Yet Another Cycling Forum

Random Musings => DIY => Skip Bike and Bodge It => Topic started by: Wobbly John on January 06, 2013, 09:07:16 pm

Title: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 06, 2013, 09:07:16 pm
Many YACFers know that I make cycling and bicycle related contraptions creations. Several will have seen me write about them a few years ago on another forum.  :smug:

This year, I intend to get more projects underway, and I thought that some of my friends on YACF might like to follow them. So, I'm creating this thread. I've tucked it away in, the underused, 'Skip Bike & Bodge It' so it's easy to ignore if you just forumate for the Audax or politics.  :P

If I may, I'll start of by presenting a few of the old projects, mixed in with the new, to give people a flavour of my work...
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: clarion on January 06, 2013, 09:09:01 pm
*gets comfy chair*:thumbsup:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 06, 2013, 09:18:37 pm
...and I'll start with this one. See if you can guess what it is before you reach the bottom of the post:

First I ground down the ends of some cranks, so that I could weld them into the ends of some box section to give me pedal threaded holes:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Ultimate1.jpg)

The box section was cut to fit where I needed it and nuts were brazed into the ends:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Ultimate4.jpg)

Holes for 6mm machine screws were drilled in an old rim. I think the rim must have been made in Russia by the strange name on it.  ;)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Ultimate5.jpg)

The holes are to bolt the box section to the rim:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Ultimate6.jpg)

This helps hold the bits in place...

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Ultimate3.jpg)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Ultimate2.jpg)

... so that they can be welded together  :thumbsup:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Ultimate7.jpg)

A quick clean up with the grinder, and pedals can be fitted for a test ride :facepalm:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Ultimateride4.jpg)

...and a final shot of it once it's been painted & stickers applied.  :smug:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/ultimate.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 06, 2013, 09:49:59 pm
Here's a more recent one - Started on Friday to be precise.

If the Wobbly Workshop did Waterbottles...

We got a new toy at work - a CNC laser cutter.  :D
 ...and, of course I need to make sure I know how to use it.   :demon:

My waterbottle hip flask, that sits in a custom made cage, has started to get tatty - the faux leather is peeling & stained :(
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Workshop%202013/flask1.jpg)

In stock, I have a quantity of real leather from a couple of dumped sofas.   ::-)
 
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Workshop%202013/flask2.jpg)

A quick blast in the laser cutter to burn some stitch holes and 'engrave' a logo   ;)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Workshop%202013/flask3.jpg)

Double sided tape holds the leather to the flask, and I used a bit of backing to stop it sticking while I stitched. I started doing it properly, but then decided just to 'boot-lace' it up.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Workshop%202013/flask5.jpg)

It looks much better when the thread ( I used strong tent-making thread) is tightened    :)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Workshop%202013/flask8.jpg)

The front looks quite good too.  :smug:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Workshop%202013/flask7.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Psychler on January 06, 2013, 09:59:18 pm
So far I love this thread!

Now, can you tell us how you made the hip flask carrier, I feel a project coming on!

Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 06, 2013, 10:37:36 pm
So far I love this thread!

Now, can you tell us how you made the hip flask carrier, I feel a project coming on!

You can buy them from Charlie the Bikemonger (http://www.charliethebikemonger.com/ahearne-spaceman-hip-flask-cage--holster-and-hip-flask-411-p.asp), but the plastic bits of mine came from an old Raleigh bottle cage. The aluminium and plastic bits of the Raleigh bottle cages tend to fall apart, and you might be able to notice the 3mm grub screw that now holds my cage together.
The new aluminium part was just bent up, by eye, from an anealled bit of 6mm aluminium rod.

I've got it so that it will still hold a normal water bottle if I'm not in the mood for a single malt.  :smug:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 07, 2013, 10:39:38 pm
Not as much response as I expected.  :(

Let's show you how the Penny Fakething was made, and hopefully I'll have something new for tomorrow.

Take a donor bike...

(http://homepages.nildram.co.uk/~talizmar/xntrick/photos/Fakething1.JPG)

...and strip out the forks. They are going to end up here:

(http://homepages.nildram.co.uk/~talizmar/xntrick/photos/Fakething2.JPG)

For this they need cold setting to match the frame:

(http://homepages.nildram.co.uk/~talizmar/xntrick/photos/Fakething3.JPG)(http://homepages.nildram.co.uk/~talizmar/xntrick/photos/Fakething4.JPG)
(http://homepages.nildram.co.uk/~talizmar/xntrick/photos/Fakething6.JPG)

The frame & forks are cut...

(http://homepages.nildram.co.uk/~talizmar/xntrick/photos/Fakething8.JPG)

...and welded up

(http://homepages.nildram.co.uk/~talizmar/xntrick/photos/Fakeweld.jpg)(http://homepages.nildram.co.uk/~talizmar/xntrick/photos/Fakething%2011.JPG)

Meanwhile, a tube is added to the headtube...

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/tube.jpg)

...and bent to shape for the spine

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/bender.jpg)

Some small forks are welded in the other end of the tube and a footpeg added for mounting.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/footpeg.jpg)

A bit of old frame is added to hold the saddle. And a piece of tubing from a scrap office chair is altered slightly to make handlebars, which are mounted in a stem fitted in the original seat tube.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/rear.jpg)

The 'step-through' handlebars means it is safer than a proper pennyfarthing as it is possible to dismount forwards without handlebars being in the way.  :demon:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/front.jpg)

A few months later, Velovision Editor, Peter Eland, catches me riding it at an event...  ::-)

(http://www.velovision.com/storyimages/2008/08.jpg)

...which is where this video was taken.  :smug:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MOXAB19lqxQ
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on January 08, 2013, 12:32:43 am
Not as much response as I expected.  :(

Oh, I for one have pulled up a comfy chair (and a first aid kit) to watch the thread with interest.  Just didn't get round to commenting.


Quote
(http://www.velovision.com/storyimages/2008/08.jpg)

Short wheelbase, under-seat steering, doesn't violate the 'no fixies' rule.  I think I want one...
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Torslanda on January 08, 2013, 12:39:29 am
Having recently mended a Wobbly 'inspired' creation* and having built several contraptions of my own in the past I will happily draw up a deckchair next to Clarion and offer to share my 'Xtravaluemegabucket'o'popcorn' and big gulp Dr. Pepper.

Please continue with the inspired choices and, whatever else should happen, we need your continued silliness and creativity. Please do not be disheartened by the seeming lack of response but monitor the number of views of the topic. Not everyone who looks will actually post a reply.

Clarion. Would you like some popcorn?



*A 'Spin' cycle which had shattered the drive pin connecting the axle to the front wheel.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wowbagger on January 08, 2013, 12:48:12 am
I don't think that the inspired inventors throughout the history of mankind would have bothered if it was public adulation they were after, WJ!

Beethoven didn't know how well his 9th symphony had been received until the end.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: loadsabikes on January 08, 2013, 12:50:48 am
I love it!!
Simply brilliant, please carry on with the madness.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Peter on January 08, 2013, 12:54:29 am
Great stuff!
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Blade on January 08, 2013, 06:43:41 am
 :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Jurek on January 08, 2013, 06:58:41 am
*struggles to hide hydraulic press envy*
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Toady on January 08, 2013, 08:19:30 am
I'm a fan
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: clarion on January 08, 2013, 09:26:15 am
Having recently mended a Wobbly 'inspired' creation* and having built several contraptions of my own in the past I will happily draw up a deckchair next to Clarion and offer to share my 'Xtravaluemegabucket'o'popcorn' and big gulp Dr. Pepper.

Please continue with the inspired choices and, whatever else should happen, we need your continued silliness and creativity. Please do not be disheartened by the seeming lack of response but monitor the number of views of the topic. Not everyone who looks will actually post a reply.

Clarion. Would you like some popcorn?



*A 'Spin' cycle which had shattered the drive pin connecting the axle to the front wheel.

Popcorn?  I'm on a diet, you know.

Oh, go on, then.

Every project you post, Wobbly, makes me think, 'that is the nuttiest idea'.  Until I see the next one.  The Penny Fakething is a marvellous case in point.  The photo of the cold setting of the forks makes me wince.  In fact, I'd be hiding behind my chair, and peeping through my fingers if I weren't typing now ;D

But, in the end, that PF turns out to be a relatively sane and sensible outcome.  I'm...tempted.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: marcusjb on January 08, 2013, 09:35:28 am
You are a nutter of the highest order - luckily a highly skilled nutter that can turn these ideas into reality.

Awesome stuff!
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 08, 2013, 10:04:17 am
I don't think that the inspired inventors throughout the history of mankind would have bothered if it was public adulation they were after, WJ!


It's not adulation I seek. I was just suprised that there weren't more: How? Why? IWOOT, comments.  :P
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 08, 2013, 10:06:10 am
*struggles to hide hydraulic press envy*

Unfortunately it tends to crush the lightweight ERW tube I often want to work with, even when they are packed with sand.  >:(
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Oscar's dad on January 08, 2013, 10:16:30 am
Mad!  But good.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: hatler on January 08, 2013, 10:24:28 am
Keep 'em coming. This is fabulous stuff.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Oaky on January 08, 2013, 10:33:02 am
The Penny Fakething looks like the ideal ride to avoid wet legs when crossing fords on the Peddars Way...  ;D
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Ham on January 08, 2013, 10:54:13 am
This is fun..... did you ever do a pushmepullyou?
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 08, 2013, 10:58:45 am
I have not made one yet, But I have riden as stoker on the back of one of these.  :o

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_pLyp5OaCU70/RxYHoVEtsnI/AAAAAAAAAUM/cLQqMEyg5No/s400/MicWic.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Mr Larrington on January 08, 2013, 03:54:38 pm
I have not made one yet, But I have riden as stoker on the back of one of these.  :o

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_pLyp5OaCU70/RxYHoVEtsnI/AAAAAAAAAUM/cLQqMEyg5No/s400/MicWic.jpg)

I've ridden as both captain and stoker on one of they.  Scary Stuffs being on the back.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Von Broad on January 08, 2013, 09:35:47 pm
I've ridden as both captain and stoker on one of they.  Scary Stuffs being on the back.

Oh, I'd love to build one of these and then ride it on PBP [provided I could get somebody else interested!] 

All this steel stuff. Takes me back a few years. Be nice to get the bug back again, and mess with some soot maybe [looks at aging epoxy in corner].

*struggles to hide hydraulic press envy*

Unfortunately it tends to crush the lightweight ERW tube I often want to work with, even when they are packed with sand.  >:(

You've done pretty well to get the bend you've been able to get. After crumpling my first attempt [not having listened to everybody's opinions that it won't work - most things you've just got to find out yourself] the only way I could get a hydraulic bender to work with ERW was to go so very, very slowly, constantly moving the tube through the press a little bit at a time with each press, but then I could only get a mild deformation. Wouldn't bother again.

ERW is pretty soft but might take better at being rolled. Think you should make one! (http://youtu.be/ahE4tqRLZRg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 08, 2013, 10:16:50 pm
When I rode the MicWic push-me-pull-you tandem, the designer was riding captain, I'd been riding alongside him on my recumbent the previous day. I was quite happy powering along the cyclepath on Morecombe's jetty...


...until the captain decided to go between 2 oncoming cyclists - the first I knew was a cyclist flying past each ear with a combined closing speed of about 40mph!  :o :o :o
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Arch on January 08, 2013, 10:39:31 pm
I have not made one yet, But I have riden as stoker on the back of one of these.  :o

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_pLyp5OaCU70/RxYHoVEtsnI/AAAAAAAAAUM/cLQqMEyg5No/s400/MicWic.jpg)

I've ridden as both captain and stoker on one of they.  Scary Stuffs being on the back.

I stoked one briefly, and much preferred it to facing forwards. I'm too scared when I can see what's coming. Stoking backwards is like wearing Joo Janta 200 Super-Chromatic Peril Sensitive Sunglasses.

Keep the madness coming John! :thumbsup:  Did you ever see a pic of MFWHTBAB's recumbent pedal powered smoothie maker?
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 08, 2013, 10:46:21 pm
I ought to explain how I am able use the facilities I have access to when making some of these projects. I work at an independant school as their Senior Science and Design & Technology technician.

I, and my small team of minions techncians, do all the background work to enable practical work to take place in these subjects - ordering & preparing materials, maintaining equipment & tools, Health & safety, etc as well as assisting in teaching.

This means I must be at least as competent as the teachers with all the tools & science equipment, which gives me a good excuse for messing about practicing - and that is how I am able to use work stuff to do a few 'home jobs' in my own time.  ;)

I often develop teachers ideas into workable classroom practical exercises or projects...

...and today's 'Tale from the Wobbly Workshop' is such an example.

In Physics, we are looking at applications of magnetic fields. One of the teachers tried to make loudspeakers, making cone shapes from paper and sellotaping a paper tube to the end of them. A coil of enammeled copper wire was wound around the paper tube and the assemebly was then placed over a bar magnet. When the ends of the coil were connected to a signal generator, the 'speaker' issued forth a rasping farting noise.  ::-)

I volunteered to come up with something better.  :smug:

I ordered some neodymium magnets that arrived yesterday and I had a good think about how I could use them to make a speaker.

Today I collected the stuff together and decided to video my attempt at creating a speaker.  :)

Let's see how long it takes to make a speaker  :D

http://www.youtube.com/my_videos_annotate?v=BSg0Pw3GvkQ

I think we need to make it easier to connect them when we run it in class.  :facepalm:

And I'll have to do a risk assessment for a proceedure for using the magnets safely.  ::-)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 08, 2013, 10:52:10 pm
Keep the madness coming John! :thumbsup:  Did you ever see a pic of MFWHTBAB's recumbent pedal powered smoothie maker?

I've not seen MFWHTBAB's recumbent smoothie maker, but I've seen & used a couple of the more upright ones.

Let's see a photo, if you've got one, Arch.  :D
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 08, 2013, 11:02:53 pm
Oh, I'd love to build one of these and then ride it on PBP [provided I could get somebody else interested!] 

Did you ever see the push-me-pull-you tandem Trice that they made for a couple to do PBP on in the early 2000's  :D
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Euan Uzami on January 08, 2013, 11:06:56 pm
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Ultimateride4.jpg)

Do the elenith on it and I'll be impressed. ;)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: drossall on January 08, 2013, 11:12:07 pm
Let's see how long it takes to make a speaker  :D
You don't do instruction sheets for stuff like that do you?
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 08, 2013, 11:17:59 pm
I will do. I only tried it out at lunchtime today.  ::-)

I've got a couple of refinements to try tomorow and on Friday we have a department meeting, when I'll get the staff to make some and get some feedback before I write a worksheet.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Oscar's dad on January 09, 2013, 08:31:46 am
The Penny Fakething looks like the ideal ride to avoid wet legs when crossing fords on the Peddars Way...  ;D

Just in case you need a reminder of the challenge you face ...

CLICKY (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jCDj9mwURs)

One of your finest hours sir  ;D
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 09, 2013, 09:10:55 am
I watched it a few days ago, and mentioned it on the 'what's your hardest working bike' thread.  :-*
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Salvatore on January 09, 2013, 09:36:11 am
I have not made one yet, But I have riden as stoker on the back of one of these.  :o

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_pLyp5OaCU70/RxYHoVEtsnI/AAAAAAAAAUM/cLQqMEyg5No/s400/MicWic.jpg)

I've ridden as both captain and stoker on one of they.  Scary Stuffs being on the back.

I rode behind one on PBP. The stoker was acting as a rear-view mirror calling out "a tandem and a solo about to overtake us" etc.

The trike version used by Mike and Linda had a range of front-view mirrors for the stoker.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Mr Larrington on January 09, 2013, 11:04:09 am
Oh, I'd love to build one of these and then ride it on PBP [provided I could get somebody else interested!] 

Did you ever see the push-me-pull-you tandem Trice that they made for a couple to do PBP on in the early 2000's  :D

They built two - the other one lives in USAnia with my chums Craig & Vicky.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: clarion on January 09, 2013, 11:26:29 am
Let's see how long it takes to make a speaker  :D

http://www.youtube.com/my_videos_annotate?v=BSg0Pw3GvkQ

Ingenious!
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on January 09, 2013, 12:38:20 pm
Indeed.  Especially the use of human flesh for damping...   :D
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: loadsabikes on January 09, 2013, 12:47:55 pm
I'm waiting for the sub woofer!!
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Oaky on January 09, 2013, 12:53:00 pm
WJ would have to drink one of those giant bottles of tramp-cider (http://www.shortersclub.co.uk/products/38377-omega-white-cider-3-litre-pack-of-4.aspx) to get the raw materials.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 09, 2013, 01:00:20 pm
I has water-cooler bottle!  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Paul on January 09, 2013, 01:14:15 pm
*gets comfy chair*:thumbsup:
*drags sofa in from back room*
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: clarion on January 09, 2013, 01:34:19 pm
I has water-cooler bottle!  :thumbsup:

Hoh yuss! :thumbsup:

...human flesh for damping...   :D

I thought that was what it was there for.  Even if some of the damping is unscheduled.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Justin(e) on January 09, 2013, 02:05:03 pm
I've ridden as both captain and stoker on one of they.  Scary Stuffs being on the back.

Oh, I'd love to build one of these and then ride it on PBP [provided I could get somebody else interested!] 


Enjoying this thread and the thought that perhaps, maybe I'd be up to putting my hand up for that vacant seat.
Title: Re: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: neilrj on January 09, 2013, 03:58:23 pm
The Penny Fakething looks like the ideal ride to avoid wet legs when crossing fords on the Peddars Way...  ;D

Just in case you need a reminder of the challenge you face ...

CLICKY (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jCDj9mwURs)

One of your finest hours sir  ;D
Looks like the TPT!
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Arch on January 09, 2013, 07:31:21 pm
Keep the madness coming John! :thumbsup:  Did you ever see a pic of MFWHTBAB's recumbent pedal powered smoothie maker?

I've not seen MFWHTBAB's recumbent smoothie maker, but I've seen & used a couple of the more upright ones.

Let's see a photo, if you've got one, Arch.  :D

Here it is in the workshop, before painting.

(http://www.cyclechat.net/attachments/dsc_0808-jpg.13546/)

Also, it folds to allow transport on a bike trailer:

(http://www.cyclechat.net/attachments/dsc_0805-jpg.13544/)

It was later painted red (to go faster), and used to public acclaim at the St Nicks "Apple Day" event - it was a bit of a rush to finish it for the event. We made it into the York Press and everything!

http://www.yorkpress.co.uk/features/ecoinfo/9984617.Celebration_of_autumn_at_York_nature_reserve/

It works very well, and we were pleased that it accommodated adults and children heightwise - any children who were really too short could slouch in the seat (an advantage of the recumbent style), or if very small, turn the pedals by hand.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Tail End Charlie on January 09, 2013, 09:38:20 pm
This is a great thread.  :thumbsup:

Your web site, WJ, was also dead helpful when I was making a trailer a while ago.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 09, 2013, 11:20:08 pm
Thanks.  :thumbsup:

The trailer I use most at the moment (mainly for taking recycling to the bottle/can banks and collecting veg from the allotment), is one that I recycled:

As bought from the tip for £2

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1030511.jpg)

The material was beyond rescue and was stripped from the frame:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1030518.jpg)

Wheel-bearings serviced:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1030527.jpg)

Original hitch removed:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1030525.jpg)

And a M10 bolt welded into a bit of handlebar to replace it:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1030526.jpg)

This is so that I can screw on one of the quick-release ball joints (http://homepages.nildram.co.uk/~talizmar/xntrick/hitch.htm) that I use on all my other trailers:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/DSCN6279.jpg)

A search of the shed barn scrapheap turned up a 'fish box' that fitted on the chassis. A couple of bits of aluminium were cut and drilled to bolt it in place:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1030529.jpg)

A couple of coats of Hammerite Gunmetal grey textured paint (discontinued=cheap   ;) ), and it's in use 5 days from buying it.
 (http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1030531.jpg)
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1030530.jpg)

Total cost? just over a fiver.  :D
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 09, 2013, 11:33:21 pm
Today's project was started...

...but is now on hold as I ran out of the special extra-strong thread.  >:(

More leather from the old dumped sofa:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/leather1.jpg)

And logos added via the laser cutter  8)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/leather2.jpg)

This time I also used it to cut out some of the parts as well.  :smug:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/leather3.jpg)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/leather4.jpg)

A few tangles on the heavy-duty sewing machine this evening  :-[

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/leather5.jpg)

and thus I ran out of thread with less than half of it sewn.  :facepalm:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/leather6.jpg)

BTW, I must remember to sort out the logo - the 'transparent' bits of it end up black when I change it to monochrome, so it's ending up a rectangular outline.  :(
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: loadsabikes on January 10, 2013, 10:33:07 am
Mmmmm: A YACF man bag, for the chap around town.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 10, 2013, 02:18:51 pm
Mmmmm: A YACF man bag, for the chap around town.

Next project: YACF chaps rainlegs, for the man about town?  ;D
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 10, 2013, 10:19:31 pm
No new project today, so here's how one of the Wobblebikes was built -the 20" Wheeled Mini Wobblebike

Chopped frame:

 (http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/20wobble1.jpg)

Where the bits will go:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/20wobble2.jpg)

The 'crossbar-link' welded up:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/DSCN5204.jpg)

Welding the rear end is done in situ so that the alignment is right - note how the seatpost locks everything together.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/DSCN5206.jpg)

A cable stop is brazed on 8)

 (http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/DSCN5210.jpg)

An here are the component parts of a Wobblebike frame

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/DSCN5208.jpg)

And assembled

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/DSCN5212.jpg)

Because these bikes tend to get abused at events, I opted for the hammerite approach to paintwork. Frame now painted, stickers stucked, and reassembly started. 

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/wobblemini.jpg)

The finished bike looks like this  :smug:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/stand2.jpg)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/stand1.jpg)

...and this is how it folds.   :o

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/fold2.jpg)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/fold1.jpg)

We also made a short video - I didn't get the fold right first time   :facepalm: , but left it in for you to laugh at.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3g66HBGZ4JM
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Jacomus on January 14, 2013, 06:36:39 pm
I love your cheeky look at the camera every time you ride past! :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Sergeant Pluck on January 14, 2013, 10:01:05 pm
Not as much response as I expected.  :(

Fear not, your thread is being watched :)

Very impressed with the neatness of the leatherwork above, for one thing.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Psychler on January 15, 2013, 12:38:17 am
My aluminium rods arrived today for my Wobbly inspired hip flask carrier.  I'm thinking of something that will attach to a rear rack and have a red light fitted.

Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: clarion on January 15, 2013, 09:08:13 am
A brothel? :o
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Psychler on January 15, 2013, 11:18:32 am
A brothel? :o

My flask won't be for broth!   :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 15, 2013, 11:30:13 pm
OK. New thread arrived, so I've been able to get on with the YACF man saddle bag.

It was an idea I had a while ago and this was just going to be a trial one with the final version being lined as well.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/leather9.jpg)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Leather7.jpg)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Leather8.jpg)

I've decided not to make another as Carradices are better & cooler.  :P
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: loadsabikes on January 16, 2013, 11:09:49 am
I think that that is a fair observation John but hey, nothing ventured.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: clarion on January 16, 2013, 12:26:47 pm
Interesting experiment nonetheless.

I have a lot of ideas on how to improve a Super C saddlebag, but neither the skills nor tools to implement it.  I had an offer of help from a forumite, but failed to get myself together enough to act upon it. :-[
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 20, 2013, 07:24:36 pm

I have a lot of ideas on how to improve a Super C saddlebag, but neither the skills nor tools to implement it.  I had an offer of help from a forumite, but failed to get myself together enough to act upon it. :-[

Hmmmmmmmmmmmm...

(http://sheldonbrown.com/images/carrababy.jpg) ?

 ;)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: loadsabikes on January 20, 2013, 07:48:28 pm
Might be a bit dark with the rain cover on though!
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 21, 2013, 10:55:19 pm
Here's another old project from the workshop to entertain you during the cold weather:

Bike chopped:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/rad1.jpg)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/rad2.jpg)

The first bit of construction is to make a loooooong head tube, by welding a scrap headtube into each end of a longer tube which they are a tight fit in.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/rad3.jpg)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/rad4.jpg)

The rest of the frame is welded in place:  ???

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/weld.jpg)


Have you managed to guess what it is yet?











...It's a pedal powered radiator!  :D

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/DSCN5490.jpg)

And with copper pipe, Lauterwasser stylee handlebars...

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/DSCN5536.jpg)

...it's ready to race.  :smug:

And where do you race a pedal powered radiator?

In the Pedal Powered Furniture World Championship, of course!  ::-)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UZeiTzr1oSg
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: clarion on January 22, 2013, 10:06:23 am
Utterly awesome.  I love the sofa collisions. 

I bet you wished you'd given it a higher gear, though. ;D

IIRC there was a toilet involved in the earlier rounds, or am I imagining that?
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Peter on January 22, 2013, 10:13:57 am
Brilliant!
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wowbagger on January 22, 2013, 10:18:06 am
That clearly demonstrates the advantages of a bicycle in a situation where traffic congestion is likely.

Have you considered rigging a small stove to a heat exchanger and keeping yourself warm on cold winters' days?
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: hatler on January 22, 2013, 10:41:44 am
Brilliant !!   But ... I want to know why you didn't include some articulation into the radiator body.

 ;D
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 22, 2013, 12:23:17 pm

IIRC there was a toilet involved in the earlier rounds, or am I imagining that?

There was a pedal powered toilet, and it proved to be the fastest in the preliminary heats on the Saturday (this was at a 2 day cycling event). However, the strong winds that were present all weekend, blew the Bog Chopper over and smashed it. Although gaffer taped together, the race organiser disqualified it on Health & Safety grounds, due to sharp porcelain.  :o
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: clarion on January 22, 2013, 12:33:46 pm
I wonder what the UCI regs on chips to the porcelain are.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Arch on January 23, 2013, 10:34:43 pm
<soppy grin>

It was at that very event that MFWHTBAB and I first met.

I was with someone else at the time, but MFWHTBAB admits that at one stage he was riding a recumbent trike behind me walking along, and admiring my Bikester-glad bottom.

</soppy grin>
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on January 23, 2013, 10:38:37 pm
Isn't admiring bottoms the whole point in recumbents?  You certainly get to see a lot of them...
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Arch on January 24, 2013, 06:53:31 pm
Isn't admiring bottoms the whole point in recumbents?  You certainly get to see a lot of them...

Only as long as the bottom you wish to admire doesn't belong to someone also riding a recumbent, I guess...
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 25, 2013, 09:34:38 pm
At work, over the last week, we've been doing Aluminium casting - grading the sand up and handling metals in this weather makes the skin split on my fingers. We've also had a couple of machines breakdown in the workshop which I've had to fix, so I've been doing extra hours and getting no free time...

...but now it's time to start making a new bike.  :)

This is going to be a major project and it takes time to strip a frame and prepare the component parts before any construction starts, and I'll update regularly as it prgresses.

First we'll take a couple of frames off the scrapheap - this is one I bought for 99p on ebay - the back wheel has already been used in the Penny Fakething upthread.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/bike-1.jpg)

The chain's a bit...

easily dealt with by holding it in a vice and clouting with a hammer to snap it.  :demon:

The first thing I need is a head-tube and this comes from another old frame. Chopped out and as much waste trimmed off with a hacksaw...

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/hacksaw.jpg)

...then using a grinder...

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/grind.jpg)

...and finishing with a file.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/headtubefinish.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Jurek on January 25, 2013, 09:50:12 pm
*Agog with anticipation*
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Psychler on January 25, 2013, 11:42:37 pm
Agog plus 1
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wowbagger on January 25, 2013, 11:47:20 pm
I'm two gogs.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Psychler on January 26, 2013, 12:03:17 am
I'm two gogs.

Gog and Magog?
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Peter on January 31, 2013, 12:45:11 am
Left-handed, Wobbly - like me (and Leonardo)!
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 31, 2013, 01:11:22 pm
I'm ambidextrous in both hands.  :smug:


 ::-)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: aidan.f on February 02, 2013, 09:34:06 pm
WJ

I am a bit involved in that big ride- lel, It would be rather fun to have some auto-pedalling articulated mannequins, would you/could you  be inspired?
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Canardly on February 02, 2013, 09:47:41 pm
Mmmm no saddlebag..... ::-)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on February 05, 2013, 09:49:08 pm
WJ

I am a bit involved in that big ride- lel, It would be rather fun to have some auto-pedalling articulated mannequins, would you/could you  be inspired?

I thought the point of Audax was to become an 'auto-pedalling, articulated mannequin'  :demon:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on February 05, 2013, 09:52:20 pm
Why does life get busy as soon as I start a new project?  >:(

I'll have to show a couple of work projects until I can make progress on the fun stuff again.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on February 05, 2013, 10:08:37 pm
New D&T teacher has been persuaded by someone from the Music dept to make musical instruments with one of his classes. He showed me a Instructables page on making a mini ukelele from scrap wood (http://www.instructables.com/id/Pocket-ukulele-home-made-Sopranino-Ukulele-from-/) and asked me to try it out.  ::-)

We'll use planed timber rather than old pallets.

Carving out the sound-box
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/uke2_zps2c67c8fc.jpg)

Sound-hole drilled, shape cut and headstock sawn at an angle...
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/uke3_zps27274954.jpg)

...and the bit cut off is glued back on like this:
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/uke4_zpsac443f6a.jpg)

A set of tuning keys costs about £3
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/uke5_zps1d9b8cc4.jpg)

Online fret calculator shows where to stick cocktail stick frets.
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/uke6_zpsf1217416.jpg)

Now he's decided it will need to be done as a 'kit build' as they will be one of the younger classes. I will have to program the CNC machine to cut the wood to shape, and I suspect we will all be sanding and tweeking the uke's to get them playable  - he wants 60 students to make them.  :facepalm:

EDIT - now realised that I've mis-asembled the tuning keys.  :facepalm: :facepalm: :facepalm:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on February 05, 2013, 10:32:22 pm
Another job is making a replacement crown guard for the circular-saw bench.

The original, plastic one is breaking apart.  :(
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1070428_zpsf83d715c.jpg)

A side is marked on sheet steel....
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1070426_zpsacf6955d.jpg)

...and cut out on the guillotine.
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1070427_zpsa7410e29.jpg)

Once cut, holes are drilled in the two sides to hold them together...
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1070429_zps66e37673.jpg)

...so that they can be ground to matching shape.
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1070430_zpsfc689bc6.jpg)

Strips of steel are cut & bent to shape for the top, then tacked in place with the MIG welder.
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1070432_zps2bf18eae.jpg)

The rest of the welding is done with the oxy torch. I'm normally neater at gas welding, but there were slight gaps to fill.  :facepalm:
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1070433_zpsdf668cf2.jpg)

A bit of tube is cut with the angle grinder to fit in for the extractor port, and welded in with the MIG. The angle grinder is then employed to tidy it up.
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1070434_zpscb97a38b.jpg)

Hopefully I'll get time to finish it tomorrow.  :smug:
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1070438_zps9b999e9c.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Jurek on February 06, 2013, 02:50:40 pm
Making things is  8)
Making things which make other things is  8) 8) 8)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on February 06, 2013, 07:40:37 pm
Thanks, Jurek.  :D

Saw-bench crown guard continued.
Plastic clamping bits cut from an old chopping board and sacrificial side cheeks from ply (If the crown guard gets pushed to the side while cutting, the plywood bits touch the blade first, rather than suddenly hitting metal with the blade.)
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1070440_zps7649a720.jpg)

Ready for painting...
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1070441_zps6f365481.jpg)

...and primed with red oxide.
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1070443_zpse71401f4.jpg)

If you are wondering why I am making one rather than just buying one - the last spare part we rang the suppliers for was one of these:
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1070439_zps0e0a2a5d.jpg)


...they quoted £70, plus P&P, plus VAT!  :o :o :o

I made one up from a standard £3 part.  :smug:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: drossall on February 06, 2013, 07:49:42 pm
Have you thought of just making the whole machine from scratch?
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on February 06, 2013, 08:03:42 pm
I once start making a metalwork lathe from scratch - only 10" between centres, 3" swing. I got the bed, cross-slide and feed screws done and the parts cut for the headstock, but then managed to pick a secondhand lathe up cheap.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: loadsabikes on February 06, 2013, 10:59:00 pm
Blimey John, you missed the opportunity to convince the school that you needed a tig welder for that job.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Ham on February 11, 2013, 08:59:56 am
Thought you might like some inspiration.....

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-rutaSwA82uY/URiyZHZfw6I/AAAAAAAAmOk/jc0gtsO7ARM/s800/S0132205.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: cycleman on February 11, 2013, 09:13:30 am
i could see them selling well at milldenhall  :).
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on February 12, 2013, 09:47:35 pm
A little more progress on the cycling project, today.

The head tube is cut in half and the ends faced and champhered on the lathe...
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/lathe1_zpsd12cf5dd.jpg)

...to make two 75mm head tubes.
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/2headtubes_zps03ae2c94.jpg)

The blades (tines/legs?) are removed from the forks.
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/fork_zpsc8203727.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Tail End Charlie on February 13, 2013, 10:04:10 pm
That uke looks great. I once tried making a violin but it didn't really work. The sound box was the tricky bit and the whole thing sounded dead. Stradivarius I ain't. Please put up some video of how it plays, when finished, I'd be really interested.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Vince on February 14, 2013, 10:04:22 pm
Wunja slides on to the end of a pew, hoping he hasn't missed too much.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Rhys W on February 26, 2013, 03:22:04 pm
(http://cdn.head-fi.org/c/c3/c37cd6f7_This-thread-Is-full-of-win.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on February 26, 2013, 08:14:50 pm
Sorry progress has been a bit slow of late - I only been facing a few bits up o the lathe for the project, although I did drill an important hole yesterday that took all lunchbreak (a 16mm dia., angled hole, off centre, through a fork-crown can't be rushed).

I bought some steel this afternoon, so hopefully will make progress soon.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on February 27, 2013, 07:28:11 pm
I bet many of you will guess what I'm making from this shot:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Wheelassembly_zps10dfa091.jpg)

A hole is cut in some ERW box section steel:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/holesaw_zpsa9544795.jpg)

Althought I have 36 & 37mm hole saws, I needed 34 & a bit  >:(, so I drilled at 32...

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Dontfit_zps86a0b721.jpg)

...and filed...

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/File_zpsb45b8eed.jpg)

...until it fits a head tube.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/fits_zpse6acc32c.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Littlesox on March 17, 2013, 07:41:36 pm
Wobbly John - I havn't enjoyed reading a thread this much for ages.

Keep up the good work !
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on March 27, 2013, 08:12:16 pm
Gah! A whole month with no progress on 'the project'.  >:(

At least I made time to do a bit of welding today.  :smug:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1070522_zps3e30c23f.jpg)

I also got the other awkward hole drilled through the other steerer - 16mm dia, at an angle and off-centre, - I now have a left & right handed pair.  O:-)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on April 05, 2013, 08:26:55 pm
A bit more progress over the last 2 days:

A couple of wedges are cut from a 2 metre lenght of box section...

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/04042013083_zps3dfc6345.jpg)

...so that they can be closed up ready for welding.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/04042013085_zps34741d8b.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on April 05, 2013, 08:43:05 pm
Once welded, some of the bits are set up in place to try to mark where the other end of the box-section-with-the-head-tube needs to be cut.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1070532_zps9b3a7f0f.jpg)

A bit of sawing & grinding it fits well enough

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1070534_zps96c83a9a.jpg)

Before it can be welded in place, it is used to mark a right-handed piece to match.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1070537_zps079e52b9.jpg)

The best way to check that they match is to put the two together, end to end, to see if they make a straight line.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1070539_zps15ba07af.jpg)

I'll need to make a jig before I weld this up.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1070542_zps74308331.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: loadsabikes on April 05, 2013, 09:09:46 pm
'Interesting' design John. Can't wait for the next installment.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: clarion on April 05, 2013, 09:33:26 pm
That's starting to look very interesting indeed.  Hope you have time to take it further soon.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on May 07, 2013, 10:05:04 pm
Another month without posting progess - Tsk.  ::-)

A few people on the Rutland camping weekend mentioned how much they enjoyed the Wobbly Workshop thread, and as there has only been a little progress on the current project, I'm going to post an old one.  :)

Raw materials

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/materials.jpg)

Which gets assembled into this:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/assembly2.jpg)

Can you tell what it is yet?









... well perhaps with a bit of kevlar wick added, and two more identical ones:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/jugglers.jpg)

And this is what they're used for:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VJPISa27R20

 :demon: :demon: :demon: :demon: :demon: :demon: :demon: :demon: :demon: :demon: :demon:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Rykard on May 07, 2013, 10:48:12 pm
juggling with fire?
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on May 13, 2013, 10:39:47 pm
The current project is going to need a bottom bracket:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/framecut_zpsf344f3a8.jpg)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/framecut2_zpse4cef432.jpg)

I also cut a bit more thread on the steerer tubes:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/steererthread_zps74c230cd.jpg) :smug:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on May 24, 2013, 09:06:45 pm
Continuing with the bottom bracket:

 I have a hole saw that is bottom bracket shell size.  :D

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/holesaw_zps7677a62d.jpg)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/holesawed_zps0767875a.jpg)

How many of you would dare try that?  :demon:

It's a good fit

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/goodfit_zpsce46f922.jpg)

They are going to be welded to the bottom bracket shell to attach it to box section

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/bits_zps429a6c2a.jpg)

 :smug:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: loadsabikes on May 24, 2013, 10:29:06 pm
Blimey John, sailing close to the wind on the hold down nuts!
Is the bottom bracket a pinch fit on the main frame for leg length adjustment?
It's coming on.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on May 27, 2013, 11:40:23 pm
Here's a quick project:

My new bike camera arrived last week.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Rollei4_zps9d5102a9.jpg)

I don't usually wear a helmet, so I need to mount it on the bike. As I have already made a mount for my old school GPS to fit a Smart light mount, I thought I'd do the same for the camera.

I took an old light apart...

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Smartlight_zps015ee041.jpg)

...and sliced it up on the bandsaw.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/saw_zps45e2854b.jpg)

After sticking a flat plastic layer on top and sanding, I drilled a hole for a 1/4 Whit thumb-screw.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/cameramount_zpsafe58bec.jpg)

A bit of thin foam from a mouse-mat colmpletes it.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/cameramounted_zps499857c2.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wowbagger on May 30, 2013, 10:34:27 pm
Is that a Rollei camera, John?
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on May 31, 2013, 01:12:49 am
Yes, as mentioned on this thread (https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=71741). I must do a write up sometime. £50 for a 5M pixel camera with waterproof enclosure, 2" screen 1280 x 720 @ 30fps or 640 X 480 @ 60fps, touch-screen to activate setting, and 4X digital zoom, sounds good, but I had big problems getting it to accept the memory card. The HD setting has good definition, but is a bit jerky with frame rate (this may be my PC's fault). 640 x 480 is smoother motion, but blockier pixel wise. Quality of the camera seems cheap - like the Muvi copies from a few years ago. The waterproof case seems well built but I haven't tested it's waterpoofness-ness yet.

I suspect the Rollei name has been bought up by a Chinese manufacturer (presumably now pronounced "Lorry").

It's worth the £50 but it ain't a match for the Go-pro market.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on June 01, 2013, 09:00:54 pm
OK. Time to make wheels for 'The Project'. I've always fancied a disc wheel. :demon:

First I marked out a disc of sheet steel. A strip of wood and a couple of nails makes a trammel.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Sheetsteel1_zps9b2d82e8.jpg)
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Sheetsteel2_zpsdaee0661.jpg)

It's trimmed on the guilotine...

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/SheetsteelChop_zpsdd42e5f0.jpg)

...before being ground to a disc on a homemade jig.  :demon:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/firepit4_zpsca346f81.jpg)
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/firepit6_zpsb6687d97.jpg)

I forgot to take a photo of the disc with a segment cut out, but following that, the next job was to dish it to a cone , cold & by hand on the anvil...

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Sheetsteel6_zps1c0ae34e.jpg)

...and the join welded up.

Annoyingly I'd miscalculated and it was a touch small for the rim.  :facepalm:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/sheetsteel7_zpse952c901.jpg)

Never mind, it would stretch a bit in forming the flange on the rim of the disc (He said 'flange' & 'rim' in the same sentance!)  :o

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/sheetsteel8_zps8fbd01f3.jpg)

Near enough. It will be OK when it's tidied up.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/sheetsteel9_zps5dd02668.jpg)

 :demon: :demon: :demon: :demon: :demon: :demon: :demon: :demon: :demon: :demon: :demon: :demon:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Torslanda on June 02, 2013, 01:20:47 pm
Love it!
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: clarion on June 02, 2013, 01:53:58 pm
Genius!
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on June 06, 2013, 10:22:26 pm
You lot are sooooooo gullible - I can't believe you thought I was making a 16 SWG steel disc to fit a Ksyrium rim.  ::-)

Its for a 26" (ERTO 559) steel rim.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Sheetsteel12_zps36c4ed27.jpg)

As you can see, I've added the mounting bolts for the knives.  :demon:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: clarion on June 07, 2013, 10:38:55 am
Now it's getting interesting.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Vince on June 07, 2013, 12:25:10 pm
16SWG wheel guards with mounting points for knives....

Remake of Ben Hurr for recumbents?
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on June 07, 2013, 10:23:50 pm
Sorry, did I say knifes?...





...I meant legs.  ::-)

It must have been because I was thinking of Charlotte - the thing I'm making is a copy of her fire-pit as seen on the 2013 Rutland camping weekend (https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=66466.msg1477021#msg1477021)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Sheetsteel15_zps6460ac5f.jpg)

The wheel is going to be part of it though. I removed the rim and cut it close to half way and then shaped the ends:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Sheetsteel13_zpsbd3ca7bd.jpg)
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Sheetsteel14_zpsae3c63e4.jpg)

These ends werethen welded up with a M6 nut in line withthe spoke hole.

A threaded hook was forged out of an old worktop joining bolt, and the rim can now be bolted on to take a chain that will suspend either a kettle or grill/grid for cooking on the embers.  :smug:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Sheetsteel16_zps056b4110.jpg)

Sorry to disappoint those that thought I was making a recumbent version of Boudicea's chariot.

As I said, you lot are sooooooo gullible.  ;)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on June 07, 2013, 10:28:35 pm
That said, a fire bowl that turns into a disc wheel could be handy for cycle camping...
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: clarion on June 07, 2013, 10:41:20 pm
Top stuff.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Psychler on June 08, 2013, 01:40:53 am
Brilliant!!
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Toady on June 13, 2013, 10:22:42 am
 ;D
Keep em coming WJ!
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Ham on June 21, 2013, 11:37:12 am
Wobbly, you ever done a reverse pedalling bike? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WkUycGHbJb4
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: clarion on June 21, 2013, 11:53:27 am
Drew Buck did PBP on a bike which back pedalled for one of its two gears.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on June 21, 2013, 01:15:50 pm
The 'Ladep Tallbike' (pronounced "Pedal-backwards Tallbike"  ::-)) was a pedal backwards bike:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BHOGzk3Sgbs

(That is Arch's voice you can hear as it was she who filmed)

The one in the video ham posted seems to have an eccentric front wheel and, by the looks of it, reverse steering.  :o

I built an eccentric front wheel for our 'PoGoPed' that could be powered by bouncing up & down once you got the hang of it (a bit like learning to power a swing)...

(http://homepages.nildram.co.uk/~talizmar/xntrick/photos/po-go-ped.jpg)

...and we have built a reverse steer bike. I've only got video of me learning to ride it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FEHY4q4oPkY

I have mastered it now as those that have seen me on it at Mildenhall can testify.  :smug:

The one in the video would be very difficult to learn to ride, as is our 'Ekib'  (http://ekib.xntrick.co.uk/) (pronounced "Backwards bike"  ::-)), which is I suppose a reverse pedalling bike of sorts.  :demon:

(http://homepages.nildram.co.uk/~talizmar/xntrick/photos/greenekib.jpg)

BTW, I'm going that-a-way on it ---------->

 :demon: :demon: :demon: :demon: :demon: :demon:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on August 18, 2013, 11:39:43 pm
Groan...

It's ages since I made any progress on the Wobbly Workshop projects.  :facepalm:

I been having a big clear up at home and have just taken the useful bits off an old project bfore dumping the rest of it.  :(

So, I thought I'd repost the write-up I did on another forum when I built it - in the days when ACF ended and YACF started.

First installment:

Starting off with a scrap exercise bike...

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/gen1.jpg)

... and welding in a bottom bracket shell and some forks

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/gen2.jpg)

Then I made a mounting for a 12V electric motor. The motor has a knurled aluminium roller on it as it was used in a Robot Wars type thing, driving a wheel by friction.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/gen3.jpg)

The electric motor was then mounted so that it would rest on a wheel held in the forks

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/gen6.jpg)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/gen7.jpg)

I now need to find a bottom bracket, chainset and chain from the pile of dead bikes.  ::-)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/gen4.jpg)

So what's it going to be?

1. An exercise bike for lazy people   ;D
2. A training aid for increasing the cadence of fixie riders for faster downhills   :demon:
3. Other - suggestions please
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: clarion on August 19, 2013, 10:08:37 am
Generator?

Be a good teaching aid for kids if so.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Clare on August 19, 2013, 11:21:40 am
Polishing up tyres for speed record attempts?

Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: clarion on August 19, 2013, 12:21:40 pm
Could be reversing the Obree process and building a washing machine using cycle bearings, I suppose.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on August 19, 2013, 10:21:36 pm
Second Installment - Todays report will be brought to you via the medium of Lolcats (http://icanhascheezburger.com/).  :D

This may be something to do with yesterdays project.
First I need a bucket...

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/lolwus.jpg)

...and I need to drill some big holes in it.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/blower2-1.jpg)

A strong elastic band for it is cut from a car inner tube.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/ohhai.jpg)

Now for the 'guts' of the thing, a computer fan is fixed to a base...

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/blower1-1.jpg)

...and once a guard is fitted, this sits in the bucket.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/finishbukkit.jpg)
Couldn't think of a caption for that one

Okay...

So what is it going to be?
  :demon:

Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Jurek on August 19, 2013, 10:26:09 pm
Teasemaster...... :demon:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on August 19, 2013, 10:29:03 pm
Bicycle powered vertical windsock thingy?
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on August 19, 2013, 10:56:32 pm
Bicycle powered vertical windsock thingy?



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vuMShXgEaXs


Tis a Humane Powered Inflate-a-bubble Smiley.  :)

Hmmm - Can't see the video or link - can anybody else?  :-\
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on August 19, 2013, 11:05:12 pm
Unfortunately the fan wasn't good enough to inflate the survival bag sized EvilChuffy/demon smiley we made:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/DSCN5225.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on August 19, 2013, 11:12:31 pm
A work collegue had been clearing out her garage. Her husband used to work in the computer industry.

"Can you make use of some 12V fans?" she asked.  ::-)

I now have a crate of brand new 5" fans to play with.   :thumbsup:

Do you think a box of a dozen will inflate the EvilChuffyFlate-abubble?   :demon:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/DSCN5482.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on August 19, 2013, 11:16:32 pm
Wellllllllllllll...

Generator couldn't produce enough current for the 12 fan two stage mega blower  :(

Plus a square box is not good for fixing the bag to.   :facepalm:

I'm going to try the bukit again with some more efficient fans:

65 watts of of fans in two stages have been replaced by 18 watts of centrifugal fans (in a bukit)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Fancompare.jpg)

And the result...


http://www.youtube.com/v/lTc0kHyHfW8 (http://www.youtube.com/v/lTc0kHyHfW8)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Peter on August 20, 2013, 05:20:05 pm
John, you are absolutely barmy!  I'm glad you're on our side (you are on our side, aren't you......?)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Toady on August 20, 2013, 05:25:08 pm
Bravo!
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: clarion on August 20, 2013, 08:02:47 pm
John, you are absolutely barmy!  I'm glad you're on our side (you are on our side, aren't you......?)

Couldn't resist!


linky (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5iAIM02kv0g)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Peter on August 21, 2013, 12:32:13 am
 ;D  Well known to me!
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: clarion on September 02, 2013, 11:06:32 pm
Folk should be aware that Wobbly John was seen at Mildenhall with a couple of turbo trainers, a few other components, and the glint of inspiration in his eye.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on September 02, 2013, 11:18:04 pm
Folk should be aware that Wobbly John was last seen at Mildenhall with a couple of turbo trainers, a few other components, and the glint of inspiration in his eye.

FTFY.

He could be halfway around the world on a bicycle-powered zeppelin by now.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on September 02, 2013, 11:22:30 pm
Two broken (the plastic fans were borked) turbo trainers for a fiver - just what I was looking for.  :demon:

You might also see the tandem stoker handlebars (like on Wowbagger's tandem), that I bought for a £5, on this thread too.  :smug:

...but I didn't manage to buy enough 'Space blankets' to make one of these:

(http://www.velovision.com/storyimages/2005/zeppy2.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: LEE on September 19, 2013, 09:16:15 am
Why do I keep imagining your neighbours peering from behind their bedroom curtains whispering, "What the **** is he doing now?"
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on September 19, 2013, 10:33:18 am
My neighbour used to be a framebuilder and ran his own bike shop.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Pingu on November 05, 2013, 08:38:20 pm
Waiting...
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on November 05, 2013, 08:55:45 pm
Waiting...

Yeah, I know. Sorry, folks :(

My colleage in the workshop at work had major, open heart surgery about a month ago, so things have been rather busy at work (he's recovering well, but will be off for some time).  :-[

At home, my son has moved back in to 'Wobbly towers', so we have had to clear enough space for him, his dog, and the contents of his house.  :facepalm:   My daughter is due to move house in a weeks time, and it will be down to me to decorate inside and out over the winter & spring. (this will be the third house I have decorated for her in 6 years).  >:(

Hopefully 'normal' service will return. I'll probably post some minor projects (some 'work' ones) as I get the opportunity.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: CrinklyLion on November 05, 2013, 09:29:36 pm
I'd buy her a set of paintbrushes and rollers for Christmas, myself!
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on November 05, 2013, 10:00:37 pm
She does some of the decorating.

I can't be too hard on her -

She has a full time draftsman job, 40 mile commute (often further to site & client meetings) and a two year old to look after.

It's not unusual for her farmer husband to do 15 hour days, 7 days a week at certain times of the year.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Pingu on November 05, 2013, 10:21:21 pm
Sorry, WJ, I didn't mean to hassle you  :-[
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on November 05, 2013, 10:24:30 pm
Remember the ukulele project (https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=67060.msg1414155)?

Well, when the teachers came back, in September, from their summer holidays (while I had been making new benches & shelves for the workshop  >:(), they announced we would be going ahead with the uke project.

This has meant that, in my 'spare time' I had to machine up 60 ukulele kits for the Year 5 students to assemble. It takes about 1/2 hour to do each kit. ::-)

I then found out that the teacher who was given the prototype machined uke kit, couldn't be arsed to assemble it to try it out - so nobody had actually trialled the uke kit I designed.  :facepalm:

Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on November 05, 2013, 10:50:36 pm
Sorry for the moaning.  :-[

Anyway, here's a project from about 5 years ago, that proves even I don't get things right all the time.  O:-)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/DSCN5332.jpg)

I need these bits...

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/DSCN5333.jpg)

...and weld in a bit of additional tube

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/DSCN5352.jpg)

This becomes the back end of a wobbly chopper Swingbike-a-like  :smug:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/DSCN6266.jpg)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/DSCN6269.jpg)

It gets a fade paintjob to match my (then) time trial bike.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/chop1.jpg)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/chop5.jpg)

Trouble is, I got the angles wrong - I've never been able to ride it for more than 10 yards without dumping it in a heap.  :facepalm:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/chop2.jpg)
That's actually howit ended up after I 'bailled out'  ::-)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on November 05, 2013, 10:51:37 pm
Sorry, WJ, I didn't mean to hassle you  :-[

's Ok - I need a kick up the arse now and again.  ;)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: hatler on November 05, 2013, 11:50:04 pm
Wot ?  Are you saying there is no Sheldon Brown page on the angles required to make a wobbly bike rideable ?

Shocker.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on November 06, 2013, 12:13:58 am
With a Wobblebike, 'rideable' is just another, additional variable. Your value of rideable probably differs from mine. :demon: :demon:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on December 04, 2013, 11:34:11 pm
OK. New project.  :D

I've noticed some of you are in need of a bit of support - some uplift to prevent it all sagging and pendulously oscillating as you honk up the hills.  :o

Today's underwired creation, also aims to keep things pert & shapely.  :smug:

It was when this thread (https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=77925.0), and this thread (https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=77921) appeared adjacent, an idea began to form.

Clare kindly sent me her pizza stone holders that were looking for a use...

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1080212_zps9a2d421a.jpg)

...which was bent to shape in the workshop.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1080214_zps59b2e91d.jpg)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1080215_zpsf9c2ab6c.jpg)

Now to attach it to the bike.

an old stem was shimmed to fit the seat tube and a bit of 1" aluminium tube cut to fit in the clamp

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1080216_zpsccaac636.jpg)

Holes were drilled for the wire pizza stone holder...

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1080219_zps8c422d18.jpg)

 ...and then cut into slots after 1" headset threads were cut on the ends.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1080220_zpsf12cca9b.jpg)

The threads are to hold the wire rack in place using headset cap nuts (a plastic cap is used as a final cover).

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1080221_zps9d997f26.jpg)

Assembled on the bike, I found the seatpost strap on the Carradice wa too short to go around the stem, so I added a cable tie loop to hold it. I also added a couple of cable ties around the rack and the saddle rails to ensure the rack doesn't tilt back.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1080226_zps93c61683.jpg)

The height of the bag can be changed by sliding the stem up or down on the seatpost, and the angle of dangle can be changed with the handlebar clamp and cable ties.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1080230_zps399cf826.jpg)

 :smug:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Clare on December 05, 2013, 07:07:26 am
How excellent is that?

 ;D


I'm glad I didn't just chuck them away.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Peter on December 05, 2013, 08:13:22 am
Great work again!  You any good at economic recovery?
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: hatler on December 05, 2013, 09:27:58 am
Just, just, ... splendid.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on December 06, 2013, 09:56:01 am
No good. No good at all.

That definitely isn't wobbly.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: clarion on December 06, 2013, 12:48:57 pm
Genius.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 03, 2014, 08:48:00 pm
A bit more progress on THE main project. You can probably all guess what it is now.  ::-)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/trike4_zpsc93a8a5c.jpg)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/trike3_zps2667a98e.jpg)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/trike2_zps42c21607.jpg)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/trike1_zps160f7b1e.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Paul on January 06, 2014, 01:34:19 am
Oooh, is there some tilt in those front wheels - to maybe help with the cornering and that?

Nice.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on January 06, 2014, 02:02:17 am
Oooh, is there some tilt in those front wheels - to maybe help with the cornering and that?

I can't work out if that's even desirable (would it not make the steering inherently unstable, like a bicycle, rather than self-centring?).  I'm not very good at this mechanical stuff.

I'd have thought the best approach would be to get a tape measure and rip off ICE's (or perhaps KMX's, given that that seems to be the style you're going for) geometry as carefully as possible.   ;D
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Ham on January 06, 2014, 06:50:37 am
That element of steering would normally be described as a king pin, but I think we should be allowed to call this one a wobbly pin.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: cycleman on January 06, 2014, 08:18:17 am
ah I see what it is now,  a catapult on wheels  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 06, 2014, 11:31:09 am
Oooh, is there some tilt in those front wheels - to maybe help with the cornering and that?

Nice.

There should be some tilt (a factor of the centre point steering and castor angle), but is exagerated in the photos on account of not having any headset bearing in the kingpins.  ::-)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: nikki on April 18, 2014, 11:04:16 am
The Wobbly Workshop seems to have gone a bit quiet...
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on April 18, 2014, 07:44:06 pm
Yeah, sorry. Weekends have spent mostly working on Daughter's house & garden and my allotment, while at work (the School) this term, we have had a full inspection, Safety audit and the workshop closed for a week for electrical work.

Spare workshop time has been spent machining old Laboratory worktop into a greenhouse for my son-in-law. I've spent most of today putting it together (Hopefully, I'll get it painted and 'plastic glazed' tomorrow).

'Terrible twos' Grandson has also taken up some of my time as one of his child-minders has just had another child of her own.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: nikki on April 18, 2014, 10:29:40 pm
Spare workshop time has been spent machining old Laboratory worktop into a greenhouse

Of course. That was going to be my first guess  ;D

No need to apologise; it just occurred to me the other day that we hadn't had an instalment for a while!

Good luck with inspection outcomes etc etc
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on April 21, 2014, 10:28:16 pm
Today I took a couple of photos of the greenhouse - frame built from iroko hardwood laboratory benchtops, recovered from a skip.  :smug:

Haven't made the door yet and there are a few bits of trim to add.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Greenhouse1_zpsba597ab6.jpg)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Greenhouse2_zpscb51c2aa.jpg)

Yesterday I put another shed up in my garden. As the sterlingboard on the roof had rotted, I used (just to annoy Jurek) Aerolam (https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=71332.msg1479048#msg1479048) aluminium honeycomb board for the roof.  :demon:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: clarion on April 22, 2014, 12:52:37 pm
Nice bit of wood.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on April 22, 2014, 10:01:03 pm
It mostly started out looking like this:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Benchtops_zpse7cb00d8.jpg)

with gas-taps, sinks, electric sockets still attached.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: nikki on April 23, 2014, 10:30:03 am
Ace! Good work!
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Graeme on April 23, 2014, 01:19:45 pm
As I've arrived late I've made some fresh popcorn for everyone.  But then I ate it all while reading through the eight pages of wobbly craziness.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Peter on April 23, 2014, 05:40:36 pm
That sounds about right!
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: BrianI on April 24, 2014, 05:39:25 pm
Excellently fettled greenhouse there!   :)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: drossall on April 25, 2014, 02:07:21 pm
Has John seen this (http://festival.yorkshire.com/events/fantastical-cycle-parade)?
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on May 05, 2014, 09:47:17 pm
Has John seen this (http://festival.yorkshire.com/events/fantastical-cycle-parade)?

La, La, La, La... not listening.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on May 05, 2014, 10:02:35 pm
I thought you might be interested in how I built the greenhouse door using false tenons.

I can do mortice & tenon joints by hand, but the bits of benchtop I had were not quite long enough for tenons on the crossmembers. So, I cut everything to length so that it butted up to each other to make the door the right size.

Then:

1. Made a jig for that fits the thickness of the wood and has a slot for the router bush.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/falsetenon2_zpsb8bdb886.jpg)

2. Use the router to cut 1/2" wide slot, in stages to the full depth of the long cutter (about 35mm).

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/falsetenon3_zps106e5c00.jpg)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/falsetenon4_zps475ef999.jpg)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/falsetenon5_zps8dcab1c3.jpg)

3. Offcuts of the benchtop are planed down to 1/2", cut to width, and then the edges rounded on the table router:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Falsetenon1_zps57026183.jpg)

4. The table router was also used to cut a housing to take a plywood panel for the bottom section of the door.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/falsetenon6_zps5585bb45.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on May 05, 2014, 10:12:10 pm
BTW, I gave my grandson a toy for Easter, rather than a chocolate egg. I built this lorry about 25 years ago for my son, and it needed a little restoration to replace a couple of damaged bits and a fresh coat of varnish.  :smug:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/lorry2_zps0ae3de76.jpg)

Oak chassis, mahogany bodywork - all scrap wood from furniture being thrown away. The wheels were off scrapped pushchair buggys.  :thumbsup:

(It is based on plans by Richard Blizzard)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Arellcat on May 05, 2014, 11:33:46 pm
I built this lorry about 25 years ago for my son, and it needed a little restoration to replace a couple of damaged bits and a fresh coat of varnish. It is based on plans by Richard Blizzard.

And somewhere in my house I have a photocopied set of those very instructions which are probably about 25 years old.  Good to see someone actually built it!

I just know I'm now going to end up turning the place upside down to find them.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Ruth on May 05, 2014, 11:37:32 pm
Wow.  Great toy.  Can you imagine unwrapping the box that came in, on Christmas morning? 

Clazzer, your weekends are taken care of now for at least two years, I reckon.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on May 06, 2014, 09:13:03 am
Oooh, is there some tilt in those front wheels - to maybe help with the cornering and that?

Nice.

There should be some tilt (a factor of the centre point steering and castor angle), but is exagerated in the photos on account of not having any headset bearing in the kingpins.  ::-)
ackerman steering?
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on May 06, 2014, 09:16:31 am
ackerman steering?

No, I'll be steering it myself.  :P

  ;)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on May 06, 2014, 09:26:32 am
I built this lorry about 25 years ago for my son, and it needed a little restoration to replace a couple of damaged bits and a fresh coat of varnish. It is based on plans by Richard Blizzard.

And somewhere in my house I have a photocopied set of those very instructions which are probably about 25 years old.  Good to see someone actually built it!

I just know I'm now going to end up turning the place upside down to find them.

I made them the ride on car, the 'rocking horse' dog and one of the Landrovers from the same book as well.  :smug:

I still have the book somewhere - and volume 2 as well.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Torslanda on May 07, 2014, 12:21:40 am
Gawd! There ain't 'alf some clever bar stewards on this forum . . .
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on May 13, 2014, 07:40:38 pm
A 'work one' from the Wobbly Workshop today  :D

Physicists - they're not very good at setting up oscilloscopes ::-)

"Do I need a flaming 'silliscope' to demonstrate standing waves?"

Well you do now.  :demon:

1.5mm holes were drilled at 15mm intervals along a length of 75mm dia aluminium tube (scrap from a roller blackboard)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1080437_zps5f8a1807.jpg)

Hardwood ends were machined on the CNC router...

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1080439_zps22414688.jpg)

...and a thread cut on the connector scavenged from an old bunsen burner.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1080440_zps414ef6c1.jpg)

The connector was bolted in and the closed end fitted, both sealed with silicone.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1080446_zps120a9d1e.jpg)

The other hardwood end cracked, so I remade it in ply. It was then fitted so that it held a latex membrane (god knows what ebay will offer me as 'other items you might be interested in' after buying sheet latex. :facepalm:)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1080448_zps2dcf2aab.jpg)

A speaker (unwanted PC speaker) was then fitted over the membrane.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1080450_zpsdceace5e.jpg)

After testing for leaks, connecting the speaker to a signal generator and the tube to the gas tap (and flushing i with gas), we have a 'flaming oscilloscope' for demonstrating resonance!

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/P1080453_zps896eacf9.jpg)

 Video  8)

http://youtu.be/yx2Ph3SZWSU

Needs a bit of tweeking.  :-\

Edit - connecting the supply to 2 gas taps, via a 'Y' connector worked wonders. :D
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: nikki on May 13, 2014, 07:56:45 pm
It makes me happy to know that jobs like yours exist.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: hatler on May 14, 2014, 12:30:29 pm
Sheer genius.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on May 14, 2014, 12:35:58 pm
Standing waves are so much better with FIRE than the traditional slinky. Though I had assumed that every school had one of these in the science cupboard. Now I'm wondering how many year 8 physicists have been missing out...
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: clarion on May 14, 2014, 01:18:30 pm
Awsumz
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Graeme on May 14, 2014, 03:26:29 pm
Totally wicked. Makes me wish I'd gone to some physics lessons.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Marco Stefano on May 16, 2014, 10:28:59 pm
Son et lumiere.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: JennyB on May 17, 2014, 07:17:24 am
ackerman steering?

No, I'll be steering it myself.  :P

  ;)

Always wondered: if the wheels weren't connected but steered independently (steer the outside and let the inside wheel castor) how much braking could you get by turning both in before the tyres came off the rims?   :demon:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on May 17, 2014, 12:08:01 pm
ackerman steering?

No, I'll be steering it myself.  :P

  ;)

Always wondered: if the wheels weren't connected but steered independently (steer the outside and let the inside wheel castor) how much braking could you get by turning both in before the tyres came off the rims?   :demon:

Depends on how well the big chainring cuts through tarmac...
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Ham on June 23, 2014, 11:48:31 am
Dear Mr Wobble,

While riding along lazily in the sunshine the other day, I got to thinking a question and I realised that you may well have the answer.

We have seen and enjoyed your wobble bikes, and the process behind creating them. Have you ever created a bike with zero castor angle? Is is particularly difficult to ride? One imagines that if nothing else, it will not be a leisurely activity.

Yours sincerely

Curious of Wanstead
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on June 23, 2014, 01:21:55 pm
Mike Burrows's Ratatcher LWB recumbent has only a few degrees castor, and I think the original version (with a 'one legged front fork') had less than the one below.

(https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4075/4735040905_2d8f85b689_z.jpg)

Although I haven't made one it certainly should be possible to construct a rideable bike with no castor angle.

However, rideability is not quite a standard from one person to the next.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on June 23, 2014, 01:36:57 pm
Presumably with zero castor, the rider is required to balance the bike - ie. the bike won't be stable on its own.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on June 23, 2014, 09:23:41 pm
BTW, I was busy last week tweeking and running jobs on the laser cutter for Year 9 classes, and mananged to fit a quick 'lunchtime' job in - Wobbly Towers has been needing a new house number for some time and I thought a granite plaque would look quite posh. We haven't tried granite in the laser cutter before  :demon:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/doorplate_zps3b98dab0.jpg)

Polished, 8mm thick, granite tile, Laser etched text and 'spot centres' for the holes. 20mm dia hole for the doorbell drilled with diamond 'core' drill, screw holes drilled with pointed carbide glass drills. Edges sanded with wet&dry and polished on polishing wheel.  :smug:

Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Mr Larrington on June 24, 2014, 11:39:42 am
IIRC the very first Ratcatcher was built as a test hack.  It had a vertical head tube and an adjustable monoblade, allowing the user to dial in as much or little steering wossname as required.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: philip on June 25, 2014, 05:10:01 pm
Caster may contribute to the stability or "feel" of a bicycle but bicycles can be stable without caster and without gyroscopic effect. For details, including videos, see:

http://bicycle.tudelft.nl/stablebicycle/

"Our results show that various design variables, like the front mass location and the steer axis tilt, contribute to stability in complex interacting ways."

"We have found no simple physical explanation equivalent to the mathematical statement that all eigenvalues must have negative real parts"
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on July 08, 2014, 09:31:04 pm
Another non-cycling project again, I'm afraid.

My daughter acquired an old table for the garden, but it needed a little restoration. I forgot to take a photo until after I had dis-assembled it.  ::-)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Table1_zpsdd996eea.jpg)

I started by sanding to see how much good wood remained (My big, F Off, Makita belt sander used first before the orbital sander shown here).

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Table2_zps8ef3bd8b.jpg)

The centre section of the top had gone toooo far, so I built a replacement section.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Table4_zpsfb77569c.jpg)

A couple of the screws holding the hinges had 'rounded slots' - solution?...

...Tack weld a nut onto the head and use a spanner.  :demon:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Table3_zpscf20ba52.jpg)

A couple of pinned mortice & tenon joints on the frame had to be taken apart, cleaned, glued and re-pinned (new iroko dowels made) but the rest of the joints were just re-glued in situ - gorrilla glue applied and heated with paint stripper until it liquifies and penetrates the timber & joint (then dampen).

For a finish, I used danish oil (2 coats), a coloured wax to disguise the slight timber mis-match and a final coat of white wax (heated to penetrate the wood).

I'm quite pleased with the result.  :smug:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Table5_zps886fd1f5.jpg)

(a couple of bits of the old top placed on table for comparison)

Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Tail End Charlie on July 09, 2014, 11:20:25 am
Not sure if I've said this before, (if I haven't I've certainly thought it), but for me this is about the best thread on this forum. It's amazing what people chuck away which with a little tlc can look SUPERB again. Your other projects do you proud and are fascinating, wobbly.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on July 09, 2014, 12:48:51 pm
It's amazing what people chuck away which with a little tlc, the right skills and access to a large assortment of tools can look SUPERB again.

FTFY


I'm no stranger to making good use of discarded tech, but most of what Wobbly John does is beyond me.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: tom_e on July 09, 2014, 01:20:39 pm
+1

I'm doing well to slap some "wood stain" on the garden table when it looks shabby, whatever that stuff is.  Wot John is doing up there appears to be a professional restoration job. :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Vince on July 09, 2014, 02:03:36 pm
Two great tips here, welding a nut on to jiggered screw (Not sure I can use this to justify buying a welder thoughbut) and using heat to get glue into a worn joint - I'll be trying that on our dinning chairs when I can access some Gorilla glue.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on July 09, 2014, 10:24:54 pm
I've just realised that there is an invention of mine, in the background of the last photo.

'Mrs Wobbly' bought a birdtable several years ago, but it always blew over and got damaged when it was windy, so most of the top has been replaced over the years. About 18 months ago, the stand was rotting.


All it needed was the top of the bird table mounting on a post (mahogany) that is rounded at the bottom to fit in the parasol base. It is yet to be blown over by high winds.  :smug:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Birdtable_zpsf730a4b6.jpg)

I could probably make a fortune out of this idea if I had any business sense. ::-)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on July 14, 2014, 10:47:14 pm
It's amazing what people chuck away which with a little tlc can look SUPERB again.

Here's a couple of bits of my garden funiture...

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/MYTABLE_zps83e33704.jpg)

...and, yes - both the table and the bench were skip finds.  ;)

The bench needed a new arm and stretcher, and the table needed a new centre and a bit of glueing (it had probably had a parasol through it in too high a wind) and new bolts for the legs.  :smug:

It annoys me that wood, that has taken years & years to grow, gets thrown away because people can't be bothered to look after the products made from it.  >:(

Last Thursday's skip haul included several bits of mahogany (actually it's sapele).  :demon:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: microphonie on July 17, 2014, 03:34:01 pm
I inherited an alternative to the parasol base when I bought my house: an old plant pot filled with concrete that had had a strategically placed bit of plastic pipe inserted to create a hole to accept the parasol pole. I buried this into the lawn & use it for my rotary drier but it could be used for parasol/bird feeder/swingball etc.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: clarion on July 31, 2014, 05:09:18 pm
Remember the ukulele project (https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=67060.msg1414155)?

Well, when the teachers came back, in September, from their summer holidays (while I had been making new benches & shelves for the workshop  >:(), they announced we would be going ahead with the uke project.

This has meant that, in my 'spare time' I had to machine up 60 ukulele kits for the Year 5 students to assemble. It takes about 1/2 hour to do each kit. ::-)

I then found out that the teacher who was given the prototype machined uke kit, couldn't be arsed to assemble it to try it out - so nobody had actually trialled the uke kit I designed.  :facepalm:



Is this an accurate picture?   As seen at the cafe in the Olympic Park.

(https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3897/14787730405_1c08b7cba9_b.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/owJZ44)P7270020 (https://flic.kr/p/owJZ44) by TJ Clarion (https://www.flickr.com/people//), on Flickr
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Mr Larrington on August 01, 2014, 10:59:15 am
Need some of these:

(https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3865/14563904198_799d3c8de3_c.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Vince on August 01, 2014, 11:08:13 am
An electric uke? That is just wrong in so many ways.

(I will confess to late night browsing of UOGB on you tube, Teenage Dirtbag is a bit of a favourite)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Mr Larrington on August 01, 2014, 06:34:26 pm
An electric uke? That is just wrong in so many ways.

(I will confess to late night browsing of UOGB on you tube, Teenage Dirtbag is a bit of a favourite)

They did "Teenage Dirtbag" last w/e.  Did it all over Wheatus from a great height :thumbsup:

The electric uke sounds teh awsum.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on October 22, 2014, 11:41:45 pm
Let's start a new project.  :thumbsup:

I need a weight for this project, and it might as well be made of lead.

A collegue keeps tropical fish, and has saved all the little weights that used to hold plants down...

... a cat-food tin & a bunsen burner and I'm ready to go.  :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/melt1_zpsf1e7770f.jpg)

Soon, under all the slag, there is liquid metal...     8)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/melt2_zpsc5e31d1a.jpg)

...which can be poured into an aluminium beaker.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/melt3_zps3935ddb4.jpg)

The lead dosn't stick to the aluminium, so when a bit cooler and solid, it can be popped out.  :D

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/melt4_zps4a7e22d5.jpg)

In the workshop, I drilled it to take a machine screw - it's on the bench here with some aluminium castings the students were doing with me on Friday (noughts & crosses games for marbles).  :smug:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/doorplate_zps2c0dd5d4.jpg)

Who can guess what the project is before you see the result at the weekend?  :demon:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/weight2_zpsbca6c2b8.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Peter on October 23, 2014, 12:22:19 am
A balance weight for a microphone boom?
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Ham on October 23, 2014, 06:41:24 am
A cyclists shillelagh? ( Possibly designed to test the reaction times of bad drivers)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Moultonaught on October 23, 2014, 06:59:29 am
a weight to help keep a no-hands-required-umbrella in place when bivvi-ing

love the noughts and crosses for marbles  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Polar Bear on October 23, 2014, 07:41:01 am
Is that some sort of strap dangling from the construction? 

Looks like a brolly handle or a walking pole.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on October 23, 2014, 08:12:12 am
love the noughts and crosses for marbles  :thumbsup:

It's great to have access to all the equipment and techniques at work - it would probably be of interest if I showed more on this thread.

For the marbles game: The patterns were machined on a CNC router (I'm the department's 'expert' and worked with the students to acheive this). Sand moulds are made and aluminium from a crucible furnace is poured in (again, I'm supposed to be the 'expert'  ::-)). The games will also have a hardwood box made to keep them in.  Oh, and guess who had to come up with the idea for the project.  :smug:


BTW, a couple of weeks ago we added a 3D printer to our range of equipment.  :D
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: nikki on October 23, 2014, 08:28:00 am
You're making a life-sized, human-ridden version of one of these and I look forward to seeing the video of you demonstrating it in your back garden.

(click to show/hide)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Vince on October 23, 2014, 09:52:42 am
Its a camera stand to keep the camera level whilst cornering at speed.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on October 23, 2014, 10:21:46 am
The last 2 are very close...

... I hope to post video of me demonstrating the contraption in my back garden TONIGHT.  :P
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on October 23, 2014, 11:59:11 am
Steadycam.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: PhilO on October 23, 2014, 12:02:03 pm
Specifically, one of these (http://www.gospin360.com/), I reckon. I recognise the handle...

Do I use this as an excuse to try and post my own video again?  ;)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on October 23, 2014, 12:19:58 pm
Specifically, one of these (http://www.gospin360.com/), I reckon. I recognise the handle...

Do I use this as an excuse to try and post my own video again?  ;)

Got it, PhilO.  :-*

Edit - ...and now I've looked up your video on the 'Bike video cams' thread - I enjoyed that!  :thumbsup:


I'm not going to drill the mono-selfie-pod though.  :demon:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on October 23, 2014, 12:44:27 pm
Next I need a castor and a 15mm pipe clip.  ???

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Castor_zps7ce9473a.jpg)

I don't need the wheel...  :-*

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Castorcut_zps2ddf20b6.jpg)

...coz I'm drilling and tapping the pipe clip to fit in there with M5 machine screws (If you want to make one, you can probably get away with self tapping screws)  ;)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Gimbal_zpsb239d859.jpg)

Here are the parts...

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Parts_zps495c4bc1.jpg)

...and here's the rig assembled (but not extended):  :smug:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Assembly_zps044e6dd3.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on October 23, 2014, 07:25:37 pm
The usual way to deploy the GoSpin360 is to use strong velcro to attach to a helmet.

I used a couple of Neodynium magnets (one inside, one out) to attach it to my vintage top hat.  ::-)

Here is the promised video. It'snot very good I'm afraid, but you can get an idea of what it's supposed to do.

I need to point the camera downwards more, and it isn't quite as 'why-dangle' as a GoPro, so you can't make out that I'm riding the Wobblebike.  :)

http://youtu.be/ZOvb6wPRmJ0
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Graeme on October 23, 2014, 08:55:13 pm
Brilliant!  Been longing to see another project from you wobbly; shame you don't get time to post more of the stuff you get up to in school.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on October 23, 2014, 09:12:19 pm
I don't always do exciting stuff, Graeme. Today I've only been testing fume cupboards, pressure vessels and radioactive sources.

 :o
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: PhilO on October 24, 2014, 07:11:28 am
Excellent stuff. The pipe clip is genius - disassemblability (is that a word? Probably not!) and adjustment in one.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Torslanda on November 09, 2014, 07:06:10 pm
I don't always do exciting stuff, Graeme. Today I've only been testing fume cupboards, pressure vessels and radioactive sources.

 :o

That would make life interesting for more than a few people I know!
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on February 22, 2015, 12:15:24 am
Gosh, it's been a long time since I posted a project.  :-[

I know a few forumites have posted about making camping stoves - I made one of Charlotte's Woodburning (https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=35564.0) ones, but I'd not managed to get the bits of can to fit together to replicate her 'Penny & beer can stove' (https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=818.msg64939#msg64939)

A couple of days ago, I saw a video onthe 'Bike & Bivi' facebook page about making a beer can stove with just a knife & scissors. So, tonight I thought I'd have a go at it.

The 'Pennyless Stove'  :D :

Step 1: cut the top out of a can - not in the bottom of the groove, but at the edge:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Stove%201_zpswi261nma.jpg)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Stove%202_zpsrxktfwlx.jpg)

Step 2: mark a line round the can - hold the knife on a block of wood and rotate the can against it, pierce with a knife and use scissors to cut round at the mark:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Stove%203_zpsz7kef4z6.jpg)

Step 3: cut the top half so that the height of the parralel parts match. Then use the blade of the knife to press slight creases at 1/2" (or 'finger-width) intervals. I decided to use my gardning gloves for this stage.  :-[

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Stove%204_zpst3vvqu01.jpg)

You need to work at this until the bottom edge looks like a cookie cutter and there are little kinks where the can reduces in diameter:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Stove%205_zps4rj1agt5.jpg)

Step 4: The two halves should easily fit together:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Stove%206_zpsutfkdfqt.jpg)

Step 5: a small breather hole needs to be punched in (twist the blade, don't stab)- just so that the tip o the knife can be felt to break through:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Stove%207_zpstk9jwhsx.jpg)

Total weight 10 gram.  :thumbsup:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Stove%208_zpsiipridoz.jpg)

Fill with meths to above the bottom of the 'pleats'. Light the meths in the middle and soon the meths will work up the pleats and burn at jets from the little creases round the top. A kettle or pan can then be placed on the rim of the can so that just the jets are alight.

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Stove%209_zpsmibhruao.jpg)

After cooking the stove cools very quickly, and can be taken apart to make it easy to pour excess fuel back in the bottle.  :smug:


If you want to make one, watch the video that I learnt from (https://vimeo.com/64726512) to get a better understanding.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: mmmmartin on February 23, 2015, 01:53:28 am
Aha, I had missed my regular dose of Wobbly John. Always interesting.

It's a small world: five days ago I had a chat with a French chap looking for meths for his stove. It was exactly like that one. He was a weight weeny, with good reason: we were in southern Patagonia and he was riding to Ushuaia, which is the southernmost town in the world.

Myself, I use gas on this trip as the gas is easier to get here (believe it or not), quicker and you can use it inside the tent when it's cold outside. But in Europe I'm a meths man.
Very useful John, thanks.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: nikki on February 24, 2015, 07:40:51 pm
WJ, can I just file this with you now for later reference?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4laxhssY8o
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on February 24, 2015, 08:00:54 pm
Toooooooooo clever for a simple soul like me.

I'm just off outside to try to film something new from the Workshop.  :D
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: cycleman on February 24, 2015, 08:44:30 pm
Any news on the mobile deckchair wj ?  :).
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on February 24, 2015, 08:48:03 pm
It's a small world: five days ago I had a chat with a French chap looking for meths for his stove. It was exactly like that one. He was a weight weeny, with good reason: we were in southern Patagonia and he was riding to Ushuaia, which is the southernmost town in the world.

I'm never sure about the weight weenie factor of these home-made burners.  What they save in weight they seem to make up for in fuel consumption, which soon makes things heavier overall if you're having to carry the fuel the whole way.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on February 24, 2015, 08:49:25 pm
Any news on the mobile deckchair wj ?  :).https://yacf.co.uk/forum/Smileys/classic/sad.gif

There is unlikely to be any progress until the summer on that project I'm afraid.  :(
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on February 24, 2015, 09:31:26 pm
While i'm messing about with meths, I thought I'd film the firing up of a couple of simple pulse jets.  :demon:

It seems the conditions aren't good, or they don't like being filmed.  :-\

The first one normally runs for 2-3 seconds, but tonight i only got a few 1 second runs.  >:(

Turn the volume up - when you hear a farting sound, thats when it's working as a pulse jet...  :D

http://youtu.be/uNdAuvGYEdk

The new watercooled 'tin can' one was even less successful...


...but worth showing for how it ended.  :facepalm:

http://youtu.be/6uPKUyxikqk
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on February 25, 2015, 10:10:31 pm
The 'Jam Jar Pulse Jet' (with added cooling tray) was much more playful tonight!  :D
Sorry about the lo-res phone video.

http://youtu.be/XmP9LKSR65c

 :smug:

 :smug:

 :-[

 :facepalm:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: mmmmartin on February 26, 2015, 02:52:40 am
What they save in weight they seem to make up for in fuel consumption, which soon makes things heavier overall if you're having to carry the fuel the whole way.
interesting point that I hadn't considered. I'm now thinking of moving to gas (screw on canister tour with a Pocket Rocket) and caring a weight weenie coke can in case I have to use meths.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on February 26, 2015, 02:00:29 pm
The main attraction as I see it is that it's something you can molish with your swiss army knife, should you find yourself in unexpected need of a stove.  That's pretty cool.

ETA: I meant the beer can stove, not the pulse jet.  Although there's always someone who's going to try making a cup of tea with one...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iBw618geqyI
http://youtu.be/iBw618geqyI
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on February 26, 2015, 02:02:05 pm
I know that will be Colin Furze without even looking at the video link.  ;)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: PhilO on February 27, 2015, 06:48:39 am
The main attraction as I see it is that it's something you can molish with your swiss army knife, should you find yourself in unexpected need of a stove.  That's pretty cool.


I quite like the idea of the two-can wood gasifier, myself. You get the scrap-built thing, and can scavenge fuel from the hedgerow (although maybe not in Ushuaia!). Bit more bulky (and sooty) though...

http://youtu.be/EtiEzPf6P_Y
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on February 27, 2015, 01:41:40 pm
I've got some Wilco coffee tins that I bought ages ago in order to make one of those, to a recipe described by Charlotte OTP.

I've been put off by the prospect of drilling into that much stubborn stainless (some sort of jig will I think be required), though I do at least have the drill press now...
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Arellcat on March 02, 2015, 08:41:06 am
I know that will be Colin Furze without even looking at the video link.  ;)

Either his microphone was dead sensitive or he really needs to get some ear protection.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on March 11, 2015, 09:57:59 pm
Things I have learned this evening: Do not try to run a 'tin-can pulse-jet' on lighter fluid. #earsstillringinginging.  :facepalm:

However, I made a another, smaller beercan stove and am currently enjoying a mug of lesbian tea brewed on it.  :smug:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: alexb on March 27, 2015, 07:29:18 pm
What's the fuel for the pulse jet?
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on March 27, 2015, 07:42:50 pm
I usually use meths for the 'Jam jar pulse-jets'. On youtube, there's quite a few videos, and some people are using 'Nitro' model engine fuel, 'HEET', etc.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Pingu on July 05, 2015, 11:29:20 pm
Been up to anything recently, WJ?
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on July 11, 2015, 01:41:23 pm
Not really been doing much. After surgury in March, I went back to work after Easter, and found it quite tiring. Also I am losing a workshop at work, so I've had to chuck lots of useful scrap in the skip.  :facepalm:

I've been selling bikes  :o Both the 'F' frame Moultons have gone, also the Bianchi (my work runabout)

I've not really been cycling since the op, either - just over 400 this year.  :(   I don't know if it's anxiety about being able to do any distance, or what, but I lost the 'mojo' for cycling.  :-\

However, yesterday, I went out for a 75 mile ride round North Norfolk.  :D

I need to sort the workshop at home out (more N-1), and build up a touring bike.

Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Paul on July 12, 2015, 05:34:32 pm
That all sounds a bit traumatic. Sorry if I've missed posts elsewhere.

However, I'm slightly narked that despite everything (surgery included) you can still do a 75 mile ride, even if it is round North Norfolk.

I look forward to your touring bike. I assume you mean touring as in going abroad loaded and for a period of time, and not as in one end going places the other end doesn't?
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on July 12, 2015, 06:48:31 pm
I have normal bikes as well. The tourer is a traditional Dawes Galaxy frame I bought - should have enough bits to build it up, but I'm considering flat bars.

Don't let the pivot in the middle of the Wobblebike fool you into thinking it's not a useful bike - I've turned up, fully loaded, to a forum camping weekend on the Wobblebike, and also did the Dunwich Dynamo on it!  :demon:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Oaky on July 12, 2015, 06:56:46 pm
I have normal bikes as well. The tourer is a traditional Dawes Galaxy frame I bought - should have enough bits to build it up, but I'm considering flat bars.

Don't let the pivot in the middle of the Wobblebike fool you into thinking it's not a useful bike - I've turned up, fully loaded, to a forum camping weekend on the Wobblebike, and also did the Dunwich Dynamo on it!  :demon:

My main memory of the Wobblebike/Dunwich thing was the ease of parking the WB.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on July 12, 2015, 11:27:09 pm

My main memory of the Wobblebike/Dunwich thing was the ease of parking the WB.

(http://homepages.nildram.co.uk/~talizmar/xntrick/photos/blue2.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on July 15, 2015, 01:21:25 pm
Years ago, before I could afford to induldge my bike building passion so much, I used to satisfy my creative desires in other ways...  ;)


...one of them was building RC model boats. I'm about to pack a few away to store in the loft, so I thought I'd show a couple. They are a bit bashed, have detailling bits knocked off, and dusty now after spending a while in the school workshop (I ran an after school model boat club for a few students several years ago).

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Model%20boats/Yellow%20pool%20racer_zpsro1iqkgg.jpg)

This is not a shop-bought moulded plastic hull - it's scratch-built from sheets of balsa, and about as compact as possible with the standard servos and NiCad pack:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Model%20boats/Yellow%20inside_zps3wxqh4gw.jpg)

Then there is this:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Model%20boats/Virgin%201_zps31kofaxz.jpg)

A semi-scale Virgin Atlantic Challenger II

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Model%20boats/Virgin%203_zpsmzuuhfr7.jpg)

Done in the days before access to vinyl cut lettering - the red decals were hand cut from sticky-back plastic with a craft knife.  :smug:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Model%20boats/Virgin%202_zpsiqq8rja3.jpg)

...and, yes, it's another scratch-built balsa wood model!  :o

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Model%20boats/Virgin%20inside_zps08fblzka.jpg)

 :smug:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on July 16, 2015, 12:10:21 am
One more - I have done plastic hulled boats...


...Step 1 - Make a pattern/mould of the hull

Step 2 - Vacuum form hull from plastic sheet...

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Vac%20form_zpsg1sbbuib.jpg)

I made no attempt to make this one look like a full size boat as it was an exercise to make a fast mono-hull boat and to see how far I could stretch the limits of our Vacuum former.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Tail End Charlie on July 20, 2015, 09:58:25 pm
Those are fantastic WJ, great attentional to detail. I'd love to have access to the sort of kit you mention, you lucky *****
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on July 20, 2015, 10:22:12 pm
The only special kit for the top 2 was a craft knife, sandpaper and a bigger-than-average-soldering-iron to solder together the handrail and ladder (made from brazing rod).
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Tail End Charlie on July 21, 2015, 09:51:31 am
Bliley, makes them even more impressive!
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on August 06, 2015, 10:49:54 pm
Bad news.  :(

Because of re-organisation at work, I'm losing lots of workshop and storeage space, so I'm having to clear out all my useful 'junk', and make room in my home workshop for anything I want to keep.  >:(

This is going to severly limit the sort of stuff I post in the Wobbly Workshop thread - no prospect of new projects.  :-[

Not only that, I've had the 'scrap man' round and cleared the home scrapheap of bikes and bits...


...there was toooo much for his truck.  :facepalm:

I've taken the last few bits to the local tip recycling facility.

Today I took the FarRad radiator bike (http://homepages.nildram.co.uk/~talizmar/xntrick/farrad.htm) to the tip.

A couple of the guys there were interested, and I explained the story of the bike.
I said to them "I'd have thought you'd seen all sorts come through here", Reply: "Yeah - but we've never had a radiator bike before!"

By the time I left, they had hauled the FarRad radiator bike out of the  metals skip, put the wheels back on it and were riding it around the recycling site.  ;D
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Torslanda on August 07, 2015, 07:31:08 am
NOOOOOEEEEEEESSSSSSSSSSS!!!!!!!!!!!

Hate it when you have to throw stuffs away.

As long as the Spincycles are safe...
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on August 24, 2015, 10:21:37 pm
I'm getting a little time while jobs are running on the CNC machine, so I've welded up kingpins and done seat mounts on the trike.  :thumbsup:

I may have b*ggered up one of the kingpins.  :facepalm:

Trying out seat shapes:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Trial%20seat1_zpsbscye5nh.jpg)

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Trial%20seat2_zpsqrt5shob.jpg)

The real one will be made of Aluminium/plastic sandwich with a 25mm closed cell foam pad.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: cycleman on August 25, 2015, 08:42:53 am
That is looking great wj  :thumbsup: . looking forward to seeing it completed  :)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on August 26, 2015, 10:39:22 pm
Marked round template to cut with jigsaw:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Seat%201_zpsjropptfb.jpg)

This used to be a sign, and the graphics can just be peeled off:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Seat%202_zps9vlr12ik.jpg)

The closed cell foam is from an old judo crash-mat. This was cut on a bandsaw - a jigsaw just wobbles foam up & down and doesn't cut:

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Seat%203_zpsjzbjhmif.jpg)

This is what it looks like  :smug::

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y252/wobblyjohn/Seat%204_zpszubak4lw.jpg)

I'm afraid it will be a while before I get to do any more on this - Start of term is looming and there are new rooms and staff to sort out.  :(
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Jurek on August 27, 2015, 07:22:16 am
Did you know you can get a 'knife' blade for a bandsaw?
ie: no teeth, just a sharp edge.
Cuts foam beautifully. Nice clean edge.
Thinking about it, you probably did know  :facepalm:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: nikki on August 27, 2015, 08:54:04 am
When I was doing the tour of foam suppliers pre MA show, they recommended using an electric carving knife!

Nice work, Wobbly John. Shame to have to put the project to one side for a bit just as it's really starting to take shape.
Good luck fettling rooms and staff!

Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Jurek on August 27, 2015, 09:54:53 am
When I was doing the tour of foam suppliers pre MA show, they recommended using an electric carving knife!

I've used an electric carving knife on foam before. It cuts it, but you don't get a particularly clean finish with it. A bandsaw with a knife blade in it, is deffo the best way.

For home use I have a long Sabatier filleting knife which is scarily sharp.
Placing the foam on a surface which has a slot in it, keeping the blade wet, and cutting only on the downward stroke, the blade disappears into the slot, cutting the foam cleanly as it does so - you move the foam towards the cutting edge - rather than moving the blade along the line you want to cut.
For cutting neat holes, I have a dozen or so copper and aluminium lengths of pipe, varying from ~3mmØ to ~50-mmØ.
I've put these inna lathe and taken the wall thickness at one end down to effectively an knife edge.
These tubes can then be hand turned into the foam to core out round holes.

I really should get out, a bit more often.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on August 27, 2015, 10:17:17 am
I didn't know about the knife bandsaw blades. I don't think we use foam often enough to justfy buying one.
A nasty trick is to suggest cutting foam on the electric fretsaw.  :demon:
We have worked foam in the laser-cutter, machined it in the CNC router and even vacuum-formed it.
I'll probably use a heat gun to 'polish' the edges of the foam seat pad.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: clarion on August 27, 2015, 10:34:04 am
When I was doing the tour of foam suppliers pre MA show, they recommended using an electric carving knife!

I've used an electric carving knife on foam before. It cuts it, but you don't get a particularly clean finish with it. A bandsaw with a knife blade in it, is deffo the best way.

For home use I have a long Sabatier filleting knife which is scarily sharp.
Placing the foam on a surface which has a slot in it, keeping the blade wet, and cutting only on the downward stroke, the blade disappears into the slot, cutting the foam cleanly as it does so - you move the foam towards the cutting edge - rather than moving the blade along the line you want to cut.
For cutting neat holes, I have a dozen or so copper and aluminium lengths of pipe, varying from ~3mmØ to ~50-mmØ.
I've put these inna lathe and taken the wall thickness at one end down to effectively an knife edge.
These tubes can then be hand turned into the foam to core out round holes.

I really should get out, a bit more often.

*hatches idea for plot of crime novel*
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Jurek on August 27, 2015, 10:34:35 am
I didn't know about the knife bandsaw blades. I don't think we use foam often enough to justfy buying one.
I remember seeing one being used by the foam vendor.
Then, whilst at The Museum, we did a shed load of foam work which justified buying one.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on August 27, 2015, 12:45:12 pm
The ones I've encountered when people were making props and costumes out of foam, were the electric carving knife or a hot wire.  Ventilation and some skill are required for the latter, but it has the advantage that you can make weird shaped cuts easily.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: clarion on August 27, 2015, 02:01:10 pm
It's mainly hot wire I've seen/used.  Pongy at times. *cough*
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Jurek on August 27, 2015, 08:20:57 pm
The ones I've encountered when people were making props and costumes out of foam, were the electric carving knife or a hot wire.  Ventilation and some skill are required for the latter, but it has the advantage that you can make weird shaped cuts easily.
Mandatory, these days, I think. Styrene fumes (and those of other insulating foams) are carcinogenic.
At college, all of the hot wire stations in the 3rd floor workshop had extraction. This was ducted and dumped, unfiltered, to mix with the traffic fumes on Southampton Row.  :facepalm:

I'm not sure how optimal a hot-wire cutter is for closed-cell foam such as Plastazote, I can see it kinda cauterising the edges in a not very nice way.
WJ's idea of 'polishing' the edges with a hot air gun is one I am not sure is necessary. Closed cell foam doesn't behave the same way as acrylic does (which does benefit from flame - or heat - polishing).
Closed cell foam edges will not deteriorate if left untreated. As materials go, it has an astonishing lifespan before it starts to fail or deteriorate. I have some closed cell foam items I made probably more than 40 years ago. They're still doing their job today.

Rohacell, on the other hand (foamed acrylic) is the king of modelling foams, and best cut (or machined) using Very Sharp (new) Tools. It is possible to cut it in slivers of 0.5mm or less without it losing structural integrity. Unsurprisingly, it is fiendishly expensive....

As I said earlier, I think I need to get out a bit more...
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on August 27, 2015, 09:31:45 pm
It is possible to use a hot wire cutter without generating excessive fumes. Did you know they do CNC hot wire cutters for expanded polystyrene?  :D

Polyurathane foam gives off nasty fumes if you get it hot enough to cut, though.

I have a box of Rohacell foam in the loft of my garage.  :demon:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Jurek on August 27, 2015, 09:39:35 pm
I have a box of Rohacell foam in the loft of my garage.  :demon:

That is little short of being deliberately provocative  :P ;)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on August 27, 2015, 09:43:47 pm
It's along side the sheets of carbon fibre/Nomex honeycomb and the roll of composite GRP/Kevlar composite sheet.   O:-)


BTW, Did I mention I used aluminium honeycomb 'Aerolam - alike' for the roof of one of my sheds.
  :demon:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Jurek on August 27, 2015, 10:08:41 pm
It's along side the sheets of carbon fibre/Nomex honeycomb and the roll of composite GRP/Kevlar composite sheet.   O:-)


BTW, Did I mention I used aluminium honeycomb 'Aerolam - alike' for the roof of one of my sheds.
  :demon:

Aerolam for a shed roof?
Sweet  ;D
Over specced or what? :P
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on August 27, 2015, 10:18:27 pm
It was the substrate for some interactive whiteboards that were chucked in the skip when work replaced them a few years ago.  ;)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Jurek on August 27, 2015, 10:22:17 pm
It was the substrate for some interactive whiteboards that were chucked in the skip when work replaced them a few years ago.  ;)
Have you asked TimO if he wants any? ;)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on August 27, 2015, 10:31:27 pm
What does he need it for? It is lighter construction than the aircraft grade.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Jurek on August 27, 2015, 10:36:56 pm
Spaceships!
That's his game....
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Mr Larrington on August 28, 2015, 11:10:50 am
My grate frend Mr Woolrich used to work for BA and had carte blanche to go skipweaselling for the engineers' cast-offs.  Aerolam figured strongly in his contemporary bike builds.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: DuncanM on December 17, 2015, 09:39:39 pm
I've just read this whole thread.  Wow! I'm envious of all the kit you've been able to use, but also all the skills you've demonstrated! :)
Is the trike based around the Atomic Zombie Warrior plans, or is the front end similarity just co-incidence?
I'm midway through building a Streetfox (with disk brakes, 20" rear wheel, jackshaft (powered in the future?) and maybe a hinge in the middle (for folding, rather than for funniness)). It currently looks like this:
(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/720/22428024071_620d1e0a07_c.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/AaTubc)2015-10-23_08-56-30 (https://flic.kr/p/AaTubc) by duncancmartin (https://www.flickr.com/photos/90461577@N00/), on Flickr

I love your seat - mine's plywood and foam now, but I think I'm going to have to make a shell style seat to fold it how I want to...
Cheers
Duncan
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on December 18, 2015, 01:20:46 am
Hi Duncan. Mine is based on the Atomic Zombie Warrior, but with a less complicated rear end - why spend so much time building from scratch when a strong set of forks will do the job?

Several years ago, before the Atomic Zombie site grew so big and he brought out his books and plans, Brad us to keep in touch and show me his projects before they were released to public view. If yoiu visit my XnTRICK Cycles website (http://xntrick.co.uk/), you can see I've also buit a few of Brad's (actually his friend Troy Way's idea) Spincycles (http://homepages.nildram.co.uk/~talizmar/xntrick/spincycle.htm).

I've been offered a broken Trice frame, so I may be building a second trike frame based on that and then decide which works best and keeping the components on one of them.

My wooden 2X4 Lowracer (http://homepages.nildram.co.uk/~talizmar/xntrick/2x4.htm) has a plywood seat, but it's 2 layers of 3mm birch ply, cut across the grain and laminated up so that holds it's curved shape.

Good luck with the Streetfox build. I'm sure YACF would love to see pictures of progress on it.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on November 02, 2016, 02:23:42 pm
I'm not getting enough time for projects  - babysitting grandsons and getting involved with major building works in the summer at my daughter's house.

I thought I'd share this 'work' project with you though...

The ICT teacher asked me a few weeks ago about a project for her programming group. She wanted an Arduino based machine to draw patterns in sand (like a Zen garden) by dragging a ball bearing around with a magnet. Because I have a reputation for being able to make stuff, at very little expense, I got asked. Scavenged a scanner and printer from the skip, stripped them and added a stepper motor to the printer carriage, screwed the printer carriage to the scanner carriage, bought an arduino and stepper driver chips, fitted the glass from the scanner in electrical channelling and mounted it on levelling bolts,learnt to program, and...

https://youtu.be/h0nEM4bsTwk

 :smug:



Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on December 01, 2017, 09:33:52 pm
Bloody hell - it's nearly 13 months since I posted here!  :o

I need to sort out some new image hosting now that Botophucket has phucked-it.  >:(

I've built a new shed and potting shed over the summer, and bought an electric go-kart chassis which I re-electrified (using a 250Watt scooter motor) with my 6 year old grandson helping. An old flytipped child-car seat was added too.

(https://image.ibb.co/jrPwe6/Kart_2.jpg)

https://youtu.be/Ux1gsE7lKak

It's a good job his younger brother can't reach the accelerator yet, although I think he will be a better driver eventually.

(https://image.ibb.co/fFeJsR/P1090972.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on December 01, 2017, 09:48:08 pm
The latest project is the re-building of a Windcheetah 'Speedy'  (with a history, as some people have said)

This is an accident damaged recumbent trike, received from Wombat OTP.
I picked it up as a collection of bits. and there's quite a bit to do.
The company that currently owns the right to Wincheetah production seems to have collapsed, with orders unfulfilled and calls and emails going unanswered (I haven't tried to contact them, but there's a thread on the BHPC forum detailing the issue). As it seems spares will be hard to come by, I'm going to have to repair or remanufacture anything I need.

Here's the main frame before starting work:
(https://image.ibb.co/hnZnK6/P1100031.jpg)
Looking along it, it ain't quite straight - bad news.

On further examination, there appear to be no cracks to tubes or castings, and on taking measurements, the rear seems straight, but the boom is a few mm off. Not as bad as I first thought.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on December 01, 2017, 09:52:44 pm
As it has been stored in a shed for some time, some parts have suffered from the damp conditions...

(https://image.ibb.co/irJsmm/P1100052.jpg)

(https://image.ibb.co/gmJsmm/P1100053.jpg)

Lots of cleaning later, and it's nearly good enough to go. I'll do a bit more when I get to the reassembling stage

(https://image.ibb.co/h19bCR/P1100054.jpg)

Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on December 01, 2017, 09:59:13 pm
I stripped things like lights and cables  - even doing this means overcoming problems.

One of the gear leavers appears to have had the cable nipple soldered on in situ. Drilling a brass nipple with a hardened steel cable out of aluminium is recipe for disaster, so heat is used to melt the solder enough to release the cable...

(https://image.ibb.co/iK5zXR/P1100056.jpg)

...before drilling the rest out:

(https://image.ibb.co/chUhmm/P1100057.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on December 01, 2017, 10:00:34 pm
One of the gear leavers appears to have had the cable nipple soldered on in situ.

Why would anyone do that?   ???
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on December 01, 2017, 10:05:12 pm
Some bits are just plain broke.  :-\

The joystick...

(https://image.ibb.co/c6d3sR/P1100058.jpg)
(https://image.ibb.co/jqxJRm/P1100059.jpg)
(https://image.ibb.co/hiUMe6/P1100060.jpg)


...and the seat support:

(https://image.ibb.co/ioJEz6/P1100061.jpg)

I have made a couple of jigs to hold the parts in place in preparation for repair:

(https://image.ibb.co/gsoxK6/P1100065.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Butterfly on December 01, 2017, 10:11:21 pm
I was very excited to see that you had posted down here  :D

I like the look of the go-cart  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on December 01, 2017, 10:17:20 pm
The rear wheel of a speedy is cantilevered - the hub is fixed to a spindle (Dog knows how), which fits through bearings in the frame, with a freewheel block on the other end of the spindle. The block is mounted on a lump of aluminium with a hexagonal hole in it, which fits on a hexagonal end of the spindle (held on by a locknut)...

...The hub has been damaged - lumps missing where spoke holes have been ripped through.  :-\

I need a plan to remanufacture a new hub and spindle. After a lot of thought, I have a plan that uses a disc front hub and a 15mm silver steel spindle:

(https://image.ibb.co/b8rOsR/P1100050.jpg)

With the bearings removed from the hub, I need to turn some ali spaces to fill the gap out to the spindle:

(https://image.ibb.co/kVHk6m/P1100062.jpg)

(https://image.ibb.co/hLXUXR/P1100063.jpg)

(https://image.ibb.co/cM9Xmm/P1100064.jpg)

Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on December 01, 2017, 10:36:01 pm
You might have guessed by now that I intend to use the disc mount to attach the hub to the spindle. As it is best to keep the wheel as close to the frame as possible, this attachment will be on the out-board side of the wheel instead of the bearing side.

I needed to cut a bit of 3mm steel plate to fit the disc mount, with a central hole. As I have access to a huge range of workshop machinery, the easiest way was to draw it up on a pc and laser cut the shape out of MDF - took about 10 mins!

The MDF template was drilled through onto the steel plate and the disc sawn out by hand. The centre hole was drilled to 13mm, and a shoulder turned onto the spindle to match (actually a slightly sloppy fit to aid welding penetration and get rid of any misalignment at the welding stage).

Now it's ready for welding, which I am doing with it installed in the hub to help with alignment:

(https://image.ibb.co/hzQxmm/P1100073.jpg)

(https://image.ibb.co/dAFxmm/P1100075.jpg)

No need to be neat, because I'm grinding it off, and turning it down in the lathe again:

(https://image.ibb.co/dKpq6m/P1100077.jpg)

(https://image.ibb.co/e6tuXR/P1100078.jpg)

 :D

(https://image.ibb.co/bSwsK6/P1100080.jpg)

I had intended to bore the axle out to 8mm as deep as possible to reduce weight, but the welding seems to have made the high-carbon steel axle harden at the end.  :(
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on December 01, 2017, 10:46:06 pm
That's it for now.

I need to make a jig to hold the spindle on the milling machine to cut the hexagon on the other end.

Hopefully I'll get the chance to do some work on the seat over the Christmas holiday.

I thought I had taken more photos of stages of making - once going I tend to concentrate on the job and forget to reach for the camera - sorry.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wombat on December 02, 2017, 09:53:23 am
Thats good work, John!  If it helps to analyse what is bent where, the accident involved it being hit from behind at a slight angle by a Honda CB1100 motorcycle.  The trike had just come out of a turning from the right, and the bike ran into it, so it may have been still at a slight angle.  Bike was supposedly not exceeding the 30mph limit.
As I said when we met, the main reason why it got abandoned in the shed, was because nobody could face up to dealing with it, and it took moving house to finally push me into facing it.  You taking the project on is the best possible outcome for me, and I'm overjoyed that you are tackling it in this way.  I like that rear hub, and its about what I would have done in the circumstances.  When we eventually get the nod to move into our new home, I'll have a much bigger workshop inside a barn.  Meanwhile, we're living in one room of a friend's house in very rural mid-Wales.  Not very satisfactory, but hopefully our ambition will come through soon, and we may possibly be in our new home by Christmas!

A big thank you from me!
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: DuncanM on December 03, 2017, 06:19:44 pm
I remember this being offered and thinking that it seemed like a great project. Now I've seen the level of the work required and the equipment and skill you have, I'm glad it's your project. Fantastic work, keep going (and taking pictures).  :thumbsup:
Cheers
Duncan
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Torslanda on December 06, 2017, 01:55:01 am
As you may be aware, I have access to two 'Seat of the Pants' 'Cheetahs, #s 176 & 216. The latter is sitting in the shop so reasonably accessible. If you need any pics or dimensions just call or PM and I will do what I can to help.

I don't know if you have the seat but 216's is available if you want to take a mould off it and I can let you have the cushions to copy - I don't think anyone's going to want to buy it anytime soon. Can't let you have anything off #176, Redshift wouldn't be very happy! Comparison pics are possible. #216 is on a 7 speed freewheel, #176 is on a freehub and the axles are different.

Just give me a shout if you need anything.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on December 06, 2017, 06:33:11 am
Hi Torslanda. The Speedy is No. 209, and uses a 7 speed freewheel/block also.

I have the seat. It has some damage, and some of this appears to be older, as it has been patched.

Kevin at Dtek has offered the chance of looking at early Speedys and also the original drawings, so I already have a resource close by - he's only 3 miles away from where I work.

Thanks for the offer, though.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on December 06, 2017, 06:39:11 am
A jig for milling the hexagonal end of the axle has been made, and we are nearly ready to start machining.

It probably won't get done this week as we are doing aluminium casting tomorrow, which means a bit of reorganising in the workshop - we only do this once or twice a year. There is one part I would like to cast for the Speedy, but I havent made the pattern for it yet, so I can't fit it in with this round of pouring.  :(
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on December 08, 2017, 09:41:36 pm
Here's the setup, for doing the hexagonal end, on the vertical mill - (If anybody is having trouble visualising the size on these photos, I'm using a 12mm dia cutter. the MDF blocks are 25mm thick each):

Using the old spindle to set the height/depth stop:

(https://image.ibb.co/fo6jz6/P1100081.jpg)

The new spindle is then swapped in:

(https://image.ibb.co/d8czhR/P1100082.jpg)

The hub/disc mounting holes are used to stop it rotating or being pushed back through the MDF blocks (it had to be hammered in with a plastic faced mallet):

(https://image.ibb.co/iXm396/P1100083.jpg)

...and the first flat is milled (I machined it in 3 passes, gradually increasing depth of cut, as I'm only using a MDF jig and also didn't want to get the metal hot and have it harden. We don't run coolant on the mill, so WD40 cutting oil (CT90) was sprayed on)

(https://image.ibb.co/j83Q6m/P1100088.jpg)

The next step is to unscrew the hub/disc mount from the block, rotate the spindle one hole and mill the next flat, and repeat - it's lucky disc mounts have 6 holes and I need to mill a hex end, isn't it?  ;)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Mr Larrington on December 09, 2017, 09:37:44 am
IIRC my grate frend Mr Woolrich, who built a Speedy from a kit, was the inventor of the hex spindle thingie as he wanted to use a cassette rather than the screw-on blocks which BurrowsCorp Intnl plc were still using.  Mr Burrows said "that's clever" and nicked the idea.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on December 09, 2017, 01:41:16 pm
...and the first flat is milled (I machined it in 3 passes, gradually increasing depth of cut, as I'm only using a MDF jig and also didn't want to get the metal hot and have it harden. We don't run coolant on the mill, so WD40 cutting oil was sprayed on)

(https://vgy.me/ksV3eh.jpg)

I regard this sort of thing as the same level of witchcraft that people seem to think I'm doing when I molish things with electronics.   :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: hatler on December 09, 2017, 01:59:59 pm
But, but, you can see what's happening with machines. You can't see electrons. What you do is def witchcraft.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Paul on December 09, 2017, 03:14:07 pm
Here's the setup, for doing the hexagonal end, on the vertical mill - (If anybody is having trouble visualising the size on these photos, I'm using a 12mm dia cutter. the MDF blocks are 25mm thick each):
...

The next step is to unscrew the hub/disc mount from the block, rotate the spindle one hole and mill the next flat, and repeat - it's lucky disc mounts have 6 holes and I need to mill a hex end, isn't it?  ;)
A delight to watch.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Jurek on December 09, 2017, 03:44:16 pm
But, but, you can see what's happening with machines. You can't see electrons. What you do is def witchcraft.
'Zactly this.
Like many things, it is a matter of trust.
Give me a bubble in a spirit level, over the GPS-generated level in my iPhone any day of the week.
Every time.
The list of where the GPS generated level has the potential to go wrong, is a long one.
The bubble, not so much.
FWIW I'd use the iPhone to level something if I was mucking about.
I'd use a bubble level if I was serious and wanted something to work.
[/philistine]
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on December 09, 2017, 04:19:42 pm
But, but, you can see what's happening with machines. You can't see electrons.

That's what oscilloscopes are for (and I'll accept that the modern ones are more than a little bit magic).  Hardly comparable with the art of not making things slightly wonky.


And yes, obviously a spirit level is more trustworthy, but not as practical as a device for sensing which orientation your phone should display its image.

Reminds me of a friend encountering a vintage doorbell where you pulled on a rope which caused a counterweighted arm to pivot and an attached mercury switch would complete the circuit.  I joked that that wouldn't be allowed today, and you'd have to use a 3-axis accelerometer chip instead...
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Jurek on December 09, 2017, 04:47:19 pm
Quote
oscilloscopes

Takes stuff to another level....
Pass the metric adjustable wrench....
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on December 09, 2017, 05:13:15 pm
Talking of silly-scopes and witchcraft, have you had a go with Jerobeam Fenderson's Oscilloscope Music yet, Kim?

https://youtu.be/5WBWIKnr0Os

Yes, you can actually get those animations on a CRO by playing the music stereo signal to the X & Y inputs!  :D

(although I always seem to get them upside-down)  :facepalm:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on December 09, 2017, 05:52:17 pm
Talking of silly-scopes, have you had a go with Jerobeam Fenderson's Oscilloscope Music yet, Kim?

From last time it came up:

(http://www.ductilebiscuit.net/gallery_albums/random/2016_11_26_16_06_54.sized.jpg)

(http://www.ductilebiscuit.net/gallery_albums/random/DS1Z_QuickPrint2_001.sized.png)

That's one of the few bits that sort-of works on a digital scope.  It's much better on analogue (the Goldstar scope is only part-time digital).
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on December 11, 2017, 08:19:30 pm
Sorry - Didn't take camera to work, so only have crappy phone pictures.  :-[

Following on from Friday's milling of the first of the flats for the hex end, I found it wasn't easy to rotate the spindle round to the next disc-rotor mounting hole, to use it as indexing for the next flat...  >:(

...so I used a bit of scrap to make a pin spanner:

(https://image.ibb.co/nDMTP6/IMG_0334.jpg)
That's the laser-cut MDF template for the holes in the photo - I used it to get the pin spacing right too.

This allows the next face to be milled.

(https://image.ibb.co/gqsDrm/IMG_0335.jpg)

...and it does't take long to do the remaining 4  :smug:

(https://image.ibb.co/deH2j6/IMG_0339.jpg)

The big question is....


...does it fit?  :demon:

(https://image.ibb.co/gXcrcR/IMG_0340.jpg)

...Yay!  :D

A bit more snugily than the original, which is probably a good thing.  :thumbsup:
I think it's going pull on nicely when the socket screw and washer are used.  :smug:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on December 11, 2017, 09:05:44 pm
We also put the spindle back in the lathe to try to centre drill it to reduce weight.

When I first tried this, I found the welding had hardened the high-carbon silver-steel used for the spindle.  :-\

But today a colleague had brought his cobalt drill bits in for me to have a go...  :demon:

... The cobalt drills hardly scratched the spindle - I'm just gonna have to put up with those extra grams. >:(



Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Jurek on December 11, 2017, 09:14:10 pm
Yay!
Suitably impressed.
And envious of the result.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on December 11, 2017, 09:47:30 pm
Thanks, Jurek. That means alot to me.

I think my ex-toolmaker colleague was suitably impressed...

...but also frustrated that I did the milling without using any measurements or measuring tools whatsoever (apart from an engineers square when bolting down the first MDF jig block).  :demon:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: DuncanM on December 12, 2017, 09:56:41 am
Thanks, Jurek. That means alot to me.

I think my ex-toolmaker colleague was suitably impressed...

...but also frustrated that I did the milling without using any measurements or measuring tools whatsoever (apart from an engineers square when bolting down the first MDF jig block).  :demon:
That just makes it more impressive. :)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on December 16, 2017, 07:43:08 pm
I'm sure I took photos of the seat when I started work on it, but I can't find them anywhere.

There was a crack/split on one side and a few other impact cracks. There were two sets of mounting holes, and there appeared to be a few places where the composite seat had been repaired previously.

As I can use the heated school workshop during the holidays, I reinforced the splits/cracks with tape and epoxy, and used body filler to patch & fill areas that needed it.

I took it in to work on Friday (last day of term), and did a bit more fine sanding...

(https://image.ibb.co/np0zXR/seat2.jpg)

...and started rubbing down with wet & dry.

(https://image.ibb.co/fhJ8Rm/seat3.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on December 17, 2017, 01:39:31 pm
...oh, and I got new bearings for the back wheel spindle:

(https://image.ibb.co/k4jhj6/bearings.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on December 18, 2017, 09:56:50 pm
Built up a few coats of wax on the seat today...

(https://image.ibb.co/iBtxK6/composites.jpg)

...and carbon, kevlar, glass tissue and resins arrived.  :D
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on December 29, 2017, 09:21:07 pm
ARSE!!!

I needed a new front rim. I ordered one of the only 36 hole 17" rims I could find online - they were listed as offset holes, and looked as if the holes were offset left & right alternately...

Just unpacked it and - it's an OCR rim.  >:(

(https://image.ibb.co/ddxUXR/P1100148.jpg)

 :facepalm:

As I need to order spokes, I measured it up, and then got the hub and existing wheel out (both off the crashed trike)...

The hubs don't match either!  :o

(https://image.ibb.co/mxBCmm/P1100150.jpg)

...so, I rounded up the spare Sturmey hub brake wheels up from the workshop/store (don't you all have such wheels lurking around?).

I had one of each type!  :D

(https://image.ibb.co/hmQuz6/P1100151.jpg)

I stripped them out to check the backplates match the trike hubs, and thought to check the bearing size, as the inboard, trike ones are 12mm id...

...ARSE - the bike ones have smaller od bearings.  :facepalm:

So, it looks as if Wobbly John's gonna have a Wonky Windcheetah.  ;D


Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on December 29, 2017, 09:30:09 pm
...Oh, and it was a chance to try out the new 1/4"drive socket set.

I've seen hexagonal sockets and dodeconal sockets before, but never ones like these:

(https://image.ibb.co/gu1OsR/P1100154.jpg)

 ???
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 06, 2018, 09:01:34 pm
It's been quite a busy week in the workshop at work - Inspection & Maintenance contractors in for fixed machines - lathes,bandsaws,etc (I've had to sort out some problems challenges they found), 45 ukelele kits to machine, and lots of clearing up. Not much time for work on the Speedy.

I did find time to get a bit done on the seat:-

More coats of wax and a coat of mould release spray...

(https://image.ibb.co/dGq22R/P1100156.jpg)

...then a gelcoat...

(https://image.ibb.co/iuO0p6/P1100157.jpg)

...and a few layers of glass mat and polyester resin.

(https://image.ibb.co/np2h2R/P1100158.jpg)

(https://image.ibb.co/ep5PGm/P1100161.jpg)

Working with composites is much more difficult than most people imagine - it took 3 hours to get to that stage and cleared up.  :facepalm:

By the next day the resin has set, and can be given a haircut with scissors...

(https://image.ibb.co/iUGaNR/P1100167.jpg)

...before being trimmed with a jigsaw and sanded to the edge of the original seat.

(https://image.ibb.co/eBmLp6/P1100168.jpg)

The next stage is to separate the original seat from the mould.

(https://image.ibb.co/gHUehR/P1100169.jpg)

We are still at the 'will it? won't it?' stage of getting it out...

 :-\
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Torslanda on January 06, 2018, 11:43:32 pm
Rims. A popular conversion is to 406. It changes the castor angle slightly but Redshift (#176 was originally built with Moulton rims) doesn't experience any odd handling and she's had hers over 15 years. Also means you can fit Kojaks, halving the cost of tyres

The SA hubs were modified with bigger inner bearings, I believe the axles were bespoke items, too.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 07, 2018, 10:28:23 am
I wish I had know that the 406 conversion works - I'd read that the frame geometry was altered when the production models went to that size.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Mr Larrington on January 07, 2018, 01:37:04 pm
Using 406s is probably an even bigger money saver than that.  Saturday: my grate frend Mr Sheen fits a brand new pair of Wolbers to his Speedy.  Sunday: racing at Eastway.  By the end of the day both tyres were shagged, even though he swapped left and right during the lunch break.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 07, 2018, 07:21:28 pm
I was more concerned about it affecting the centre-point steering than castor angle.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Torslanda on January 08, 2018, 09:40:33 am
ISTR reading that speedy has neither centrepoint NOR Ackermann steering.

BICBW...
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Mr Larrington on January 08, 2018, 11:21:21 am
ISTR a chap called Burrows writing "if you want to start an argument with a trike designer ask him whether he uses Ackermann steering geometry".

Note to self: find out what my chum Mr Bird is using on his long-gestating racing trike.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 08, 2018, 03:26:56 pm
I remember the same Burrows gentleman shouting to Dave Wrath-Sharman, who was riding one of the first Greenspeed trikes in the UK, to "Try pulling just one brake on, then", and being very annoyed that Mr Wrath-Sharman raised one arm above his head, locked one wheel and kept a completely straight path. (I believe this was at a Wolverhampton BHPC meet)

I'd guess the Wincheetah doesn't have perfect centre point or Ackermann, but has an element of both. I would expect with larger front wheels it would be even less centrey point, unless you did something stupid like dishing the wheels...
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: DuncanM on January 08, 2018, 04:17:14 pm
Mr Wrath-Sharman raised one arm above his head, locked one wheel and kept a completely straight path.
Howzat possible? Sounds like the "active yaw control" witchcraft that Mitsubishi used to make the Evo turn in faster than a 4wd car has any right to.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Mr Larrington on January 09, 2018, 01:21:23 pm
Back in the Olden Days a trick used by Windcheetah racers was to slacken the RH brake cable right off to aid turn-in for the Eastway hairpin.  It was important to rebalance the brakes before riding home :D
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 09, 2018, 08:35:13 pm
Well the seat popped out of the mould. I used a 80mm wide strip of 6mm MDF (offcut) shoved down, around the curve between the seat and the mould. A few areas of filler stuck fast and I'll have to clean these off and 'dress' the mould before I can make a new seat. I will probably repair the original seat with carbon/glass tape and Kevlar resined on the inside.

(https://image.ibb.co/gRFVp6/seat_popped.jpg)

The shape would also probably work well as a front fairing too. If the new seat turns out OK, I might make a fairing too.  :D

As the speedy doesn't have any capabilty to carry anything, I fancy making a tailbox for it too, but that can be done once the machine is restored to roadworthyness-ness.

Next, I need to decide on 369 or 406 (17" OR 20") wheels...  :-\
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 09, 2018, 08:39:48 pm
Mr Wrath-Sharman raised one arm above his head, locked one wheel and kept a completely straight path.
Howzat possible? Sounds like the "active yaw control" witchcraft that Mitsubishi used to make the Evo turn in faster than a 4wd car has any right to.

Back in the mid '90s, Greenspeed absolutly nailed tadpole trike steering geometry. It's the trike I would have chosen at the time, had I the money to buy one.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Torslanda on January 10, 2018, 11:11:43 am
Not stopping you from fitting a tailbox but I happen to have a Speedy rack in the shed. #justsayin'
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 10, 2018, 12:39:56 pm
Not stopping you from fitting a tailbox but I happen to have a Speedy rack in the shed. #justsayin'

<Like>
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Torslanda on January 11, 2018, 12:01:57 am
 :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 14, 2018, 04:20:05 pm
The spokes for the rear wheel were delivered last week, so, one evening earlier in the week, I laced the wheel. Today's dry (but cold) weather gave me an oppotunity to get the frame out and give it a clean...

(https://image.ibb.co/dz96U6/P1100182.jpg)

...loosen the clamps and drift out the old bearings...

(https://image.ibb.co/jDOphR/P1100183.jpg)

...and fit the new bearings and rear wheel, ready for trueing (it doesn't fit in the normal jig.

(https://image.ibb.co/eKddbm/P1100184.jpg)

An old seatpost was used as a drift to drive the new bearing on/in, but that was a job that needed three hands, so no photos of it being done.

(https://image.ibb.co/gmujGm/P1100185.jpg)

 :thumbsup:

Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 16, 2018, 08:45:18 pm
Bollocks - another image hosting service FAAAAAAAAAAAAAAIIIIIIIIIIILLL.  :facepalm:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 16, 2018, 08:47:14 pm
Last night was mostly spent unspoking a 406 rim (one of a pair of front rims), so that I can measure and order spokes to build them on the drum brakes.

 (https://image.ibb.co/jWG1cR/P1100186.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 17, 2018, 10:07:50 pm
No pictures update:


Edit: ...and photos of Kart and Windcheetah uploaded on to another photohost.  >:(
Still have all the Botophucket ones to do.  >:( >:( >:(
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 19, 2018, 08:48:36 pm
Remember these bits?

(https://image.ibb.co/gsoxK6/P1100065.jpg)

(https://image.ibb.co/hiUMe6/P1100060.jpg)

(https://image.ibb.co/c6d3sR/P1100058.jpg)

Well, a colleague's husband works for the Welding Institute...

He also has a home workshop and is a keen amateur welder...

He got a new TIG welding setup in November...

Before Christmas, I asked my colleague if he would take a look at the bits and let me know if he thought a welded repair was possible. The answer came back that it should be possible, and would I like him to have a go at it?  :D ;)

I've just got them back:

(https://image.ibb.co/kMwBzG/P1100187.jpg)

(https://image.ibb.co/gNR0tb/P1100188.jpg)

(https://image.ibb.co/muBYDb/P1100189.jpg)

(https://image.ibb.co/j8UyeG/P1100190.jpg)

(https://image.ibb.co/b39aRw/P1100191.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: DuncanM on January 20, 2018, 09:23:40 pm
Niiiice.
 ;D
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 20, 2018, 09:53:12 pm
 :thumbsup:

Spokes for the front wheels arrived on Friday too.  :)

One wheel laced this afternoon, and the old 17" rim stripped from the hub.

I may need to replace a bearing in this hub, and now that it will fit on the lathe, I'll probably skim the surface of the drum too.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 22, 2018, 11:04:39 pm
The bearing in the front hub brake had completely seized, so it's been drifted out and a new one ordered. The hubs take 28mm bearings - I think the bike Sturmey Archer brake hubs are 26mm Od bearings, so I think Mike/AVD use the wheelchair version of the hubs, designed to have 12mm ID bearings (the Speedy axle is 12mm on the inboard end, tapering to 10mm on the outside.

The seat is now going to be the hold-up on making progress with the trike. Working with composites needs a heated workshop, and quite a bit of time in one session. Home workshop is unheated (and toooo cluttered) and at work, I can only do short 'lunchtime' sessions. I'm hoping to 'save some lunchtimes up' to be able to have an afternoon session during half term.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 23, 2018, 07:10:36 pm
Castings painted and will now be left for the paint to harden off.  :thumbsup:

(https://image.ibb.co/mnRFzG/P1100192.jpg)

(https://image.ibb.co/bNmyKG/P1100193.jpg)

 :D

Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on January 31, 2018, 10:59:56 pm
With a busy week at work, and Mother-in-law being hospitalised at the weekend (now slowly improving), progress on the Speedy has been slow.


Last week I grabbed a bit of stainless steel sheet from the skip. Today I guillotined a strip off...

(https://image.ibb.co/ebtQw6/IMG_0398.jpg)

...bent it round a bit of 2" tube...

(https://image.ibb.co/g9ROim/IMG_0399.jpg)

...turned and tapped a brass boss...

(https://image.ibb.co/bQULUR/IMG_0400.jpg)

...and silver soldered it on the strip.

This is to make a clamp-on replacement for the broken spoon-brake mount.

(https://image.ibb.co/gLEXb6/IMG_0401.jpg)

Alot of riders remove the spoon parking brake, but I like that such a radical bike employs such ancient technology - and Mike designed an elegant component, so I want to reinstate it.  :smug:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Mr Larrington on February 01, 2018, 01:25:27 am
Early ones had a metal plate welded to the side of the main tube with a crappy sidepull bolted to it.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Torslanda on February 01, 2018, 03:27:43 pm
The epitome of 'cosmetic' . . .
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on February 15, 2018, 09:22:44 pm
I managed to sqeeze a couple of hours in the workshop this afternoon, playing with Aramid (Kevlar)...

(https://image.ibb.co/gsAcD7/IMG_0413.jpg)

...Carbon fibre, and epoxy resin.  :o

(https://image.ibb.co/ktzhfn/IMG_0414.jpg)

Dunno if it will work okay - I didn't get the chance to set up a vacuum bag (I couldn't find the mylar that stops it sticking) or put pressure on other than rolling & stippling.  :-\

I used some of the offcuts to reinforce the old seat as a 'Plan B'.

(https://image.ibb.co/hAAAY7/IMG_0410.jpg)

I am Grandson-sitting tomorrow, and off to Manchester for a wedding at the weekend. It sounds like it's going to be a busy week at work next week, with colleages off sick etc.

I started putting bits on the frame last weekend, but it was too cold and I gave in when I found one of the front brake mechanisms seized.  >:(

Although I had a cleaver idea for moulding a tail fairing, I bought a rack-pack from Phantasmagoriana OTP, and I think I'll go with that. As I won't be using panniers, I'm considering designing my own 'low level' rack to sit just above the chain and cable line...


...and made from Carbon fibre.  :o
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on April 11, 2018, 09:24:35 pm
With lack of indoor workshop space at home, the wet weather has been a major holdup.  >:(
The couple of dry weekend days we had, were spent trying to work on the allotment.

Assembled a bit more tonight to get the seat position right before cable-ing and chain-ing up...

(https://image.ibb.co/nnDbEx/Seat_on_1.jpg)

(https://image.ibb.co/iGZiux/seat_on_2.jpg)

The old, patched seat is pictured, because I did a little resin work on the new carbon one to try to remedy some minor faults.

It's getting there...

 :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Torslanda on April 11, 2018, 11:10:22 pm
'Cheetahs at Wing in July? Or Silverdale in September . . .
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Mr Larrington on April 12, 2018, 11:11:36 am
Or at Betteshanger in also July?  The BHPC is trying to assemble as many Burrows machines as possible at the Worlds as it's The Man's 75th this year.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on April 14, 2018, 08:59:34 pm
I'm hoping to get it down to Betteshanger for the Burrows bikes/trikes meet.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on April 14, 2018, 09:24:44 pm
I had hoped to have an afternoon working on the Windcheetah, but a stuck float valve on the allotment mower stole my time.  >:(

I decided to use a bargain XTR rear mech as the LX one it came with was knackered:

(https://image.ibb.co/jVXbmn/P1100311.jpg)

... that's gonna confuse anybody else who rides it - it's a 'rapid rise' mech  :demon:

This evening I just had time to do a couple of jobs  - put the original Campag crank bolts in, that I had mislaid when I wanted to fit the cranks, and swapped the gear shifters around as I realised I had them round the wrong way.

I got a bit of old crash-mat out and had a go at cutting a full length seat pad out, so that it could be weighted down in the seat to take a bit of shape before I work on it more tomorrow...

(https://image.ibb.co/d2Lwmn/P1100312.jpg)

(https://image.ibb.co/dCkke7/P1100314.jpg)

...or I might decide to just go for a bike ride.  ;D
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on April 15, 2018, 07:37:56 pm
Oh BOLLOCKS......

 >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:(
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Paul on April 15, 2018, 08:31:18 pm
What? What?
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: DuncanM on April 16, 2018, 11:24:29 am
You can't leave it like that?   :o
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on April 16, 2018, 09:45:42 pm
Welding is a process where pieces of similar metal are melted together, and often more of the same metal is added as a 'filler'

When welding a thin or small bit of metal to a chunkier bit, the chunkier bit conducts more heat away from the weld area than the thin bit, and this can lead to the problem of the filler only fusing to the chunky bit in a small area.

This is exactly what I feared might happen when welding the 3mm end plate to the 15mm dia rear axle I made.  :-\

On Sunday, I assembled the Windcheetah and rode it round the garden. However, on reaching a small kerb, I kicked on the pedals, in a low gear, to get the front wheels to climb it, and broke the weld on the rear axle.  :facepalm:

(https://image.ibb.co/d8aAXS/P1100315.jpg)

I really ought to have arraned to have some mechanical means of locating the plate on the axle rod, like the hexagonal other end, so that the torque would be less likely to break the weld.

Tonight I loaded the seatless Windcheetah into the car - A Fiesta!  :o  and popped back into work to do a quick repair.

First I cut some slots with a cutting disc on the angle grinder, so that I could use a washer as a 'key'...

(https://image.ibb.co/eRHPsS/P1100316.jpg)

...then welded it up...

(https://image.ibb.co/gcazRn/P1100317.jpg)

...followed by cutting the rest of the washer off and tidying the weld a bit.

(https://image.ibb.co/g7WTK7/P1100318.jpg)

I'll try this repair out for a bit, and if I think it will hold this time, I'll use some filler to tidy it before repainting.

I've still got to do some work on the seat-pad, but the next step will be to do a few short rides to find any other fuck-ups challenges...  :-\

Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on April 17, 2018, 07:13:02 pm
I've just got back from a couple of trips around the block (about a mile each).  :thumbsup:

I needed to tighten the front shifter up a bit, after the first lap, as it was slipping down the gears a bit.  >:(

It all seems to be working fine. a bit of rubbing noise from one of the front wheels on turns, which I need to look into further.  ???

It tracks straight, hands off,  and the handling is quite twitchy, which I think is normal  rather than an issue of increasing the front wheel size. 

Seat pad still needs some work trimming the shape and rounding over on the router.  :o

(https://image.ibb.co/bRwESS/P1100319.jpg)

(https://image.ibb.co/kLyuSS/P1100321.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on April 17, 2018, 10:21:06 pm
BTW, that's the carbon fibre/kevlar layered seat that I made, on it now.  :smug:
 It's a lot stiffer than the original.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Torslanda on April 17, 2018, 11:17:03 pm
Hats off to you. Fabulous job!

Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on April 17, 2018, 11:25:57 pm
Hats off to you. Fabulous job!

Seconded   :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Torslanda on April 17, 2018, 11:48:27 pm
QQ. Which rims did you go for and what length spokes please?

What do you mean, "lazy bastard"...? :)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Torslanda on April 17, 2018, 11:49:17 pm
BTW. Wanna rack?
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on April 18, 2018, 12:34:22 am
406 rims - some 'V' section 'Salco' ones - I bought these as a pair of front wheels years ago, and one of them had to be stolen from the 2 x 4 lowracer. Spokes were 155mm 2 cross pattern.

I'm still unsure what to do about luggage. I want to carry a few essentials, rather than a pair of panniers, so am aiming for a rack-pack maximum (I have a carradice one).

I had a few ideas, but hadn't realised how much room the cables and chain took up behind the seat.

I have lots of materials at my disposal - stiff and flexible composite boards; carbon or Ali tubes; strong waterproof fabric (yellow  :D); etc...

...but I'm lacking ideas.  :-[

Also, because I've been oogling Wincheetahs and luggage systems, I think my seat needs to lie back a bit more - I guessed at the wrong pair of holes to use at the rear, so will be drilling some more ASAP.  :facepalm:

I also want a mount for a flag and rear light. The seat has mounting holes for reflector/Vistalight type mounting, but I use mostly Smart or stretchy band mount lights.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: cycleman on April 18, 2018, 07:08:16 am
That's looking wonderful wobbly John  :thumbsup:.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: DuncanM on April 18, 2018, 10:25:48 am
That looks fantastic - chapeau!
I love the ghetto key applied to the axle stub - make a slot and then weld in a T piece. :)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Peter on April 18, 2018, 11:18:16 am
WJ, you've even got the rim decals lined up - I can't stand it!
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: ElyDave on April 18, 2018, 03:14:59 pm
Great idea on the seat cushion. I'm finding the cruzbike stock material a bit squishy and was wondering what else I could use. I was thinking about butchering an old camping mat i have
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on April 18, 2018, 05:13:42 pm
Great idea on the seat cushion. I'm finding the cruzbike stock material a bit squishy and was wondering what else I could use. I was thinking about butchering an old camping mat i have

Ventisit (https://ventisit.nl/en/recumbent-bicycles/).  I mean, closed-cell foam is lovely when it's  a) cold  and  b) pish[1], and it's easy to work with as a way of contouring the seat underneath the pad (I've got a bit of old camping mat doing just that), but the rest of the time something that allows a modicum of air circulation is so much better if you're going to be riding for more than a couple of hours.  Ventisit is also firmer and more breathable than the pond filter stuff.


[1] It's lovely when it's cold and dry too, until you get off the bike with your soaking wet back and promptly develop hypothermia.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on April 18, 2018, 09:14:49 pm
BTW. Wanna rack?

Yes, I may be in the market for a rack - Howmuch?

I'm getting frustrated at chain/ cables/ wheels being in the way of everything I consider doing.  >:(
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: ElyDave on April 19, 2018, 01:09:09 pm
Great idea on the seat cushion. I'm finding the cruzbike stock material a bit squishy and was wondering what else I could use. I was thinking about butchering an old camping mat i have

Ventisit (https://ventisit.nl/en/recumbent-bicycles/).  I mean, closed-cell foam is lovely when it's  a) cold  and  b) pish[1], and it's easy to work with as a way of contouring the seat underneath the pad (I've got a bit of old camping mat doing just that), but the rest of the time something that allows a modicum of air circulation is so much better if you're going to be riding for more than a couple of hours.  Ventisit is also firmer and more breathable than the pond filter stuff.


[1] It's lovely when it's cold and dry too, until you get off the bike with your soaking wet back and promptly develop hypothermia.

I'm not so fussed about the wet back, more the compressibility of the stock foam combined with the width of the seat results in an edge right inside my shoulder blades at the top of the seat. Was thinking of a couple of layers of camping mat under the stock foam, which does seem to move the moisture away reasonably. 

I had a ventisit on my ICE B2 and was happy enough with it, and looking at pricescfor direct purchases they are not unreasonably priced, so I may try the camping mat first followed by the ventisif if unsuccessful.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on April 21, 2018, 09:43:05 pm
Grandson sitting today, so unable to get much done.

I did a bit of flagmaking  (Mrs WJ sewed for me):

(https://image.ibb.co/dOBVbx/P1100339.jpg)

And some routing on the seat pad:

(https://image.ibb.co/gY0Owx/P1100340.jpg)

Made a bit of a mess of it in places - it only takes a little knock or slip to go off-line.  :-\

Hoping to go for a ride tomorrow...  ;)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on April 22, 2018, 10:54:52 pm
The machined seat pad fits the seat better, and is more comfortable.

(https://image.ibb.co/gb7Tyc/IMG_0476.jpg)

 15ish mile ride into Ely today, and the first person I bump into, at the coffee stall, is Hugh, who did the aluminium welding for me.  :D

Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on April 25, 2018, 08:41:52 pm
I've been doing little bits at work, using a couple of old tent poles, and a couple of feet of aluminium extrusion from an old whiteboard frame - nothing worth taking photos of...

...and cutting another bit of scrap stainless steel...

(https://image.ibb.co/bFimpH/IMG_0477.jpg)

...to make this mount:

(https://image.ibb.co/cOO83c/IMG_0478.jpg)

Photos of the end product (for the Windcheetah) later, when I've sorted the card reader on my PC out.  :facepalm:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on April 25, 2018, 11:24:38 pm
One problem with the Windcheetah is carrying stuff - a few tools, tubes, phone, wallet, etc.

So, I've made myself a rack:

(https://image.ibb.co/kWi5Yc/P1100342.jpg)

It's not as elegant as I would have liked...

(https://image.ibb.co/h8UqzH/P1100343.jpg)

...but holds the rack-pack in place.

(https://image.ibb.co/mZzOKH/P1100344.jpg)

I took a couple of house bricks for a ride around the block to test it out.  ;D

(https://image.ibb.co/mpECDc/P1100345.jpg)

The Yellow bottle cage arrived too.  :thumbsup:

(https://image.ibb.co/fxO5Yc/P1100346.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on April 25, 2018, 11:30:29 pm
Love the colour-coordinated bottle cage.   :thumbsup:

Put the rack bag on the other way round, though, that wedge shape looks aerodynamically embarrassing.   :hand:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: PhilO on April 26, 2018, 07:54:14 am
I'm impressed (and slightly mystified!) by the lack of twist in that rack when it's loaded.  An impressively neat and simple solution!  :thumbsup:

And +1 on the bottle cage.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on April 26, 2018, 06:56:39 pm
I'm impressed (and slightly mystified!) by the lack of twist in that rack when it's loaded. 

To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on April 27, 2018, 08:46:28 pm
Love the colour-coordinated bottle cage.   :thumbsup:

Did you notice the Garmin mount too?

(https://image.ibb.co/g7P19H/P1100349.jpg)

3D printer FTW.  :smug:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on April 27, 2018, 08:51:39 pm
Brilliant!  I assume those are temporary cable ties, until the yellow ones arrive?  ;)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on April 27, 2018, 08:55:12 pm
I have yellow ones somewhere - just can't find them in the workshop.  :P
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Torslanda on April 28, 2018, 09:21:32 am
So when do you re-start Speedy production using 3d printed lugs? I know the man who used to machine the castings for the last guy...
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Jurek on April 28, 2018, 09:30:22 am
Before that last picture finished loading, I said to myself 'I bet he's 3D printed that'.
Nobody other than Fisher Price, injection moulds anything in that colour  ;)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Canardly on April 28, 2018, 09:58:54 am
Do you need a barrier between bag and wheel Wobbly?
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Torslanda on April 28, 2018, 10:12:07 am
Redshift OTP used to use something similar. When the pack started to sag and occasionally catch the tyre she did surgery on the LH pocket - a radical pocketectomy.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on April 28, 2018, 02:04:44 pm
Do you need a barrier between bag and wheel Wobbly?

TBH, I'd say the whole back wheel needs enclosing.  Mr Burrows would probably suggest a haircut.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Paul on April 29, 2018, 09:02:22 am
Do you need a barrier between bag and wheel Wobbly?

TBH, I'd say the whole back wheel needs enclosing.  Mr Burrows would probably suggest a haircut.
To improve the hairodynamics?
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on April 29, 2018, 02:58:20 pm
Do you need a barrier between bag and wheel Wobbly?

TBH, I'd say the whole back wheel needs enclosing.  Mr Burrows would probably suggest a haircut.
To improve the hairodynamics?

If there's one thing I know about, it's hairodynamics:

(http://www.ductilebiscuit.net/gallery_albums/york_rally_215/DSC_1732.sized.jpg)
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Mr Larrington on April 29, 2018, 03:19:21 pm
Must be this brower (Puffin).  It's done the photo-substitution thing again, so what shows up as a yellow bottle cage elsewhere is appearing as author Marshall Karp standing on a New York street corner ???
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on May 03, 2018, 09:48:05 pm
Grandson James now has a recumbent trike too!

This evening we tried fixing up the old, ex-Cyclemagic KMX Kart that has been in the workshop for 5 years waiting for him to grow big enough to ride it.

(https://image.ibb.co/mRQg4S/KMX1.jpg)

He had a few rides up & down the road, but then one of the chain tubes came loose.  >:(
One of the tyres is tearing as well, and the chainring discs are loose, so I have a bit of work before he can have another go.  ::-)


He tried the Wincheetah for size  - a long way to grow, yet.  ;D
Younger brother Elliott will fit the KMX sooner:

(https://image.ibb.co/iqaQW7/Trikes.jpg)

 :smug:
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Canardly on May 03, 2018, 09:53:35 pm
Spoiled rotten.  :-D
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Kim on May 03, 2018, 10:22:18 pm
Yeah.  Less scope for putting your shoulders on the bum-end of the seat and arching your back over the steering pivot to reach the pedals[1] with a tiller.


[1] Technique successfully (if somewhat improbably) employed by EldestCub[2] a few years ago to pedal my Streetmachine a good 100m or so when he was still blatantly too small for it[3].
[2] Not to be outdone, SmallestCub photobombed a local BBC TV news interview using a similar technique on barakta's ICE trike.
[3] "You can't reach the pedals, but I'll push you up to speed and we can see if you can balance it."
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Torslanda on May 04, 2018, 01:06:00 am
Spoiled rotten.  :-D

Only because he can . . .
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: DuncanM on May 04, 2018, 09:37:20 am
How old, and what are those things like to ride? My 8yo has been casting envious looks at my trike (though she might be big enough to ride it by the time I finish it!).
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on May 04, 2018, 12:36:52 pm
How old, and what are those things like to ride? My 8yo has been casting envious looks at my trike (though she might be big enough to ride it by the time I finish it!).

The KMX Kart suits from about 7 year old until they are tooo tall (small adults) They aren't the best, quality wise, but good for their intended use of having fun on and off-road. Of course, they do tend to get more abuse than other recumbent trikes.

I've seen them sold for around £100 new, and that's about what they often make secondhand too.

The one I have was used at Cyclemagic tryout roadshows etc, and was sold off when they disbanded.
Title: Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
Post by: Wobbly John on June 08, 2018, 09:37:17 pm
I'm impressed (and slightly mystified!) by the lack of twist in that rack when it's loaded. 

Well...

I was getting a little bounce/shake on the rear of the rack, so I decided to do something to sort it.

The support at the rear used a bit of aluminium angle bolted to a bit of stainless plate that was from the original setup. There was some flex in the stainless plate.

I decided to replace the 2 components with a single one made from stainless (bent) angle:

Here is thwe old bit, and the new bit partially cut to shape from a length of the stainless angle (scavenged from old commercial kitchen table)

(https://image.ibb.co/h40cf8/IMG_0560.jpg)

And here it is fitted. It's stiffened it up nicely.  :thumbsup:

(https://image.ibb.co/meGHf8/IMG_0561.jpg)

I also fitted an inline adjuster for the gears.