Yet Another Cycling Forum

General Category => Freewheeling => Losing the stabilisers => Topic started by: loadsabikes on July 19, 2012, 08:29:19 am

Title: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: loadsabikes on July 19, 2012, 08:29:19 am
A year ago, we bought our grandaughter a Isla Bikes Rothan balance bike for her third birthday.
They are beautifully made, lightweight and with good components that work with small hands.
She has used this bike a lot, gradually improving in confidence and ability.
For her fourth birthday, her parents have bought her the Cnoc 14 Isla.
I took her to the local park for some nice smooth tarmac. She took all of about 5 minutes to get the hang of pedalling and a little more practice to master moving off unaided.
I am totally convinced that her abilities, honed on the balance bike, have made the transition to a "proper" bike almost seemless.
Proud Grandad or what :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: clarion on July 19, 2012, 03:30:10 pm
Oh absolutely.  Congrats to your g.d. :thumbsup:

And it's in the genes, you know ;)
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: Notsototalnewbie on July 19, 2012, 03:37:00 pm
Awww!

The second she is old enough, myself and Rob are plotting to get his sister’s toddler a balance bike. Her parents are petrolheads, so she needs us for…balance, I suppose! She has recently started walking so it can’t be long now, eh!  ;D

(It took me aaaages to get rid of my stabilisers, my parents didn’t know any better but I wouldn’t inflict them on a kid now!)
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: Wowbagger on July 19, 2012, 03:41:06 pm
I don't think Martha has really got to grips with her balance bike yet - another Isla Rothan.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: Kim on July 19, 2012, 04:14:32 pm
(It took me aaaages to get rid of my stabilisers, my parents didn’t know any better but I wouldn’t inflict them on a kid now!)

The last time I took someone to the local park to teach them how to ride my 'bent, there was a child with stabilisers (which I suspect had recently been raised) being encouraged to balance properly.

They were just about managing it, until they looked over their shoulder, causing the stabiliser hit the ground and put the steering into trike mode.  At which point they immediately veered into the kerb and suffered a spectacular unplanned dismount.


I had to wonder how we ever managed to learn to ride with the bloody things.  Work of Stan.   :hand:
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: hellymedic on July 19, 2012, 04:59:27 pm
Stabilisers teach bad balance habits.
Taught kid brother (5.75) to ride in an afternoon after removing the things.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: TimC on July 19, 2012, 06:07:52 pm
(It took me aaaages to get rid of my stabilisers, my parents didn’t know any better but I wouldn’t inflict them on a kid now!)

The last time I took someone to the local park to teach them how to ride my 'bent, there was a child with stabilisers (which I suspect had recently been raised) being encouraged to balance properly.

They were just about managing it, until they looked over their shoulder, causing the stabiliser hit the ground and put the steering into trike mode.  At which point they immediately veered into the kerb and suffered a spectacular unplanned dismount.


I had to wonder how we ever managed to learn to ride with the bloody things.  Work of Stan.   :hand:

My first two-wheeled experience was when my stabilisers fell off (my Dad was a crap mechanic) on a downhill stretch in our estate. The instant demon descent went well, right up till it came to a corner. Having never learned the technique of leaning to turn, I tried turning the bars. Cue Wacky Races-type prang, with legs, wheels, arms & stuff revolving madly in a cloud of dust.

After a bit of a lower-lip wobble and a gentle feel to make sure I was in one piece, I went and did it again!

Balance bikes are definitely the way ahead.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: Marmitegeoff on July 23, 2012, 06:11:49 am
I bought one each for my 2 grand daughters on their second birthday, about 4 weeks ago. 1 has already done a 1 mile trip and wanted to do it again very soon after.  The other one is still not quite so sure, but it will come.

They are definatly the way to go.

Geoff
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: Efrogwr on August 10, 2012, 05:28:02 pm
E Minor  started on a Likeabike (twelve years ago, pre Islabikes), and took to it immediately.

I'm currently helping him to build up his first road bike, based on a frame from Paul D. He'll be able to ride it tomorrow!!!!!!
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: David Martin on September 05, 2012, 10:49:08 pm
We bought a Lidl likealikeabike about 6 years ago. Youngest took to it around the house and had no problem transitioning to a real bike (apart from kids bikes being manufactured out of depleted unobtanium and damned hard to pedal at the best of times).
Then it went south to his two cousins (along with other hand me down bikes) and is now back in Dundee at the home of a friend for her 3yo to play on.
The ones they had on the Cycle Show with the very angled seat tube looked excellent. I liked the phrase 'balanceability' as a precursor to bikeability.

Definitely the way to go. There are several kids who 'commute' to the Uni nursery on balance bikes.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: hatler on September 05, 2012, 11:30:54 pm
Another balance bike evangelist here.

We stripped the chainrings and pedals off a bike for our first. When we put him on regular bike he did six laps around the caravan site. I never once had to hold the bike while he was on it.

For number two we were lucky enough to get a £9.95 balance bike from Aldi (or was it Lidl) and she pulled off pretty much the same stunt, except that she was about 18 months ahead of No 1, and her first pedalling was on a fixed.

I think that having them both on the back of a trailer bike before solo pedalling really helped as well as they understood what pedalling was all about.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: Tewdric on September 13, 2012, 03:52:53 pm
Tomos has Had a balance bike since he was 18 months.  He loves it and, judging by the way he scoots along on it, he should be able to move up to a pedal bike fairly easily. 
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: loadsabikes on November 09, 2012, 10:37:01 pm
Update from our grandaughter today.
She rang after school today to tell us that it had been bike day at her school. She was very proud to tell me that she was the only child in the reception class who can ride a bike without stabilisers. :thumbsup:
She then went on to ask me to explain War. I found that a bit difficult for a four year old. :-\
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: tonycollinet on November 27, 2012, 07:14:03 am
I am very sad that I didn't know about balance bikes when kids were small. I never managed to get either of them into cycling, and I'm pretty certain it is because I started too late.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: Biketogo on January 26, 2013, 03:07:31 pm
I am a team member helping to run a NW London infant and primary school cycling club with it's own off road cycling circuit. Experience has shown that children who have ridden for any time with stabilizers have great difficulty adapting to riding the same bike with the stabilizers removed even with the saddle down to allow both feet on the ground. Their sense of balance is stabilizer dependant and without them they fall off, lacking the instinct to correct off balance movement or to just put a foot down. The solution has been to convert a number of small bikes - the club has a collection of 'gifted' bikes - to balance bikes by stripping off pedals, chainsets, etc. The result is a much lighter balance bike that the child feels in complete control of as they scoot along. So the progression is; from stabilizer bike to balance bike to bike with pedals. Progress is rapid and it works every time. Your small family member can try it out at the 'Field End Flyers' Saturday morning club held at the school circuit. 
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: robgul on January 28, 2013, 05:44:11 pm
Our grandson who is almost 4 has had a balance bike since he was  2 (a Halfords machine) and a Pashley Pickle trike ... he loves both of them .. and is an absolute speed demon on the trike.

.. I've just bought an Islabikes 16" wheel machine that he's getting in about 3 weeks time (no stabilisers) ..... last week he was in the park with his pal (2 weeks older than him) who has an Islabike (our lad was on his trike) ... he got off the trike and asked for a go on the 2 wheeler - got on and pedalled away .. no stabilisers.  Brilliant!   

[The downside is that our son-in-law hasn't had that baptism into fatherhood that involves running along holding the back of the saddle on a two-wheeler .... he'll have to wait for his daughter (born the week before Christmas) to get cycling]

Stabilisers should declared illegal!

Rob
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: clarion on July 28, 2013, 09:38:24 pm
Spotted in Southwark.  I thought this was so sweet

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v326/ado15/IMG_4882_zpse0f976f7.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/ado15/media/IMG_4882_zpse0f976f7.jpg.html)
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: jhob on September 02, 2013, 11:51:11 pm
My 3yo daughter has had a balance bike for 6 months and is a total demon at it now - she can really zoom around and balance amazingly well.  She enjoys it a lot.

I'm looking forward to seeing how the transition to pedal bike goes in a year or so.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: hatler on September 03, 2013, 08:39:01 am
If you can get her on a trailer bike then that teaches pedalling. Combine that with the skills acquired on the balance bike and our experience is that the child simply pedals off when you put them on a regular bike.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: tom_e on September 03, 2013, 09:36:52 am
If you can get her on a trailer bike then that teaches pedalling. Combine that with the skills acquired on the balance bike and our experience is that the child simply pedals off when you put them on a regular bike.

Interesting.  We have been teaching the pedalling by putting stabilizers on for a couple of weeks, or gently pushing them to give them a bit of time to pedal before the bike stops.  Might try the followme for our third kid then.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: TPMB12 on February 21, 2015, 12:49:45 am
We have had our son on a balance bike for 2 months now. His grandparents bought it for his second birthday. Early days but did anyone find their child just walks along with it between their legs and not actually sit down? Our lad just won't sit on it which kinda defeats the object. Should I raise the seat a bit? At the moment he can keep his feet flat on the floor without needing to sit on the seat. If he's on his toes he'd have to sit down and might learn to balance.

What do you think? How to persuade him to try it sitting?

I know I'm a little impatient, I do want him on a proper bike asap though.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: CrinklyLion on February 21, 2015, 10:25:10 am
The only thing I'd say is that they learn quickest if they are having fun.  If you make it too hard, or too stressful with expectations, you'll turn them off from the idea. 
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: woollypigs on February 21, 2015, 01:13:23 pm
I taught a 3 year old girl to ride in a few steps, holding on to her before I let go. After that she zoomed/wobbled around the park with a great smile on her face. I then spend one and a half hours with her big brother who had two years on her and on stabilisers. I had to book him in for another lesson, because all he wanted to do was lean.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: ianrauk on February 21, 2015, 10:10:08 pm


I know I'm a little impatient, I do want him on a proper bike asap though.

You're being a little impatient. Just let the little one find his own way. And he will.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: hellymedic on February 22, 2015, 01:24:40 pm


I know I'm a little impatient, I do want him on a proper bike asap though.

You're being a little impatient. Just let the little one find his own way. And he will.

+1

Your kid is still very young.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: Paul on February 22, 2015, 02:14:49 pm
We have had our son on a balance bike for 2 months now. His grandparents bought it for his second birthday. Early days but did anyone find their child just walks along with it between their legs and not actually sit down?

Yep. It can take a while for them to trust the bike to take their weight. He will. They all do.

 
Our lad just won't sit on it which kinda defeats the object. Should I raise the seat a bit?

Nope. Louis spent a year on his balance bike, then another on a pedal bike with the cranks removed (so, a balance bike with brakes). I was getting a bit frustrated and encouraged him to have a go with the pedals back on. He tried it but it was too soon: he lost his nerve and didn't want to do it. I took them back off quick smart: I didn't want to put him off cycling altogether. Then a couple of months before his 5th birthday I put the cranks and pedals back on and off he went.

Dylan (Louis' younger brother) started riding just before his 4th birthday. I put this down to his impatience - he just won't accept that he can't do anything Louis can do. He's usually right.


Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: Kim on February 22, 2015, 02:25:07 pm
Balancing a bicycle isn't something you learn:  It's something you discover.

Adults and older children can be helped along with the right advice and physics knowledge, but a toddler has to do it empirically.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: TPMB12 on February 23, 2015, 03:25:53 pm
Oh I am being patient. In fact most of the time he goes out on it isn't with me but during the week with grandparents or his mother. I only get the chance at the weekend due to work hours. When i do I just let him go, too busy fretting about danger around him to worry much about getting him to sit down.

I raised it an inch at the weekend and he now has to put his bum on the seat but he still takes his weight. At least he absolutely loves it and wants to take it everywhere, well either that or the little wheeled fox on a stick but mostly the bike. This week he will be visiting relatives who have a trike for him so we use that to teach pedalling, not that he found that hard to work out it is just his leg strength to get that heavy trike moving.

The one thing in his favour is we made being outdoors a big part of his life since it was a big part of ours. It gives him a love of being outside doing stuff no matter what the weather and he especially loves running around on the fells in the Lakes. He was running up and down some steep grassy fellsides at less than 18 months and was in a trailer or child seat from about 9 months (not advised by Burley or hamax but he was sitting up ok and we only did half hours at that age). Later on we did more but with hourly stops for him to run along (he doesn't walk anywhere only runs).

Anyway I can say the balance bike is a much favoured toy of his and the way he is going I suspect he will pick it up sooner or later. He certainly knows his mind so if he wasn;t enjoying it i guarantee it would never get used. We do get him to pick his feet up and we push him along. I am not sure that helps but he loves it and I get the feeling it gives some feel of balance to him. I hope so.

BTW what balance bike have you used (or your kid/grandkid)? Our is a kiddimoto, the smaller version IIRC. It was a lightweight one which for a 2 year old I thought would be better than the likes of the heavier, highly rated bikes (IIRC the islabikes one and ones from say specialized are heavier by some way).
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: Paul on February 24, 2015, 12:55:03 pm
We had the wooden one from Evans: http://www.evanscycles.com/products/early-rider/lite-balance-bike-ec015768.

It was briliant. I was a bit anxious about the lack of brakes but over 2 years and 2 boys, inside and out, that never proved to be a problem.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: menthel on February 24, 2015, 01:20:49 pm
Blimey, give him a chance! My son has only just managed to cycle at the age of 5 1/2 and its still a big work in progress even then! Don't push the kid too hard or too far, it will bring on the fear and they will end up not enjoying it.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: hellymedic on February 25, 2015, 05:35:51 pm
Blimey, give him a chance! My son has only just managed to cycle at the age of 5 1/2 and its still a big work in progress even then! Don't push the kid too hard or too far, it will bring on the fear and they will end up not enjoying it.

See also https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=20257.0 (https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=20257.0)

Some kids walk at 9 months, some are more than twice that age when they take their firs steps.
If child is not ready to ride a balance bike, he's not ready.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: JJ on February 25, 2015, 07:16:48 pm
My 4 kids all learnt in different ways.  All started with stabilisers.  All were riding without well before their 4th birthdays.
#1 I took the stabilisers  off and ran alongside steadying him.  By the time he noticed I'd let go, it was too late.
#2 I took the stabilisers and pedals off, and we played a game of Whee! How far can you go?  Took 2 afternoons, then I put the pedals back.
#3 was nervous.  Played the same game of Whee! as his big sister, but with Mum catching at the other end.  Took 2 weekends.
#4 I took off the stabilisers, but when I took the pedals off he threw a hissy fit, so I put them back.  I turned round to shut the garage, and when I turned back, he'd pedaled off!

Balance bikes work, but so do stabilisers.  Horses for courses.  They all go like stink now.  If only they'd clean the bloody things.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: Kim on February 25, 2015, 07:36:17 pm
Stabilisers teach you to ride a bike that suddenly turns into a trike at low speed and when turning.  You can do it, but it's a more advanced skill than balancing a bicycle (put a kid who's learned to ride on balance bikes on their friend's bike with stabilisers, and watch them lose control on the first corner, just like adults do when faced with upwrong trikes for the first time).  The advantage is they bypass the fear of falling off and get you moving, the disadvantage is they can convince you that keeping a bike upright is about balance.

I was about 7 when I learned to ride a bike, because of stabilisers and the knowledge that I was unable to balance a stationary bicycle.  By then I'd become adept at leaning to keep my bike in trike-mode at all times so the handling was predictable (which wasn't too difficult, as I was only usually allowed to ride in circles round the garden).
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: Si on June 21, 2015, 04:16:45 pm
FWIW: my 2p's worth......

We do 'Ditch the stabilisers' sessions with balance bikes now and then.....we tend to get the vast majority of them going in around 1.5 hrs.  Actually, I find that it's often easier with the kids than the adults as the kids have much less fear.  Kids that we do tend to be from 3 up to 10, with most around 4-6.

Ideal is a smooth surface with slight downhill slope.  Things to keep reminding them: they need to be looking ahead, where they want to go, not down at the front wheel, and they should start with two-footed scooting (so that feet both come off the ground at the same time).  If the saddle is too high they won't be able to scoot properly, if too low then they'll be kangarooing rather than balancing.

Once they can get the bike going a bit, getting them to scoot in and out of cones can sometimes help too - they stop thinking about why they can't balance and start thinking about the cones....balance then comes naturally and it's also funnerer.

It can sometimes also be better for an 'instructor' to be telling them what to do rather than a parent.....they can often pay more attention to an 'outsider'.

The issue of actually holding the child is contentious - obviously if you are a parent then you are fine, but as an instructor then you don't want to be manhandling kids!  Rather than holding them up all of the time it's better to just try to correct them when they start to lean.   

And, of course, loads of praise, make sure that they are enjoying it, never yell at them no matter how exasperated you might feel, etc etc.  If they don't enjoy they won't do.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: Wowbagger on June 22, 2015, 08:20:38 am
I have just introduced Martha to her Bheinn 20 - she had the Rothan before and was pretty adept at balancing. This bike came in at exactly the right size for her, according to the website, but even with the saddle at its lowest, she can only just touch the ground with both sets of toes at once. She has only had one brief go on it and her confidence has not returned yet. Partly, the problem was that the children's playground, where he younger brother was playing in the sand pit, was too much of a temptation. She won't be 5 until next week so there's no rush.

I have a feeling that, once her brother, aged 2, gets on the Rothan, he will be a natural - he is a fearless climber and when he falls over he often just picks himself up again and carries on. M is very competitive and certainly won't want him doing something she can't!
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: Morat on June 23, 2015, 01:57:58 pm
My son is now happy pedalling away :) He started on a "Pukilino" indoor trike/scooter thing which isn't really a bike at all but it did get him used to steering round objects. It was only ever used indoors so it's mainly a handy mobile seat for him and footstool for us. He does still love it. I don't know if it was important to his developent as a cyclist or not, but he was using it pretty much as soon as he could walk (14 months ish).
Then a balance bike from Joe Joe Maman Bebe. Far too expensive, but I couldn't persuade SWMBO otherwise and he loved it as soon as he saw it, union jacks and all. He got that for his second birthday and was soon scooting along on it. An early downhill panic/crash did set him back a bit but it did teach him to respect speed and grass verges! He was happy freewheeling down hill with his feet up as long as it wasn't too steep (no brakes) but most happy scooting along on the flat at fast adult walking pace.

We tried a couple of goes on a trailer bike behind my mountain bike but to be honest I was never very comfortable with it. I couldn't see him but I could feel him leaning all over the place and making it very hard to steer while probably being very dangerous. We certainly never tried it in traffic. We might come back to this later on.

Now, he's 3 3/4 and his 4th birthday present was a CUDA bike in horrific Dayglow yellow and green with black and white "badger stripe" tyres. I've almost persuaded myself that it is Tour de Yorkshire colours... but no1 Son loves it to bits. He got it early and after a couple of sessions with a gentle grass slope and some careful instruction on brakes and pedals he was ready to try riding on a (very quiet) country lane. Last weekend he did a lap of York Racecourse on the cycle paths and coped really well with the extra traffic due to the Rally. He's happy uphill and down, and I'm absolutely chuffed to bits with him and his progress. We're seriously considering a trip to Dalby Forest on his fourth birthday (the family path, not the World Cup circuit :) )

This was only possible due to the balance bike, they're an absolutely fantastic invention and I can't recommend them highly enough.

One piece of advice I'd give is that if you give a child a bike with V-brakes (or probably any other brakes) don't be tempted to adjust them to perfection in a moment of Proud-Dad efficiency. The first time we tried an emergency stop from 1mph he nearly went over the bars - I un-tweaked the front brake immediately so it gives mild decceleration at full grip. He can still lock the rear brake if he tries but I'd rather he slid the back than went over the front.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: hatler on June 23, 2015, 02:27:17 pm
I saw one of these (http://www.scotbycycles.co.uk/bikes-c19/kids-bikes-c30/early-rider-road-runner-14-aluminium-kids-balance-bike-p3946/s13809?gclid=CjwKEAjwh6SsBRCYrKHF7J3NjicSJACUxAh7jvUDVWmQiSRyX0aiK-H3vvL_PklAonjVNM4dIsF2uBoCfHnw_wcB) in the window of the new cycle café in Hassocks at the weekend. Cute, but bonkers. Only for the terminally wealthy, or the children of pro-racers for the inevitable photo-shoot.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: hatler on June 23, 2015, 03:04:28 pm
The Wikipedia entry (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balance_bicycle) on Balance Bikes has it as a fact that the first run out for a Dandy Horse was June 12th 1817.

Hmm, 200 year anniversary of two wheeled transport coming up. How should we best/most appropriately celebrate ?
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on June 23, 2015, 03:44:02 pm
There is a Dandy Chargers section in the Veteran-Cycle Club and I expect they'll be celebrating the bicentenary in style.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: CAMRAMan on June 27, 2015, 06:12:29 pm
All three of my kids learned on balance bikes. I bought one from Germany that converted from a balance bike to a pedal bike, so they were familiar with it. They all, more or less, took off on pedals a few minutes after having the pedals fitted. It's probably still in the cellar in Budapest.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: Morat on July 07, 2015, 02:48:24 pm
I saw one of these (http://www.scotbycycles.co.uk/bikes-c19/kids-bikes-c30/early-rider-road-runner-14-aluminium-kids-balance-bike-p3946/s13809?gclid=CjwKEAjwh6SsBRCYrKHF7J3NjicSJACUxAh7jvUDVWmQiSRyX0aiK-H3vvL_PklAonjVNM4dIsF2uBoCfHnw_wcB) in the window of the new cycle café in Hassocks at the weekend. Cute, but bonkers. Only for the terminally wealthy, or the children of pro-racers for the inevitable photo-shoot.

Mad as it is, that's only a tenner more than JoJoMamanRipoff were selling kiddimoto Kurves for a couple of years back.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: aidan.f on November 07, 2015, 11:53:14 am
I am looking for a first balance bike for #1 grandson at 14 months he is too young for the isla model, recommended from 2+ anyone recommend a stop gap
 An unbiiased opioin is that he is if course advanced for his age.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: hellymedic on November 07, 2015, 04:18:54 pm
However 'advanced' a child might be, his legs at 14 months will still probably be very short.
I'm not convinced anything beyond a ride-on toddler toy is appropriate yet.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: clarion on November 09, 2015, 04:44:37 pm
We found a Toddlebike very useful from an early age.  It's not quite a balance bike, but it gets them ready for that.  We passed ours on to another tiny forumite.
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: ianrauk on November 14, 2015, 09:23:35 pm
Another vote for the Toddlebike.
My boy was zooming around on his at the age of 12 months...
Title: Re: In praise of balance bikes.
Post by: ianrauk on November 14, 2015, 09:26:48 pm
And talking of Toddlebikes...

they are looking for people to trial the Toddlebike 2

http://www.toddlebike.co.uk/toddlebike2launch/ (http://www.toddlebike.co.uk/toddlebike2launch/)