Yet Another Cycling Forum

General Category => Reviews Database => Bicycles => Topic started by: PeterM on April 22, 2013, 07:47:50 pm

Title: Trek Domane
Post by: PeterM on April 22, 2013, 07:47:50 pm
My new Trek Domane has just had its first proper test:  the Heart of England 300.  So maybe it's time for a review.

It's a Domane 5.2.  To look at, it's a bit, how can I put it, Essex.  You may wish to don shades before looking at the following pic.

(https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/8031160/Domane.jpg)

The stock bike is, believe it or not, even more Essex than that.  It has white bar tape, a white saddle, and whitewall tyres.

HK took one look at my toned-down version, and referred to me for the rest of the day as the King of Bling.  Harsh but fair, I think you'll agree.

The Domane's USP is that the frame is vertically compliant, but stiff where it counts for power transfer.  The seat tube is attached to the top tube via an elastomer, and can flex slightly, though not so much that you're aware of any bobbing.  There's no creaking.  The down tube, bottom bracket, and chain stays are chunky and seem very stiff.  You can find the full marketing voodoo on the Trek website.

Does it work?  Short answer is yes.  The ride quality is remarkable.  It seems to turn crappy English lanes into smooth French tarmac, but is disconcertingly responsive when you get out of the saddle or put the hammer down (in my case a very small hammer).  I felt significantly less beaten up than usual when I finished the ride.  The bike is also very light.

Some other versions of the Domane have a more tasteful paint job, or you can pay Trek ludicrous sums for a custom version.  The TOWIE paint job is growing on me, mainly because I don't have to look at it while I'm riding.

Here's a list of pluses and minuses, from the viewpoint of an audax rider.

Pluses:

Plush ride combined with sharp handling.
Goes like stink if you're in the mood.  I spent a greater proportion of the day in the big ring than I ever have before.
Light.  Very light.  Frame-filled-with-helium light.  You need a café lock to tether it to a solid object in case it floats away in the breeze while you're eating your beans on toast.
Will take mudguards, via discreet mounts (You remove grub screws, and screw mudguard eyes into the threaded bosses.  There's a threaded eye behind the bottom bracket for the rear mudguard.  I've fitted a narrow Tortec guard at the rear—clearance is fine with 23s.  Bigger tyres might require a bit of mudguard creativity.  I haven't fitted a guard at the front—given the width of the downtube, there seems little point).
Long-distance frame geometry—relatively tall steerer, relatively short top tube, so it suits a less aggressive, more comfortable position.
Triple chainset option available (and you can get a 12-30 cassette, so you can get a 1:1 bottom gear).

Minuses:

Unless you spend silly—well, sillier—money for a custom bike or a frameset, you're stuck with Shimano.  Leaving aesthetics aside (I can't be the only one who thinks that current Shimano chainsets have been given a good seeing-to with the ugly stick), I find the ergonomics of Shimano suboptimal.  It's too easy to end up in the granny ring rather than the middle ring, or to brake unintentionally while shifting.
There's a slight question mark over the brakes, though this is probably just a matter of replacing the pads for something sensible.  Braking was mostly fine, but got juddery when slowing to take a right turn on a long fast descent, almost like brake fade.
You're limited to seat packs, non-SQR saddle bags, or something like the Arkel Randonneur Rack for luggage carrying.  Though it's arguable that this is a plus for audax riding, since it forces you to travel light…

Question marks:

I suspect the longevity of the external bearing BB90 bottom bracket may be less than wonderful.

I also wonder about the durability of the factory-built Bontrager Race Light wheels.  They have quite a deep section rim, but not many spokes (18 front, 24 rear).  They're noticeably light, though, and stood up fine to their hammering on some cratered roads over the weekend.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on April 22, 2013, 07:57:42 pm
I've got much the same kit on my Madone 4.5. My shop is very positive about the wheels - passing up an opportunity to flog me some hope hoops. They reckon they've never had a dodgy pair, and that they get used for CX with no problems.

I've gone for a large ortlieb saddlebag. Fidgetbuzz has started a thread about them somewhere. I really like it. I've also gone for a framebag. I can't remember the name, but it's the same as the SKS one.

I realise that saddles are an issue of personal taste, but mounting the nose of a Gonzo puppet is a bold statement, particularly at that angle.

Delighted to see one being used - if I hadn't been suckered by the paintjob on the bike I went for, I'd have gone for one too.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Sergeant Pluck on April 22, 2013, 08:31:11 pm
I had a good look at a Domane a few weeks ago - just out of curiosity; financially carbony goodness isn't on the horizon just now.

It is indeed light. The main thing that struck me was how massive the BB shell area was. It dwarfs the BB itself really, looks so solid going back along the chainstays.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Glover Fan on April 22, 2013, 08:42:50 pm
My Dad bought a 4.0 yesterday and collects it on Saturday, I'm looking forward to having a look. I nearly bought a 4.5 before buying my Giant TCR.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Hot Flatus on April 22, 2013, 08:45:43 pm
Regarding Shimano..... you'll be glad of it when you come to remove the chain set. Its easy, unlike the utter farce that is Campag. I have Shimano and Campag levers and I like them both really. What I find with the shimano is that you have to position them dead flat on the bars, with the bars set flat across the tops.

The issue with the low spoke count wheels is that if you do ping a spoke it might put the wheel unrideably out of true. Its your call, I suppose. I once had to pack on your Rural south because I broke a spoke in the front wheel.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: PeterM on April 22, 2013, 10:36:32 pm
I realise that saddles are an issue of personal taste, but mounting the nose of a Gonzo puppet is a bold statement, particularly at that angle.

It's a Selle SMP Avant, and not quite as nose-down as it appears from the photo.  Selle SMP recommend mounting the saddle between -3 and -10 degrees from horizontal.  It's a pretty comfy saddle, well made, and reasonably light.  Spendy, though.  I got fed up of Brooks Imperials going saggy after a year or so.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: StuAff on April 22, 2013, 10:45:03 pm
Nice (I actually like the 5.2 paint job).  If I was in the market for another bike the Domane would definitely be on the list. My Viner is a great ride, but I don't doubt that all that clever stuff would improve on it.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: GrahamG on April 24, 2013, 09:11:42 am
This is surely the first proper 'audaxers wet dream' carbon bling bike - I mean a proper classics winner, lightweight, comfortable, etc. etc... but with mudguards eyelets! I do a little sex wee every time I see one.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Karla on April 24, 2013, 01:09:56 pm
I do a little sex wee every time I see one.

TMI!  :o
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on April 24, 2013, 01:18:05 pm
Shame it won't fit 25s + guards.

You could use a bagman on the saddle, couldn't you?
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on April 24, 2013, 04:05:17 pm
Shame it won't fit 25s + guards.

You could use a bagman on the saddle, couldn't you?

On the 4-series you have a post, so I suspect so. On the seat mast ones, I don't see why not either.

I've gone for a Ortlieb 2.7l saddlebag on the madone I got instead of a domane.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: velosam on April 25, 2013, 07:41:45 pm
Shame it won't fit 25s + guards.

You could use a bagman on the saddle, couldn't you?

Actually I think it does take 25 and maybe 28 with their own brand specific mudguards.

Apparently the 5 series and higher are better due to the seat mast rather than a seat post.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: shyumu on April 25, 2013, 07:48:55 pm
Those Bonty wheels are actually really reliable.  I'm a heavy rider and found these wheels have stood the test of time.  The only downside has been the version with the bladed spokes; any nipple tweaking leaves them all akimbo.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on April 26, 2013, 10:37:56 am
Are any of you with these wheels tempted by the tubeless system? I *might* be getting to demo a set. However, having just put some of those green stripe Vittoria Paves on, it'll have to be epic to make me switch.

They've demoed the pin through the tyre stuff trick, and that you can swap in a tube relatively easily should it all go wrong is tempting. I just want to see what the tyres are like at 90psi.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: fboab on April 26, 2013, 03:52:37 pm
Are any of you with these wheels tempted by the tubeless system? I *might* be getting to demo a set. However, having just put some of those green stripe Vittoria Paves on, it'll have to be epic to make me switch.

They've demoed the pin through the tyre stuff trick, and that you can swap in a tube relatively easily should it all go wrong is tempting. I just want to see what the tyres are like at 90psi.
Bikeymikey's your man for tubeless tyres. All those miles and no problemos.
ETA: he only weighs 25kg tho'
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on April 26, 2013, 04:11:01 pm
pin through a tyre means nothing. I've ridden 20-30miles on a tyre that had a pin through it.

It's the bloody great gashes from chunks of glass or hawthorns that are the problem.

Can't see an advantage to tubeless unless you are a weight weenie myself. Might be good if you do lots of climbing.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: marcusjb on April 29, 2013, 08:51:23 pm
Must stop looking at bike websites.  The domane 5.9 looks very handsome in grey/black.

Cass would forgive me eventually I think.......

I must not go to sigmasport anytime soon.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on April 29, 2013, 09:26:16 pm
(http://www.chevincycles.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/d/m/dmande.jpg)

Still think they need to do an H2 or even H1 geo version. Even with the stem slammed, those bars would be too high for me.

I believe they have 5.2 in all sizes for a test day at my LBS (http://www.chevincycles.com/blog/?p=137) at the weekend. You could pop up, do some riding (http://letour.yorkshire.com/local-heroes/lizzie-armitstead).

 :demon:
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: PeterM on April 29, 2013, 10:08:18 pm
Shame it won't fit 25s + guards.

You could use a bagman on the saddle, couldn't you?

Think you could fit 25s with guards if you cut the guards either side of the brake bridge and mounted the guards via a bracket each side of the brake bolt.  There's decent clearance for 25s under the brake bridge (frustratingly, the brake blocks are nowhere near the bottom of their mounting slots on the calipers, so there's unexploited potential clearance in the frame design).

An old-style Bagman would be no problem—not sure about the new design with that horrible strut to the seat post.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: PeterM on April 29, 2013, 10:19:16 pm
Must stop looking at bike websites.  The domane 5.9 looks very handsome in grey/black.

That's much more like the colour scheme I'd have gone for, given a choice.  The 5.9 has electric gears, though.  I'd wonder how those would survive the biblical deluges on LEL.  And the compact chainset is a device for maximising time in the wrong chainring and ensuring that you never have gears that are quite low enough.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: thewinch on April 29, 2013, 10:31:39 pm
It's annoying the fork positions the caliper as far away from the wheel as possible but the frame doesn't do the same. With 25s there is ~4mm clearance between the tyre and the rear brake caliper. That limits you to crud raceguards and the like.
 The rear caliper is at a bit of a strange angle which is why the cable sticks out so far from the frame. Perhaps they had to position it like that due to problems with vibration or something? Still for a bike I imagine most people would use with 25s it's a little annoying.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on April 30, 2013, 10:39:36 pm
The seat tube is attached to the top tube
The top tube's connected to the head tube,
The head tube's connected to the neck tube,

erm... Don't call a taxi, I'll take the tube.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: TrevA on May 19, 2013, 09:32:56 pm
I've got the Domane  (pronounced Dough-Mar-Knee apparently ::-)) 2.0 with triple chainset and 10-speed Tiagra. I've upgraded the stock brakes to Tiagra's, which improved the braking. I'm quite impressed by it. I won't be putting mudguards on mine, but I could. It's a tasteful black and white colour scheme. Not especially light but sturdy and quick.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Parklands on July 03, 2013, 10:58:31 pm
Have just taken delivery of a Domaine 2.3 that's the alloy version with isoflex + 105 groupset. However SWMBO has decreed that I can't ride it till the outstanding jobs list is shorter so a full review will follow soon ( I hope)
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: LEE on August 07, 2013, 11:52:33 am
I've looked with interest at many reviews of the Domane range and I think it will tempt me next year.

The "decoupler" frame seems to get rave reviews for comfort.

The budget next year dictates the model...and it's still dependent on me seeing 12stone something on the scales (Carbon is a reward for  successful weight loss you see.  I'm not going to be a fat bloke on a skinny bike).
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: AwfulQuiet on August 14, 2013, 07:42:25 pm
 Nice Selle SMP you've got there  ;D
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on August 14, 2013, 10:24:10 pm
I have to say, it looked very handsome in the sunlight in Essex towards the end of LEL.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on August 19, 2013, 01:52:03 pm
Ooh, doesn't the 2014 4.5 look great - the striping does the trick of making of longer than it is.

(http://road.cc/sites/default/files/imagecache/node-gallery-display/images/Trek%20World%202013:%20Domane%20Pro%20Fit,%20Domane%20Four%20Series/Trek%20Domane%204.5%20-%20full%20bike.jpg)
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Parklands on September 27, 2013, 11:48:08 pm
So the list of jobs has got shorter and the new Trek has done just over 200 miles. Yes it is comfortable but more importantly it handles well and is very responsive. I feel much more confident riding in a group as it handles so well. One thing pre purchase that concerned me was the gearing being higher than I was used to, but combined with being lighter and better spec than my previous mount this has translated into slightly higher average speeds. Overall very pleased.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Foghat on December 13, 2014, 05:50:08 pm
I'm trying to find images of methods for attaching mudguards to the upper rear vanishing mounts on the Domane Disc models which have no brake bridge between the seatstays, as shown in the lefthand photo below. Does Trek provide a special attachment with the bikes?

(http://cdn.mos.bikeradar.com/images/news/2014/05/02/1399044629111-8nug5z8cdt8u-700-80.jpg)
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: LEE on December 13, 2014, 05:58:05 pm
I think they do supply something but forums are full of "what the *** am I supopsed to do with them?" questions.

I have some Raceblades that I'll fit over Christmas.  I'll post photos if I get them to fit OK.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: urban_biker on April 20, 2015, 12:05:06 pm
I'm trying to find images of methods for attaching mudguards to the upper rear vanishing mounts on the Domane Disc models which have no brake bridge between the seatstays, as shown in the lefthand photo below. Does Trek provide a special attachment with the bikes?

(http://cdn.mos.bikeradar.com/images/news/2014/05/02/1399044629111-8nug5z8cdt8u-700-80.jpg)

I only just got my Domane 4.0 disc, but here is a pic of what is supplied. The plastic brake bridge is for the rear. Looking at clearances I'm pretty sure that I can get a set of full SKS 35mm guards on the disc version and have heard of others doing this. It has a lot more clearance than the rim brake versions.

(https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/35013091/2015-04-20%2011.55.35.jpg)
(https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/35013091/2015-04-20%2011.55.47.jpg)
(https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/35013091/2015-04-20%2011.55.56.jpg)




Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: urban_biker on April 20, 2015, 12:08:46 pm
I'm loving mine (2015 4.0 disc). More comfortable than my steel tourer and the lightest bike I own.

(https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/35013091/2015-04-15%2011.31.57.jpg)

The addition of my brooks saddle has improved it as well :-)
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: T42 on April 20, 2015, 12:57:20 pm
...It seems to turn crappy English lanes into smooth French tarmac...

Y'what???  Sometimes I druther be in Italy.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: TrevA on October 08, 2015, 12:48:15 pm
I've got the Domane  (pronounced Dough-Mar-Knee apparently ::-)) 2.0 with triple chainset and 10-speed Tiagra. I've upgraded the stock brakes to Tiagra's, which improved the braking. I'm quite impressed by it. I won't be putting mudguards on mine, but I could. It's a tasteful black and white colour scheme. Not especially light but sturdy and quick.

I have to sadly report that the frame on my Domane 2.0 has cracked. It's 3 years old and has done about 10,000 miles. There's a weld about 2 inches below the Isospeed joint on the seat tube and it has cracked at the weld. Trek offer a lifetime guarantee  on their frames, so it's currently back with the shop to see if they'll honour the warranty. I've heard of at least 2 examples of the same thing happening, so beware the Alu Domane, it seems to have a design fault.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: LEE on October 08, 2015, 03:01:48 pm
I've got the Domane  (pronounced Dough-Mar-Knee apparently ::-)) 2.0 with triple chainset and 10-speed Tiagra. I've upgraded the stock brakes to Tiagra's, which improved the braking. I'm quite impressed by it. I won't be putting mudguards on mine, but I could. It's a tasteful black and white colour scheme. Not especially light but sturdy and quick.

I have to sadly report that the frame on my Domane 2.0 has cracked. It's 3 years old and has done about 10,000 miles. There's a weld about 2 inches below the Isospeed joint on the seat tube and it has cracked at the weld. Trek offer a lifetime guarantee  on their frames, so it's currently back with the shop to see if they'll honour the warranty. I've heard of at least 2 examples of the same thing happening, so beware the Alu Domane, it seems to have a design fault.

Interested to see photos.

I have the carbon frame so it's easier to lay down the carbon to support a point of stress/flex, and retain flex/compliance, than it is to engineer Alu to do the same.

I'd like to see where the crack is and what the carbon structure looks like at the same point.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on April 16, 2016, 11:03:24 pm
(http://thumbsnap.com/s/UNFyHBrf.jpg?0415)

Go on then, I'll add mine to the thread.

Standard 2016 Domane Disc 4.5 with an Aliante saddle, an Ultegra chainset, Bonty 28mm AW3 HC Lite tyres (love these - the wet weather grip seems amazing, and they are relatively cheap), and matt SKS Bluemels. The shop took measurements of my Madone, and set it up the same. That meant a stem swap, a slammed headset cap, 42mm bars.

So far, I am enjoying it a lot. The stiffness the thru axles bring is amazing. The comfort from the big tyres and flexy seat tube is reassuring on Leeds' potholed roads.

BTW if anyone else with OCD and discs is unhappy about the position of the thru axle lever when closed, here's an easy guide to sorting it.

http://www.bike-manual.com/brands/trek/om/road/whl_qr_qr15.htm

Short version - with the thru axle tight, undo that Allen bolt you can see. It just removes the lever. Twirl the lever where you want it closed, and retighten the bolt. Open and close the lever to make sure you are happy with the tightness. Job done.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Ben T on April 17, 2016, 10:18:23 am
You've got 28mm tyres and mudguards on it?  :o they must have improved that then because my domane you can only fit mudguards on it with 23mm tyres and even then it's a very tight fit.
What year/model is yours?
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: closetleftie on April 17, 2016, 04:42:24 pm


Go on then, I'll add mine to the thread.

Standard 2016 Domane Disc 4.5 with an Aliante saddle, an Ultegra chainset, Bonty 28mm AW3 HC Lite tyres (love these - the wet weather grip seems amazing, and they are relatively cheap), and matt SKS Bluemels. The shop took measurements of my Madone, and set it up the same. That meant a stem swap, a slammed headset cap, 42mm bars.

So far, I am enjoying it a lot. The stiffness the thru axles bring is amazing. The comfort from the big tyres and flexy seat tube is reassuring on Leeds' potholed roads.



That is so very pretty. Once I have this gert big frame-destroyer off my leg, I may flutter my eyelashes at you to be allowed a brief go? I can feel a "glad to be well" present from myself coming on.... ;D
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on April 17, 2016, 05:04:37 pm
You've got 28mm tyres and mudguards on it?  :o they must have improved that then because my domane you can only fit mudguards on it with 23mm tyres and even then it's a very tight fit.
What year/model is yours?

2016 4.5 disc. Will take 32s with guards according to mechanics. Certainly with 28s there is very generous clearance with guards a at least one size down from what will fit.

The new SLR will take 35s with guards, apparently. With 32s there's vast clearance.

@CL - When you are recovered, definitely! It feels really bombproof. Very much looking forward to the commute tomorrow.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: closetleftie on April 17, 2016, 05:10:59 pm




@CL - When you are recovered, definitely! It feels really bombproof. Very much looking forward to the commute tomorrow.

 ;D ;D  I fancy a go now, but I'll scratch the frame!  :P
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on April 18, 2016, 07:43:59 pm
So impressed with it so far - love the way you don't need to worry hammering through the potholed bits. Tried an emergency stop. You can do seated stoppies with 2 fingers. Rest of the time, one finger is plenty - the brakes and sticky tyres are fabulous. Compared to my old ali bike, it's wonderfully silent. I just wish it was about 3kg lighter, with 300g lighter wheels. I suspect the slr 7 disc is mega. However, even with a £4800 price tag, it's 8.6 kg compare to 8.95 kg for mine before guards and crap. That wasn't the point though - this is meant to be a fun commuting bike, and it is that in spades.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: LEE on May 01, 2016, 07:43:31 am
Just fitted Raceblade Mk2 Mudguards to mine (there's no clearance for full guards on the non-Disc version with 25mm tyres)

I also used a CRUD-guard accessory from the parts bin.  The rear "Nose" attaches perfectly to the Raceblade bracket to provide an excellent shield for the seat tube and font mech.  Much better than the ineffectual part from the Raceblades.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-1e4Lb9maF-Y/VyIMr8NQJtI/AAAAAAAAHYs/Jx2nhiLFwqMKOPiBjvf0nbRwEKGOTEw4QCCo/s1152/a%2BTREK%2BRaceblades%2Band%2BCRUD%2B720p.jpg)
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: aeolus on May 09, 2016, 09:56:45 pm
Currently looking at a Domane SLR 6 or 7, the bottom bracket is the BB90 - has anybody here had issues with them ?
I have previously read of problems but to what extent is difficult to quantify.

They ride well, very comfy, lightweight + discs and great clearance for guards. - it will be my first venture away from steel so pressfits are a new thing to me.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on May 09, 2016, 11:36:22 pm
Firstly, I have to say, isn't the SLR a special thing? So much tech that Trek have put in to it. Really impressive.

I've got BB90 on my previous and current Madone. The first did 2300km before a BMW pulled a uturn in from of me. The second has 7300km on it. I also have a aluminium Trek with a press fit BB. It's on 15800km on its original bearings. Lastly, I have a Trek Stache with press fit BB and 2500km on it.

I wonder what's going on with people who have press-fit problems, but not enough for it to put me off. No problems here. They've proven more hardy than my Hope Pro3 rear hub.

Do you like the isocore bar on the SLR? I do, but some of the guys in the shop say it's too flexy. Certainly, it can be yanked about when you are sat still, but what that means for steering, I don't know. They've offered me a 30 day trial.

Will you go for 32 or 35mm tyres? My LBS has sold 3 already. I'd be very tempted to trade in the wheelset before it left the shop and get the money off some Aoelus 3.

http://pelotonmagazine.com/goods/bontrager-tubeless-aeolus-review-images-weight/

Don't they sound like they'd go wonderfully on a SLR6?
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: aeolus on May 12, 2016, 12:34:17 am
I only had a fairly short test ride on a slightly bigger size than I need, but it felt good - absorbed the bumps well and the slider was far from the most compliant setting - never really seem to find any big potholes when you are looking for them !
Didn't notice the bars too much, so that is a good sign - but it climbed well and felt smooth -  needed a longer ride to fully test, as with any strange bike it takes some getting to grips with everything.
Don't think I can look at upgrading the wheels as already  at top of my budget and will settle for the 6 (Black stealth) rather than the 7 (with DI2)- will run the 32's to start and probably convert to tubeless 28 Pro ones later.
Will have guards fitted and change to 32T rear to suit local hills/age !!
Hope to have another look at weekend - need to hide credit card !
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: LEE on May 12, 2016, 08:35:11 am
The owner of our local bike shop rides the new SLR and he has his choice of practically anything he wants.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on May 12, 2016, 10:56:43 am
My lowly Domane disc 4.5 came with a 32T on the back. I didn't break sweat on the Heartbeat 400. 34/32 is lovely. Spin spin spin and save your knees.

I don't think the 6 is settling - I think it's the sweetspot. I look forward to hearing how crazy compliant it is on full squish. The reviews are saying it can switch from Emonda stiff to ~20% more squishy than mine. I'm running 85psi with 28s at the back, and it's ridiculously plush. I love it so much. The SLR6 comes with the big finned pads. I found on my MTB that the braking with them was much improved when bedded in. It's hard not to dump mine and just get them. I think yours has the upgrade disc calipers too. I suspect that 1 finger braking will be nothing short of phenomenal. I find I've always got more stopping power than I need, which is lovely.

The idea of the bike as a commuter bike for me was to ensure that I make the most of the commute. Its delivering that in spades. I'm sure the SLR will be a delight.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: LEE on May 12, 2016, 01:16:04 pm
I've used my Domane on every qualifier for PBP and PBP. 
It has sidelined my Condor Fratello Triple (my previous go-to comfy long-distance ride).

The Domane frame makes up for the lack of a granny Chainring (squishy over bumps and yet super stiff thru the drive-train).

It holds all my Strava PBs, many of which I wasn't even trying for, it just covers ground effortlessly.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on May 13, 2016, 05:56:29 am
Effortlessly - that's s great word for it. The way it just glides over everything with no fuss; the way it calmly descends and turns in to a corner. The disc brakes mean if you over cook it, hauling it back in can be done effortlessly to.

It's really thrown me, this bike. It was meant to be my "ride it hard, but it away wet" commuting bike, albeit one that encouraged me to ride more. In fact, I'd pick it over my 7.2kg Madone for almost anything.

The only thing I could accuse it of is that it has no pop or fizz. It's a perfect bike for endurance - spin away in z1-3 - all good. Tired? It's geometry will keep you tracking straight. However, if you are in a group and that guy on the front keeps surging and dropping people, this isn't the bike you want to keep giving a kick on.

What's throwing me is that it's so lovely for everything else, could light wheels (sub 1500) give it that pop and fizz? But then why throw money at a commuting bike?

I know I'll use there Domane for my 600. Whether I do for Mille Pennines depends whether my mate Tom is going to keep kicking.

My LBS is trying to arrange loan of some Aoelus 3 disc wheels- 1450g and fancy carbon with DT hubs. I'm already thinking I'll pull the carbon pedals and post from the Madone...

It's an amazing bike. I went top 4/>4000 on a strava segment nodescending Norwood Edge without trying too hard yesterday. It's so confidence inspiring.

It is a hell of a bike for long distance.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: aeolus on May 16, 2016, 06:45:55 pm
Well I didn't hide my credit card too well !
SLR6 (black stealth) ordered (last 520 size currently available), however the bike size fitting showed that I need the short reach Isocore bars and they are not available until mid June - so a bit of a wait but I'm sure it will be worth it and I'm having a full fitting  when it is ready - reach is always now my problem to get a comfortable position - no head down positions anymore !

Yes the brakes have the finned pads /discs, however I think they are the 140mm size - my Croix de Fer has the hydraulics but 160mm - I'm quite light so still lots of stopping capacity !

Looking forward now to trying it out !!!

Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on May 26, 2016, 05:05:36 pm
I think you'll love it. It is very covetable.

So, to create a racier position on a Domane, remove stem, spacers and headset top assembly cap, and replace with.

1. Cane Creek 40 zero stack top cap (friendly shop may give it to you)
2. a 17deg Elite stem, flipped

Result

(http://thumbsnap.com/i/Cqj1MBSs.jpg?0526)

Feels much more like my Madone now. I think I did the whole of the Heartbeat on the drops, even climbing, Hopefully this should bring the hoods in to play.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: tippers_kiwi on May 26, 2016, 06:19:42 pm
Love my Domane as well. It's the same 4.3 as Lee did PBP on (I think) with after market wheels etc. I also did all my qualifiers and PBP on it and a whole season of Audax before that because that was my bike and I have to say I always felt like I made the right choice when I bought it.

Since buying my Genesis Croix Stainless I have de-audaxed the Domane and I am really enjoying it as the lightweight of my bikes but as everyone says....it's still super comfy.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: IJL on May 26, 2016, 06:53:25 pm
Everyone seems happy with their Madone so I have finally taken the plunge on a 4.3 with discs, apparantly there is a new update to the range coming soon.  Hopefully the weather will be good for the weekend and ill be able to get some miles in over the next few weeks, its going to serve as my audax bike so will gain 'guards at some point
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: IJL on June 02, 2016, 01:38:39 pm
I have only just noticed that the forks don't have a 'guard mount on the side with the brake, is there a bracket available that uses the brake mounting or is it a DIY job?
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: aeolus on June 02, 2016, 07:19:33 pm
Have you looked at the Trek web site - you can download various manuals.

The Domane 2016 has a section on fitting guards, for disc forks it notes :-

' require use of an angled bracket adapter that mounts between caliper bolt head and the disc brake caliper. Position eye bolt so it is perpendicular to the ground'

HTH

I'm still waiting for mine !
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: IJL on June 02, 2016, 08:28:32 pm
Thanks for that, ill get in touch with the shop and see if they can get one,  I assume it was meant to come with the bike, all the other bits did, including a couple of mystery widgets.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on June 13, 2016, 06:17:16 am
My shop did a lovely job of shaping the mudguard stay so that the it can be attached behind the top caliper bolt - looks really tidy.

After 2500km, I have to say, I love this bike. I was coming down the hill from Harewood at about 65kph and thought to myself - I could sit up and take my hands off the bars it's so stable. I finished a recent 600 and didn't feel beaten up. The relentless brakes, the comfy rear end, the surefooted handling and the plush ride make it perfect for audax. It also feels bombproof - no concerns about hurling it down gravel strewn lanes. Everything just works. It feels really tough, but exceptionally comfortable. Nothing has needed adjusting yet. I washed it for the first time yesterday. It's a cracking piece of kit.

BTW - I'm similarly enamoured with the Bontrager AW3 HC Lites that the shop swapped on for me. They are cheap, and not the lightest, but the grip - wet or dry - exceeds the Vittoria Evo Paves I've been spending my pension savings on, and they seem to be lasting really well - none of the cutting up I'm used to on soft, grippy tyres.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Divingrob on June 13, 2016, 03:36:36 pm
I also love my Domane, mines a 2014 4.5
interested in the post about the mudguards does anyone know if you can purchase the angle bits to fit the little bolt holes?
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on June 22, 2016, 08:48:28 pm
Took my Domane Disc in for its 6 week service - a bit late in that it's done 2858km. Mechanics know I've got Mille Pennines coming up and I gave permission for them to change anything that needed it or might need it in the next thousand plus km.

Nothing.

Not bad for a bike that has been washed once, and only had the chain wiped down and lubed as required.

So far, all it's cost me is a swap of tyres for Mille Pennines as I wanted to try some lighter tyres.

Chap that sold it to me said he's seen how much I've enjoyed it and has put his Emonda SLR up for sale to fund a Domane Disc SLR 6.

I will be jealous.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: velosam on August 05, 2016, 04:13:56 pm
I am curious about this bike and reading the reviews there has been some suggestion that the front feels a lot harsher than the rear, due to not having a similar system.

Is the front harsher etc or does it feel disjointed compared to the rear? (Note this would be on the cheaper version as opposed to the newer updated one, on which some of them do have a front coupler)

thanks
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on August 05, 2016, 05:30:00 pm
I really don't know what they are on about. The front end just isn't harsh. The whole bike feels completely coherent to me. The back end has it's magic trick of taking the sharp edges of potholes, and the front doesn't. However,my arms are much more able to cope than my arse, so I don't feel like the front is acting in a way that's inconsistent.

My mate has the SLR. In his view, the new bikes trickery is primarily through the new bars, not the front decoupler, but even more of it is via having 32mm tyres. I'd be amazed if anyone found the normal Domane harsh - if you did, the damped bars and 32s would be cheaper than a SL (non adjustable back, decoupler front) or SLR (adjustable read and decoupler front). In the US, taking the S6 (the non adjustable back end, no front decoupler) as a base, the SL is another $800, and then the SLR is $1500 more than the SL ($2300 up from the S). Weight is pretty much the same.

The SLR 6 disc that my mate has is lush, but despite how similar they look, his is nearly double the price of mine.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: citoyen on August 05, 2016, 06:58:22 pm
I would definitely say that the bars on the old Domane were pretty stiff and that I felt it in my hands after 600km. 'Harsh' might be overstating it though.

I've been up to Trekworld today and had a look at the new SLR. It's lovely. I'm hoping to get one in to play with very soon. As you say, the 32C tyres are going to be a hugely significant factor - and it can take up to 36C, apparently. For me, that gives it the kind of versatility that can compete with bikes like the Genesis Datum.

The adjustability of the SLR is perhaps a bit of a gimmick. I'm sure the non-adjustable SL would be fine for most people.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: velosam on August 06, 2016, 01:07:53 pm
Cheers for that.  Maybe one day I will bite.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on August 06, 2016, 11:43:28 pm
I wonder if the difference in perception might be that I'm on the disc version? I have arms like a small child, so the alternative hypothesis that you have princess & the pea arms seems unlikely.

Guys in my lbs are saying that they'd been told it's all good as a gravel bike with big tyres. I still think a Tripster would be what I'd want, or even an Open.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: citoyen on September 05, 2016, 06:49:03 pm
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k170/smutchin/slr1_zps1j90f8wt.jpg)

Haven't ridden it properly yet - just a quick spin round the block - so far too soon to make any meaningful assessment of the differences with the old Domane. First impressions are very favourable though. I love the fat tyres (even if they do have tubes in) - inflated them to 75psi but might try them a bit lower.

Spent most of today getting it set up. Still could do with lowering the bars a bit, and would ideally like to fit some mudguards. The brake hoses could definitely do with being shortened too.

Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on September 05, 2016, 08:21:31 pm
I replaced the headset top cover with a normal (non volcano) one and flipped the stern. That combo brings the stern down to Madone levels. I've gone as low as f60/r70psi - just brilliant over chipseal.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: citoyen on September 05, 2016, 08:27:09 pm
I've gone as low as f60/r70psi

You probably weigh a good 10kg less than me though.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: aeolus on September 05, 2016, 11:28:17 pm
That's my bike !

I've had mine for a good few weeks now, initially got off to a really bad start with the Bottom bracket bearings needing replacement after about 34 miles ! - I think there was an installation issue at the factory - LBS were sending back to Trek for review. This was my main concern with a press fit and this has not helped develop any confidence in the system.

However the ride is great - I think the adj rear decoupler does help take out the bumps (mine is now at the soft setting also) and the carbon iso bars have nearly stopped the occasional numb l/hand - I've got the short reach bars.

I keep the pressures about the 70 mark and it bowls along very smoothly and fast with the big tyres also climbs very well - frame seems stiff.

What wheels are on the bike - the red logo's look different in the pic - mine are the Affinity Comps.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: citoyen on September 06, 2016, 06:14:42 am
That's my bike !

 :thumbsup:

Quote
I've had mine for a good few weeks now, initially got off to a really bad start with the Bottom bracket bearings needing replacement after about 34 miles !

That's slightly worrying since I'm setting off for a long ride this weekend...

Quote
What wheels are on the bike - the red logo's look different in the pic - mine are the Affinity Comps.

Affinity Comps here too.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: closetleftie on September 06, 2016, 01:04:03 pm
Is it just me, or have Trek effectively made a carbon touring bike (obvs faster and without the load-carrying capability as consequence of the frame material)? Longish wheelbase, 72 degree head angle, tallish front end, plenty BB drop, etc, etc... the geometry is pretty much exactly the same as any 1980's "fast tourer" or a Surly LHT.

Have we just come full circle?

[pseuds corner]
Or is this actually convergent evolution? Something evolved from the road bike, and ended up looking much the same as something that evolved from utility machines?
[/pseuds corner]
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: citoyen on September 06, 2016, 01:08:37 pm
All bikes are hybrids now!
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: LEE on September 06, 2016, 01:52:32 pm
Is it just me, or have Trek effectively made a carbon touring bike (obvs faster and without the load-carrying capability as consequence of the frame material)? Longish wheelbase, 72 degree head angle, tallish front end, plenty BB drop, etc, etc... the geometry is pretty much exactly the same as any 1980's "fast tourer" or a Surly LHT.

Yes they have.

I have one (see above somewhere) and it changed my plan on taking my Steel Condor to PBP last year.

The geometry is what most people need, despite it not looking as "Pro" as a full on road bike (which is what people tend to want when they see one).

It's as comfy as my Condor, the front end isn't harsh at all, the front axle is mounted behind the line of the forks to add compliance/flex.  The back end is de-coupled...AND YET...the drive train (Bottom Bracket and chain stays) components are huge.

The more power you put through it, the more you honk it up steep hills, the more you notice the benefits of that Brunel-like power train.
It's comfy and yet covers ground so much faster than my other "comfy" bikes.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: T42 on September 06, 2016, 04:17:00 pm
Only quibble I have is that the matt black finish is very easy to damage.  I had the list of PBP control times taped to the top tube, and it's still a bit shiny where the tape was.  I wouldn't use it off-road for that reason, flying gravel would make a fair mess.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: aeolus on September 06, 2016, 05:25:46 pm
I had the Bontrager mudguards fitted by the LBS as part of the deal (and 32 cassette) for some reason the 32 is standard on the SLR7 ? (DI2 version)- although they spaced the rear guard off the seat tube at the fixing point, the front mech still pushed against the guard - so I've drilled an approx 10mm hole in the guard so the extreme end of the mech now clears.

Agree the geo is not extreme and is not much different to my 2015 Croix de Fer 30 (now my winter bike) but I climb at least one gear higher on the same hills.


Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on September 06, 2016, 06:18:08 pm
That's my bike !

I've had mine for a good few weeks now, initially got off to a really bad start with the Bottom bracket bearings needing replacement after about 34 miles ! - I think there was an installation issue at the factory - LBS were sending back to Trek for review. This was my main concern with a press fit and this has not helped develop any confidence in the system.


I posted elsewhere - my current ones lasted <6000km, but soe on another bike are at 15800km and still going strong.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: postrestant on September 07, 2016, 02:09:38 pm
So far I've needed a new set each year (2 years, 7,500 km / year?) and TREK LBS suggest that's not unusual. On both occasions the bearings have gone without there being obvious play beforehand.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on September 07, 2016, 02:15:39 pm
Is it just me, or have Trek effectively made a carbon touring bike (obvs faster and without the load-carrying capability as consequence of the frame material)? Longish wheelbase, 72 degree head angle, tallish front end, plenty BB drop, etc, etc... the geometry is pretty much exactly the same as any 1980's "fast tourer" or a Surly LHT.

Have we just come full circle?

[pseuds corner]
Or is this actually convergent evolution? Something evolved from the road bike, and ended up looking much the same as something that evolved from utility machines?
[/pseuds corner]
 
Surely there's no inevitability about carbon not being able to carry a load? I'm sure there are carbon frames with rack eyes.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: LEE on September 07, 2016, 04:08:33 pm
My BB90 lasted about 9,000 miles.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: closetleftie on September 08, 2016, 11:20:01 am

Surely there's no inevitability about carbon not being able to carry a load? I'm sure there are carbon frames with rack eyes.

I would have thought the point loading at the rack bolts would be too mch for the individual fibers? But I don't really know and I suspect designers could make it work. However, I've not see carbon frames with rack eyes (plenty with mudguard eyes but that's not carrying load).
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on September 08, 2016, 11:47:47 am
It's possible I was getting carried away by knowing some have mudguard eyes then.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on September 08, 2016, 12:44:37 pm
Koga have done carbon touring and trekking bikes in the past. From memory, the dropouts and rack mounts were variously aluminium and titanium. Really, this problem isn't a big one.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: citoyen on September 08, 2016, 01:31:25 pm
The Orbea Avant takes a bespoke rack designed to fit its concealed mounts -
http://www.bikerumor.com/2013/06/19/new-orbea-avant-fondo-road-bike-rim-or-disc-brakes-racks-fenders-or-not/

By the way, fans of endurance road bikes (which is what we're calling the category the Domane fits into) should keep an eye on the bike news websites tomorrow for an interesting announcement...
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: closetleftie on September 08, 2016, 01:34:05 pm
The Orbea Avant takes a bespoke rack designed to fit its concealed mounts -
http://www.bikerumor.com/2013/06/19/new-orbea-avant-fondo-road-bike-rim-or-disc-brakes-racks-fenders-or-not/

By the way, fans of endurance road bikes (which is what we're calling the category the Domane fits into) should keep an eye on the bike news websites tomorrow for an interesting announcement...

Nah, sorry, that won't do! Spill 'em.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: citoyen on September 08, 2016, 01:37:39 pm
Nah, sorry, that won't do! Spill 'em.

New version of an old favourite officially launches tomorrow, with some interesting new features to rival the Domane SLR. You can probably guess the rest - rumours have been doing the rounds for a while.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on September 08, 2016, 03:19:41 pm
Ooh Ruby / Roubaix update? Sis is looking at getting a Ruby Comp Disc.

I've heard that the ATR tripster will be going hydro & thru-axle next year.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Aidan on September 08, 2016, 06:00:46 pm
Ooh Ruby / Roubaix update? Sis is looking at getting a Ruby Comp Disc.


Hope it is, I've been thinking about another Roubaix
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Pieman on September 09, 2016, 09:22:59 am
That new Roubaix has lost the plot , you need to be very careful just using springs for damping unless you like very old motorcycles or springy brooks saddles 🙄
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: citoyen on September 09, 2016, 10:18:48 am
I've not ridden it yet but I've had a close look and played with the bouncy handlebars. Really quite odd, though m'colleague who has actually ridden the bike is a big fan...
http://www.cyclist.co.uk/specialized/roubaix/1640/specialized-roubaix-review-first-ride
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: phantasmagoriana on September 09, 2016, 12:14:59 pm
Oh wow, that new Ruby (http://www.cyclist.co.uk/specialized/ruby/1642/specialized-ruby-review-first-ride) looks gorgeous... :o
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Aidan on September 09, 2016, 04:27:30 pm
Not sure Ill be rushing to change my SL4.   Would really want to have a ride, they seem to have stretched and lowered it as well as given it bouncy bits, and my SL4 fits just right.   Ill be looking at all of the competition ( Domane, Synapse, Datum etc ) as well before moving
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Pieman on September 09, 2016, 04:42:56 pm
I would not get a Synapse in Hi mod form as they are more a race bike , I have had one two years and it is very stiff and very fast but nowhere near as comfy as the mrs's Specialized Ruby , I have done a 400 and 600 on it this year and it does not look after you to well on those distances .
After speaking to Drmekon on the first part of the Heartbeat 400 I am seriously looking at a Slr or the new Sl Domane Frameset to ride LEL next year .
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on September 09, 2016, 05:33:49 pm
I do love my Domane - finishing a 600 without any aches is lovely.

I do still want the Isocore bar from the SLR - or indeed, an SLR.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Aidan on September 10, 2016, 08:05:59 am
I've not ridden it yet but I've had a close look and played with the bouncy handlebars. Really quite odd, though m'colleague who has actually ridden the bike is a big fan...
http://www.cyclist.co.uk/specialized/roubaix/1640/specialized-roubaix-review-first-ride

Do you know if it has fittings for mudguards? Much of its direct competition does
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: citoyen on September 10, 2016, 07:34:06 pm
Do you know if it has fittings for mudguards? Much of its direct competition does

Good question - no idea, sorry!
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Aidan on September 10, 2016, 08:20:12 pm
Do you know if it has fittings for mudguards? Much of its direct competition does

Good question - no idea, sorry!

No worries, cant find any reference to this anywhere. I'll have to go and look at one :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: citoyen on September 11, 2016, 04:59:31 pm
I will be able to find out quite easily, but not until next week...
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on September 14, 2016, 02:47:54 pm
Can one of you lucky sods with an SLR tell me how you find the isocore bar? One of the big lads in the shop hated it because he said it was too flexible, but it sounds ideal for someone like me who couldn't sprint for the lights, let alone be interested in sprinting in a race.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: TimC on September 14, 2016, 03:06:39 pm

Surely there's no inevitability about carbon not being able to carry a load? I'm sure there are carbon frames with rack eyes.

I would have thought the point loading at the rack bolts would be too mch for the individual fibers? But I don't really know and I suspect designers could make it work. However, I've not see carbon frames with rack eyes (plenty with mudguard eyes but that's not carrying load).

According to the Gravel Bikes supplement in the October 'Cyclist' magazine, the Specialized Diverge Pro has a carbon frame with rack and mudguard mounts front and rear.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: aeolus on September 14, 2016, 07:18:18 pm
Well DrM, I'm fairly lightly built and I can't say I've found them 'too flexible' maybe a little bit of give - but I've never had carbon bars before to compare - never really noticed it.
As too how effective they are Its difficult too isolate just one element of the bike as it all has some give that adds up to the comfortable ride.

Be aware they do them in two different reaches - mine were changed to short reach (75mm I think) from the standard ones - the local LBS may still have them  - 400cc's width - maybe they would do a deal to clear ?

Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: citoyen on September 19, 2016, 02:34:47 pm
After 972 miles in the last 9 days... not the slightest hint of hand discomfort. And the bars are definitely not too flexy either.

Love the 32mm tyres. Only had one puncture and that was a pinch flat - had let some air out when riding on a very rough section of road and hit a stone, causing a pinch flat. Probably wouldn't have happened if I'd been running them tubeless as they were intended. Mostly had them around 70-75psi and found them plenty fast enough.

Did have a few issues with discomfort at the rear but that was more down to a shorts problem and possibly the saddle - really should have swapped the stock saddle for one I knew I liked before undertaking such a long ride.

The adjustable seatpost is brilliant but I'm still not entirely convinced it's anything other than a gimmick. I found the old non-adjustable seatpost offered plenty enough flex on bumpy roads and I would probably go for the SL if I were spending my own money, just to save a few quid (and maybe spend it on Di2 instead). I had it at the flexiest setting throughout and there were a couple of occasions when I dropped other riders simply because I was able to continue riding through the bumpier bits without slowing down.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: velosam on September 19, 2016, 04:09:46 pm
Can anyone confirm that the 2016 model i.e. the 4 or others will take 32c tires and guards, my local LBS isn't sure.

Talk about price fixing in the market - the 'Roubaix' is £1900, and the cheapest 2017 carbon disc domane is £2000.  Its also the 400 series carbon. Turns out the old 5 series was the bargain in the bunch!

What is surprising is that the range between £1000 and £2000 is an aluminium version. I guess they must have sorted out the issue with the frames breaking.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on September 19, 2016, 09:46:31 pm
Yes - I have the 2016 4.5 disc - you can fit the bontrager AW3 HCs in 32 with guards. I am running GP4000iis which measure up big - I have the 28s which are supposed to measure up ~31mm (see http://www.bicyclerollingresistance.com/specials/conti-gp4000s-ii-23-25-28). There's plenty of room.

I ran ~70psi at the weekend on the Dales Tour Plus. Was first back, so these big tyres appear not to be too slow. Cornering is really assured.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on September 22, 2016, 12:59:22 pm
(http://trek.scene7.com/is/image/TrekBicycleProducts/1462000_2017_A_2_Domane_SL_6_Disc?wid=3000&hei=2454&fmt=jpg&qlt=50,1&op_usm=0,0,0,0&iccEmbed=0&cache=on,on&bgc=247,247,247)

Given the recent demise of my Domane Disc 4.5, I'm thinking this looks really sweet for the money - £3500 inc lovely carbon wheels.

http://www.trekbikes.com/gb/en_GB/bikes/road-bikes/performance-road/domane/domane-sl-6-disc/p/1462000-2017

Obviously, The SLR6 looks wonderful too, but I know I want carbon wheels so bad. If they did the SLR6 with the £400 upgrade to Visions, I think I might be tempted to stretch. I just don't think I'll ever use the adjustability, and I'm not sure I really need 17% more compliance.

Go on SLR riders, please tell me stories of how lovely the extra compliance is.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: citoyen on September 22, 2016, 02:01:00 pm
Go on SLR riders, please tell me stories of how lovely the extra compliance is.

Nah, I'm with you. In fact, I'd be worried that the slider could eventually become a nuisance in the long run, especially since the bolt to secure it doubles up as a bottle cage bolt, so you have to be very careful when removing the bottle cage not to lose the bits. And to be honest, I found the level of flex in the old Domane with the non-adjustable seatpost perfectly adequate. If you've got the IsoSpeed steerer, IsoCore handlebars and 32mm tyres (the disc brake option is essential for this reason more than the brakes themselves) as well, you've got a more than comfortable enough bike to not need the gimmick of the slider. After nearly 1,000 miles in 9 days, I'm feeling no ill effects beyond tight leg muscles, while many of my fellow riders are still complaining of numbness in the hands, feet and rear end.

By the way, I realised that the wheels on the SLR 6 I was sent are Paradigm, not Affinity. I checked with yer man at Trek and apparently this was a late change to the spec. The Paradigm wheels have wider rims and lighter straight-pull spokes, apparently. I think they're perfectly good for the job, but those carbon Vision wheels are rather nice.

Seriously, the SLR is an incredibly lovely bike and it's going to be a real wrench to give it back, but I would be more than happy with the SL.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: citoyen on September 22, 2016, 02:10:39 pm
Btw, yer man at Trek did explain to me why they use Vision wheels rather than Bontrager on the low/mid-range models. It's to do with cost. I can't remember exactly why the Vision wheels are cheaper, it's to do with the way they're built (might be that they don't have disc-specific rims?), but the Aeolus are lighter and stronger, iirc. If I were in your position, DrM, I would be thinking about the SL 6 but upgrading to the Aeolus wheels - have a look if they're an option on the Project One site.

[ETA: just checked and the SL isn't available on Project One, chiz!]
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: velosam on September 22, 2016, 02:44:46 pm
Prepare yourself for unhappy viewing/reading before going to

https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=99501.0

I suspect that was for me. Thanks, I found it and deleted my post. GWS

I agree with citoyen, I think the SL6 with some very nice wheels and Di would be better than the SLR. However, given all the gold you may have in the future (all that weight lol) you may want the newer coupler design!
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: aeolus on September 22, 2016, 04:27:54 pm
Glad you are up to thinking about  replacement bikes already  - I'm sure I wouldn't be !

I would suggest trying the SL and SLR at your local LBS for a true back to back test - I'm sold on the ride I get from mine and as noted above it goes well over the rougher bits.

Not sure the SL has the Isocore carbon bars either and I would want them as I believe they have helped my l/hand pins and needles etc.

The SLR7 version has just had some very good reports in the Cycle press but in the end its down to what feels right to you.

Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Pieman on September 28, 2016, 03:07:07 pm
I'm torn but leaning towards a SLR none disc Frameset after reading this https://intheknowcycling.com/ (the section on 2016 disc wheel sets ) I already have nice none disc wheels and if I go disc SL/SLR the cost at the moment of getting decent aero wheels is very high , a complete SLR 6 upgraded with bontrager Carbon wheels would be over 5k retail 🙈 .
As I already have wheels I would think I can build up a SLR none disc Frameset for 3 to3-5k no problem .
Does anyone have experience of the direct mount brakes ?
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: chrisbainbridge on October 03, 2016, 07:39:48 pm
Well, based on the reviews on here and in the press i have just ordered a Domane SLR disc.  Should be in for this weekend.  I will report back.  I now have to get the appropriate end caps for my best wheels DTswiss hubs  and sort out my dynohub.

Does anybody want a DP disc dynohub with QR?
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: zigzag on October 03, 2016, 07:52:30 pm
<...>

Does anybody want a DP disc dynohub with QR?

is that an sp dynohub? i might be interested to use it on the hybrid bike
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: chrisbainbridge on October 03, 2016, 10:43:43 pm
Sorry yes it is the PL8
SP PL-8 (for Center lock disc-brakes 700c/26" wheels)
Color
Black 32hole

I can find the rim later.

Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: citoyen on October 03, 2016, 10:49:01 pm
i have just ordered a Domane SLR disc.

 :thumbsup:

Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: chrisbainbridge on October 08, 2016, 02:23:32 pm
Picked it up this morning. First ride tomorrow. I will report back.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Graeme on October 08, 2016, 04:38:43 pm
Picked it up this morning. First ride tomorrow. I will report back.

Ooooooooooo! :)
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: citoyen on October 10, 2016, 01:16:27 pm
Took the SLR 6 for a final ride yesterday before sending it back to its rightful owners - the first time I've had to deal with proper rain while riding it, and I got two punctures, dammit.

I've done 1,800km on these tyres (Bontrager R3 Hard Case Lite) but that's probably too soon to put it down to being worn out, so you'd have to say it's just a case of not particularly great puncture protection - at least, not what you'd expect from a bike that's designed to be ridden in all conditions.

On the other hand, maybe I wouldn't have suffered those punctures if I'd been running them tubeless, as they are intended to be. Not sure what caused the first puncture, but the second was a shard of glass that stayed embedded in the tyre.

That aside, I've been impressed with the tyres - they feel supple and grippy.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: aeolus on October 11, 2016, 04:12:22 pm
What size Bontrager R3 HCL do you have on your SLR, mine are 32's and Bontrager do not list 32's for tubeless, they do a different version according to their website that are tubeless ready but only 2 sizes listed.

I have not used them in very heavy rain as its my best bike ! so far no visitations and fingers crossed.

The tread feels a soft compound that grips well, it seems quite sticky - riding on a very gravelly surface I had loads of small stones being picked up and rattling in my mudguards, my brother in law cycling beside me had virtually no pick up in this Durano DD's. I agree they are supple and this must add to the ride quality.
I am planning on trying some tubeless when these wear out.

I think glass shards are a tough call and will go through any most tyres once embedded, perhaps the soft compound makes them stick on more ?
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: citoyen on October 11, 2016, 04:47:32 pm
What size Bontrager R3 HCL do you have on your SLR, mine are 32's and Bontrager do not list 32's for tubeless, they do a different version according to their website that are tubeless ready but only 2 sizes listed.

They're 32. I was led to believe they're tubeless ready but you're right - they only list them as TLR in 24 and 26 on the Trek website. And it doesn't say TLR in the spec for the bike. Hmmm.

Quote
I think glass shards are a tough call and will go through any most tyres once embedded, perhaps the soft compound makes them stick on more ?

Maybe. And the wet conditions won't have helped.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on October 12, 2016, 08:52:02 am
What size Bontrager R3 HCL do you have on your SLR, mine are 32's and Bontrager do not list 32's for tubeless, they do a different version according to their website that are tubeless ready but only 2 sizes listed.

They're 32. I was led to believe they're tubeless ready but you're right - they only list them as TLR in 24 and 26 on the Trek website. And it doesn't say TLR in the spec for the bike. Hmmm.

Quote
I think glass shards are a tough call and will go through any most tyres once embedded, perhaps the soft compound makes them stick on more ?

Maybe. And the wet conditions won't have helped.
I have the 28s AW3HC lites. The grip is phenomenal, better than GP4000iis in 28 (actually 31). However, I got a puncture at around 2000km, and the rear tyre felt awful thin. I think they wear exceptionally quickly, which is where the grip comes from, and two of the mechanics I spoke to add my LBS had the same experience. The grip in the wet is magical and they are pretty cheap, but long term, I'll be sticking with GP4000iis.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Graeme on October 12, 2016, 09:31:17 am
There is a Trek Domane competition running at the moment with Tour de Force. Closing date is the 1st November...

Clicky (https://www.tourdeforce.org.uk/win-trek-tour-de-force/)
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: chrisbainbridge on October 12, 2016, 08:39:32 pm
I need to get new end caps for the DT Swiss hubs on my own carbon rims. Trek sell the wheels that came with the bike independently with either 135 or 142mm axles but do not state what the domane is.  I presume it is 135 but would be grateful for confirmation.  At 135 they will not need pretensioning but at 142 they will need resetting!  I cannot find the info on the trek website.


Otherwise Iwill resort to measuring them at the weekend!


 
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Pieman on October 18, 2016, 07:59:58 am
The new Roubaix does not have guard mounts so I have been told 🤔💨by Evans
So as a all round bike that's off the list unless it's just for the summer or you like getting wet/crud guards etc
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: chrisbainbridge on October 19, 2016, 02:14:43 pm
I can confirm that the Domane does take mudguards although the screw holes are fairly small
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Pieman on February 12, 2017, 12:57:16 pm
Ordered 👀 You have a lot to answer for DrMekon 😉
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on February 12, 2017, 04:06:13 pm
Glee!

I am still waiting for my insurance money to come through post RTA. I thinking SLR6 with Aeolus 5s via project one. Was in the LBS this morning. The shop are building up a Bish Bash Bosh with spares for me, but with Compass Bon Jons setup tubeless.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Pieman on February 12, 2017, 08:33:52 pm
Mine will be a SL6 disc with the carbon bars could not bring myself to spend the extra on the slr plus extra for the wheels , I did go in to buy a none disc version but they convinced me to go the disc route as it will be used as my new All weather  bike , I'm not yet sure I will use it for LEL as it will be a good bit heavier than the Synapse but it will be interesting to decide.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: dhmpap on February 13, 2017, 09:38:52 pm
I have to say it is a truly comfortable speed machine but I have to say that the 5.2 deserves better wheels
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: chrisbainbridge on February 16, 2017, 04:50:55 pm
I have the SLR7 Disc and it is the best bike I have ever ridden.  I love through axle.  Compared to QR they are just so much more stable and I believe essential with discs.  I previously had a BMC GF01 with discs and QR.  They were a nightmare to get properly closed without disc rub.

The wheels are not the best but the frame plus 32mm tyres is amazing.  I reckon you could put 32mm gravel tyres on and heavy an amazing gravel bike.  I have taken it to places I would hesitate to take previous bikes and have complete confidence in it.

If I was going to plan something longer and hillier than LEL I would think about super compact but otherwise it is faultless
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on February 16, 2017, 06:55:46 pm
http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:j7pTkRNg7bEJ:www.bikeradar.com/road/news/article/trek-emonda-disc-2017-49203/+&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=uk

They've managed to erase it from most places, but my LBS confirmed that they'd heard about this - Emonda with decoupler and discs for next year. I asked whether the Madone would get the same treatment. Not heard, but they pointed out that Domane for classics, Madone for the flat, Emonda for the hills - it's got to be likely.

Was told not to expect clearance for guards on a disc madone, which means much as I'd like one, a disc Madone with all the aero gubbins should stay off my wishlist.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Pieman on February 17, 2017, 08:38:05 am
I will have to wait till next month for mine as no stock in 56s and while I'm on has anyone used the R2 tyres that come on it?




Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: aeolus on February 17, 2017, 12:34:41 pm
My SLR6 came with the R3 Hard Case Lite in 32's - their web site still notes the R3's have they changed ?

The R3's seem good to me, grip well and roll well, the bike seems to float over most bumps etc, I keep the pressures at about 80ish - not used them in winter as its my summer bike.

I'm interested in going tubeless but the only 32's Bontrager do are AW2HCL TLR - has anybody tried these ? none of their fast/light tubeless range seem to be available in 32's, but a bit extra punture protection is no bad thing !
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on February 17, 2017, 02:12:49 pm
No, only the AW3 HCLs, which are better than GP4000iis for grip, IME, but wear double quick.

Difficult one.

I'm going to be running bon jons on Grails initially, then try Schwalbe Pro Ones, either on some of Mikes wide 30mm carbon rims or some LBC 46mm carbon rims.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Alex B on February 19, 2017, 08:23:07 am
If I was going to plan something longer and hillier than LEL I would think about super compact but otherwise it is faultless

I'm building a bike from an SLR disc frameset at the moment, and my plans for a super compact were scuppered by the front derailleur hanger, which only allows a FD position low enough for the cage to sit nicely over a normal compact (or maybe a 48/32 would work?). Instead I'm going with a 12/36T cassette and a roadlink to get lower gearing.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: chrisbainbridge on February 21, 2017, 06:51:26 pm
Interesting.  I have a compact and about 5mm further to drop.  I look forward to hearing about your 12/36.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Pieman on March 01, 2017, 09:44:34 am
See they have put all the prices up in the last week or so fortunately after I ordered mine.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on March 01, 2017, 01:07:33 pm
I saw! The bike I have claimed for on insurance (SL6 Disc) has gone up £200 - will need to tell them.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Pieman on March 14, 2017, 09:48:06 am
I will put this here as well as the disc topic as it relates to my new Domane.
Will post a review and my thoughts after a few more rides and after a bit of fettling.

I have a question with regards to the front righthand shifting on my new Trek Domane .
It's a RS 685 shifter , on the upshift sweep (going small to big at the back) I'm only able to shift two gears at a time (I can only get two clicks in a complete sweep of the leaver)🙁 All my previous shimano leavers( or sram/campag) have let me shift three in one go .
So the question is do I have a faulty shifter or is two clicks/shifts all I'm getting? Per sweep of the lever.


Also on the inner shift leaver/ so for going big to small at the back I have 35mm of free play before I get to the click to change gear 😳
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: citoyen on March 14, 2017, 10:08:06 am
It's a RS 685 shifter , on the upshift sweep (going small to big at the back) I'm only able to shift two gears at a time (I can only get two clicks in a complete sweep of the leaver)🙁 All my previous shimano leavers( or sram/campag) have let me shift three in one go .
So the question is do I have a faulty shifter or is two clicks/shifts all I'm getting? Per sweep of the lever.

Also on the inner shift leaver/ so for going big to small at the back I have 35mm of free play before I get to the click to change gear 😳

That does sound like it could be faulty, or at very least badly set up. I've not used one very recently but I'm sure the RS685 levers are supposed to allow three clicks as per your previous experience.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Pieman on March 14, 2017, 12:58:21 pm
Don't think it's the set up as even if I release the cable out of the rear mech so there's no tension on the cable there's still only two clicks at the lever.
Shop does not seem to know🤔
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: aeolus on March 14, 2017, 04:05:24 pm
Your levers seem fine to me - exactly how my SLR6 Ultegra is set up - my Genesis also has the same levers (before they introduced the larger 105 types) running a 11speed 105 gearset and that operates exactly the same.

I was tempted by the Di2 where you can blitz up and down changes but a bit pricey so I went with the mechanical set up which does work well.

Hope you enjoy the bikes ride - I'm waiting for better weather before bringing mine out of hibernation !
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Pieman on March 15, 2017, 08:23:05 am
Thanks for the reply Aeolus was just a bit shocked as all my old 10speed shimano groupsets 105 and Tiagra shift 3 , but its good to know it's not faulty .
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Aidan on March 25, 2017, 11:05:41 am
Just pulled the trigger on an SL6   :thumbsup:   collect next week.   gonna have to make some space in the garage though :facepalm:
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on March 25, 2017, 01:24:13 pm
They have it in the custom matt red with the Vision wheels in my LBS. It looks fantastic.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Aidan on March 25, 2017, 08:09:14 pm
Sounds nice, and it'll be faster because it's red!    I've gone for the standard Black and white, which is understated but quite nice although the white saddle and bar tape will probably go , saddle straight away, bar tape later ( if I can put up with the mismatch  ;D)   

I considered a few different models and a few other makes of bike ( Cervelo C3 was next favourite)   but the SL6 disc really hits a sweet spot of features and standard equipment.  I'm off to read the tubeless for dummies thread now!
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on March 26, 2017, 11:33:15 pm
Two wraps of Gorilla 25mm width - if your rims are narrower, it tears perfectly
Stans valves - poke them through the tape, and then press with your thumb, and tighten down with a pair of pliers.
Orange endurance sealant

I used a track pump plus a Beto inflator - http://road.cc/content/review/219192-beto-cja-001s-tubeless-air-tank-inflator

Done 4 tyres so far using that recipe - up first time, and stayed up.

Orange Seal tape and valves are utter rubbish, but the sealant seems fine. I only got it because I use Compass tyres and Jan Heine claims his tyres were designed for use with it.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: sojournermike on March 27, 2017, 12:28:57 pm
I've used Gorilla on mtb rims, but would prefer something a bit less stretchy on road rims. I've got some tape I bought in bulk (like the Effeto Mariposa tape) or you can get Tesa 4298 (or some such) if you like Stans. Also, Gorila will leave adhesive on your rims.


Aidan, if you're near Harrogate I can put a couple of wraps of tape on your rims some time of course.

Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on March 27, 2017, 01:01:34 pm
Good to know there are other tapes that work reliably - I only went with Gorilla becuase it's what my LBS workshop uses in preference to the stuff they sell. Orange Seal tape is useless
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Pieman on March 27, 2017, 06:03:43 pm
I will give you a update on my SL6 disc and bear in mind these are my personal views
First thing the price now retail is £3700 I paid just over £3000 they increase the retail £200 in the last few weeks.

Weight mine weighs 8.580kg as it came ( no pedals) cycling plus weighed a SL5 at 8.450kg go figure ,don't trust what magazines say.

The isocore bar on this model is nothing more than some eva foam on top of the alloy bars , I changed mine for a carbon fsa one I already had it's makes a good deal of difference I cannot really say the front isospeed does much that I can tell but it's a good ride even on 25mm tyres ,which brings me to..

The Vison carbon wheels 40mm deep ,came with 90mm valved tubes 🤔Look daft long,
32mm R2 tyres nice and grippy but far far to big (wide) for the rims , they catch the wind badly much worse than a deeper zipp303 with 28mm tyres I would not want to descend fleetmoss on them and I'm used to deep section wheels, I put 25mm contis on them and they are fine, if you want to run 32s get some shallower rims or eat some pies to get over 75 to 80kg 😛

With regard to the tyres the 32mm weigh 125g each more than cont 25mm 4seasons (that's tyres and tubes) that's a lot of weight .

The bottom bracket is solid no flex that I can feel , the isospeed rear takes the sting out of the road better than my synapse with 28mm fitted the front is also less firm than said synapse even with the trek on 25mm tyres so maybe that fork does do something.

Mine came with a full Ultegra groupset other than the BR685 hydraulic shifters, the brakes are great but...
The shifters are at best Tiagra quality (in my opinion) at best.
The right shifter has 35mm of free play on the inner leaver(downshift))before you get to click a gear and you can't adjust it out , the worse we have on any of our other bikes is 20mm on out old Tiagra tourers .
The right outer shifter (upshift) freeplay fine but for the full sweep you can only change 2gears up the rear cassette, I have never had anything that did less than 3 .
Left hand shifter works fine but is heavier to shift up the front chainring than any of your other bikes.

I had to put spiral wrap around the cables in the down tube (there is a inspection cover under the front bottle cage so you can get at them) it sounded like a bag of spanners in there until I did that.

The rear cassette was not tight on the hub 🙈

If you get it from a decent shop some of these points will hopefully be sorted but the std build is let's say lacking.

It will make a very good winter and wet weather bike but .... if I had to choose again I would have bought the SL6 or SLR none disc I think that is the best value and a lot lighter.
If I was going disc it would be cable or electronic or Sram but these are just my thoughts
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Aidan on March 27, 2017, 06:35:29 pm
Two wraps of Gorilla 25mm width - if your rims are narrower, it tears perfectly
Stans valves - poke them through the tape, and then press with your thumb, and tighten down with a pair of pliers.
Orange endurance sealant

I used a track pump plus a Beto inflator - http://road.cc/content/review/219192-beto-cja-001s-tubeless-air-tank-inflator

Done 4 tyres so far using that recipe - up first time, and stayed up.

Orange Seal tape and valves are utter rubbish, but the sealant seems fine. I only got it because I use Compass tyres and Jan Heine claims his tyres were designed for use with it.

Cool, I've got Stans tape and sealant in the garage ready to do my Orange P7, just not got round to it yet.  Definitely need an inflator though,

Quote
Aidan, if you're near Harrogate I can put a couple of wraps of tape on your rims some time of course.

Thanks :thumbsup: appreciate the offer, but I think I'm ok with the Stans tape that I have.

Bikes in the shop being built up so getting a bit excited now  :P
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on March 27, 2017, 06:51:39 pm
@pieman thanks for the write up. The SL6 is what my i am claiming for, but the LBS are saying i should stretch for the slr6. I definitely want to run big tyres, so your views on the visions is really helpful.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: sojournermike on March 27, 2017, 08:24:55 pm
I tend to agree that big tyres and mid to deep section rims are a poor match in cross winds. 28mm (31 actual) Schwalbe Ones on 31mm deep Kinlin 31T is hard work when it gets too windy, but 25s are pretty well fine. The difference far exceeds what you might expect.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Pieman on March 28, 2017, 07:55:39 am
@DrMekon I think for you at your weight(a little less than me)the SLR will be the better option you get shallower rims , the carbon bars and the Frame will weighs a little less or buy the Frameset and build it how you like which is what I would do .
With regard to the wheels , only the latest Enve's have been designed to run with 25/28mm tyres all the rest were designed to run mainly 23mm or 25 mm , zipp  303 which are wider than there 404 or 202 for that matter , were designed for 23mm , I can get away with 28 conti on my 303s unless it's very windy in which case I swop out the front for something shallower , the 303 are wider than the Vison wheels on my SL6.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: DrMekon on March 28, 2017, 10:36:48 am
The latest Enves are on my wish list for sure - but I would need a promotion to justify them to myself!
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Andrew Br on March 29, 2017, 05:03:45 pm
I see that Trek have just launched a "Dege" version of the Domane in both disc and rim braked versions.
They're saying that the "Dege" has a longer, lower position.
It certainly looks that way since the head-tube is very short and the top-tube is almost horizontal. I haven't found any geometry info yet.
I think it uses a "higher grade" carbon composite than the "endurance" geometry versions.

 https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/degenkolb/

Perhaps the lower position would suit you Dr M although I suspect it costs "F*ck me how much"* ?

* Maybe you'd need two promotions to justify it and the wheels  ;D.



Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Aidan on April 02, 2017, 08:25:21 am
Well first impressions are good!   Did a 50km shakedown ride yesterday , it feels really stiff when first riding off, but it really does soak up the road surface, not to soft Ti levels but still really nice! The new shape Ultegra hydraulic levers are long  but I like the shape,  the change feels clunkier than usual , though that may improve as I tweaked the gears a bit after the ride.  The brakes are superb. really superb.  Gearing seems good, I'm not a big fan of compacts , but this semeed ok as I was pretty much in big ring all the time, and  although I've not really hit any proper hills yet, but it does suggest that the lowest gears will be low enough !  Wheels are quite bling  but roll well and seem fast, I broke a couple of Strava PRs on roads I ride fairly regularly.  I havent really needed to change much, move seat height a bit, put the bars properly level  ::-)  tweak the gear change , do a full PDI  ;D
Am really pleased with it, really looking forward to lots more miles on it and thats how it should be.
 
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Peat on February 15, 2018, 09:38:58 pm
What size mudguards, and on what size tyres, have you lot jammed into the clearance of the olde Domane?
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: T42 on February 16, 2018, 08:57:02 am
28 mm Raceblades on 25 mm tyres (2015 Domane 4.5, dunno if that's olde or not.)

---o0o---

My rear wheel has done >13k km now. The telltales are still clear - full of crud but distinct.  I'm wondering (a) how much longer it'll last and (b) how much they cost. Front wheel is still fine on 8,300, since it shares the work with a Spa dyno wheel
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Aidan on February 16, 2018, 02:56:10 pm
I have a set of these sitting waiting to be fitted to mine

https://www.evanscycles.com/bontrager-ncs-road-mudguard-set-700c-x-18-35c-EV138150

these were what were reccomended by Trek for a 2017 Domane SL6 disc  which has 32mm tyres.   I'm hoping to get round to fitting them over this weekend so may be able to update on fit then
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: simonp on February 16, 2018, 03:12:26 pm
I really would like a Domane but I keep getting drawn to the SLR 9 Disc which is Dura Ace Di2.

I have all the promotions required but something about spending that much on a bike bothers me.

It's a shame Ultegra Di2 isn't available as an off the peg build, since that would be a lot more sane, and potentially gives a lower granny gear.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Ben T on February 16, 2018, 03:22:54 pm
I really would like a Domane but I keep getting drawn to the SLR 9 Disc which is Dura Ace Di2.

I have all the promotions required but something about spending that much on a bike bothers me.

It's a shame Ultegra Di2 isn't available as an off the peg build, since that would be a lot more sane, and potentially gives a lower granny gear.

You can swap it for my 2013 one which has got ultegra di2 if you like  :P
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: carl on February 16, 2018, 09:25:22 pm
I really would like a Domane but I keep getting drawn to the SLR 9 Disc which is Dura Ace Di2.

I have all the promotions required but something about spending that much on a bike bothers me.

It's a shame Ultegra Di2 isn't available as an off the peg build, since that would be a lot more sane, and potentially gives a lower granny gear.

I just put together an SLR frameset with eTap for far less than the off-the-shelf price (sure, not all he components are the same standard, but good enough for me), and have 11-36 at the back.  It must be cheaper to do the same with Ultegra Di2.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Graham the gorilla on February 16, 2018, 09:35:44 pm
You may still be able to pick up a new 2017  domane slr7 £4600  BUT discounted now and spend the rest on some lighter hoops
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: simonp on February 17, 2018, 12:08:42 am
I really would like a Domane but I keep getting drawn to the SLR 9 Disc which is Dura Ace Di2.

I have all the promotions required but something about spending that much on a bike bothers me.

It's a shame Ultegra Di2 isn't available as an off the peg build, since that would be a lot more sane, and potentially gives a lower granny gear.

I just put together an SLR frameset with eTap for far less than the off-the-shelf price (sure, not all he components are the same standard, but good enough for me), and have 11-36 at the back.  It must be cheaper to do the same with Ultegra Di2.

I did wonder if that might be the case. Ta.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: LEE on February 17, 2018, 11:41:57 am
The owner of my LBS (Abbots Ann Cycles) can pretty much have any bike he chooses (He has a personal collection of Colnagos, new and vintage).

He chooses to ride an SLR 6 disc (I think it's the 6) through the winter.

I have an Domane SL 5 Disc (I upgraded from a Domane 4.3) which came with Vision Metron wheels as standard, they are very nice.  I just think they are superb bikes that, in the disc version, make a practical all-year bike.

If I had the cash to get a higher spec model then I probably would but the SL 5 Disc with those wheels was a bargain at £2600 (2016 model clearance)
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Pieman on February 19, 2018, 08:15:06 am
Just a note for people with the vision wheels
Keep a close eye on the rear freehub because they are giving problems mine just failed at 3000 miles ish shop said they had changed 7 or  8 , trek had no stock the uk importer windwave neither ,my shop were very helpful and found me one off a damaged wheel that was as new.
It’s not rebuildable , it’s like a low end Shimano unit but only has one bearing in the freehub and one on the none drive side/disc side so just wears the freehub quickly due to the lack of support on the drive side.
Easy to check , you can feel up and down play in the cassette and you will see the cassette going up and down if you put it on the bike stand and spin the pedals and then watch it freewheeling.
Don’t buy one off the internet even though they say they are for treks as they look the same but the thread on the back is a smaller size.
I’m going to build mine up onto a better quality hub to solve the issues from happening again.



Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Peat on February 19, 2018, 09:29:34 am
I answered my own previous question. I have 45mm SKS longboards atop the stock 32mm tyres. All fits really nicely. The tyres (Bontrager R1) are junk though, they go as hard as blocks of wood when its cold and offer no purchase on a wet surface.

It's a 2018 SL5 Disc, I've put 150 miles on it over the weekend and I'm thoroughly convinced that this is the finest bicycle ever produced. I'm in love.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Peat on February 21, 2018, 08:06:18 am
(https://s17.postimg.org/ebuatyalb/domane.jpg)
And here she is, for your delectation.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: T42 on February 21, 2018, 09:23:40 am
Congrats!  I've loved mine ever since I put my own saddle on it.  My old Ti Warhorse feels like a carthorse in comparison.

Can you get a 1-litre bottle in & out of that rear cage?  I put side-opening cages on my Domane, but a 1-litre bottle tips over sideways and knocks my leg.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Pieman on February 21, 2018, 11:36:11 am
Very nice 👍
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Hot Flatus on February 21, 2018, 02:57:53 pm
Would an SL7 (rim brake) for £2300 be a bit of a bargain?
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: LEE on February 21, 2018, 08:20:47 pm
Would an SL7 (rim brake) for £2300 be a bit of a bargain?

Watch out for mudguard clearances on the rim-brake versions (if that is a consideration).  The disc versions have much greater clearances under the fork bridges.

Otherwise it's £2K off RRP.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Pieman on February 22, 2018, 08:40:34 am
I would get a rim braked version if I was buying again(I have the sl6 disc)the sl7 has direct mount brakes so will fit 25mm tyres and guards no problem it may take 28s they say it will.
The price is very good .
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: rafletcher on February 22, 2018, 12:59:24 pm
If they are any taller riders in the market...

https://www.bikeradar.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=40090&t=13089394&p=20296049&hilit=Domane#p20296049
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: LEE on February 22, 2018, 01:42:50 pm
I would get a rim braked version if I was buying again(I have the sl6 disc)the sl7 has direct mount brakes so will fit 25mm tyres and guards no problem it may take 28s they say it will.
The price is very good .

You don't like the full hydraulic brakes?  I love the ones on my SL5, they're a revelation after my mechanical BB7s, plus it takes 30mm tyres no problem with mudguards.

The biggest factor though is that the Vision wheels it came with are about £1500 RRP (over 50% of the price of the package) and disc brakes mean I can keep them long time as they are amazing.
I'm bored with Winter riding/braking grinding away my wheel rims.

I admit that discs make for an uglier build than rim brakes but the positives outweigh the negatives for me (2-finger rear wheel braking, in the wet, down steep hills without creating black alloy paste).
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: simonp on February 22, 2018, 02:57:31 pm
I'm with Lee on this one.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Pieman on February 22, 2018, 03:32:12 pm
Lee , I agree about the brakes they are excellent but as a overall package I would still buy a rim version if I was buying again .
I did a ride report a few pages back after I had used the bike for a few months and gave a few reason why in that.
Having had it nearly a year now my views are the same , it is without doubt a very good winter wet weather bike and much better comfort ,speed and brake wise than my old winter bike that was a alloy Cannondale synapse , but given at the moment there are some SLR 6 none discs going at leasure lakes for £2200 ish and SL7 at £2300 somewhere else that’s where my money would go , it’s taking me all my time to stop myself buying one of those SLR s and selling mine .

All personal views ,I’m just getting the rear wheel of mine rebuilt onto a DTswiss 350 hub so I had better not by another bike 🙄🔫
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: LEE on February 23, 2018, 10:05:24 pm
Lee , I agree about the brakes they are excellent but as a overall package I would still buy a rim version if I was buying again .
I did a ride report a few pages back after I had used the bike for a few months and gave a few reason why in that.
Having had it nearly a year now my views are the same , it is without doubt a very good winter wet weather bike and much better comfort ,speed and brake wise than my old winter bike that was a alloy Cannondale synapse , but given at the moment there are some SLR 6 none discs going at leasure lakes for £2200 ish and SL7 at £2300 somewhere else that’s where my money would go , it’s taking me all my time to stop myself buying one of those SLR s and selling mine .

All personal views ,I’m just getting the rear wheel of mine rebuilt onto a DTswiss 350 hub so I had better not by another bike 🙄🔫

But I think we all, Domane owners, love the blend of stiffness, "suspension", and compliance that you get from this TREK design.

The worse UK roads become the more the Domane "decoupler" system makes sense.  Many of my friends simply can't tolerate the broken-up top-dressing surfaces any more but that's where the Domane excels (it was designed for Paris-Roubaix after all).
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Pieman on February 24, 2018, 05:25:26 pm
Totally agree , having just come back from a ride on my old alloy cannondale synapse it’s a real  boneshaker compared to the Trek not rode it for quite a few months and it makes you realise what a difference being able to run bigger tyres and a carbon frame makes.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: citoyen on February 26, 2018, 01:03:58 pm
Would an SL7 (rim brake) for £2300 be a bit of a bargain?

Yes.

I may have said this upthread so forgive me if I'm repeating myself, but if I were buying a Domane, I'd go for the SL over the SLR simply because I think the slider thing is a bit of a gimmick. I'd prefer the disc brake version but more for the wider tyre clearance than the disc brakes themselves, and at that price, I would happily settle for rim brakes.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: LEE on February 26, 2018, 01:36:37 pm
Would an SL7 (rim brake) for £2300 be a bit of a bargain?

Yes.

I may have said this upthread so forgive me if I'm repeating myself, but if I were buying a Domane, I'd go for the SL over the SLR simply because I think the slider thing is a bit of a gimmick. I'd prefer the disc brake version but more for the wider tyre clearance than the disc brakes themselves, and at that price, I would happily settle for rim brakes.

Agree about the slider.  Everyone just puts it on maximum flex and leaves it there.  I can't think of any reason anyone would think, "I reckon I'll adjust the slider so I can feel the bumps up my spine a bit more".
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: mattc on February 26, 2018, 10:06:54 pm
Is there an idiot's guide to the Domane model range? I guess my main question is when/where do larger tyre clearances start to come in? And are framesets available at decent price? (I dont tend to get on with the gear levers/ratios on most modern bikes :( ) Used bikes are definitely of interest!

Asking for a friend, obvs - my views on carbon frames have been well documented (mainly by Flatus).
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: LEE on February 26, 2018, 10:31:32 pm
Is there an idiot's guide to the Domane model range? I guess my main question is when/where do larger tyre clearances start to come in? And are framesets available at decent price? (I dont tend to get on with the gear levers/ratios on most modern bikes :( ) Used bikes are definitely of interest!

Asking for a friend, obvs - my views on carbon frames have been well documented (mainly by Flatus).

This isn't definitive but..

The pre-2015 carbon bikes used a numeric model number (I had a 4.3).  I think the 5 series had a higher-spec carbon weave. 
These models had a de-coupler at the seatpost (where the seat tube had a pivot bearing at the junction with the top tube, allowing the whole seat tube to flex down to the bottom bracket.  You don't notice it  whilst pedalling but it takes out the impacts that usually travel straight up the seat tube.  It makes for a very smooth ride).

Post 2015 they introduced SL and SLR prefix. 

The SL models have a de-coupler at the seat tube AND in the head tube, allowing a similar "flex" in the steerer.  Again you don't notice it, it just smoothes out poor surfaces.

The SLRs have a slider in the seat tube, allowing you to "dial in" the amount of flex yo uwant in the seat tube.  It turns out that most people just want a very cushy ride and set it to max flex.

Aagin you really don't detect any flex as such, we're talking small deflections, but enough that all your mates seem to be moaning about the rough road conditions more than you do.

As for tyre sizes.  The rim brakes all seem to tie you down to 28mm max (I ran Conti 4 seasons 25mm) and Race-blade guards.  The disc versions have clearance for 32mm I think (they come with 30mm) and clearance for SKS mudguards (with a bit of botching I found).

I bought mine (my original 4.3) as a summer toy but, within a few rides I changed my plans of riding my Condor Fratello on PBP2015 and took the Domane.  It was every bit as comfortable as the Fratello but 5-10% quicker over any of my longer local routes.

The sheer size of the power-train (massive bottom bracket shell and huge chain-stays) make for great power delivery whilst skinny seat stays and the de-coupler make for great comfort.  It's an amazing mix of stiffness where it counts and comfort everywhere else.

The SL5 has a new spec now, they don't come with the Vision Metron wheels.  That's a shame because it was a cheap way to buy expensive wheels as part of a "last year's model" package. 
The standard Bontrager wheels are nothing special.

Here's mine, pre-mudguards. 
Check out the size of the tyres, Head-tube, Down tube and chain stays!!  Brutally functional.  Not pretty like my old Condor Fratello but bloody quick.
The seat post is a slip-over design, not a slip-inside.  This allows even more of the seat tube to flex.

Did I mention the braking?  Mama Mia..the braking!

I think the bottom gear is a 34T on to a 32T sprocket which, given the stiffness of the drive train gets you up anything.

(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4740/40505391041_f52219f2be_o.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/24HjHz4)]
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: mattc on February 26, 2018, 10:47:12 pm
Ta  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: citoyen on February 26, 2018, 11:47:10 pm
Current Trek naming system is based around the frame spec and component level (5=105, 6=Ultegra etc). They also do their frames in two different 'fits' - H2 is the standard fit for us plebs, but the pros get the more 'aggressive' H1 fit.

Trek call their proprietary brand of carbon 'OCLV'. I could tell you what that stands for but it really doesn't matter. Make something up - it will be just as meaningful as the official blurb. They grow it under laboratory conditions on a top secret military-grade carbon farm in Wisconsin and employ ex-NASA scientists to weave it by hand. It comes in different grades - the SL uses 500 series OCLV carbon, the SLR uses 600 series OCLV carbon. If you can tell the difference between the two, remind me never to try to hide a pea under your mattress.

There's also the AL and ALR - AL is bog standard bacofoil, ALR is 'premium' aluminium.

SL Disc frameset is yours for £1775 - that's the official list price anyway, but your friend can probably get it for less than that if she shops around.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Pieman on February 27, 2018, 08:11:13 am
They will also take a 11/34 cassette at the rear if you adjust the b screw on the older 11speed Ultegra and 105 models the new once’s 2018 Onwards Ultegra takes a 34 as std apparently so would probably take a 11/36 .
Someone from my club just bought a 2017 SLR6 on Sunday £2200 and they are changing out the 11/28 to  a 11/34 cassette for him that’s a lot of bike .
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: LEE on February 27, 2018, 12:31:41 pm
PS.  Mine is 11spd 105.  I think it was a trade-down against the Vision wheelset.  Given how nice 105 is now I was fine with that.  I've had 105 in various incarnations for as long as I can remember. 
This is better than the other incarnations (I guess last year's Ultegra becomes next year's 105 ...and so on).
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: T42 on February 27, 2018, 01:06:45 pm
The standard Bontrager wheels are nothing special.

Stoopid question: since the bike is designed around Shim 11 spd, any Shim-11spd-compatible rear wheel should do, shouldn't it?

PS.  Mine is 11spd 105.  I think it was a trade-down against the Vision wheelset.  Given how nice 105 is now I was fine with that.  I've had 105 in various incarnations for as long as I can remember. 
This is better than the other incarnations (I guess last year's Ultegra becomes next year's 105 ...and so on).

Sounds like it.  I went from 2011 10spd 105 to 2015 11 spd Ultegra. That was night & day.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: simonp on March 27, 2018, 04:05:10 pm
Will soon be owner of a custom Domane SL Disc Di2 build. 56cm SLR frames literally went out of stock as I placed my order.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: dim on March 27, 2018, 10:02:45 pm
maybe my next Audax bike .... the new Domane SL 5 Gravel Disc

(https://trek.scene7.com/is/image/TrekBicycleProducts/DomaneSL5Gravel_22408_A_Portrait?wid=1360&hei=1020&fmt=pjpeg&qlt=40,1&iccEmbed=0&cache=on,on)



just bought a Whyte, but I bought it knowing that I would upgrade in a years time .... I really like the Domane Gravel ... £2600 new price, but I will buy 2nd hand off ebay in a year or so

sometimes you see a bike and even before riding it, you know that you will be fast on it ... I've had lots of bikes over the past 3 years (some good ones)

it's hard to explain, but on some bikes you sit ontop .... and some bikes you sit 'inside'  ;D

My old 2014 Giant TCR is one that you 'sit inside' ...,. it's a fast bike, and a keeper  ....

This new Domane SL 5 Gravel is one that I know that I will enjoy (even beofre taking it for a test ride)





Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: simonp on March 27, 2018, 10:23:22 pm
Sweet.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on April 03, 2018, 08:45:27 pm
Popped into LBS and saw there are also aluminium framed Domanes. I hadn't realized this.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: simonp on April 03, 2018, 11:20:03 pm
Popped into LBS and saw there are also aluminium framed Domanes. I hadn't realized this.

Indeed they do cover quite a wide range of prices and specs.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: LEE on April 03, 2018, 11:55:23 pm
The standard Bontrager wheels are nothing special.

Stoopid question: since the bike is designed around Shim 11 spd, any Shim-11spd-compatible rear wheel should do, shouldn't it?


Remember it has Thru-axles (Disc brakes).  I'm not up to speed on the various types.

It's my first bike with Thru-axles.  I'm not sure whether it's just those, or the combination of lots of things, but it holds a line through even tight corners as if it's on rails.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: simonp on April 04, 2018, 02:03:48 am
Rear axle is 142x12mm. Front 100x12.

These are supposed to be stiffer than standard quick release. I’ve had wheels build to spec for my build. Rear hub Ultegra 142x12 Center Lock disc, front a SON 12 i.e. SON Delux 100x12 Center Lock disc.

These parts are not this: cheap.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: LEE on April 09, 2018, 02:59:20 pm
The owner of Abbots Ann Cycles in Andover, Hampshire, is selling his Trek Domane SLR8 Disc (Dura Ace) 58cm for £2999

New tyres and serviced (By Barry the shop's mechanic).

UK Warranty.

Trust me, Will has the best stuff.  It's a saving of £2500 on the new RRP.  Call the shop and ask for Will if you are interested.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: simonp on April 09, 2018, 03:25:15 pm
Too late for me. My build is completed but I have a few snagging issues to fix. Lovely though.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: citoyen on April 10, 2018, 08:24:07 am
Size 58? I wouldn't be able to reach the pedals, dammit.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: rafletcher on April 11, 2018, 04:25:07 pm
I could but the Trek size guide says I should e a 56cm. Given age related lack of flexibility a 58cm would bee just too big. Lucky for my wallet!
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: simonp on April 11, 2018, 04:30:24 pm
Trek say 58 for me but a 56 is a better fit.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: sg37409 on May 08, 2018, 01:19:31 pm
I seem to be considering a Domane SL 8 2018, after this thread has brought these to my attention  :)
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: simonp on May 08, 2018, 01:31:12 pm
I’m loving the Di2 synchro shift. Bunch of Strava PRs on it yesterday. Guess gears are faster than fixed.

Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Peat on May 09, 2018, 03:28:11 pm
A couple of months in on my Domane now. Whistles around a 200 to the extent it feels a bit like cheating. I found some areas of discomfort in the last 100 of a 400, but that's to be expected (?) with rides of that duration. Still, jumping back on my old Madone feels very jarring and harsh which makes you really appreciate the compliance of the Domane.

Good bike.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: LEE on May 09, 2018, 04:55:16 pm
A couple of months in on my Domane now. Whistles around a 200 to the extent it feels a bit like cheating. I found some areas of discomfort in the last 100 of a 400, but that's to be expected (?) with rides of that duration. Still, jumping back on my old Madone feels very jarring and harsh which makes you really appreciate the compliance of the Domane.

Good bike.

Agreed about cheating.  It has the same level of comfort, possibly more, as my steel Condor Fratello but has 5%-10% more "going forwards efficiency".  5% over a 200km Audax is worth an extra pub stop*

*The ISO standard for measuring Audax efficiency
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: sg37409 on May 21, 2018, 06:54:48 am
Some of the domanes have a Matt finish. How do folks find this is to keep clean ? Do you need anything other than fairy liquid to wash it ?
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: T42 on May 21, 2018, 07:27:29 am
I use detergent on most of the frame and WD40 degreaser on the right chain stay and any other stubborn bits.

Re the Matt Finish*: there's matt & matt. Mine's matt black all right, but there's a lustre to it. But after 3 years' use the top tube is dull matt at the front, from scuffing when I'm standing over it. Unavoidable, unfortunately; I'm a low-down bum.

*the notorious full-value Audacieux
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: madcow on May 21, 2018, 08:50:06 am
A couple of months in on my Domane now. Whistles around a 200 to the extent it feels a bit like cheating. I found some areas of discomfort in the last 100 of a 400, but that's to be expected (?) with rides of that duration. Still, jumping back on my old Madone feels very jarring and harsh which makes you really appreciate the compliance of the Domane.

Good bike.

Which model of Madone are you comparing it with?
I keep looking at this thread and Domanes for sale asking myself if I can justify the spendiness.
I did a 400k at the weekend, with a lot fewer miles under my belt than I really wanted , but didn't really struggle on the comfort side.
My shoulders and arms are fine. Sure, my arse is complaing a bit this morning but that was expected due to lack of conditioning rather than bike comfort.
My Madone is  a 5.2. I have completed 3 x 1000km+ rides on it so know how it performs over long distances.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: LEE on May 21, 2018, 11:24:19 am
A couple of months in on my Domane now. Whistles around a 200 to the extent it feels a bit like cheating. I found some areas of discomfort in the last 100 of a 400, but that's to be expected (?) with rides of that duration. Still, jumping back on my old Madone feels very jarring and harsh which makes you really appreciate the compliance of the Domane.

Good bike.

Which model of Madone are you comparing it with?
I keep looking at this thread and Domanes for sale asking myself if I can justify the spendiness.
I did a 400k at the weekend, with a lot fewer miles under my belt than I really wanted , but didn't really struggle on the comfort side.
My shoulders and arms are fine. Sure, my arse is complaing a bit this morning but that was expected due to lack of conditioning rather than bike comfort.
My Madone is  a 5.2. I have completed 3 x 1000km+ rides on it so know how it performs over long distances.

I think you need to ride a Domane first.  If you're comfortable on the Madone then I'd stick with it, it's faster than the Domane.

My skeleton just can't deal with the Madone geometry (maybe if I were 21 again) so the high front end of the Domane suits me. 
I'd say the (carbon) Domane was the fast-tourer that suits owners of steel fast-tourers perfectly. 

However yo won't know unless you ride one.  I went out to buy a GIANT Defy 2 (Bike of the year) which felt great on my test ride.  Then I rode the Domane and I knew in 50 yards it was a different level of comfort.  It's probably not as quick as the Defy but it's a damn sight quicker than my steel Condor Fratello (Sold)
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: citoyen on May 21, 2018, 11:43:57 am
I think the Domane is just as quick as the Defy, and definitely more comfortable.

Another similar bike to consider is the Orbea Avant, which I found to be a very fast and very comfortable bike. Of the three, I'd find it hard to choose between the Domane and the Avant, with the Defy in a close third place.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Peat on May 21, 2018, 03:11:22 pm


Which model of Madone are you comparing it with?


Aluminium 4.3 circa 2012.

Physical comfort aside, the Domane's longer wheelbase makes it quite lazy i find. Certainly when jumping from the Madone, but on a long ride I don't want to waste energy keeping it in a straight line.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: LEE on May 21, 2018, 03:14:07 pm


Which model of Madone are you comparing it with?


Aluminium 4.3 circa 2012.

Physical comfort aside, the Domane's longer wheelbase makes it quite lazy i find. Certainly when jumping from the Madone, but on a long ride I don't want to waste energy keeping it in a straight line.

My SL5 Domane has discs with thru-axles.  I have to agree that it holds a line beautifully (it doesn't get out of shape when cornering either).  Would be superb for the "riding whilst almost asleep" stages of PBP.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Peat on May 21, 2018, 03:14:13 pm
This weekend, i did away with the mudguards and slung on a set of 35mm Panaracer Gravelking SK's in preparation for TiNaT.

The bike handles the loose/rough stuff very diligently. I think it'll benefit from a bit of luggage on the bars as the front end felt a little numb at times. At 40/50psi it takes the smooth-factor on road to another level.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: rafletcher on May 22, 2018, 03:08:36 pm
Some of the domanes have a Matt finish. How do folks find this is to keep clean ? Do you need anything other than fairy liquid to wash it ?

I have a 50% matte frame on my Argon. I use RedAnt cleaner and protector. Works well and a little goals a long way.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: rafletcher on July 06, 2018, 03:14:05 pm
I think the Domane is just as quick as the Defy, and definitely more comfortable.

Another similar bike to consider is the Orbea Avant, which I found to be a very fast and very comfortable bike. Of the three, I'd find it hard to choose between the Domane and the Avant, with the Defy in a close third place.

As I’m shortly to be gainfully employed again, I started looking at Domanes which a I’ve been thinking about for ages, but they only do Di2 disc versions (which is what I’d like) at the very top end. I could of course build one up from a frame set but that’s always more costly than a complete bike. Your comments above led me to look at the Avant and it looks to be considerably less expensive than an equivalent Domane. Hmmm, decisions decisions.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: sg37409 on July 09, 2018, 12:21:16 am
I bought this from a LBS in May and have done 1200km on it.
I was swithering over a 2018 model with Dura Ace 'cos I fancied the carbon wheels. So when I saw this in my size and for less than half the price of the £4300 of the 2018, I went for it. I got it for 1800 once after talking nicely to get the store sale applied and card discount.
(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/844/28416890607_7facc7850f_c.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/Ki6ZxM)Trek Domane 2016 (https://flic.kr/p/Ki6ZxM) by sg310 (https://www.flickr.com/photos/24775321@N02/), on Flickr

I didn't buy it as a race bike, and although I've don't a few chain gangs on it, its at its best on longer ride where speed and comfort are needed.

I had high expectations of the smoothness of ride quality and I wasn't disappointed: I feel the big proportion of that must be the 32mm tyres.
Its very solid on descents and braking into corners.
Ive ridden on a few chain gangs on it, and this is where the wheels feel most beneficial. At normal speeds, I don't notice that much difference, but at higher speeds on the chaingang, I'm having to put in less effort for the speed.

The handlebars are really wide for my pref. I will look for narrower set later, but I don't want to change too much initially as I'm getting used to it. The bars are also higher than I'm used to, but they are comfortable and I use the drops much more than I'm used to. I have more variety of hand-positions.
Brakes are fantastic. Firm braking with the front on bumpy decent and you can feel the front isocoupler moving.  I don't like that as it feels like a loose headset but I'll get used to that.
I swapped out the cassette from 11-32 to 14-28 and this suits me very nicely, I change a lot and the shifting is pretty good, but the lever throw is longer than I'm used to. Also, rapid change from big ring to little needs more care and pressure off than I'm used to with 105.  I expect the long cage mech is a factor here.

And I changed the saddle. I put put with the original for over 1000km but really didn't get on with it.
 
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: rafletcher on July 09, 2018, 03:12:20 pm
I think the Domane is just as quick as the Defy, and definitely more comfortable.

Another similar bike to consider is the Orbea Avant, which I found to be a very fast and very comfortable bike. Of the three, I'd find it hard to choose between the Domane and the Avant, with the Defy in a close third place.

As I’m shortly to be gainfully employed again, I started looking at Domanes which a I’ve been thinking about for ages, but they only do Di2 disc versions (which is what I’d like) at the very top end. I could of course build one up from a frame set but that’s always more costly than a complete bike. Your comments above led me to look at the Avant and it looks to be considerably less expensive than an equivalent Domane. Hmmm, decisions decisions.

In the end, after much deliberation, I pulled the trigger on a 2018 SL disc frameset I found at Sigma, apparently the last one in my size they had. I might well have gone for the Orbea if they still accepted the neat combined rack/guard but that aprentky stopped with the 2017 model year frames. Now to source all the other bits and pieces I need! 
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Dave_C on July 09, 2018, 04:08:30 pm
I bought this from a LBS in May and have done 1200km on it.
I was swithering over a 2018 model with Dura Ace 'cos I fancied the carbon wheels. So when I saw this in my size and for less than half the price of the £4300 of the 2018, I went for it. I got it for 1800 once after talking nicely to get the store sale applied and card discount.
(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/844/28416890607_7facc7850f_c.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/Ki6ZxM)Trek Domane 2016 (https://flic.kr/p/Ki6ZxM) by sg310 (https://www.flickr.com/photos/24775321@N02/), on Flickr

I didn't buy it as a race bike, and although I've don't a few chain gangs on it, its at its best on longer ride where speed and comfort are needed.

I had high expectations of the smoothness of ride quality and I wasn't disappointed: I feel the big proportion of that must be the 32mm tyres.
Its very solid on descents and braking into corners.
Ive ridden on a few chain gangs on it, and this is where the wheels feel most beneficial. At normal speeds, I don't notice that much difference, but at higher speeds on the chaingang, I'm having to put in less effort for the speed.

The handlebars are really wide for my pref. I will look for narrower set later, but I don't want to change too much initially as I'm getting used to it. The bars are also higher than I'm used to, but they are comfortable and I use the drops much more than I'm used to. I have more variety of hand-positions.
Brakes are fantastic. Firm braking with the front on bumpy decent and you can feel the front isocoupler moving.  I don't like that as it feels like a loose headset but I'll get used to that.
I swapped out the cassette from 11-32 to 14-28 and this suits me very nicely, I change a lot and the shifting is pretty good, but the lever throw is longer than I'm used to. Also, rapid change from big ring to little needs more care and pressure off than I'm used to with 105.  I expect the long cage mech is a factor here.

And I changed the saddle. I put put with the original for over 1000km but really didn't get on with it.

Hi, if the handlebars for 44cm wide, could I have dibs on them if you are selling? If I recall right you live/work in Edinburgh right? We met a few years ago cycling in along the A8 cycle path?

If you don't plan on selling, not problem, but I'm after a new set of bars, don't want a new set, and prefer collection to postage.

Dave Crampton
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: rafletcher on July 10, 2018, 04:09:12 pm
My google-fu has failed and I’ve got bored looking. What size discs are fitted to the Domane please.

Edit: Is it 160mm both ends?
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Peat on July 11, 2018, 12:16:18 pm
Just a note to say NOT to run the Gravelking SK 35mm tyres.

The clearance is just too tight. When swapping over to my road wheelset, I noticed a scoring in the helitape under the fork crown. Upon closer inspection, they had worn a groove through the tape and into the paintwork. I had  the LBS look at it and they reassured me they didn't think it'd got down to the carbon so I touched it up with nail varnish and re-taped it.

The 'Domane Gravel' ships with 35mm G-Ones. I can only assume they are a bit narrower or the shoulder profile doesn't interfere as much.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: chrisbainbridge on July 15, 2018, 10:15:33 pm
My trek domane so disc came with 140mm rotors but now has 160 front to work better with the dynamo.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Peat on July 16, 2018, 07:28:29 am
how so?
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: chrisbainbridge on July 26, 2018, 11:17:26 pm
Long story but the Son dynamo hub size meant the spokes fouled the piston housing with 140mm rotors. However going upto 160mm gave perfect clearance.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: sg37409 on August 06, 2018, 04:57:34 pm
2,100 km and the bottom bracket has play in it and creaks !
Not happy at all.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Pieman on August 07, 2018, 04:06:02 pm
Yep mines creaking a bit too ,done a bit more mileage than yours mind and it’s my winter/bad weather bike.

Wait till those vision wheels start playing up 😉
I Spent far to long today trying to sore some front wheel bearings for the vision wheels (I have already replaced the rear hub with a dt Swiss as the original freehub was a complete pile of 💩)
Anyway unless the uk importer has some they are unobtainable on the internet and off my local bearing suppliers no Fag/ina/ncn listing .
I can feel a new front hub coming on as I really don’t have the time in my life for such rubbish

It’s still a good bike but as I posted up thread it’s certainly overpriced anywhere near retail pricing
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: sg37409 on August 07, 2018, 05:44:54 pm
Yes.  I’m glad I got mine for a healthy discount.  I’m aware of the cheap hubs and if and when mine go I’ll replace with some that are a lot less shite.

It’s a really nice ride but right now I fear the B.B. is just the start of a long thread of issues
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: sg37409 on August 25, 2018, 07:14:47 pm
Was called by the shop yesterday.  Its been back to Trek who can't fix it and have approved a new frame.  :thumbsup:

Just the crappy shimano leaky front calliper to sort out now.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Rando on August 27, 2018, 05:03:39 pm
I too have a Trek Domane 5.2 (2014) with the BB worn. It is currently with Trek UK warranty. I am hoping they replace the frame rather than try and bodge a fix. It has been 3 weeks now without my bike and not happy at all about it. I have had at least 3 new BB fitted since new - it really is a flawed design and can't believe Trek have not changed to a more suitable BB.
So fingers crossed that I too get a new frame.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: rafletcher on August 27, 2018, 07:45:18 pm
I’m in the process of building up a Domane. I have the Trek BB but am trying to source a Token BB3724 bottom bracket.

https://www.tokenproducts.com/bottom-brackets/20-ninja/470-bb3724

I’ll let you know how I get on.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: sg37409 on August 27, 2018, 09:51:39 pm
I’m in the process of building up a Domane. I have the Trek BB but am trying to source a Token BB3724 bottom bracket.

https://www.tokenproducts.com/bottom-brackets/20-ninja/470-bb3724

I’ll let you know how I get on.

 :thumbsup:  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: rafletcher on August 28, 2018, 08:33:04 am
So, it seems that the Token BB "Thread Through" bottom bracket is readily available from the UK Importer of Token (though the installation tool seems a bit expensive).
EDIT: Ah, the tool for this BB is a long steel item, not the small cup-like ones I've seen for £6. So maybe not sooo bad a price.

Also there is an "oversize" bb version available (presumable for after an original 2-bearing type BB has eroded the seat) in 37.2mm o/d.

"The Token Ninja BB you require for the BB90/BB95 fitting (TK-BB3724) is currently in stock with ourselves ready for immediate despatch as is the tool required. The bottom bracket retails at £59.99 and the tool is £26.39, these can be ordered direct or through your local bike shop.
Any questions let me know
Regards,
Carey O’Callaghan
Sales Support Team Leader
+44 (0)1444 243000"

This type of BB might eliminate some of the creaking issues there can be with PF bottom brackets - although the Hope PF41 (a similar design) I have on my Argon 18 does still occasionally creak, though I note that Token say to grease the cups before installation.  Anyway I'll be getting the Token one to try out on the Domane.

Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: sg37409 on September 05, 2018, 10:51:35 pm
Thanks for this ratfletcher. I heard from the shop that the new frame is in, and they've built it up. I suspect its an SLR frame rather than SL. The low end shimano hydraulic front brake was leaking and they've changed that under warranty also. I don't know if it will include the changer or just the caliper. I was going to pick it up tomorrow, but they called me to say that the rear free hub has seized up and they've put in a warranty claim on that now. Sheesh. Maybe get it back for next summer.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: s3dbw on September 09, 2018, 08:39:25 pm
So, it seems that the Token BB "Thread Through" bottom bracket is readily available from the UK Importer of Token (though the installation tool seems a bit expensive).
EDIT: Ah, the tool for this BB is a long steel item, not the small cup-like ones I've seen for £6. So maybe not sooo bad a price.

Also there is an "oversize" bb version available (presumable for after an original 2-bearing type BB has eroded the seat) in 37.2mm o/d.

"The Token Ninja BB you require for the BB90/BB95 fitting (TK-BB3724) is currently in stock with ourselves ready for immediate despatch as is the tool required. The bottom bracket retails at £59.99 and the tool is £26.39, these can be ordered direct or through your local bike shop.
Any questions let me know
Regards,
Carey O’Callaghan


+44 (0)1444 243000"

This type of BB might eliminate some of the creaking issues there can be with PF bottom brackets - although the Hope PF41 (a similar design) I have on my Argon 18 does still occasionally creak, though I note that Token say to grease the cups before installation.  Anyway I'll be getting the Token one to try out on the Domane.

Would be interested to hear what you think of the Token BB. I have had owned Domanes since 2013 and lost count of the number of non-drive side bearings I have to replace primarily as a result of water ingress causing the bearing to fail. This is another major weakness of the BB90 which Trek have never really solved, even with the latest bearings with the integrated plastic seal. Seriously thinking about trying the Token system as they claim,in addition to solving any creak issues that the bearing seals they use are better than the standard enduro bearings.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Peat on September 10, 2018, 12:01:22 pm
4500km in and my BB is now creaking too. I suspect riding through knee-deep flood water in April didn't help. I was able to service all bearings except the BB that time.

Interested in the Token BB too. I have shimano press-fit BB's across 3 of my bikes now and am universally unimpressed with their life and ease of replacement.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Rando on September 15, 2018, 08:17:35 pm
Update on my Domane 5.2 BB issue - Bike was sent to Trek UK and it has been repaired and new BB fitted. First ride out on it today and exactly the same problem as in it sounds like a bag of spanners being rattled ! Not happy at all. Lost 4 weeks already with the messing about from Trek.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: s3dbw on September 16, 2018, 08:33:32 am
Update on my Domane 5.2 BB issue - Bike was sent to Trek UK and it has been repaired and new BB fitted. First ride out on it today and exactly the same problem as in it sounds like a bag of soanners being rattled ! Not happy at all. Lost 4 weeks already with the messing about from Trek.

Did they fit the oversize bearings?
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Rando on September 17, 2018, 06:10:09 pm
Update on my Domane 5.2 BB issue - Bike was sent to Trek UK and it has been repaired and new BB fitted. First ride out on it today and exactly the same problem as in it sounds like a bag of soanners being rattled ! Not happy at all. Lost 4 weeks already with the messing about from Trek.

Did they fit the oversize bearings?

According to LBS yes they did fit oversize bearings. Typically when the mechanic had a quick go on bike it wasn't making the rattling/creaking noise but i explained that for a few miles it was OK then it would suddenly start playing up - especially when going uphill or trying to push the pace a bit. I honestly thought on my ride that the bike was going to seize up !
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: rafletcher on September 18, 2018, 10:08:59 am
I haven't yet fitted the Token BB - a bit of an hiatus in the build whilst I waited for parts - but for reference they also do it with the oversized bearings if you need to replace a failed standard unit, as opposed to a "first fit" that I'll be doing.  I have been very happy with the Hope PF41 I have on another bike, which operates on the same principal of threading the two halves together to pull the bearings into place.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Peat on October 17, 2018, 07:43:32 am
Has anyone tried fitting a power meter to a modern Domane?
I'm talking left crank Stages or 4iiii.

The clearance seems tight and the 'clearance checker tools' (paper stencil) seem to suggest probably not.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: rafletcher on October 17, 2018, 08:41:32 am
A quick google suggests that a 1mm spacer can be fitted to the spindle to space out the LH crank if clearance is an issue. Assumes a Shimano chainset tho.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Peat on October 17, 2018, 09:22:55 am
Is that to space the BB shell out from the frame, or to sit on the crank axle between the crank and the bb? I would have thought the later would damage to face of the bb or encourage crap to get in.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: rafletcher on October 17, 2018, 12:54:35 pm
Is that to space the BB shell out from the frame, or to sit on the crank axle between the crank and the bb? I would have thought the later would damage to face of the bb or encourage crap to get in.

I could be wrong, but I suspect it's between the BB  and the crank arm, and that the spacer bears on the rotating part of the bearing.  Maybe a question for the "knowledge" thread.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: s3dbw on October 17, 2018, 04:53:39 pm
Has anyone tried fitting a power meter to a modern Domane?
I'm talking left crank Stages or 4iiii.

The clearance seems tight and the 'clearance checker tools' (paper stencil) seem to suggest probably not.

I have a 4iiii fitted to my 2016 model year Domane SLR. Fits no problem. I also have an earlier 2013 Domane 5.9 and it will also fit this model. Hope this helps.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Peat on October 17, 2018, 05:01:46 pm
Cheers. I've ordered one (and some spacers just in case).

It'll spend most of its time on the other bike that i use on the turbo and for going fast-fast, but I want it to be able to fit both.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: s3dbw on October 17, 2018, 05:45:39 pm
Cheers. I've ordered one (and some spacers just in case).

It'll spend most of its time on the other bike that i use on the turbo and for going fast-fast, but I want it to be able to fit both.

Have to say the 4iiii has been pretty well bomb proof!, connects every time and has never dropped put on ride. You can also set it up for left/right leg imbalance through a phone app which you can download. Power readings match closely with Wattbike that I use as well. Also had no issues with water ingress which was a problem on early stages units.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: sg37409 on October 19, 2018, 09:01:48 am
I got "my" Domane back yesterday.
The frame was replaced under warranty due to the bb shell being ovalised. It was a 2016 frame replaced with a 2018 (I think model) Still an SL though, not an SLR. I'm very happy with it.
The wheels (Vision Metron) were replaced under warranty: They were fine when the bike went in, but the freehub on the cheap hubs seized and the shop put a claim in. Trek replaced with Bontrager Aoulous Pro5's which look great and have good hubs.
The f.brake calliper and lever were also replaced due to a leak.

I still have grave misgivings about the press fit b/b but hope thats a few years down the line for me now.

Looking forward to riding it now. The long wait when it was in the shop doesn't seem so bad at all now.
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1918/44508108955_1904fe070f_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/2aP2G9T)Triggers Broom (https://flic.kr/p/2aP2G9T) by sg310 (https://www.flickr.com/photos/24775321@N02/), on Flickr
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: Peat on October 19, 2018, 09:04:42 am
Same as mine, except the snazzy wheels.

Do you take that strap off the front wheel when riding? ::-)
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: chrisbainbridge on October 19, 2018, 02:02:59 pm
Very nice

Has anybody tried the Token BB yet?
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: rafletcher on October 20, 2018, 12:46:11 pm
No  :-[ I’ve still not gi5 my act together to start that build, weathers been too nice. But if it’s anything like the Hope PF41, which is a similar design, that I’ve got in my Argon, it’ll be great. When built I’ll report back.
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: chrisbainbridge on October 24, 2018, 04:22:55 pm
Thank you

I took my domane in to be serviced as I was running out of time.  Oh yes they said we can fit a better bottom bracket, we know the supplier.

Picked the bike up and they said" there is no other bottom bracket for these!"

Ah well!  They also subtly managed to decrease the quality of the Di2 change.  I think they have adjusted the limit screws to limit the Di2 travel rather than trusting the Di2 to do its job.  really very disappointed.  There are apparently 2 mechanics in the shop and guess who did the work this time?
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: s3dbw on October 26, 2018, 12:33:15 pm
There are  two alternatives to the standard Trek fitted BB90 that I am currently aware off.

1. Token BB3724 which is a complete assembly:  https://www.tokenproducts.com/bottom-brackets/470-bb3724

2. Sugino BB90 ceramic bearing which is claimed to have a better seal arrangement: https://www.suginoltd.co.jp/us/products/bb/bb90.html

If anyone is aware of any other alternatives, perhaps they could post links?

regards
Title: Re: Trek Domane
Post by: s3dbw on October 27, 2018, 08:00:16 am
Just replaced the non-drive side bearing again! same problem, water ingress eventually leading to the bearing running rough. No matter how much grease you put on, always the same result! I replace these things pretty much every quarter, fortunately with the right tools, its only a 10 minute job at most, but its the one thing that really annoys me on what is otherwise a great bike. I am clearly not the only one who suffers these problems, so major design flaw in my opinion. The later Trek Domane, I have one of those as well, changed the bearing design slightly, it has a slightly bigger inner diameter, 25mm as opposed to 24mm, but the seal has a sleeve which sits inside the bearing (which makes up the extra 1mm) and wraps around the outside face of the bearing. I have had to replace at least one of these as well, so while the new design may be a bit better, it only delays the inevitable