point margin a good performance in that light)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: andytheflyer on March 23, 2018, 08:51:59 am
My youngster alto sax (Yamaha YAS 280) and its new companion, a grown-up tenor (Yamaha YTS 32), made between 1980 and 1991.

https://flic.kr/p/HhkAQh

I've hankered after a tenor to go with my alto, and have idly browsed eBay for a while, seeing an awful lot of battered and bent dross, and then this popped up.  There's no way I'd buy a used sax without consulting my music teacher and my servicing technician - but both said it was worth a look.  Particularly since it was only about 10 miles away.  Would normally go for the student level but this one is the intermediate.

Had a look last Saturday night with teach, and she pronounced it gorgeous, and managed to win the auction for about £90 over my advisers' guide price, and £300 less than the cost of a new student model.  It's immaculate.  Been played but not a mark on it and it came with a hard case, 3 mouthpieces, some reeds (which are old and will go in the bin), some music and a sax stand.

Been able to play some scales and basic tunes as the keywork is exactly the same as my alto.  But I'm going to put it to one side for a few weeks until my first ever music exam is out of the way as I need to keep my eyes on the initial prize.

Phew!  The low notes don't half rattle the windows.....
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: nicknack on March 23, 2018, 09:03:19 am
Very nice!
What exam are you doing?
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: andytheflyer on March 23, 2018, 02:25:55 pm
Very nice!
What exam are you doing?

Only Grade 1 AMRSM.  I last played an instrument at school - over 50 years ago. Took up the sax 2 years ago when I retired and stopped travelling for work and have had weekly lessons more or less ever since.  My teacher says I'm well beyond Grade 1, but we'll start with that and hope to get a strong pass.  We will see. The exam experience will be good for further exams to come.

I'm more nervous about that than I was about my model aeroplane flying test, years ago!

I do about 7-10 hours a week practice, but I had spinal surgery on my neck in 2010 which has affected my hands, so my dexterity and finger speed is not as good as it might otherwise be, and I can't stand up for more than a few minutes so I have to play sitting down.  Takes me quite a long time to get the muscle memory to kick in, and find the fingering that works best for me.  Mixture of classical and jazz.

But I really love playing the sax........  Maybe one day I'll be good enough to get into a pub band!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: nicknack on March 23, 2018, 02:31:39 pm
Good luck!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on June 06, 2018, 09:17:53 am
(http://www.pbase.com/image/167601789.jpg)

My first guitar build: 24-"fret" fretless 3-string cigar-box guitar, tuned E-B-E.

Sapele neck, pearwood fingerboard, homemade plywood box. Top flamed using old cassette sprockets as stencils, then waxed and stained with Diamine Majestic Purple and Twilight inks. Soundhole "rosette" is an old 30T chainring. Tailpiece is a 13T sprocket.  Pickups from an old PJ bass, faced with mahogany veneer then stained.

Fret slots cut but left empty for use with slide: side-dots on neck.

Calling it The Oops because it is full of beginner's mistakes, not to be repeated and mostly hidden: but it works!

Still needs a headstock badge: I'll probably just nail on a couple of chain links. Haven't quite got the courage to try an inlay - next time maybe.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on June 06, 2018, 12:34:00 pm
Bonkers! But I love it!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bobb on June 06, 2018, 01:16:18 pm
That's awesome! Totally in the spirit of cigar box guitars!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on June 06, 2018, 03:35:49 pm
:thumbsup: Cheers both! 

Going to have to put a plexiglas shield over the right lower bout, though: When I tried it in my nice cool workshop the colours were fast, but when I played it with a sweaty arm I got a purple wrist.

Apart from that, I had so much fun building it that now I'm bereft, so the next one will be on the stocks by the end of the week - cat-bowl resonator.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on June 11, 2018, 01:24:11 pm
Just discovered these in one of our hidey-holes:

(http://www.pbase.com/johnewing/image/167630912.jpg)

The other half of the set went into an Appachian dulcimer I built 50 years ago. I knew they'd come in handy some day.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on June 21, 2018, 02:40:36 pm
Ladies and gentlemen, may I introduce Judas

(https://s26.postimg.cc/g4t5klxuh/308_BB02_E-_A05_E-43_AC-_AADE-47_CC839_A126_C.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/i9dilozh1/)

Primarily bought because, in technical terms, my playing is "a bit crap" and this allows me to practice with headphones on
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on June 21, 2018, 04:03:16 pm
Looks like fun, and I bet I'm crapper than you.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on June 22, 2018, 05:27:01 pm
I sincerely doubt that ;D
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: andytheflyer on June 30, 2018, 12:29:59 pm
My youngster alto sax (Yamaha YAS 280) and its new companion, a grown-up tenor (Yamaha YTS 32), made between 1980 and 1991.

https://flic.kr/p/HhkAQh

I've hankered after a tenor to go with my alto, and have idly browsed eBay for a while, seeing an awful lot of battered and bent dross, and then this popped up.  There's no way I'd buy a used sax without consulting my music teacher and my servicing technician - but both said it was worth a look.  Particularly since it was only about 10 miles away.  Would normally go for the student level but this one is the intermediate.

Had a look last Saturday night with teach, and she pronounced it gorgeous, and managed to win the auction for about £90 over my advisers' guide price, and £300 less than the cost of a new student model.  It's immaculate.  Been played but not a mark on it and it came with a hard case, 3 mouthpieces, some reeds (which are old and will go in the bin), some music and a sax stand.


Gave my new (to me) tenor sax to my music teacher (and technician) for her to give it the once over. a few weeks ago.  Took her a while but I got it back this week - she pronounced it immaculate. Bought some new Van Doren reeds, which arrived this morning.  I've been having a go this week with a very old VD reed that came with the sax, and had mixed results.  But the new reeds are much better. I managed to get to be squeak-free after about 10 minutes, and was soon playing my alto sax practice and exam pieces.

Very different instrument to play, even though the keywork is all the same as the alto.  But I love it, and I think it'll become my main instrument, over the alto.

Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on July 13, 2018, 09:40:34 am
I built Judas somewhere to live ;D

(https://s26.postimg.cc/k4juu8abd/1579_E1_DA-8891-4696-80_A2-3966157_C4_BAB.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6nmwbczzp/)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: ScumOfTheRoad on July 13, 2018, 09:59:20 am
PaulF:   Shagadelic!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on July 13, 2018, 10:05:53 am
:thumbsup: Needs a built-in cocktail bar.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bobb on July 13, 2018, 10:22:24 am
(https://s26.postimg.cc/k4juu8abd/1579_E1_DA-8891-4696-80_A2-3966157_C4_BAB.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/image/6nmwbczzp/)

I reckon Keef would dig that  :P

I've just been reviewing my latest guitar build (which I should have finished ages ago!) and I'm thinking I need to stump up for a half decent band saw. I've made life ridiculously difficult for myself with my laminate through neck design. Running before walking and all that....
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on July 13, 2018, 01:05:02 pm
I've just been reviewing my latest guitar build (which I should have finished ages ago!) and I'm thinking I need to stump up for a half decent band saw. I've made life ridiculously difficult for myself with my laminate through neck design. Running before walking and all that....

That's my wail too.  I had an E. German cheapo for >20 years and it was wonderful, but then it died. My current Metabo is shit. Apart from the fact that it won't cut true no matter what the blade tension, the blade guard is so constructed that you can't see the blade with both eyes at once when you're cutting, and the wee LED light throws it into shadow.

I could do with a table saw, too.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: road-runner on July 13, 2018, 10:39:30 pm
(https://i.imgur.com/Wl5SngF.jpg)

These two white tom toms are far from new but as I have shut my studio they are not in use at the moment. At church I usually play on an electronic kit but I prefer the sounds and dynamics I can get from acoustic drums so I decided to swap out the electronic toms in favour of the acoustic toms. The next step will be to convert my 16" floor tom into a bass drum.

PS. That's a nice cigar box guitar, T42; and what a plush case you have made, PaulF!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on July 14, 2018, 07:56:58 am
Thanks!  I screwed up with the neck break angle, though - as in there isn't any - so I've added a nut extension and now I try to play slide. Sounds like an old steam turntable with a dickey drive-belt.  But hey, the neighbours' kids drench the neighbourhood in [c]rap so I figure that adding a wail like a seasick cow improves things.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: andytheflyer on July 19, 2018, 08:07:04 pm
Good luck!

Got the results today - distinction: 133/150.  Stop sniggering at the back - you haven't spent the last 40 years travelling all over the UK and half the globe, away for weeks at a time, and dealing with tricky Furriner clients in languages you don't speak.  Now I need to get my Tenor up to speed and on to the next exam - Grade 3 I'm told!

Had an ice cream and a couple of beers to celebrate.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: nicknack on July 19, 2018, 08:18:00 pm
Congratulations!
Same score as I got for grade 8 35 years ago.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: andytheflyer on July 19, 2018, 08:27:53 pm
Congratulations!
Same score as I got for grade 8 35 years ago.

Thx - can't see me taking grade 8 aged 99 somehow!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: andytheflyer on July 20, 2018, 08:12:40 am
Well done, Andy. Take it easy: rushed progress will be short lived and provide plenty of frustrating moments. I guess progress is music is a bit like the hare and the tortoise story.

Thx RR.  I was totally exhausted for a couple of days after the exam, presumably the after effect of several months of concentration,  trying to learn a lot of new skills all at once - plus Grade 3 Theory, and the exam being way out of my comfort zone.  Got my mojo back now, but have moved over mostly to the tenor sax to bring that up to my alto standard (which I still play every day), but it's a new learning curve as the embouchure and blowing is different.  Fortunately, the keys are in the same relative places, but a bit further apart.  Progress frustratingly slow, and two steps forward, one back, but my teacher is excellent - loads of patience and I completely let her set the pace and direction. She only puts pupils into exams when she knows they'll get a strong pass. 

Becoming 'legitimate' (in that I've passed a music exam - beyond my wildest imagination a few years ago)  has given me some confidence that I can do this, given enough time and diligence, and it's only anno domini and my natural limit of ability that will curtail how far I get.

And I really enjoy playing the sax.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on July 20, 2018, 08:15:41 am
Good luck!

Got the results today - distinction: 133/150.  Stop sniggering at the back - you haven't spent the last 40 years travelling all over the UK and half the globe, away for weeks at a time, and dealing with tricky Furriner clients in languages you don't speak.  Now I need to get my Tenor up to speed and on to the next exam - Grade 3 I'm told!

Had an ice cream and a couple of beers to celebrate.

Congratulations!


Understand how you feel about switching between tenor and alto. I have the same issue switching between mandolin with a 14" scale and the octave with a 20" scale.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on July 20, 2018, 08:40:58 am
:thumbsup: Well done!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Woofage on July 20, 2018, 04:14:27 pm
Congratulations!
Same score as I got for grade 8 35 years ago.

& a lot more than I got for my Grade 8 Violin 34 years ago :(.

#1 son has been looking at baris on eBay :o. He volunteers gets roped in to play bari sometimes at school (including in the recent school production) as a) the fingering is the same as alto, apparently and b) at 6'3"" he's big enough.

I think he's been somewhat inspired by this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=krLYZmPRtnc
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: andytheflyer on July 20, 2018, 05:47:37 pm
#1 son has been looking at baris on eBay :o. He volunteers gets roped in to play bari sometimes at school (including in the recent school production) as a) the fingering is the same as alto, apparently and b) at 6'3"" he's big enough.

He'd need to be a big lad.  I was surprised at just how much heavier the tenor is than the alto.  Daren't think about the weight of the baritone. I had a 3 level disc decompression and fusion in my neck a few years ago - before I started playing the sax - and I have to use a braces style of neck strap to keep the weight off my neck.  They fasten to my trousers belt.  I suggest he looks at the same otherwise he'll hurt his neck!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: nicknack on July 21, 2018, 09:56:45 am
He'd need to be a big lad.
Not necessarily.
Here's a really big person showing what you can do with a baritone.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ilm1ZB3dexI
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: nicknack on July 21, 2018, 10:02:13 am
Actually, when I come to think of it, most of the baritone players I have known over the years have been small women.

I'm lucky in that I've never suffered from neck problems when playing baritone. Lower back yes, neck no. There isn't a harness around that can take the pressure off your lower back. If it's a big problem then a stand is the only way to go.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on September 17, 2018, 10:54:36 am
Cigar-box guitar I built for daughter's partner.  My second build and first fretting job. I missed a day due to illness during the week and had to go flat out from Thursday on, but it worked. The boy (age 37) loves it - he played for >2 hours, but dear Lord I hate the stuff he plays.

(http://www.pbase.com/johnewing/image/168132022.jpg)

Pentatonic blues scale w. 2nd fret & flat 5th ==> versatile, easy to play and only half the frets to bugger up.  Bridge is skew here, he probably knocked it going for the volume knob.

I put a gallery of most of the build on here (http://www.pbase.com/johnewing/oliva).
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on September 17, 2018, 11:09:40 am
Great, the revised bridge position will definitely affect the intonation ;D Could that be why you don't like the sound of his playing :)

What pickup did you use?
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on September 17, 2018, 11:11:54 am
Not quite an instrument but in the spirit of home built and related:

(https://i.postimg.cc/D0xwNQmZ/17_B1_B829-_EA28-487_D-_AC8_E-_F9_DBCE8_C44_FD.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/p5nvhFfb)

The gap is now occupied by a tremolo pedal
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on September 17, 2018, 11:25:36 am
Great, the revised bridge position will definitely affect the intonation ;D Could that be why you don't like the sound of his playing :)

What pickup did you use?

An el cheapo piezo under inside the box under the bridge.  Works pretty well.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on September 21, 2018, 03:32:40 pm
Introducing The Pingfuckit Resonator (prototype)

(http://www.pbase.com/image/168151949.jpg)

Piezo under the sink-trap: instant oil-drum.

Built into soundhole:

(http://www.pbase.com/image/168152000.jpg)

Going to hook it up with under-bridge piezo via a Gibson 3-way switch.  Needs more elegant screws, but this guitar is a test-bed so I'm not too fussy.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on September 21, 2018, 04:23:58 pm
You sir are totally barking ;D

I salute you!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on September 21, 2018, 04:52:25 pm
Woof!

CB guitars are lots of fun.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on November 16, 2018, 03:44:03 pm
Just finished today, the Brazen Beast:

(http://www.pbase.com/johnewing/image/168409639.jpg)

(http://www.pbase.com/johnewing/image/168409640.jpg)

(http://www.pbase.com/johnewing/image/168409644.jpg)
Tha can't 'ave too much brass.

(http://www.pbase.com/johnewing/image/168409642.jpg)

The box comes from spare tongue & groove, the neck is from red pin des Landes left over from building our current bed in 1994, and the fretboard is mahogany from a knock-off G-Plan dining table MrsT's folks had built in Uganda in 1959.  It has a 3-pole CB guitar pickup at the neck and a disc piezo inside the dogbowl under the bridge.

Sounds pretty mellow in a twangy sort of way.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on November 16, 2018, 04:23:43 pm
Amazing!
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: andytheflyer on November 16, 2018, 04:58:14 pm
Just finished today, the Brazen Beast:

(http://www.pbase.com/johnewing/image/168409639.jpg)

Ooooo.  A proper workshop.  Great bench, face vice, and a table saw on castors.  I did the same to mine, and my B&D Workmate with its extended top.  Makes working in a small space so much easier.

Top fettling, Mr T42.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: bobb on November 16, 2018, 09:55:39 pm
Another supurb build!  :) Are you going to move up a notch? Maybe make a Tele or Strat?
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on November 17, 2018, 09:38:55 am
Cheers, all. :thumbsup:

Yes, I am going to move up, early next year I think. One more CB guitar as a Christmas present, then I want to do a through-neck bass for my daughter - who, bless her, prefers fretless.  I don't think I'm going to try standard 6-strings thereafter, but I'd like to do something a bit more unusual - maybe a Chapman Stick, though the fretting on those looks like a nightmare.

CBGs are fun, though...
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on November 17, 2018, 10:46:31 am
I think doing the frets on a Chapman Stick will be a cinch compared with learning to play one.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on November 17, 2018, 11:13:31 am
Aye, but I'll leave that bit to my son.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on November 29, 2018, 09:36:11 am
I'm selling a couple of mandolins to make place for n+1

First my Ashbury Octave

(https://i.postimg.cc/Vk2LbZDy/Ashbury-1.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

And my electric mandolin, now sold

(https://i.postimg.cc/Qt9QJzrp/Harley-Benton-1.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/WFVq2Xz3)


More details here https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=110351.0 (https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=110351.0)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on December 03, 2018, 07:06:03 pm
And here is my n+1

(https://i.postimg.cc/qBSRG6fS/image.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/mh3BLDgy)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: road-runner on December 04, 2018, 12:04:12 am
My experience of Ashbury has been good; good quality instruments at competitive prices.

How does it feel and sound, PaulF?
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on December 04, 2018, 04:50:20 am
Yes I agree Ashbury offer great value for money, in fact the octave on the right is also an Ashbury.

Plays really nicely; set up well “out of the box” with the action the right height for me and intonation spot on. I was able to buy the model they had on display which I’d played rather than from the warehouse so I knew it was playable. Given that half the battle with mandolin family instruments is getting the setup right that was a plus for me.

Has a nice warm tone and volume is well balanced across the strings just needs a touch of reverb and chorus to properly fill the sound out but I haven’t played it enough yet to get the sound quite right.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on December 04, 2018, 09:19:41 am
That is very pretty.  I had a Neapolitan for some years, but found that the meeting of two rotundities impeded virtuosity.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: PaulF on December 04, 2018, 09:24:24 am
My virtuosity is impeded by more than mere rotundities :)
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: T42 on December 30, 2018, 04:44:10 pm
And then there were four:

(http://www.pbase.com/image/168609235.jpg)

Build n°4, made at breakneck speed with workshop often too cold for the glue to set.
Neck in Pin du Jura, fretboard in mahogany, 20x30 cm box in Obeche & ply,
double piezo at bridge, 4-pole pickup at neck. No pickup switch, it's all
done by pots. Home-made Gibson-style truss rod.

Great sound, best I've done so far.

Shop now looks like a bomb hit it.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: T42 on December 31, 2018, 09:22:24 am
Thanks!  Unfortunately I couldn't try it for more that five minutes.  It was a Christmas present for my daughter, and she was here yesterday to pick it up. I made the bridge and put on the middle string about an hour before lunch and found I had a short somewhere. Worked for two hours after lunch to find it and finish stringing & testing. I got done at half-past four and she had to leave to catch her train five minutes later.

I've been going flat out at this guitar for the last two weeks. Utterly knackered last night, still am today.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: andytheflyer on December 31, 2018, 01:57:14 pm
And then there were four:

(http://www.pbase.com/image/168609235.jpg)
Shop now looks like a bomb hit it.

I'll post a pic of my bench next time I'm doing an aeroplane build or refurb.  It really does look like a bomb hit it.....  At least you can see your bench top.

Mind you, my music teacher also services saxes, flutes and clarinets.  Her bench looks a bit like yours, come to think of it.  Must be a musical thing.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: T42 on December 31, 2018, 04:51:04 pm
More like a blind panic thing.  There was meant to be a lizard transfer to the left of the strings but by the time I got that far my hands were shaking so much from the coffee I just gave it to the lass along with the guitar.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: menthel on March 29, 2019, 05:50:56 pm
Accidentally bought a Mexican strat second hand for a decent price. Will post up piccies when it arrives.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: PaulF on March 29, 2019, 06:03:24 pm
A couple of weeks ago I picked this up on Gumtree:

(https://i.postimg.cc/3RdGzRDC/Taylor-Baby.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/Q9ZVTjmH)

Got it in DADGAD, just need to learn how to play the thing!

Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: phantasmagoriana on March 29, 2019, 09:07:30 pm
Glad to see that the title of this thread is now correct! :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: The Movers on March 29, 2019, 11:49:46 pm
Some mods are grammar pedants...  ;) ;D
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: PaulF on March 30, 2019, 05:39:43 am
What is that Taylor? Mini, Baby, Junior, Parlour?

It’s the Baby so essentially a 3/4 size. Was finding my Dreadnaught uncomfortable to play so decided o try something smaller.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: bobb on March 30, 2019, 06:27:25 pm
Got it in DADGAD, just need to learn how to play the thing!

I take it you've got Kashmir down then?  :P
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: Steph on March 30, 2019, 07:12:22 pm
Arsebollocks!
Picked my fiddle up for a play this morning, and it is borked. For those who don't know fiddles, the strings attach to a 'flooating' piece of wood called the 'tailpiece', which is secured to the fiddle by way of a loop of 'catgut' (tail gut) round a dowel (end pin) pushed into the instrument's base.

The tail gut has snapped, so I will need to find someone who can fettle it--it's not a huge job. The violin is one I have had since new, at the age of 11, and so is coming up to its half century. Not too shabby in the way of longevity, then.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: PaulF on March 30, 2019, 07:26:25 pm
Got it in DADGAD, just need to learn how to play the thing!

I take it you've got Kashmir down then?  :P

Well it sounds like Kashmir to me....
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: menthel on March 30, 2019, 07:54:49 pm
(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7805/47501403261_26df6d44eb_b.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/2fnx7gp)New (to me) Fender Strat Mexico. (https://flic.kr/p/2fnx7gp) by Jim Swales (https://www.flickr.com/photos/menthel/), on Flickr

Bloody flickr on the mobile ddn't allow for the BB code sharing option so here it is now from the laptop.

Still haven't plugged it in yet but it plays nicely not plugged in!
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: PaulF on March 30, 2019, 08:04:08 pm
Arsebollocks!
Picked my fiddle up for a play this morning, and it is borked. For those who don't know fiddles, the strings attach to a 'flooating' piece of wood called the 'tailpiece', which is secured to the fiddle by way of a loop of 'catgut' (tail gut) round a dowel (end pin) pushed into the instrument's base.

The tail gut has snapped, so I will need to find someone who can fettle it--it's not a huge job. The violin is one I have had since new, at the age of 11, and so is coming up to its half century. Not too shabby in the way of longevity, then.

Something like this: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Violin-Tailpiece-Tailgut-Tailcord-Replacement/dp/B00FVSQMQW ? Not familiar with fiddles but should be a simple DIY job I’d have thought?
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: Steph on March 31, 2019, 04:04:10 pm
Ta! Will save up. If it's on Amazon, I should be able to source it from a music shop locally.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: PaulF on March 31, 2019, 04:20:31 pm
Ta! Will save up. If it's on Amazon, I should be able to source it from a music shop locally.

Just saw the price with postage - plus you’re buying 2. And I’m pretty sure that when you need the second one, in another 50 years, you’ll have forgotten where you put it :)

If you Google “violin tailgut” you can find them for 99p delivered on eBay which may be more cost effective? But I know nothing about them so you may need to check that the fitting matches what you need.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: hubner on March 31, 2019, 07:56:30 pm
Nylon tailcords cost pennies not £10 each!!

Eg
https://www.amazon.co.uk/SODIAL-Violin-Nylon-Brass-Fiddle/dp/B018WWCQKY
seller is in China though

Yes, fitting is straightfoward but there some things to take note of, such as putting back the bridge in the "correct" or original  position, removing and refiting the chinrest, checking the soundpost, ratio of string length to the distance between bridge and tailpiece.

Or go to a specialist violin shop, where the price you'll pay is mainly for fitting and checking with the cost of the tailcord itself being negligible.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: Woofage on April 01, 2019, 01:22:53 pm
Arsebollocks!
Picked my fiddle up for a play this morning, and it is borked. For those who don't know fiddles, the strings attach to a 'flooating' piece of wood called the 'tailpiece', which is secured to the fiddle by way of a loop of 'catgut' (tail gut) round a dowel (end pin) pushed into the instrument's base.

The tail gut has snapped, so I will need to find someone who can fettle it--it's not a huge job. The violin is one I have had since new, at the age of 11, and so is coming up to its half century. Not too shabby in the way of longevity, then.

That's an easy repair. Your LMS will have the bits (or complete tailpieces in stock if you decide to buy a replacement). May as well re-string while you're at it.

I was taking part in a carol concert a few years ago and my violin got knocked from my hand while I was holding a door open for someone. Cue detached fingerboard :o. Luckily the I was able to borrow in instrument from the conductor but it felt completely wrong :-\. It's been fine since it was repaired, thankfully.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: Ham on April 07, 2019, 03:14:58 pm
One for them there luthiers about the place. Laying it on with a shovel.

http://www.justinjohnsonlive.com/shovel-guitar.html
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: T42 on April 08, 2019, 09:29:50 am
$450???? Nice shovel.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: Ham on April 08, 2019, 12:27:51 pm
I think the $450 also buys the expectation (for at least the time from parting with the dosh to plugging it in) that you can make it sound as good as he can.....
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: T42 on April 08, 2019, 12:53:05 pm
The way I play these days I'd have a hard time selling mine for $10.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: pcolbeck on April 09, 2019, 10:10:19 am
And then there were four:

(http://www.pbase.com/image/168609235.jpg)

Build n°4, made at breakneck speed with workshop often too cold for the glue to set.
Neck in Pin du Jura, fretboard in mahogany, 20x30 cm box in Obeche & ply,
double piezo at bridge, 4-pole pickup at neck. No pickup switch, it's all
done by pots. Home-made Gibson-style truss rod.

Great sound, best I've done so far.

Shop now looks like a bomb hit it.

Some inspiration for your next one. An oil can guitar being seriously rocked:

https://youtu.be/eNoRUfz4jxc
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: T42 on April 09, 2019, 01:32:31 pm
Yeah, but I promised my daughter a real bass.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: Mr Larrington on April 10, 2019, 12:46:40 pm
Some inspiration for your next one. An oil can guitar being seriously rocked:

https://youtu.be/eNoRUfz4jxc

My grate frend Mr Woolrich has seen her playing that one though she didn't bring it out when we saw her at the Borderline last year.  Instead bringing a trumpeter and saxophonist who were way too loud and rendered her guitar practically inaudible chiz.  She's playing at The Garage at Highbury Corner next month1 so I may give her another try.

1: Other UK gigs may be available.
Title: Re: Reader's Instruments
Post by: nicknack on April 10, 2019, 02:24:06 pm
[ Instead bringing a trumpeter and saxophonist who were way too loud and rendered her guitar practically inaudible chiz. 
Ha!
Finally!!!
 ;D
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: menthel on June 03, 2019, 12:48:38 pm
Not a new instrument but thoughts on a new one. I know some of you here can actually make such things!

I would like to take a telecaster body and attach to it a suitably manufactured 5 string banjo neck. Would such a thing be possible? I think having the neck made is probably the only way to do this but the scale etc are relatively close so tuning etc should be possible.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: PaulF on June 03, 2019, 01:07:37 pm
Not a new instrument but thoughts on a new one. I know some of you here can actually make such things!

I would like to take a telecaster body and attach to it a suitably manufactured 5 string banjo neck. Would such a thing be possible? I think having the neck made is probably the only way to do this but the scale etc are relatively close so tuning etc should be possible.

No experience but I've seen where people have converted electric guitars to a tenor (4 string) guitar. The 3 issues I see are: 


To make intonation easier you might want to consider a 25.5" neck (Telecaster standard) - I don't know what length a banjo neck normally is - otherwise if you can't compensate with the bridge you may need to move it which will be messy.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: PaulF on June 03, 2019, 01:10:26 pm
P.S. Obligatory banjo joke

(https://i.postimg.cc/P5Kth2xd/Too-Much-Banjo.png) (https://postimages.org/)

;D
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: menthel on June 03, 2019, 01:13:38 pm
Not a new instrument but thoughts on a new one. I know some of you here can actually make such things!

I would like to take a telecaster body and attach to it a suitably manufactured 5 string banjo neck. Would such a thing be possible? I think having the neck made is probably the only way to do this but the scale etc are relatively close so tuning etc should be possible.

No experience but I've seen where people have converted electric guitars to a tenor (4 string) guitar. The 3 issues I see are: 


  • scale length (which you identified);
  • the neck width since a banjo neck will be narrower than a guitar so you'll need to either have a neck that widens to fill the neck pocket, of course if you're getting a custom neck made you can specify that in
  • the strings may not be perfectly over the poles of the pickups so you may get a weaker signal. But since we're talking banjos that's probably a benefit ;D
To make intonation easier you might want to consider a 25.5" neck (Telecaster standard) - I don't know what length a banjo neck normally is - otherwise if you can't compensate with the bridge you may need to move it which will be messy.

My Deering is 26 1/4 but for standard open G anything from 25 1/2 to 27 seems to work, at least that is what my research indicates! I think it should be ok. As for the pickups something lipsticky or railey might better suit but if I can use the tele bridge and get the string run correct from the headstock that might just negate any misalignment. I have been thinking about this for a while, I just don't have any manual skill to carry it off!

Edit: https://www.eaglemusicshop.com/prod/5-string-banjos/Gold-Tone-EB-5-Electric-Banjo-with-Gig-Bag.htm
This has a 25 1/2 scale length, so it is obviously possible!
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: menthel on June 03, 2019, 01:14:24 pm
And as for banjo noises, it should make it sound basically like an electric guitar.  ;)
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: PaulF on June 03, 2019, 02:06:07 pm
And as for banjo noises, it should make it sound basically like an electric guitar.  ;)

:)

Yes, my electric mandolin sounds pretty much like an electric guitar so I’d expect the banjo to sound similar but with the benefit of banjo tuning.

Joking aside I quite like the sound of a banjo. Have you head the new Rhiannon Giddens?
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: menthel on June 03, 2019, 02:53:07 pm
And as for banjo noises, it should make it sound basically like an electric guitar.  ;)

:)

Yes, my electric mandolin sounds pretty much like an electric guitar so I’d expect the banjo to sound similar but with the benefit of banjo tuning.

Joking aside I quite like the sound of a banjo. Have you head the new Rhiannon Giddens?

I have not, I will give it a go later.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: pcolbeck on June 03, 2019, 02:56:38 pm
That Mr Richards has made a decent living playing a Telecaster with only 5 strings in an odd tuning.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: menthel on June 03, 2019, 03:09:21 pm
That is the other option, cheap Tele, banjo strings and a spike at the 5th fret to bring the high G into the right tuning...

Would be a good proof of concept before doing anything drastic.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: andytheflyer on June 04, 2019, 08:32:28 am
Blimey.  How does Seasick Steve manage with an old hub cap and a bit of broomstick?
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: Steph on June 13, 2019, 07:32:10 am
Not connected with photos...

Noticed my old mandolin was sounding a bit dull on the A and E strings, and on inspection those have cut into the frets. It is just the first five or six frets, because I rarely play past second position. Thoughts/costs of fixing?
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: PaulF on June 13, 2019, 08:03:36 am
Hard to say without looking. You may get away with a fret dressing but if they're very worn the dressed frets will be lower than the undressed ones which could cause buzzing depending on how high your action is set.

From the price list at London Guitar Hospital https://guitarhospital.co.uk/pricelist.php it looks like £40-50. That's for a guitar but a mandolin shouldn't be much different
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: PaulF on August 01, 2019, 08:40:26 pm
I only went out for new strings


(https://i.postimg.cc/zvZb5JqB/58320-EE5-98-FB-4903-BBA5-6-CD60082-AC24.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/8J4PmgJQ)
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: Andrij on August 01, 2019, 10:22:01 pm
Yes, dear, I did buy new strings.  Guitar?  No, that's just the packaging.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: T42 on August 02, 2019, 07:49:27 am
Got to have something to straighten them with.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: bobb on November 14, 2019, 09:46:59 pm
My latest build is finally finished! I am rather pleased  :)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49066176416_62f0e88eab_z.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49066176441_9d05129b67_z.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49066176476_5dbbaee2c3_z.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49066176496_ecb08847ab_z.jpg)

Some of you may have seen all the images from the very start of the build to the very end on Faceache. But for those who haven't (or anyone who has and wants to see them in a non-Facebook environment) I have put all 731 captioned images on my site, which you can find below:

https://zaribor.co.uk/guitars/custom (https://zaribor.co.uk/guitars/custom)

All the Tele pics are up there too....
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: Wowbagger on November 14, 2019, 10:06:21 pm
Here's mine (1936 Blüthner Style VIII):

Traumerei (Schumann)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9nsVS6FBaQ

Prelude & Fugue inB flat (J. S. Bach)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Ir6QosIGMY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lv2OHYI6Y4M
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: PaulF on November 14, 2019, 10:22:11 pm
My latest build is finally finished! I am rather pleased  :)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49066176416_62f0e88eab_z.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49066176441_9d05129b67_z.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49066176476_5dbbaee2c3_z.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49066176496_ecb08847ab_z.jpg)

Some of you may have seen all the images from the very start of the build to the very end on Faceache. But for those who haven't (or anyone who has and wants to see them in a non-Facebook environment) I have put all 731 captioned images on my site, which you can find below:

https://zaribor.co.uk/guitars/custom (https://zaribor.co.uk/guitars/custom)

All the Tele pics are up there too....


Wow! You should be pleased. That’s a beauty!
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: Woofage on November 15, 2019, 09:22:00 am
My latest build is finally finished! I am rather pleased  :)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49066176416_62f0e88eab_z.jpg)


That's really lovely that. Reminds me of a Gordon Smith guitar I saw in a music shop in That London in the 80s (when I thought I could play the guitar). You should be rightly proud.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: Mr Larrington on November 15, 2019, 11:16:33 am
That is really rather gorgeous, Bobb.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: road-runner on November 15, 2019, 11:33:34 am
Bobb, I agree, it looks really good and it also reminded me of Gordon Smith (before I saw Woofage's comment). I am most impressed as I know it takes a lot of time, patience, skill and quality tools.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: bobb on November 15, 2019, 11:09:07 pm
Yeah, I guess it's similar to some of the GS shapes but with less pointy horns. I loosely based the shape on a cross between a Les Paul and an Ibanez AR series with a little bit of 335 thrown in. It's *my* shape now, I just have to think of a name for it!

I really ought to come up with my own headstock shape, but it's really difficult to get something unique that doesn't look wrong. Many brands try to avoid being too obvioulsy Gibson or Fender inspired and end up with some horrible monstrosity.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: T42 on November 16, 2019, 09:04:46 am
My latest build is finally finished! I am rather pleased  :)
...
Some of you may have seen all the images from the very start of the build to the very end on Faceache. But for those who haven't (or anyone who has and wants to see them in a non-Facebook environment) I have put all 731 captioned images on my site, which you can find below:

https://zaribor.co.uk/guitars/custom (https://zaribor.co.uk/guitars/custom)

All the Tele pics are up there too....

Lovely job - congrats!

I've had a quick gander at your 731 pics & I'll be going back later. Good stuff.

How's the Triton thicknesser doing?
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: Ham on November 16, 2019, 09:47:57 am
Very nice indeed, a thing of beauty.

From the photos, it might be that the thicknesser is clogged with cat hair.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: Jurek on November 16, 2019, 10:18:59 am
My latest build is finally finished! I am rather pleased  :)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49066176416_62f0e88eab_z.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49066176441_9d05129b67_z.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49066176476_5dbbaee2c3_z.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49066176496_ecb08847ab_z.jpg)

Some of you may have seen all the images from the very start of the build to the very end on Faceache. But for those who haven't (or anyone who has and wants to see them in a non-Facebook environment) I have put all 731 captioned images on my site, which you can find below:

https://zaribor.co.uk/guitars/custom (https://zaribor.co.uk/guitars/custom)

All the Tele pics are up there too....

Some damn fine work there, Bob!  :thumbsup:
They must love you at Axminster tools.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: Canardly on November 16, 2019, 10:37:03 am
Wonderful.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: bobb on November 16, 2019, 01:56:45 pm
How's the Triton thicknesser doing?

It's good. I've used it quite a bit recently as I've got two more builds on the go - a Les Paul and a Thunderbird bass! I've reversed the blades as one of them got a tiny chip somehow which meant it left a mark along anything I ran through it. New blades are about 20 quid I think, so I'll get some more at some point. There's a little plastic cover near the top that covers the belt that came off when I was moving it. I obvioulsy didn't put it back on properly as it started rubbing on the belt and started to melt! I don't bother with it now. It doesn't seem to matter as nothing can get in there as the belt whizzing around blows any dust and chips straight out. I always use it outside now as the amount of crap it spews out means a massive clean up operation after use. I've made a collection thingy out of an old cardboard box that deals with the worst of it, but it throws out chips all over the place. So using it outside, I just mow the lawn afterwards which just blows all the chips evenly all over the garden  :P
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: pcolbeck on November 16, 2019, 09:29:43 pm
I really ought to come up with my own headstock shape, but it's really difficult to get something unique that doesn't look wrong. Many brands try to avoid being too obvioulsy Gibson or Fender inspired and end up with some horrible monstrosity.

That headstock is very Epiphone. Not that that's a bad thing.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: bobb on November 16, 2019, 10:08:43 pm
It's actually very Gibson! I used a Gibson template for it.

Comparison:

(https://zaribor.co.uk/raz/pics/ep-gib.jpg)
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: pcolbeck on November 16, 2019, 10:17:23 pm
Ooh your right, I blame it on a my age Bobb.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: bobb on November 16, 2019, 10:21:04 pm
 :P
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: T42 on November 17, 2019, 09:12:21 am
How's the Triton thicknesser doing?

It's good. I've used it quite a bit recently as I've got two more builds on the go - a Les Paul and a Thunderbird bass! I've reversed the blades as one of them got a tiny chip somehow which meant it left a mark along anything I ran through it. New blades are about 20 quid I think, so I'll get some more at some point. There's a little plastic cover near the top that covers the belt that came off when I was moving it. I obviously didn't put it back on properly as it started rubbing on the belt and started to melt! I don't bother with it now. It doesn't seem to matter as nothing can get in there as the belt whizzing around blows any dust and chips straight out. I always use it outside now as the amount of crap it spews out means a massive clean up operation after use. I've made a collection thingy out of an old cardboard box that deals with the worst of it, but it throws out chips all over the place. So using it outside, I just mow the lawn afterwards which just blows all the chips evenly all over the garden  :P

Sounds good.  Can't you use a dust extractor with it, or doesn't it work too well?
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: bobb on November 17, 2019, 10:10:08 am
Oh I'm sure a decent extraction system would make a huge difference. Unfortunately I don't have any extraction set up. Yet!
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: T42 on November 17, 2019, 01:28:43 pm
Something else to find room for.  I banged a hole in the wall and put mine next door.  Universal hose connectors are wonderful.

I'm in envy of your bench. I have two that looked great when I bought them 30 years ago, but the working surface is too narrow and the face vices are crappy. They also have a big tray at the back that tends to fill up with junk and sawdust.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: bobb on November 18, 2019, 08:02:41 pm
My bench is good, but it's taken a lot of abuse and I really need to break the joints and reglue it as it's got a bit wobbly.

Have you started that through neck bass yet?!
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: T42 on November 19, 2019, 09:16:59 am
I haven't done anything this year to speak of.  All my oomph disappeared back in May when my daughter - for whom the bass was intended - dropped a financial bomb on us and the quacks hobbled me with meds they needed me to take to cover their arses.  I did start some panelling for the hall but that's on hold until the tools in the workshop are warmer than the stuff in our fridge.
Title: Re: Readers' Instruments
Post by: bobb on November 20, 2019, 08:47:49 pm
I haven't done anything this year to speak of.  All my oomph disappeared back in May when my daughter - for whom the bass was intended - dropped a financial bomb on us and the quacks hobbled me with meds they needed me to take to cover their arses.  I did start some panelling for the hall but that's on hold until the tools in the workshop are warmer than the stuff in our fridge.

Good luck with all that. Hopefully you'll be able to crack on soon.

Just a word on building through necks - I may be teaching you to suck eggs, but get the bridge you want to use before you start so you can get your neck break angle sorted early doors. It will save a whole world of pain later.

Here's the Thunderbird I'm building - fretboard thicknessed, bridge acquired, neck break angle machined in:

(https://zaribor.co.uk/raz/pics/nbreak-s.jpg) (https://zaribor.co.uk/raz/pics/nbreak-l.jpg)

Even if you buy a bridge designed for something with no break angle (eg Fender style bolt on) I'd still put in a tiny angle. Every bolt on guitar/bass I've ever owned has needed a shim in the neck pocket to get the action down to something playable....

Edit: A useful resource: Neck Angle Calculator (https://www.tundraman.com/Guitars/NeckAngle/index.php)