Yet Another Cycling Forum

Off Topic => The Pub => Topic started by: Auntie Helen on April 16, 2012, 09:31:22 am

Title: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Auntie Helen on April 16, 2012, 09:31:22 am
I'm sure there must be a thread like this already but Search couldn't help me find it!

Anyway, I had the following email from a nice German chappie I've been in communication with about an App for my phone to log my position on my forthcoming bike ride:

Quote
The current GPSLogbook Version is capable of fitting all your needs, including an embedded map view in your blog.

I will answer your mail in detail tomorrow as it is now getting too late.

Best Regards and be anxious!
I am now anxious!
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: why1040 on April 16, 2012, 09:53:03 am
Oh gods, I love mistranslations...we use them quite deliberately within the family for amusement.  Colloquialisms (like playing it by ear) in particular make for really funny expressions when direct translated!  Swenglish ftw!

My father was once introduced as the department VD by an overenthusiastic co-worker...(VD in Swedish=vice director/vice president...it's used daily as a title)   :facepalm:

I had great difficulty for a while with the old-fashioned Swedish word karrott (=serving bowl), which sounded too much like carrot to make sense...lol   ;D

Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: snail on April 16, 2012, 10:35:26 am
Kind of a reverse-translation funny. I do some private tutoring and have been teaching a Thai lady. I use lots of English names in the sentences so we have "Dave goes to the shop" and "Jim eats cake". Every time I said "Jim" she howled with laughter.

A few weeks later I discovered that the way I say "Jim" sounds exactly like the Thai word for vagina.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on April 16, 2012, 10:39:36 am
I had exactly the same when teaching a class of Polish 16-year-olds comparatives and superlatives. We were using a text book which had taken prices as its theme for this topic, and "cheaper" sounds just like the Polish for "vagina" or rather something more colloquial but not quite obscene, say "pussy".
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: barakta on April 16, 2012, 01:17:27 pm
I once tried to sign (in British Sign Language) "English is a stupid language, it's for Germans" to excuse myself for being crap at English. 

I mis-signed 'German' and signed 'Shark' instead.

Now when I am tired I will sign English is for sharks to let Kim know I will probably not be making sense any more.

I'm not very good at BSL. 
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: andrew_s on April 16, 2012, 01:53:15 pm
I noticed that google translate was getting into product placement the other day
"laatste wielernieuws" comes out as "Shimano disc brake movies last".
Even I can work out it should be something along the laines of "latest cycling news", and my knowledge of dutch is verging on non-existent.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Wowbagger on April 17, 2012, 04:27:19 pm
When I was an HMCE person of a computery persuasion I obtained a Certificate of Proficiency in SSADM. I've forgotten the name of the company that trained us, but the model we were using was based upon designing a system for a local football association. It was abbreviated to "LoFA".

The chaps training us told us of an occasion on which the course almost broke down in riotous hilarity when the class was mainly made up of Hungarians. It would appear that "lo fa" in Magyar means "horse's todger".
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Deano on April 17, 2012, 04:39:32 pm
My mate in Iran told me that Iranians, when speaking a foreign language, often make literal translations from Farsi.

Colloquial Farsi for "I fucked up/made a mistake" translates literally into English as "I ate shit".

So the story goes, an Iranian in New York parks on double yellow lines and, when he returns to the car, a no-nonsense New Yoik cop is giving him a ticket.

By way of apology and explanation, the Iranian tells the cop "I ate shit!"

The cop comes over all concerned for the welfare of this poor bastard who's eaten shit and doesn't seem to speak much English, and he calls for an ambulance, telling them that "there's a guy here who ate shit - I think he should see a doctor."

Becoming ever more flustered, the Iranian is taken into an ambulance and off to a hospital. The doctors ask him what the problem is.

He tells them: "I ate shit when I said that I ate shit!"
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Auntie Helen on April 22, 2012, 02:10:59 pm
A comment on my blog:

Quote
Bite the street Helen!!!! You're a great one!!! Greetings from Italy David
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on April 24, 2012, 12:47:22 pm
From the label of a garment made in China, bought in Poland:

Do not blanch.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on April 24, 2012, 06:05:36 pm
From the instructions of the Lidl-Barbieri chain cleaner:

Use rage or paper towel to catch fluid in excess from the chain.

TBF I think that's a typo or cupertino rather than an actual translation error.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: ferret on April 24, 2012, 07:14:26 pm
I translate gwynt y ddraig as the dragons fart either way if you come across this, it comes very highly recommended

I think it's supposed to be the dragons breath
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Andrij on April 24, 2012, 07:29:31 pm
I translate gwynt y ddraig as the dragons fart either way if you come across this, it comes very highly recommended

I think it's supposed to be the dragons breath

I wouldn't think there's much difference!
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on April 26, 2012, 06:01:16 pm
Warm Hint:

Remember: Should keep in the place where the small children cannot touch. In case they swallow the parts.

Remember: Do not play on the head, in case it hurts when it falls down.

Remember: Do the experiment in the place where can be wet.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Feline on April 26, 2012, 07:00:24 pm
I've no idea what language these iphone case instructions were translated from, or to for that matter!
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v171/feistyfeline/iPhonecase.jpg)
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on April 27, 2012, 10:32:55 am
I think Feature 3 means you can put in your fish pond to scare away herons.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Palinurus on April 27, 2012, 12:49:31 pm
Warm Hint:

Remember: Should keep in the place where the small children cannot touch. In case they swallow the parts.

Remember: Do not play on the head, in case it hurts when it falls down.

Remember: Do the experiment in the place where can be wet.

I'm trying to guess what it might relate to. Haven't a clue.

I like "warm hint"!
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on April 27, 2012, 01:54:51 pm
Warm Hint:

Remember: Should keep in the place where the small children cannot touch. In case they swallow the parts.

Remember: Do not play on the head, in case it hurts when it falls down.

Remember: Do the experiment in the place where can be wet.

I'm trying to guess what it might relate to. Haven't a clue.

I like "warm hint"!
It's a model of a water mill for kids to assemble, which explains "Do the experiment in the place where can be wet." I've no idea what "play on the head" is about!
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Arch on May 09, 2012, 08:48:00 pm
One of my colleagues had a foil pack of Chinese "Nurition Pickles for Students" with his lunch today. It had this warning on the back:

(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8157/7166545742_1b0d331f24.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/59866846@N02/7166545742/)
Picture 0145 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/59866846@N02/7166545742/) by Panticle (http://www.flickr.com/people/59866846@N02/), on Flickr
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Auntie Helen on June 12, 2012, 02:00:41 pm
Rose Versand sent me an email about Willingen Bike Festival, although not where Willingen is. In searching through their menus in the English language section I came across a broken link which said:

Quote
Page Not Found

Reason: Page is not available in the requested language (strict).
Not entirely sure of the purpose of the 'strict' there!
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Kim on June 12, 2012, 02:05:14 pm
Probably in the pragma sense: The PHP or Perl or whatever interpreter's saying that it's been instructed not to allow certain otherwise legal shortcuts/sloppinesses (depending on your view) in the code, which helps avoid stupid bugs.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Auntie Helen on June 30, 2012, 08:41:05 pm
Just had a rather sweet comment on my blog from a German chap:

Quote
searching for Einbeck, I found Your travel diary. Since June 18th I am working at Kayser Automotive in order to design active carbon filtering devices for fuelled vehicles. It's good to hear something about the accomodation possibilities in the region. You writing manner is a good one for me, I like to be a witness if Your big journey. I am currently living in Wuppertal (remember the famous suspension railway!) and it necessary to gear up to Einbeck over 290km every Monday and Friday. My guesthouse is located in Kuventhal and there You can stay overnight for less than 30€! Totally quiet place, sometimes it seems like a graveyard (smile). Keep on writing, Dear Auntie!
I love the ever-present German "possibilities" that they use all the time; we would often say "options" instead. Möglichkeiten cover a multitude of sins!
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Gasman on July 01, 2012, 09:32:07 pm
12 months in Estonian (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j65dLyAu47s)

I heard a story of a Scottish football coach who took a team of boys on a trip to France to play a few games.  During one match he was alerted to a commotion at one end of the pitch where his goalkeeper was having a set-to with some local lads.  He went and broke up the fight and asked the goalie what was going on.

"He was calling me a wanker!" the goalie protested indicating one of the French boys.

The coach went to investigate, returned shortly after and cuffed his goalie about the head saying,

"Not 'wanker' ya pillock, 'vainqueur' he's just asking if you're winning!
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on July 26, 2012, 10:49:17 am
Ultimate visibility
Homogeneous light-ring
thus very good distance estimate descendant vehicles!
Good visibility from the side

from http://www.bike-discount.de/shop/k999/a59791/saferide-led-rear-light.html

I love 'descendant' for 'approaching from behind'.  :)
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Arch on November 09, 2012, 09:44:10 pm
At work we've recently bought two sets of scales for weighing rubbish. I was tasked with plugging them in to charge today, and when a green light came on, I looked in the manual to see if that meant 'charging' or 'charged'.

The manual was helpless on that subject, but I found the following:

"It is forbidden that weld the indicator. When there is thunderstorm, please make solution for avoiding the thunder. in this way it can protect the safe of scales and stuff"

Oh. Right.

Lightning's not a problem then?

Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on November 10, 2012, 09:04:14 pm
A solution of thunder sounds good - I imagine it would involve a lot of electrolysis!
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Wobbly John on November 15, 2012, 12:47:33 am

Instuctions on these 'Silicone Bandages' (http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/5-PCS-Bicycle-Bike-Silicone-Elastic-Bind-Strap-Bandage-Flashlight-MP3-GPS-Holder-/330653583833?pt=UK_SportGoods_CyclAcces_RL&hash=item4cfc7d49d9)  ???
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Palinurus on November 18, 2012, 07:01:26 pm
  • Regardless and by oneself the lamp,
  • the stop-watch,
  • repair a foetus first aid pack,
  • tool set, inflate a bube
  • canteen,
  • cellular phone etc.
  • all ability easy install

Instuctions on these 'Silicone Bandages' (http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/5-PCS-Bicycle-Bike-Silicone-Elastic-Bind-Strap-Bandage-Flashlight-MP3-GPS-Holder-/330653583833?pt=UK_SportGoods_CyclAcces_RL&hash=item4cfc7d49d9)  ???

That's beautiful!
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Auntie Helen on May 26, 2013, 01:31:24 pm
Posted on Facebook by a friend - the English translation of an Italian Swimming Pool's rules & regulations

(https://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-frc3/971138_473499139395791_1405048649_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: clarion on May 26, 2013, 03:13:39 pm
Well that's perfectly clear.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: jamesld8 on May 28, 2013, 07:14:15 pm
OK it`s maybe not a translation error but a quip by TomTom software de signers??

Ross On Wye was shown on TomTom screen last time I was in vicinity, approaching from Monmouth as "Pussy In Wye" ????? mmmm interesting

Maybe this should be another thread?
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: hellymedic on May 28, 2013, 07:34:57 pm
OK it`s maybe not a translation error but a quip by TomTom software de signers??

Ross On Wye was shown on TomTom screen last time I was in vicinity, approaching from Monmouth as "Pussy In Wye" ????? mmmm interesting

Maybe this should be another thread?

I think I posted about amusing transient Google Maps errors previously.

White City in West London became Weisse Stadt at some but not all levels of magnification.
Southampton Row WC1 became Northampton Row,

Errors disappeared with updating.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on May 29, 2013, 06:20:25 pm
Some funny ones in the Ortlieb catalogue that arrived today with ye CTCe Gazette. Their panniers have "genial functionality" and they also admit to a "velcro fixation", while Scotchlite panels are "incandescent".
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on June 11, 2013, 12:18:11 pm
Perhaps not exactly an error, in that the meaning is correct, but hidden under a chain of words:
projects in the phase of recognition of possibilities for development and market
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on June 26, 2013, 06:27:25 pm
What does "food cost" mean? It's clear in English, but when the English words are used in a Polish text,  they must mean something slightly special, because otherwise you would say "koszt jedzenia" - which in turn means I'm not sure if the Polish-English has been correctly translated into English as, of course, "food cost". Not that I really have any option but to leave it - there's enough to correct in there anyway, Marta!
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on June 26, 2013, 06:42:28 pm
Same context, which is a cookery presentation:
He/she collects feedback and, if needed, provides it to relevant recipients, e.g. channel marketing, catmix, etc.

Cat mix?!!  :o  :D

(Again, it's the same word in English - presumably "category mix")

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41rx4mwUGEL.jpg)
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Biff on July 06, 2013, 03:36:19 pm
Not sure how accurate this is as I don't speak Spanish. Could be a wind-up. Apparently its all to do with the accents:

Mi papá tiene 47 años = my dad is 47 years old
Mi papa tiene 47 anos = my potato has 47 assholes
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on July 11, 2013, 05:07:11 pm
Quote
You must be zaloguj się żeby dodać komentarz.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on July 15, 2013, 06:53:46 pm
The ship should have an ice class enabling it to cruise in crushed ice.


And you thought they no longer had the floating gin palaces!
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Greenbank on July 15, 2013, 07:40:37 pm
The ship should have an ice class enabling it to cruise in crushed ice.

And you thought they no longer had the floating gin palaces!

The Royal Yacht Britannia?
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on July 24, 2013, 02:52:16 pm
I've got a poet-translator. Which is great, but not quite what you want in a technical document about dams and barrages. By the references, I've got past swearing at him and have started laughing:
Quote
However, make no mistake - Mr. Majewski himself is an author of over 300 Polish and English publications in the field of water resources management and engineering. To cut a long story short, a great engineer and scientific authority.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Pickled Onion on July 24, 2013, 03:18:02 pm
Not sure how accurate this is as I don't speak Spanish. Could be a wind-up. Apparently its all to do with the accents:

Mi papá tiene 47 años = my dad is 47 years old
Mi papa tiene 47 anos = my potato has 47 assholes

I'm learning Spanish, and yes this is more-or-less true. "Anos" is closer to "anuses", and papa only means potato in Latin America, more globally it can also translate to Pope... The sentences would be pronounced quite differently, but it's a good example of why you can't just leave the accents out if you can't find them on your keyboard!
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on July 29, 2013, 07:03:15 pm
Then, rich raftsman folklore poetised by poets and pictured by painters came into being.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on July 29, 2013, 07:17:54 pm
And the neolithic is the later period of the stone age, not the earlier! When you call it młody, that's young, or new as we say, not early! Hrrrrrrrrm!
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on July 30, 2013, 12:04:01 pm
Numerous tourist guides encourage discovering anthropogenic values near the river.

Along with numerous references to the Baltic See and consistent misuse of tenses and articles, this one is really pissing me off. I think I'd better stop now before this becomes a personal rant thread. But a lot of it makes me laugh too.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Gus on July 30, 2013, 09:21:35 pm
(http://i1286.photobucket.com/albums/a618/Nagasawa25/999703_10201744781449821_1881875018_n_zps10d015f9.jpg) (http://s1286.photobucket.com/user/Nagasawa25/media/999703_10201744781449821_1881875018_n_zps10d015f9.jpg.html)

 :facepalm: :facepalm: Long live the danish railroads & google translate.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on August 18, 2013, 10:31:30 am
About a charitable organisation: "Besides granting material aid, the Foundation promotes knowledge related to health prevention."
That would be an anti-charity!
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: hellymedic on August 18, 2013, 01:46:19 pm
(http://i1286.photobucket.com/albums/a618/Nagasawa25/999703_10201744781449821_1881875018_n_zps10d015f9.jpg) (http://s1286.photobucket.com/user/Nagasawa25/media/999703_10201744781449821_1881875018_n_zps10d015f9.jpg.html)

 :facepalm: :facepalm: Long live the danish railroads & google translate.

 ;D ;D ;D

I grew up with this kind of thing!
Danish relatives who couldn't *quite* get it right, ship personnel likewise, as well as many trips to Klampenborg & Helsingør.
Google translate has a horrid habit of not translating hard words...
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Feanor on September 12, 2013, 11:50:44 am
I need to repair some Surface-Mount things, and need a temperature-controlled hot air reflow gun.
Amazon came up with this:

The sensor closed path, microcomputer zero crossing triggering controls warm, LED demonstrated that the power is formidable, the elevation of temperature is rapid, temperature precise stable, Not amount of wind influence. The air current may adjust, the amount of wind is formidable, and the wind is gentle, the temperature control is convenient, suitably in multiple functions. The system establishment automatic cold wind function, may lengthen the heating device service life. The fuselage exquisite, is durable, is artistic. Uses the original installation import not to brush the electrical machinery, the life is extremely long, the noise is minimum, Ues the high quality heating element the efficiency to be possible to enhance one time under the same power, but lengthens, heating element's working life effectively and saves energy Source.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/858D-Rework-Digital-Station-Solder/dp/B007F9HM28/ref=pd_sim_sbs_diy_1
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on July 28, 2016, 03:49:23 pm
(https://c8.staticflickr.com/9/8633/28530263671_f80b3af5a1_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/Kt84pM)
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: hellymedic on July 28, 2016, 04:26:44 pm
Is that a TIGER puncture kit?
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on July 28, 2016, 04:41:07 pm
It is indeed a Tiger lappegrej. I have every intention of avoiding all use of the "growbars" but I thought the tin was nice. Perhaps I'll turn it into a cycle touring first aid kit (by filling it with tea bags  :thumbsup:).
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: hellymedic on July 28, 2016, 04:49:39 pm
My cousin Philip Bier1 is one of TIGER UK's bigwigs.

Their white 'Blu Tack a-like' is called 'Elephant's Snot'....

1) Susanne Bier2's younger brother.

2) Oscar-winning film director
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on July 28, 2016, 04:53:32 pm
Oooooh, can we get freebies by dropping his name at the till?  :D
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: hellymedic on July 28, 2016, 05:12:23 pm
 ;) ;) I doubt it...

Went to a Tiger store for the first time with my Mum (née Bier) a couple of months ago. Bought various bits and bobs, as you do.

Bell I bought for my wheelchair has disintegrated. :(
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on July 28, 2016, 05:16:39 pm
One of those big painted bells? That's a shame. It does strike me as a bit like Ikea for gadgets and gimmicks!
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: hellymedic on July 28, 2016, 05:35:25 pm
One of those big painted bells? That's a shame. It does strike me as a bit like Ikea for gadgets and gimmicks!

It's a little 'ping' bell, about 3cm diameter, with a plastic flower.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on August 01, 2016, 09:10:57 am
Also from Danish but from a book. A church is being given a new roof:
Quote
A small team of plumbers is casting the lead outside the church, and for that purpose they're equipped with a tray of sand which they hold at an angle, and onto it they pour the molten lead.
Too much technical precision, not enough usage!
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on September 03, 2016, 05:55:04 pm
In an article in a Polish magazine about the Orthodox Church, the Patriarch of Moscow is referred to in a caption as Kirył and then in the text as Cyryl. The saint is mentioned too, as Cyryl.

(Okay this is proofreading fail but translation, or at least transliteration, related.)
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Andrij on September 03, 2016, 06:13:44 pm
In an article in a Polish magazine about the Orthodox Church, the Patriarch of Moscow is referred to in a caption as Kirył and then in the text as Cyryl. The saint is mentioned too, as Cyryl.

(Okay this is proofreading fail but translation, or at least transliteration, related.)

I would have thought the correct transliteration would be Kirił, but I'm not sure that is the Polish version of Cyril.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on September 03, 2016, 07:19:03 pm
Cyryl is the Polish version both for the saint and as an everyday name. Having looked up the Patriarch, I agree that Kirił (or even Kiriłł) would be a better transliteration. The version used in the caption seems to be a mix-up of the two.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on February 04, 2020, 07:51:28 pm
Quote
A system of bicycle infrastructure design principles that road infrastructure experts may find useful to
think about with regards to designing cycle infrastructure are the following principles of design that
both the Dutch and Danish bring into the design and implementation of their cycling infrastructure.
Uggh! I'm not sure what language this has been translated from, but this and a few other phrases (in NL cyclists can be fined for "not holding your right" and might be subject to a "speed control") make me think it is translated rather than badly written.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: The French Tandem on February 06, 2020, 09:09:49 pm
^^ No translation error in my view, just plain, basic, politician's double talk...

A
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on February 07, 2020, 08:59:57 am
No, it's from the European Cyclists Federation:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/10iWb4SJPVt6irFsb-LcX1VocRBNnNRhI/view
It's not intended to be double talk (I think), just clumsily worded with all that "infrastructure".
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on November 26, 2020, 05:29:03 pm
As this is the nearest we have to a Random Thread For Small Translation Things That Don't Need A Thread Of Their Own: I'm editing (proof-listening on paper, you might call it – not that there's actual paper involved, of course) an interview in English and Swahili. The odd thing is that the interpreter is mixing his Swahili with a lot of French. Not just what you might expect as loan words, such as days of the week and words like 'Inspector General' but even numbers and phrases like 'answer the questions truthfully and completely'. The interviewee is Congolese, which explains the French, but I don't know whether it's just easier for them this way or possibly the interpreter's Swahili isn't quite as good as it should be. I guess most likely though it's just Congolese creole.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on November 26, 2020, 06:38:12 pm
DNA, however, is DNA, in English, not ADN like French. They also use English for 'hand-crafted shoes'. Yes, DNA, Inspector General and hand-crafted shoes in the same interview; this could be a good one!
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: fuaran on November 26, 2020, 09:01:22 pm
The yew tree spreading its "seeds".
(https://i.imgur.com/Hcis6QX.png)
from https://www.facebook.com/heinrich.wagner.1420/posts/2491414261095539
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Mrs Pingu on November 26, 2020, 09:43:19 pm
I love the word for red sqrl in German
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Auntie Helen on November 27, 2020, 05:18:19 am
I love the word for red sqrl in German
But can you say it?
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: ElyDave on November 27, 2020, 06:47:57 am
Yes, but only with an appalling comedy accent.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Mr Larrington on November 27, 2020, 07:51:01 am
I love the word for red sqrl in German
But can you say it?

According to some of Miss von Brandenburg's dodgy mates the ability satisfactorily to pronounce Eichhörnchen is the ultimate test of whether a non-German can call themselves a speaker of their lingo.  This Unit passed :smug:
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: andytheflyer on November 27, 2020, 08:51:20 am
According to some of Miss von Brandenburg's dodgy mates the ability satisfactorily to pronounce Eichhörnchen is the ultimate test of whether a non-German can call themselves a speaker of their lingo.  This Unit passed :smug:
My Dutch colleagues used to do the same with Scheveningen.  Being from Holland, Lincolnshire, and having webbed feet, I passed.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: hellymedic on November 27, 2020, 04:53:03 pm
My late grandmother holidayed in Scheveningen when I was young so its pronunciation was no challenge.

Friend has posted heart-warming tale of hospital ward wedding in FOREIGN land.

Bride's mum is unwell...
Quote
a senior doctor who was on duty, checked one of the patients - a 62-year-old woman, a violent cancer patient, whose condition is deteriorating quickly.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Mrs Pingu on November 27, 2020, 05:05:40 pm
I love the word for red sqrl in German
But can you say it?

Well I can say what it looks like, but I doubt that would be correct :)

And having just watched this I was close at the beginning but failed with the -chen
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=KYjXiKzZWgs
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Auntie Helen on November 27, 2020, 05:30:20 pm
Here are lots of Germans saying squirrel and at the end Klaus saying Eichhörnchen

https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F161094258&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&visual=true&show_comments=true&color=false&show_user=true&show_reposts=false#
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on November 27, 2020, 05:33:33 pm
Here are lots of Germans saying squirrel and at the end Klaus saying Eichhörnchen

https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F161094258&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&visual=true&show_comments=true&color=false&show_user=true&show_reposts=false#
I don't know why that made me laugh but it did.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on November 27, 2020, 05:41:12 pm
Here are lots of Germans saying squirrel and at the end Klaus saying Eichhörnchen

https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F161094258&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&visual=true&show_comments=true&color=false&show_user=true&show_reposts=false#
So what does
Quote
Scheißbuchfertigstellungbedürfnis
mean? Something along the lines of ''the need to finish a shit book''?
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Mrs Pingu on November 27, 2020, 05:42:17 pm
Ok I think I can say it if I do it really fast repeatedly ;D
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: fboab on December 23, 2020, 01:44:51 pm
Quote from: Randonneurs Tokyo
注意 Cautions
Heavy traffic are expected at major route (national route). Please watch very carefully at city area where cars tends to go into shops and restaurants along the road. Please make much time for your riding plan. Please have enough sheep time, it will be very dangerous to ride without proper sheep.

https://randonneurs.tokyo/?p=11173

Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on December 23, 2020, 01:53:05 pm
I have a merino baselayer, will that do?
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on January 08, 2021, 01:13:50 pm
Transliterating placenames can be tricky. There are rules or conventions but most well known places are exceptions, and then the conventions themselves are subject to change, eg Peking > Beijing. I've been reading a story set in nineteenth century Poland but translated from Yiddish. It mentions many small towns which, obviously, are given the Yiddish versions of their names. It's a bit odd seeing eg Lentshno instead of Łęczna, but of course most readers won't be familiar with these names at all, so that doesn't matter. In addition, the Yiddish names are more accessible for the English reader: Shebreshin looks quite readable, whereas Szczebrzeszyn might make you  ??? and  :o . But world events can change even the most anonymous small town in the middle of nowhere or Central Europe. When the translation was made, no one had heard of Tchiernobil...
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: hellymedic on January 09, 2021, 01:58:56 am
I usually have little trouble dealing with transliterated entities.

I'm often puzzled by names ending with ...cki.

Is that pronounced ski or key?

Seems like the named one chooses...
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Rod Marton on January 09, 2021, 07:59:31 am
Its pronounced -tski.

The place I always find strange for transliterated placenames is the Czech Republic. Because historically both Czech and German were spoken there, all the towns have names in both languages. Unfortunately Czech contains sounds which don't exist in German, and vice versa, so the transliteration gets somewhat mangled. The town of Winterberg, for example, is awkward in Czech and comes out as Vimperk. Or in the other direction, Kroměříž is unpronounceable in German (or pretty much any language other than Czech) and ends up as Kremsier.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Kim on March 02, 2021, 12:50:05 am
Just spotted a Chinglish translation of 'Live' and 'Neutral' (in the electrical sense) as 'Zero line' and 'Firewire'.  Put those on your tragic hipster toilet doors.   :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Steph on March 02, 2021, 03:48:53 am
Now, I admit I have advantages in that I am someone who picks up languages easily, as well as pronunciations, and I do lack the attitude seen in too many people I know*, but I found the immediate refusal to even attempt to pronounce this easy one depressing. All it is is a tongue click and a guttural voiced 'g'...

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-56182349


*I was attempting to explain how to pronounce Liechtenstein to a colleague, who is a tit. Attempting to explain the blindingly simple rule in German that 'ei' and 'ie' are pronounced (in essence) by simply saying the English name of the second letter, I was met with "You've got a degree in this shit. How are ordinary people supposed to remember?"

Actually listening to what I say would probably be a good starting point.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Beardy on March 02, 2021, 08:12:05 am
Now, I admit I have advantages in that I am someone who picks up languages easily, as well as pronunciations, and I do lack the attitude seen in too many people I know*, but I found the immediate refusal to even attempt to pronounce this easy one depressing. All it is is a tongue click and a guttural voiced 'g'...

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-56182349


*I was attempting to explain how to pronounce Liechtenstein to a colleague, who is a tit. Attempting to explain the blindingly simple rule in German that 'ei' and 'ie' are pronounced (in essence) by simply saying the English name of the second letter, I was met with "You've got a degree in this shit. How are ordinary people supposed to remember?"

Actually listening to what I say would probably be a good starting point.
Being deaf and dyslexic means that language has always been a challenge for me, even English and I’ve been trying to use that with varying levels of success for nearly 60 years. Being somewhat aspergic also adds my almost teenage tragicomic inability to read even the most basic of human emotion/body language to the mix so I in effect walk around in my own personal fog of confusion. Fortunately Sarah is mostly tolerant of my apparent stupidity and can get cross with people who start to treat me like an idiot because I’ve reacted in an unusual way to some attempt at their communication with me.
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: T42 on March 02, 2021, 08:50:50 am
Just spotted a Chinglish translation of 'Live' and 'Neutral' (in the electrical sense) as 'Zero line' and 'Firewire'.  Put those on your tragic hipster toilet doors.   :thumbsup:

The toilets in a restaurant we ate in once had a rooster on the door of the gents.  After my son had been, I asked him where it was.

Son: Round there at the back. You can tell it's the gents, it has a cock on the door.
MrsT: What's on the ladies?
Son: Dunno... a knocker?
Title: Re: Amusing translation errors
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on March 02, 2021, 10:46:44 am
Now, I admit I have advantages in that I am someone who picks up languages easily, as well as pronunciations, and I do lack the attitude seen in too many people I know*, but I found the immediate refusal to even attempt to pronounce this easy one depressing. All it is is a tongue click and a guttural voiced 'g'...

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-56182349


*I was attempting to explain how to pronounce Liechtenstein to a colleague, who is a tit. Attempting to explain the blindingly simple rule in German that 'ei' and 'ie' are pronounced (in essence) by simply saying the English name of the second letter, I was met with "You've got a degree in this shit. How are ordinary people supposed to remember?"

Actually listening to what I say would probably be a good starting point.
By a spooky coincidence, in 2019 I spent a short time working with a trans woman called Steph who had recently moved from PE, as she called it ("So whereabouts in South Africa did you live?" "PE" "Umm... Pietermaritzburg?")