Yet Another Cycling Forum

General Category => Audax => Highest Annual Mileage Record attempt => Topic started by: bunker on January 10, 2015, 09:34:46 pm

Title: Steve's Kit
Post by: bunker on January 10, 2015, 09:34:46 pm
For the benefit of us kit geeks and one for those in the know....what kit is Steve using? Bike, tyres, lights, gloves etc, etc.

Also what is he carrying on a day to day basis in his Carradice? what 'emergency' kit is he lugging around (hopefully never to be used). Bivvy bag? that sort of thing.

Its a fantastic opportunity to see what lasts and what doesn't. If Steve wears it out in a month, I will know it would be suitable for at least 2 years for me!
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: thing1 on January 10, 2015, 10:45:41 pm
I was wondering the same, and thought we could start to crowd source the list here? Reply with what you know.

A couple I know off top of head to get started.


Frame & fork: Raleigh Sojourn

Tyres: Schwalbe One tubeless

Rims: Stans Alpha (?)

GPS: Garmins 1000, 510 (I think?) etrek xxx(?). And I saw a "Mobile upload" on strava too.

Clothing: Miltag

Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Kim on January 10, 2015, 10:55:38 pm
"Mobile upload" is probably the eTrex.  Strava is in a state of denial over the things.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on January 10, 2015, 11:28:50 pm
The Etrex 30 does show up as a mobile.
Milltag clothes
Nuun bidons and tablets
2 x Smart 1W Superflash rear lights and 2 spares
Hope headset and BB
Alpha 340 rims on this bike, 400 on another
Shimano PD-M540 pedals
Shimano barend shifters in TranzX aerobars (they'll have to come off for PBP)
Carradice rackpack
Brooks saddle and handlebar tape

No bivvy bag
AA and AAA lithium batteries as spares (uses rechargeables primarily)
Spare tyre
Anklets
Cable lock
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Mad Jack on January 11, 2015, 12:09:24 am
Interesting,

What shoes is TG using..
 :thumbsup:


Here's the STD bike- http://www.raleigh.co.uk/ProductType/ProductRange/Product/Default.aspx?pc=1&pt=14&pg=8075

Clothing, good to see these photos again  ;D ;D :thumbsup: http://milltag.cc/features/yesterday-everyday



Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: thing1 on January 11, 2015, 12:31:20 am
Great start! Interested to know: front lights, reflective sticker thingies. Any spare power source for Garmin 1000/510?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on January 11, 2015, 01:14:21 am
I've just unplugged a couple of rubber-covered Garmin battery doohickeys that velcro around tubing.

Standard reflective tape on frame, cranks, rims. Mostly they match the base colours in daylight.

Front lights range from a Chinese Cree thing to a couple of RSP backups. I think this is where some upgrading could really pay off. Even while maximising daylight, he is spending a fair bit of time in the dark each day,
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: The Bonk on January 11, 2015, 04:58:47 am
What size chainrings/cassette?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on January 11, 2015, 05:03:08 am
Kask helmet
Shimano MTB shoes, midrange (5 pairs)
Stock Sojourn chainring and cassette sizes
Hope hubs
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Fab Foodie on January 11, 2015, 07:54:37 am
Kask helmet
Shimano MTB shoes, midrange (5 pairs)
Stock Sojourn chainring and cassette sizes
Hope hubs

Is that to wake him up if he stops pedaling?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on January 11, 2015, 08:24:30 am
I don't think he ever stops pedalling. Too many miles on fixed wheel perhaps?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: jsabine on January 11, 2015, 08:50:58 am
I don't think he ever stops pedalling.

I'm reminded of what he had as his sig here a year or two ago, and which is probably a fair mantra for this year - eat, drink, and keep bloody pedalling.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Mr Larrington on January 11, 2015, 02:42:08 pm
I don't think he ever stops pedalling. Too many miles on fixed wheel perhaps?

I think this is trufax.  I once encountered him riding his Moulton up a long drag in the Forest of Dean.

In top gear.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on January 12, 2015, 12:45:00 pm
Yup, power packs supplied by Garmin.

Steve didn't want a dynamo and wanted multiple lighting redundancy
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: zigzag on January 12, 2015, 01:01:51 pm
i agree about cree lights - (with few modifications) it is hard to find a more suitable light for Steve's endevour. never seen garmin's power packs before.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Mad Jack on January 12, 2015, 01:19:20 pm
From the great man TG today--

The year is going well so far. Problems with lights that don't work in the wet and getting equipment, especially wheels which we now need to get elsewhere. I seem to spend a lot of time not riding but in spite of that we're above the 87000 mile schedule.



Future sponsors, here's your chance to help the great man with reliable kit..  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: rafletcher on January 12, 2015, 01:57:27 pm
From the great man TG today--

The year is going well so far. Problems with lights that don't work in the wet and getting equipment, especially wheels which we now need to get elsewhere. I seem to spend a lot of time not riding but in spite of that we're above the 87000 mile schedule.


Surely he jests a little!
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Canardly on January 12, 2015, 02:40:58 pm
Presumable he means time wasting faffage with kit not working.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: The Bonk on January 12, 2015, 02:58:18 pm

Is it known why he didn't want a dynamo hub? I'd have thought a Schmidt would have been a good choice for his attempt.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: duncan on January 12, 2015, 03:09:06 pm

Is it known why he didn't want a dynamo hub? I'd have thought a Schmidt would have been a good choice for his attempt.

I would guess the power input for a dyno hub is probably about 5W. TG's generally putting in about 100W according to Strava, so I imagine he simply thought getting that power from batteries rather than him was the way!
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: The Bonk on January 12, 2015, 03:11:06 pm

Worth it just for the lights though, surely?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Hedgebanger on January 12, 2015, 03:14:19 pm
Also if he wrecks a front wheel, a non dynohub replacement is more easily available. Even without a disc brake its still rideable.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: duncan on January 12, 2015, 03:16:27 pm

Worth it just for the lights though, surely?

I love dynohubs and always use them, but if I were Steve, I'd be thinking: 5% of my night time power and 1% of daytime on lights - I'll take batteries.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: zigzag on January 12, 2015, 03:50:19 pm
i wouldn't want the drag from the dynamo for this type of challenge. the access to electricity every day makes rechargeable (and reliable!) lights a no-brainer.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Fidgetbuzz on January 12, 2015, 04:51:04 pm
I have chucked a message at those who see him at home - asking about his lights  -- I am VERY comfortable with spending money to keep Steve happy -- so lets see what I learn from them -- hopefully tonight , tomorrow morning - and then see where we go.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Laid Back Rich on January 12, 2015, 07:58:25 pm
i wouldn't want the drag from the dynamo for this type of challenge. the access to electricity every day makes rechargeable (and reliable!) lights a no-brainer.

as a long-time Schmidt hub user, I disagree, the drag is absolutely negligible, but don't just take my word for it...

Chris Juden the CTC tech man writes:

A good way to think about this drag is in terms of riding uphill: how steep is the hill that would make you work that much harder? The answer, for the ‘worst’ bottle dynamos, assuming an all-up weight of 90kg, is a gradient of 1-in-300 or 0.3% . That’s a rise of only 18 feet in a mile and if that’s a hill, I’m a Dutchman!  Internal hub generators drag [is] equivalent to ascending only five or six feet per mile, i.e. one-in-a-thousand…Lights-off drag for the Schmidt Original Nabendynamo (SON) equates to an utterly insignificant one foot per mile! 

http://www.ctc.org.uk/file/public/feature-hub-dynamos.pdf
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Tewdric on January 12, 2015, 08:09:09 pm
I make that an additional 160 km vertical climbing over the year..
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: duncan on January 12, 2015, 08:11:53 pm
I always ride with a hub dynamo too, and have never noticed the extra drag. Having said that, I've never tried doing anything like what Steve's doing and I'm sure he'll want to save every last bit of drag. Most dynamo front lights are 2.5W, with probably 0.5W for the back light. Even if the dynamo is 100% efficient, that's still a significant amount of the power output that Steve's limiting himself to. Combine that with the extra hassle/expense of changing the wheels if broken (or worn out - Steve wears out the dynamo bearings according to some other thread) and I can see he'd not want them for this!
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Kim on January 12, 2015, 08:14:24 pm
And the vast majority of miles won't need lights, anyway.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Karla on January 12, 2015, 08:20:13 pm
I make that an additional 160 km vertical climbing over the year..

It's a Mr Micawber thing, innit.

"Kurt's ride X,000 miles, TG's ride X,000 + 1 mile, result: happiness.  Kurt's ride X,000 miles, TG's ride X,000 - 1 mile, result: misery."
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Wowbagger on January 12, 2015, 08:21:42 pm
A Schmidt has a recommended service interval of 50,000 km. Steve is intending on doing about 3 times that distance in the year.

However, as Kim has mentioned, the vast bulk of that distance will be in the hours of daylight. I wondered about the wisdom of a Schmidt between 21st September and 21st March and battery lights for the rest of the time. Having said that, of course, if he has 4 identical bikes for the purposes of this record then he's got an outlay of almost £800 in front hubs alone.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on January 12, 2015, 08:27:14 pm
3 x Raleigh Sojourns for this year.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: drgannet on January 12, 2015, 08:32:11 pm
I always ride with a hub dynamo too, and have never noticed the extra drag. Having said that, I've never tried doing anything like what Steve's doing and I'm sure he'll want to save every last bit of drag. Most dynamo front lights are 2.5W, with probably 0.5W for the back light. Even if the dynamo is 100% efficient, that's still a significant amount of the power output that Steve's limiting himself to. Combine that with the extra hassle/expense of changing the wheels if broken (or worn out - Steve wears out the dynamo bearings according to some other thread) and I can see he'd not want them for this!

duncan (and Steve) is spot on. The Schmidt hub is about 60% efficient, so even with a single LED front light like the (IMHO rubbish) Cyo, that will cost Steve of the order 5W, or 5% of his power output, when the lights are on. Decent battery lights with a correctly sized Li-ion battery are the way to go for this ride.

(FWIW I will be using my hub dynamo for all my rides this year).
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Canardly on January 12, 2015, 08:36:16 pm
Will the team be providing some interim reports as to how the kit is standing up? (Agree with FB cannot provide daily updates). Suppliers should be seeing this as a huge test/recommendation for their kit. I hope Steve is keeping notes as to best eateries along the way  ;D
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: zigzag on January 12, 2015, 08:50:20 pm
i wouldn't want the drag from the dynamo for this type of challenge. the access to electricity every day makes rechargeable (and reliable!) lights a no-brainer.

as a long-time Schmidt hub user, I disagree, the drag is absolutely negligible, but don't just take my word for it...

Chris Juden the CTC tech man writes:

A good way to think about this drag is in terms of riding uphill: how steep is the hill that would make you work that much harder? The answer, for the ‘worst’ bottle dynamos, assuming an all-up weight of 90kg, is a gradient of 1-in-300 or 0.3% . That’s a rise of only 18 feet in a mile and if that’s a hill, I’m a Dutchman!  Internal hub generators drag [is] equivalent to ascending only five or six feet per mile, i.e. one-in-a-thousand…Lights-off drag for the Schmidt Original Nabendynamo (SON) equates to an utterly insignificant one foot per mile! 

http://www.ctc.org.uk/file/public/feature-hub-dynamos.pdf

i agree that it seems negligible, but it does add up. we tend to consider a route as "hilly" if it's more than 10m/1km in ascent. with a hub dynamo light on, it would make an additional ~1.5m/1km rise. let's say tg rides 100km in the dark - this would mean an extra 150m climb (fairly big hill!) every day for a year.
i've got a son hub and other parts to build it into a wheel, but the longer i wait the less likely it is that i'll build it. i see two scenarios where i'd benefit from a dynohub - on a very long tour or commuting on unlit roads every day.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: jsabine on January 12, 2015, 09:10:57 pm
i wouldn't want the drag from the dynamo for this type of challenge. the access to electricity every day makes rechargeable (and reliable!) lights a no-brainer.

as a long-time Schmidt hub user, I disagree, the drag is absolutely negligible, but don't just take my word for it...

Chris Juden the CTC tech man writes:

A good way to think about this drag is in terms of riding uphill: how steep is the hill that would make you work that much harder? The answer, for the ‘worst’ bottle dynamos, assuming an all-up weight of 90kg, is a gradient of 1-in-300 or 0.3% . That’s a rise of only 18 feet in a mile and if that’s a hill, I’m a Dutchman!  Internal hub generators drag [is] equivalent to ascending only five or six feet per mile, i.e. one-in-a-thousand…Lights-off drag for the Schmidt Original Nabendynamo (SON) equates to an utterly insignificant one foot per mile! 

http://www.ctc.org.uk/file/public/feature-hub-dynamos.pdf

i agree that it seems negligible, but it does add up. we tend to consider a route as "hilly" if it's more than 10m/1km in ascent. with a hub dynamo light on, it would make an additional ~1.5m/1km rise. let's say tg rides 100km in the dark - this would mean an extra 150m climb (fairly big hill!) every day for a year.
i've got a son hub and other parts to build it into a wheel, but the longer i wait the less likely it is that i'll build it. i see two scenarios where i'd benefit from a dynohub - on a very long tour or commuting on unlit roads every day.

As a long-standing and enthusiastic SON user, I'm a fan because I've found it utterly reliable and simply don't notice the drag in use, but agree that it's the cumulative effect of the drag that needs to be considered for this sort of enterprise.

Back of the envelope maths suggest that it was equivalent to an extra 1400m or so of climbing over LEL - if I'd thought about this too hard, I might have looked at other options, though I'd probably still have come back to the SON because of uncertainty over charging possibilities.

Steve has access to mains electricity every night, and as LWaB has noted is anticipating doing about 3x the service life of SON bearings, which he has worn out before. Add that to the (admittedly small) drag effectively giving him another 150,000m or so of climbing, and there's a very strong case for choosing battery lights - as he has done.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: zigzag on January 12, 2015, 09:16:57 pm
what i was surprised about though is that Steve has chosen disc-braked wheels for this challenge. in the type of terrain he's riding and the absence of stop-start routes, the rims would have lasted 30-40k km, so 3-4 sets of high quality wheels would see him through the challenge easily, imo. (with the added benefits of lightness, compatibility and availability).
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on January 12, 2015, 09:19:58 pm
Steve tried to do multiple 220 mile days last winter. Brake pads were wearing out in days and rims would have lasted a few weeks. Rim failure would a serious problem. Steve has backups for most things but not rims. For instance, he has 4 headlights on the bars, so a couple of failures doesn't stop him riding.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Mad Jack on January 12, 2015, 09:21:20 pm
3 x Raleigh Sojourns for this year.

Just a thought......  How about each machine has it's own service record that is somehow attached to it.
Then when the machine is back home, (after being up the road at various potential hosts) the base camp will
be able to respond to any issues that need to be replaced/needs attention. (Hosts can fill in an advisory note, bit like an MOT).

Re: Lights, these simply have to work with every type of weather thrown at them, it's not worth the risk of failure! Nor is it worth cutting any corners with any of the other kit be it tyres with a slight cut in the sidewall, brake pads that are on the minimum thickness. Cables that are starting to fray. Replace and throw it all in a pile then at a later date Steve can make any decisions on what he wants to do with any of it say this time next year. 

Dynamos- even the thought of dragging any sort of dynamo puts shivers up my spine, plus the added rolling weight.
Remember also that there is only a certain amount of charge Li-on/ Ni-MH batteries can take, so hosts have some spares  :thumbsup:

 
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: zigzag on January 12, 2015, 09:34:19 pm
Steve tried to do multiple 220 mile days last winter. Brake pads were wearing out in days and rims would have lasted a few weeks. Rim failure would a serious problem. Steve has backups for most things but not rims. For instance, he has 4 headlights on the bars, so a couple of failures doesn't stop him riding.

if that's Steve's experience, fair enough. but rims have lasted me for a very long time (definitely over 30k km) in all kinds of weather and also in hills/mountains, so something doesn't add up. just wish that Steve used every possible advantage! :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Mr Larrington on January 12, 2015, 11:00:47 pm
Disc rotors aten't immune from wear either but I suspect Steve's will get a hell of a lot less of a bashing than the one I had go Wibble! on me halfway round the Cambrian 600.  Most of the active use that one had seen was commuting in London.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on January 12, 2015, 11:02:50 pm
A large component of rim wear is lack of cleanliness. You are a lot more interested in keeping your bike clean (and have more time to do so) compared to Steve.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: zigzag on January 12, 2015, 11:16:12 pm
re: cleaning the bike - if i were Steve, i'd kindly outsource this to a host i stay at ::-) ;D
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on January 12, 2015, 11:18:32 pm
I did clean it a bit but not a race mechanic's wash. I got noticeably less sleep than Steve without doing the 'spit polish' thing.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: zigzag on January 12, 2015, 11:44:07 pm
does Steve keep an eye on component wear? over 2k miles in, the chain and rear tyre are approaching their end of life. (i hope he has the chains cut to length and ready for swapping over). few drops of oil into derailleur pivots wouldn't go amiss too :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Wowbagger on January 12, 2015, 11:51:33 pm
What is the preferred chain lube? I am led to believe that it's not a great idea to mix certain different brands together and it is quite likely that a host will not have the preferred brand. Or does Steve carry a small bottle on the bike?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Mr Larrington on January 13, 2015, 01:09:51 am
Preferred chain lube?  Snake oil :demon:
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: duncan on January 13, 2015, 07:36:23 am
over 2k miles in, the chain and rear tyre are approaching their end of life.

Steve has three bikes, remember!

I'm sure the team have this kind of stuff in hand.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Robh on January 13, 2015, 10:41:57 am
What is the preferred chain lube? I am led to believe that it's not a great idea to mix certain different brands together and it is quite likely that a host will not have the preferred brand. Or does Steve carry a small bottle on the bike?
This is a good question and, as a future host, one that I was on the point of asking myself.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on January 13, 2015, 10:52:40 am
He just wanted me to stop it squeaking. The chain and cassette is expendible. Provided the gears are relatively clean, shift ok and keep go round till he gets home, maximising mileage per component is irrelevant.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: hubner on January 13, 2015, 11:13:41 am
Any pictures?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on January 13, 2015, 11:48:54 am
Outside shots at night are a waste of time, due to glare from reflective tape, etc. so HK didn't bother. While his bike was inside the house, I got caught up in getting Steve's stuff sorted and him either asleep or back on the bike.

No doubt the next host will do better with photos.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: redfalo on January 13, 2015, 12:32:56 pm
Interesting discussion about the pros and cons of a dyno hub. I’m sure Steve has put a lot of thinking in this.
On weight terms, I’d argue that the case for battery lights is not easy to make. The differences are minor, as the following comparison shows. I exclude rear lights, which for convenience reasons may be battery lights anyway.

A Tune MIG 45 road front hub – one of the lightest available on the market - weights 45 gram. A Hope Vision one weights 110g without batteries. Assuming Steve carries a set of spare batteries per lamp, batteries add 216 gram (one Eneloop weights 27 gramm, the Vision one uses 4 batteries). Assuming he is carrying two Vision One, total weight of headlights and batteries is 652 grams. The 45 grams for the hub brings this to 697 grams,

A SON deluxe weights 392 grams, the Edelux II weights 85 grams. Throw in 20 grams for cabling and the mounting bracket, and the total weight is 500 grams. Carrying one Hope Vision One with one set of batteries as a backup (218 grams) lifts the total weight to 715 grams.

The point that a damaged dyno hub front wheel may be harder to replace is not too compelling either. In emergencies, Steve could always switch back to battery lights. Moreover, a spare dynamo hub wheel does not cost the earth, relative to the overall costs attached to the whole project.

The drag may be an issue – according to Schmidt’s website, the SON deluxe consumes about 5.5 watt at 25kpm when the lights are running (first graph: http://www.nabendynamo.de/produkte/SONdelux.html). That may be 3 to 5 percent of Steve’s total energy. When the lights are off, however, it consumes less than 1 watt.

According to Schmidt’s, the difference to a high quality front hub without a dynamo is very small (lower green line in 1st graph in link labeled “hochwertige Vorderradnabe”). According to the chart, a non-dynamo hub consumes about 0.5 watt.

From my point of view, the big advantage of a hub dynamo is that its one less issue you have to think about. It’s basically “fit and forget”. Throw in that Steve seems to have issues with battery lights playing up in the wet, and the case for a hub dynamo becomes even stronger, at least for the time of year with limited hours of day light.

Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Ashaman42 on January 13, 2015, 01:17:41 pm
I know Steve had three bikes to use. Does anyone know if he's just used one so far for everything or if he's changed about?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on January 13, 2015, 01:19:59 pm
As far as I know, just the one bike used by last weekend. I think he was planning to switch over sometime this week.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Karla on January 13, 2015, 03:30:14 pm
The point that a damaged dyno hub front wheel may be harder to replace is not too compelling either. In emergencies, Steve could always switch back to battery lights. Moreover, a spare dynamo hub wheel does not cost the earth, relative to the overall costs attached to the whole project.
Surely the point is that if he's stranded out in the wilderness with a broken bike, normal wheels and battery lights are both a lot easier to come by than dynohub wheels.

Quote
The drag may be an issue – according to Schmidt’s website, the SON deluxe consumes about 5.5 watt at 25kpm when the lights are running (first graph: http://www.nabendynamo.de/produkte/SONdelux.html). That may be 3 to 5 percent of Steve’s total energy. When the lights are off, however, it consumes less than 1 watt.

According to Schmidt’s, the difference to a high quality front hub without a dynamo is very small (lower green line in 1st graph in link labeled “hochwertige Vorderradnabe”). According to the chart, a non-dynamo hub consumes about 0.5 watt.

From my point of view, the big advantage of a hub dynamo is that its one less issue you have to think about. It’s basically “fit and forget”. Throw in that Steve seems to have issues with battery lights playing up in the wet, and the case for a hub dynamo becomes even stronger, at least for the time of year with limited hours of day light.

Do you know how much money and effort some time triallists are willing to spend to shed 5 Watts of drag?!

There's also a psychological issue to it.  This is a race, and races hurt.  Deliberately hampering your performance before you start a race is not conducive to giving your all at the point when it gets serious.  Ditching the draggy dynohub for Steve's OYTT is like unscrewing your bottle cages before a hillclimb: you've given yourself every possible advantage so you can't just chicken out and blame your kit.  "Oh yeah, I know I lost the world record by finishing 1 mile behind the other guy, but I'd have done more if I hadn't used a hub dynamo" is not an excuse you want to allow yourself to make. 

On top of this, TG has used both dynohubs and battery lights extensively, so how about we let him be the judge of which is most appropriate for his attempt?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: jsabine on January 13, 2015, 03:40:51 pm


On top of this, TG has used both dynohubs and battery lights extensively, so how about we let him be the judge of which is most appropriate for his attempt?

Don't be ridiculous!

Next thing, you'll be suggesting that extrapolating from tangentially related (but much lesser) experience isn't an adequate basis on which to pass judgment. You'll make the interweb collapse with those sorts of radical ideas.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Karla on January 13, 2015, 03:44:00 pm


On top of this, TG has used both dynohubs and battery lights extensively, so how about we let him be the judge of which is most appropriate for his attempt?

Don't be ridiculous!

Next thing, you'll be suggesting that extrapolating from tangentially related (but much lesser) experience isn't an adequate basis on which to pass judgment. You'll make the interweb collapse with those sorts of radical ideas.

I'm sorry, have I Godwinned the thread or something?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: jsabine on January 13, 2015, 03:56:01 pm
Probably ...

(I should point out that, as I've said elsewhere, I find the discussion around the issues and possible reasons for Steve's choices really informative. But there does seem to be quite a lot of bringing up matters as though they're radical, new notions that Steve+team simply won't have thought of - because after all, he's just hopped on his bike and started riding, hasn't he?)
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: redfalo on January 13, 2015, 04:06:46 pm
But there does seem to be quite a lot of bringing up matters as though they're radical, new notions that Steve+team simply won't have thought of - because after all, he's just hopped on his bike and started riding, hasn't he?)

No, he hasn't. That's precisely the reason I'm surprised he's experiencing issues with lights.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: jamesld8 on January 13, 2015, 04:17:08 pm
From Steve website

By the end of 2012 I had built a proto type bike and had given it a good test ride in the very wet Christmas holiday. A few changes were made. I now believe that I have the best bike set up for the challenge to go along with the best plan on how to do it

Doesn`t that say it all and show his high degree of checking stuff out beforehand---and in the wet too !
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: adenough on January 14, 2015, 04:52:22 pm
I thought he was riding a pretty standard Raleigh touring bike?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on January 14, 2015, 05:05:23 pm
That matched his requirements, when some components were upgraded e.g. Hope headset, BB, hubs, Stans tubeless rims, etc.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: matthew on January 14, 2015, 05:10:58 pm
Raleigh have come on board as a sponsor and provided three frames. However Steve will have accepted those frames in the knowledge that he could fit his desired components and achieve his required riding position.

So:
Frame is disk brake compatible
Handlebars will be Steve's choice
Stem will be to Steve's choice
Saddle will be Steve's preferred Brooks
Wheels are built to Steve's choice of Hub and rims
etc.

For Steve's purpose the frame has to be comfortable for hour after hour and reliable, with the number of miles he will put into them Raleigh will be getting good robustness data out of them.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: bunker on January 16, 2015, 01:15:03 pm
Any idea what jacket he's using to keep all this wind and rain out?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on January 19, 2015, 01:58:32 pm
Any idea what jacket he's using to keep all this wind and rain out?
Milltag, I think.

the website says they were his first sponsors.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: swiss hat on January 22, 2015, 03:08:17 pm
Steve's been using the following to keep hands and feet working in the recent arctic conditions:

Trespass gloves - he rates them highly and hasn't used an inner liner:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Trespass-Ergon-Thinsulate-Ski-Glove/dp/B00FC4Q9TK

Thick neoprene overshoes:

http://www.raleigh.co.uk/ProductType/ProductRange/Product/Default.aspx?pc=2&pt=77&pg=9280

Chapeau merino socks.

Proven by the mileage monster!
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: bobb on January 22, 2015, 05:06:41 pm
As far as I know, just the one bike used by last weekend. I think he was planning to switch over sometime this week.

If Steve has changed bike or is about to change, might it be worth setting up:

Raleigh Sojourn 1
Raleigh Sojourn 2
Raleigh Sojourn 3

On Strava for statistical purposes?

Of course, Steve and team may:

a. Have already done this
b. Don't care about such things

...in which case ignore me  :P
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: citoyen on January 22, 2015, 05:38:17 pm
Handlebars will be Steve's choice
Stem will be to Steve's choice
Saddle will be Steve's preferred Brooks
Wheels are built to Steve's choice of Hub and rims

Does anyone know which Brooks saddle Steve is using?

Also, I know he's using Hope disc hubs, but any idea which ones? From looking at the Hope website, I'm guessing Pro 2 EVO.

Handlebars, likewise: anyone have any specific information?

And since he's using gears, do we know what groupset he's on? The Sojourn comes with Sora triple as standard but I'd have thought he'd want to go for something a bit more durable.

Do we know which brakes he's using? I presume he has upgraded from the standard Avid BB5 to hydraulics but which ones? And I'm guessing he's using Shimano ST-RS685 levers, but can anyone confirm that?

Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on January 22, 2015, 05:43:05 pm
Cable discs.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: swiss hat on January 22, 2015, 06:21:33 pm
Just checked in the bike room:

Brooks Team Pro

Hope Pro 2 Evo are fitted on the bike Steve has used continuously so far. There is also a spare unused pair of Hope/Stan 400 wheels. The spare bikes are currently fitted with American Classic hubs/rims and Shimano hubs/Ryder 23 rims, these look like std Sojourn spec.

Handlebars not identified as the TransX tri-bar clamps hide the branding.

Sora triple as standard except that bar end levers are fitted to tri-bars.
Sora STI levers operating brakes with BB-7 calipers.


Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: citoyen on January 22, 2015, 06:25:02 pm
Excellent. Thanks LWaB & Swiss Hat.

I had the idea that he was using hydraulics but no idea where I got that from. And of course I knew he was using bar-end shifters as it has been discussed already. Doh!
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: The Bonk on January 22, 2015, 06:30:37 pm
Just checked in the bike room:

Brooks Team Pro



If there's not a Steve Abraham edition of this by next year I'll eat B17.

Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: citoyen on January 22, 2015, 07:32:56 pm
The spare bikes are currently fitted with American Classic hubs/rims and Shimano hubs/Ryder 23 rims, these look like std Sojourn spec.

Not familiar with American Classic so looked it up. It's a tubeless rim so presumably that's a genuine spare - for when the Hope hubs eventually drive him mad? ;)

Supplementary question: what size tyres is he using? (afaict the tubeless Ones come in 23, 25 or 28 - if I were a betting man I'd put my money on 28.)
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: swiss hat on January 22, 2015, 07:55:41 pm
Tyres are 25. They measure up as genuine 25mm.

There are 6 off boxes each with 6 tyres in the bike room plus a few loose ones. What's the MRP £50 each? Schwalbe have been a generous sponsor by the looks of things. Steve says he likes the tyres as the roll well and have already saved him time with reduced p* fairy visitations.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Canardly on January 22, 2015, 07:59:23 pm
Brilliant PR and proof of concept for Scwalbe and great of them to sponsor Steve.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: zigzag on January 22, 2015, 11:25:18 pm
with the sora levers i take it he's using bb7 road calipers? are sora shifters there for redundancy in case the bar-end ones failed? iirc the drivetrain is 9speed, what range cassette is on the bike, is the replacement one the same? thanks swiss hat! :)
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Climberruss on January 23, 2015, 07:01:37 am
Tyres are 25. They measure up as genuine 25mm.

There are 6 off boxes each with 6 tyres in the bike room plus a few loose ones. What's the MRP £50 each? Schwalbe have been a generous sponsor by the looks of things. Steve says he likes the tyres as the roll well and have already saved him time with reduced p* fairy visitations.

Just out of curiousity, is anyone keeping a log of mechanicals / punctures - after a year like this it could make interesting reading, both for us as "fans" and also the sponsors/manufacturers?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Polar Bear on January 23, 2015, 07:23:57 am
A couple of points in the discussion about lighting and dynamo hubs:   

No dynamo hub that I am aware of is easily serviced if / when the bearings go but your average high quality front hub these days has 6001 2RS or similar cartridge bearings that could be replaced at the side of the road.   A box of SKF bearings in the fettling kit would allow most competent home mechanics to swap over a set of bearings whilst Steve eats, sleeps, or even stops for a fuel break if such things can be coordinated.   

The light output is totally restricted by what is currently available on the market.   Lots of battery lights pump out far more light that the best dynamo offerings at similar or lower cost.

Over the entire year the vast majority of Steve's riding will be in daylight rather than darkness.   I guess that there will be a period of time where Steve will not even carry lights, or just a couple of small 'be seen' lights because he's not scheduled to ride into dusk and darkness.   

Overall I reckon he's got the kit right for this particular challenge.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: The Bonk on January 23, 2015, 07:51:12 am
A couple of points in the discussion about lighting and dynamo hubs:   



The light output is totally restricted by what is currently available on the market.   Lots of battery lights pump out far more light that the best dynamo offerings at similar or lower cost.
   


Pumping out bright light is one thing, where it's being pumped to is another. I don't disagree with the light set up for this challenge. I had a chat with Steve when I road with him last week and it makes total sense.
But, I've got a cheap cree lamp with battery pack and it kicks out a lot of light, it's super bright, but only in a concentrated area. I've also got a Son hub and Lumotec IQ Cyco and the beam pattern/spread is superb.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Polar Bear on January 23, 2015, 08:04:24 am
Clearly not superb enough for Steve to choose it though.

I use SON/B&M dynamo and CREE/Hope/USE battery lighting setups and I conclude that I get more useable light from the battery setups but that I find the dynamo setups far more convenient for most of my cycling.     

Steve has made a choice based upon his preferences and I can easily see why.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: The Bonk on January 23, 2015, 08:11:14 am
The decision wasn't made based on the lights. It was based on hub vs batteries.

Like I said, I agree with his choice for this challenge. I was simply pointing out my experiences with the two.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: swiss hat on January 23, 2015, 09:25:45 am
with the sora levers i take it he's using bb7 road calipers? are sora shifters there for redundancy in case the bar-end ones failed? iirc the drivetrain is 9speed, what range cassette is on the bike, is the replacement one the same? thanks swiss hat! :)

The calipers on the 2 spare bikes are marked BB7_MTN. What's the difference between road and mountain calipers and how will they perform with the Sora levers (reduced cable pull an issue?)?
The Sora levers only have the brake cables fitted and are used solely for braking. Gear cables routed to bar-end levers. In the unlikely event of bar-end problems I can imagine Steve would secure cable to give suitable gear and ride on.
There are a stack of 11-25 HG-50 9 speed cassettes kindly provided by CRC. This looks like the std cassette for all bikes.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: swiss hat on January 23, 2015, 09:35:05 am
Just out of curiousity, is anyone keeping a log of mechanicals / punctures - after a year like this it could make interesting reading, both for us as "fans" and also the sponsors/manufacturers?

There are maintenance log sheets for each bike on the wall in the bike room. Steve's recorded a few notes on tyre issues so far ie major cuts. Chain & cassette changes have been noted. No major mechanicals to date afaik (touch wood). So the answer is yes but it does take time. 
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: rafletcher on January 23, 2015, 09:38:14 am
with the sora levers i take it he's using bb7 road calipers? are sora shifters there for redundancy in case the bar-end ones failed? iirc the drivetrain is 9speed, what range cassette is on the bike, is the replacement one the same? thanks swiss hat! :)

The calipers on the 2 spare bikes are marked BB7_MTN. What's the difference between road and mountain calipers and how will they perform with the Sora levers (reduced cable pull an issue?)?
The Sora levers only have the brake cables fitted and are used solely for braking. Gear cables routed to bar-end levers. In the unlikely event of bar-end problems I can imagine Steve would secure cable to give suitable gear and ride on.
There are a stack of 11-25 HG-50 9 speed cassettes kindly provided by CRC. This looks like the std cassette for all bikes.

Hmm, well BB& MTN's need much more lever pull than the road version - but who knows if they work with the Sora levers - as you're there you can check them using the spare wheels I guess.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: zigzag on January 23, 2015, 10:19:50 am
The calipers on the 2 spare bikes are marked BB7_MTN. What's the difference between road and mountain calipers and how will they perform with the Sora levers (reduced cable pull an issue?)?

while it kind of works it's a suboptimal setup; the required cable pull is different resulting in mushy feel on the lever and increased noise from rotors as the pads need to be set up very close for brakes to be effective.
newer road brake levers from shimano/trp (http://www.probikekit.co.uk/bicycle-brakes-and-pads/trp-rrl-alloy-brake-levers/10782153.html) work fine with mtn calipers otherwise bb7_road (http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/avid-bb7-road-disc-brake/rp-prod67750) are the ones to use, which crc as a sponsor could provide. :)
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LeoW on January 23, 2015, 11:35:53 am
The calipers on the 2 spare bikes are marked BB7_MTN. What's the difference between road and mountain calipers and how will they perform with the Sora levers (reduced cable pull an issue?)?

while it kind of works it's a suboptimal setup; the required cable pull is different resulting in mushy feel on the lever and increased noise from rotors as the pads need to be set up very close for brakes to be effective.
newer road brake levers from shimano/trp (http://www.probikekit.co.uk/bicycle-brakes-and-pads/trp-rrl-alloy-brake-levers/10782153.html) work fine with mtn calipers otherwise bb7_road (http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/avid-bb7-road-disc-brake/rp-prod67750) are the ones to use, which crc as a sponsor could provide. :)

+1
Must have V-pull brake levers or get the calipers changed to road-pull

e.g. levers
http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/cane-creek-drop-v-brake-levers/rp-prod35189

I probably have a pair of Dia-Compe V brake levers knocking around in my garage ...... happy to donate ?

What brakes are on his current bike ?

Leo
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on January 23, 2015, 11:39:40 am
The most recent STI levers pull enough cable for V-brakes.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: zigzag on January 23, 2015, 11:46:45 am
yes, so ideally it should be either recent sti levers or bb7_road calipers. Steve however is using old style sti levers which pull less cable.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Ham on January 23, 2015, 11:52:56 am
It's a tubeless rim so presumably that's a genuine spare - for when the Hope hubs eventually drive him mad? ;)


That's unlikely - to drive him mad he would have to stop pedalling  ;)
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LeoW on January 23, 2015, 12:09:17 pm
The most recent STI levers pull enough cable for V-brakes.
?
Could you post a link for that.

If they pull enough for V-brakes (20mm) they'd be rubbish for calipers (10mm ish)..... surely ?

Leo
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on January 23, 2015, 12:10:49 pm
The latest Shimano dual-pivot callipers require greater cable pull.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LeoW on January 23, 2015, 12:27:43 pm
The latest Shimano dual-pivot callipers require greater cable pull.
Ahhh  - makes more sense now .....

Quote from :

http://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-mechanics/597661-shimano-6700-7900-brake-lever-pull-ratio-opinions-info.html

"Linear-pull / V-brake levers:
 Avid FR5 = 33mm
 Tektro RL520 = 33mm
 Dia Compe 287V = 30mm

 Standard brake levers:
 Shimano 5600 = 20mm
 Shimano 6600 = 20mm
 Cane Creek SCR-5C = 21mm
 Tektro RX2.0 = 23mm

 Shimano 6700 = 34mm (25mm if measuring shortest distance between lever pivot and the closest part of the cable) "

BUT also further down it says :
" 6700 (and 7900) levers have a different cable pull ratio in different parts of their sweep (I believe Shimano call this feature Servo Wave). "

Hence it may be awkward to set up to get the right feel.

Leo
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Mr Larrington on January 23, 2015, 01:27:11 pm
"We build our cars to go, not to stop.  Let us hear no more of this foolish talk about brakes!"

- usually attributed to Ettore Bugatti, though some sources say Alexandre Darracq.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: zigzag on January 23, 2015, 02:06:20 pm
from my petrolhead days (i still am!), if you want to make a car go faster around the circuit the best "bang for your buck" upgrade is the brakes.
back on topic, due to the terrain and the areas he's riding i doubt that Steve is using his brakes a lot so it doesn't really matter how they perform (i'd have chosen rim brakes for this challenge, personally)
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Climberruss on January 23, 2015, 02:35:21 pm
from my petrolhead days (i still am!), if you want to make a car go faster around the circuit the best "bang for your buck" upgrade is the brakes.
back on topic, due to the terrain and the areas he's riding i doubt that Steve is using his brakes a lot so it doesn't really matter how they perform (i'd have chosen rim brakes for this challenge, personally)

You'd be surprised how much he is using them, particularly atm with feathering them to avoid ice etc. I once "burnt" through a set of Ambrosio rims from brand new to that worn they split in 4500 miles. If Steve did that he be rebuilding a pair of wheels every 3 weeks!
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: citoyen on January 23, 2015, 02:39:09 pm
"We build our cars to go, not to stop.  Let us hear no more of this foolish talk about brakes!"

- usually attributed to Ettore Bugatti, though some sources say Alexandre Darracq.

Reminds me of something from my younger, more foolish days...

http://www.davesweboflies.com/search.cgi?id=QhM
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: zigzag on January 23, 2015, 03:04:26 pm
You'd be surprised how much he is using them, particularly atm with feathering them to avoid ice etc. I once "burnt" through a set of Ambrosio rims from brand new to that worn they split in 4500 miles. If Steve did that he be rebuilding a pair of wheels every 3 weeks!

fair enough, every rider chooses according to their circumstances. in order to make the most out of your effort, you must be fit, get the nutrition right but also use the best available equipment which contributes to your goal. i heard this from another highly esteemed long distance rider and i fully agree.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: toontra on January 25, 2015, 10:09:04 am
There was mention of sorting a rattling rear mudguard in today's fettling.  What mudguards are on Steve's bike at the moment?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Grandad on January 26, 2015, 12:49:51 pm
If Steve's Kit includes clothing I'd love to know how what items make up the many layers that he uses on the coldest days.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: mattc on January 26, 2015, 06:39:33 pm
from my petrolhead days (i still am!), if you want to make a car go faster around the circuit the best "bang for your buck" upgrade is the brakes.
back on topic, due to the terrain and the areas he's riding i doubt that Steve is using his brakes a lot so it doesn't really matter how they perform (i'd have chosen rim brakes for this challenge, personally)

You'd be surprised how much he is using them, particularly atm with feathering them to avoid ice etc. I once "burnt" through a set of Ambrosio rims from brand new to that worn they split in 4500 miles. If Steve did that he be rebuilding a pair of wheels every 3 weeks!
I would still say that Steve will get a LOT less brake-wear than many/most riders e.g. those commuting with more stop-start,  and those riding in hillier terrain.

The very routes that are selected for high average speed will inevitably give less brake-wear!
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: rr on January 26, 2015, 08:01:40 pm
There have been several references to the time Steve loses putting on and taking off his layers, has he considered a Buffalo type one layer system with vents?

I have a bike-specific polaris version and wear it as my only top for several months from autumn to spring. I would have thought the Buffalo cycle shirt would suit Steve's low intensity style and could be taken on and off in a few seconds. Adjustments during the day by moving a zip.

I can't suggest a quicker way to do overshoes though.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Wobbly on January 26, 2015, 11:17:39 pm
I keep seeing the thread title and thinking... is he? Really???

(http://d3trabu2dfbdfb.cloudfront.net/4/0/406172_300x300.jpeg)
Title: Steves Electrics
Post by: aidan.f on January 28, 2015, 04:37:37 pm
And so it starts again. Just about to wake Steve before re-assembling this lot
(https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/31223201/20150127_224050.jpg)

I did think about asking mods to move this but just cut-n-x-posted

Bear in mind that Steve's having to lug that lot round with him every day... :(
Quote
AAA - 8 in use, for the 2 each for the rear lights and 4 for the spot tracker
AA - 2 in use plus 2 spare, Garmin Etrex
MicroUSB - Phone, one of the garmins (1000 IIRC)
Mini USB - The other garmin (500)
Round connector, don't know the size or polarity, for the USE Exposure headlight
Proprietary miniature 3 pin to USB lead - 2 x BBB front lights
And the powermonkey, with it's own charger, although the USE exposure fits and worked

The 7 port charger is good, but the lead situation could be improved as you can see from the photos. When travelling the leads are wrapped around the charger and stuffed into stored in his rack bag, 365 days of that treatment is bound to result in some failures. One for the boffins.
'Proprietary miniature 3 pin to USB lead'  - so my leads don't look home made.
Unplug the leads and pop them in a separate bag - the failure mode will be if they are constantly bent
Those two spare ports on the Bolse 7 port charger are being wasted.
The USE exposure fast  charger is 5 volts@2.8 Amps 11 Watts- Having Looked at the Bolse usb spec - Total load 60 Watts I am pretty sure it would supply this.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Kim on January 28, 2015, 04:58:29 pm
Wow.  I'm drawn between thinking "what a mess" and not really seeing a way to substantially improve it.

I mean, it wouldn't be particularly challenging to design a neat unit to charge umpty AA and AAA batteries, while providing oodles of USB power, from a single mains plug.  But it would be untested, a single point of failure and probably not a substantial saving on weight/bulk.

And cables are cables.  They're going to fail at the strain relief, the question is when... I'm not sure that pre-emptive replacement would be worthwhile.  Carrying a spare probably isn't either, at least for the USB ones, which are fairly ubiquitous.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Climberruss on January 28, 2015, 05:04:00 pm
Surely, a lot of this extra weight to be carried could be avoided by using non-rechargables? A wholesale box at Steves place and just change them every time he gets home. Even an emergency spare set of both AAs and AAAs would not weigh as much as all of that re-charging clobber?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: aidan.f on January 28, 2015, 05:05:46 pm
The Bolse is pretty good from a read of the spec it 'negotiates' power supplied. Whether it would charge the power monkey & USE light at full rate would require a quick experiment
= two wall warts less.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Kim on January 28, 2015, 05:07:13 pm
Surely, a lot of this extra weight to be carried could be avoided by using non-rechargables?

Good question.  I assume someone has done the maths...
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: fungus on January 28, 2015, 05:09:16 pm
I don't think he ever stops pedalling.

I'm reminded of what he had as his sig here a year or two ago, and which is probably a fair mantra for this year - eat, drink, and keep bloody pedalling.

That's my quote that is  :thumbsup:

Someone once asked for tips on long distance cycling & I said "Just eat, drink, and keep bloody pedalling"  :)
Title: Re: Steves Electrics
Post by: TGS on January 28, 2015, 05:55:23 pm
'Proprietary miniature 3 pin to USB lead'  - so my leads don't look home made.

 ;D No. Can you make me some!
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: jsabine on January 29, 2015, 12:10:56 am
And cables are cables.  They're going to fail at the strain relief, the question is when... I'm not sure that pre-emptive replacement would be worthwhile.  Carrying a spare probably isn't either, at least for the USB ones, which are fairly ubiquitous.

I'd probably be most concerned about partial failure of either cable or device USB socket, leaving the device drawing minimal current and charging either very slowly or not at all. Solvable easily by replacement (albeit a new device is a pain) - but only once it's been spotted. Diagnosis of a device that runs out of charge prematurely, yet appears to be charging OK when you check it, is a little bit of a pain.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Vince on January 29, 2015, 02:11:54 am
All these rechargeable devices and batteries are fine when there is a decent break at night in a location with mains electrickery, but what happens when Steve's night rests get shorter or disappear completely - e.g. PBP?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Butterfly on January 29, 2015, 06:50:10 am
The nights will be shorter, so less battery consuming and there is nothing to stop him using non disposables for a day or week if that works for the conditions.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: TGS on January 29, 2015, 01:42:42 pm
Wow.  I'm drawn between thinking "what a mess" and not really seeing a way to substantially improve it.

I was impressed by the charger as we have all sorts of USB gizmos littering the house. Turns out they are only £25 so I've ordered one. http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00L2SBZ80 (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00L2SBZ80)
I might have to make a charging station.

Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: zigzag on January 29, 2015, 01:55:15 pm
the cables and ports on both chargers and the devices could be colour coded for even quicker daily set up routine
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LeoW on January 29, 2015, 03:01:18 pm
the cables and ports on both chargers and the devices could be colour coded for even quicker daily set up routine

Coloured Sugru is good for that, might be good for improving/weathertightening connections too.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Sugru-Multi-8x5g-Mini-Packs/dp/B00J0PW4RS

Leo

Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: zigzag on January 29, 2015, 03:36:15 pm
just wondering if umca require to upload gps active log to strava every day, how is Steve going to do that when riding pbp? will this be made an exception?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on January 29, 2015, 03:41:11 pm
The team has been assessing options to upload to Strava during PBP. It shouldn't be a major problem.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: citoyen on January 29, 2015, 03:51:03 pm
Obvious option IMO would be for Steve to carry a smartphone with credit on a French network during PBP - you can upload from the Edge 1000 to the Garmin Connect app via Bluetooth, and Garmin Connect can be set up to auto-sync with Strava.

Of course, that would be one more thing to charge, but it would probably last the duration if kept switched off during the day.

Uploading the ride in stages at the end of each day would be as easy as switching on the phone and opening the app.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on January 29, 2015, 03:53:45 pm
And the front-running option has been identified, though a backup option for an alternative GPS will also be available.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Kim on January 30, 2015, 03:27:37 pm
Following up here...

End of January.  Some minor French audax event has 16 topics and 391 posts.  One quiet bloke from Milton Keynes has 86 topics and 5158 posts. 

It's early days yet....

Besides, the Facebook page will proabaly take the brunt of those August posts like "HELP!! I qualified in May but in two months have forgotten where my bike is...what GPS should I buy to find it??!!!"

On which note, I've searched the threads, and I can't see a reference anywhere:  What colour valve caps is Teethgrinder using?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Laid Back Rich on January 30, 2015, 06:15:34 pm
On one of the other TG threads there was recent reference to vulnerability of garmin USB connection, I cannot find it now so replying here which looks the right place. 

Mine (800) failed last year on my RTW laid back ride, it got wet and corroded, and this is a common problem apparently. The connection still works ok for charging, but not for data. Fortunately it's easy to get round this issue by selecting to save ride data to the SD card rather than internal memory, then inserting the card into a card reader for upload to strava. I realise that I'm probably teaching granny to suck eggs here, but just in case not thought I should mention it...it would be awful to lose a day's toil like that!

GO STEVE GO!!!
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: aidan.f on January 30, 2015, 06:44:36 pm
Card reader...just another thing for tg to carry....
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Laid Back Rich on January 30, 2015, 07:00:05 pm
Card reader...just another thing for tg to carry....

it's the size and weight of a USB memory stick and costs a few quid
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: duncan on January 30, 2015, 08:15:27 pm
Card reader...just another thing for tg to carry....

Is it MicroSD? If so, he might be able to put it in his phone to get the data off rather than carrying a separate widget.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Von Broad on January 30, 2015, 09:16:31 pm
Ok, moving way slightly - bottom brackets.
I consider myself to be pretty competent practically, and I've just been looking at BB's for another bike.
Oh my goodness, where have I been? I am old school - sqaure tapered and octalink - and I've looked at one HT2 on LEL. And that's it.
But I had no idea how many different BB's you can get now. Heavens sake! Confusing or what?

Anyway [and I have gone through the thread], but I see that Steve has a Hope BB. Any particular type, model etc.?

All I seem to read about is how the newer BB bearings need replacing because of water ingress causing failure and corrosion etc
I'd be interested to know exactly what is the Hope BB Steve has on the Raleigh ? [Or maybe there is only the one and that's it].
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: citoyen on January 30, 2015, 10:18:08 pm
The Edges 1000 & 510 don't use anything so quaint as memory cards or cables to transfer data.

The Etrex 30 is IPX7 rated.

I think Steve's pretty well covered on that side of things.

Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Laid Back Rich on January 30, 2015, 10:18:22 pm
Is it MicroSD? If so, he might be able to put it in his phone to get the data off rather than carrying a separate widget.

Yes I think so, it's about the size of my little fingernail, and the same as the one in my samsung smart phone, and indeed that would serve as a card reader (I think).
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: zigzag on January 30, 2015, 10:30:31 pm
Anyway [and I have gone through the thread], but I see that Steve has a Hope BB. Any particular type, model etc.?

All I seem to read about is how the newer BB bearings need replacing because of water ingress causing failure and corrosion etc
I'd be interested to know exactly what is the Hope BB Steve has on the Raleigh ? [Or maybe there is only the one and that's it].

the ubiquitous shimano-compatible ht2 bb made by hope. i'm using the ceramic version on my audax bike, but haven't clocked significant mileage yet to comment on the longevity.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Von Broad on January 30, 2015, 11:04:52 pm
Anyway [and I have gone through the thread], but I see that Steve has a Hope BB. Any particular type, model etc.?

All I seem to read about is how the newer BB bearings need replacing because of water ingress causing failure and corrosion etc
I'd be interested to know exactly what is the Hope BB Steve has on the Raleigh ? [Or maybe there is only the one and that's it].

the ubiquitous shimano-compatible ht2 bb made by hope. i'm using the ceramic version on my audax bike, but haven't clocked significant mileage yet to comment on the longevity.

Right, ta. I'm a bit late to the BB party, mainly because I keep riding old clapped out bangers, but it's an interesting development what's happened - bigger crank spindle, moving the bearings outward [both good], but at the cost of smaller bearings,some fo which ahve obviously casued a few problems...so then make the shell bigger :-)
Steve must have confidence in the Hope BB [no issues yet AFAICS] or else he'd have just gone with a boggo sqaure-tapered thingie.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: rogerzilla on February 02, 2015, 07:54:56 pm
Has he killed his first chain yet?  Or even two or three?  On an all-weather bike even a 1/8" chain is ruined after less than 1,000 miles, although main and town roads are a bit cleaner than country lanes.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: PAC on February 02, 2015, 08:51:09 pm
Has he killed his first chain yet?  Or even two or three?  On an all-weather bike even a 1/8" chain is ruined after less than 1,000 miles, although main and town roads are a bit cleaner than country lanes.
Yes....more than one so far.  When I was with him on Saturday, I think he said they're lasting about 1,500 miles before a change.  He's really liking the Raleigh...really comfortable bike for the challenge & proving to be reliable.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Canardly on February 02, 2015, 08:51:58 pm
Shimano chain or something else?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on February 02, 2015, 09:02:58 pm
Wippermann was one of Steve's first sponsors.
http://oneyeartimetrial.org.uk/sponsors
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Climberruss on February 03, 2015, 06:37:58 am

[/quote]Yes....more than one so far.  When I was with him on Saturday, I think he said they're lasting about 1,500 miles before a change.  He's really liking the Raleigh...really comfortable bike for the challenge & proving to be reliable.
[/quote]

I'd have expected a chain to last a damn sight longer than 1500 miles, even in these conditions - especially given that Steve is not whacking huge power outputs through it. What parameters are being used to change them?  Time on the bike / miles done  or a chain checker?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Canardly on February 03, 2015, 10:05:58 am
Wippermann was one of Steve's first sponsors.
http://oneyeartimetrial.org.uk/sponsors

Missed that thanks.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Karla on February 03, 2015, 11:06:19 am

Quote
Yes....more than one so far.  When I was with him on Saturday, I think he said they're lasting about 1,500 miles before a change.  He's really liking the Raleigh...really comfortable bike for the challenge & proving to be reliable.

I'd have expected a chain to last a damn sight longer than 1500 miles, even in these conditions - especially given that Steve is not whacking huge power outputs through it. What parameters are being used to change them?  Time on the bike / miles done  or a chain checker?

At a guess, a planned preventative maintenance schedule?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: aidan.f on February 03, 2015, 12:23:26 pm
3x chains, = 4500, then chain + cassette @6000. IIRC
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Climberruss on February 03, 2015, 12:54:13 pm
3x chains, = 4500, then chain + cassette @6000. IIRC

I generally work on 3 chains to a cassette but even pushing my weight I only change chains about once every 3-3500 miles.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: bryn on February 03, 2015, 02:08:45 pm
At a guess, a planned preventative maintenance schedule?

I seem to recall a mention of chain skipping.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LeoW on February 03, 2015, 02:34:59 pm
At a guess, a planned preventative maintenance schedule?

I seem to recall a mention of chain skipping.
2nd chain at 4000 miles produced some skipping on the smaller cogs so the cassette was changed the next day

Steve's probably still riding his 2nd bike that he switched to last Thursday ..... this will soon skew our armchair calculations
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on February 03, 2015, 02:37:21 pm
Steve is spending a lot of time on flat ground, so is only using a few sprockets most of the time, increasing the wear on those cogs. Most of his distance is in crappy weather, often on gritted roads, and you know how that kills chains.

In any case, there is not a lot of point in squeezing a few hundred extra miles out of a chain. It would only be an extra couple of days.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: TGS on February 03, 2015, 11:52:08 pm
Surely, a lot of this extra weight to be carried could be avoided by using non-rechargables?

I've just received my Bolse charger. 371 grammes including the mains lead for the weight weenies amongst you.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Sergeant Pluck on February 08, 2015, 03:08:50 pm
Steve’s Raleigh Sojourn frames seem very similar - identical as far as I can see going by the dropout, lug and fork designs - to the Jamis Aurora I had for a while. A decent ride although I found it a bit short: toe overlap was an issue, albeit with larger tyres than Steve is using and size 12 shoes.

It’s going to be a very stern test for the disc fork, even if there are 3 bikes to share the miles.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on February 08, 2015, 03:21:26 pm
Some people aren't troubled by toe overlap. I'm one and Steve has ridden many miles on shorter fixed wheel bikes.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Sergeant Pluck on February 08, 2015, 03:47:58 pm
I’m not overly bothered by a bit of toe overlap, but I think it is best avoided in a bike that’s intended for loaded touring (as i had envisaged the Jamis to be). Steep hills, heavy bike, with a bit of weaving... awkward with toe overlap. But for Steve’s purposes it matters not a jot, and the frame geometry may be different in any case. I’d bet it’s made in the same factory though.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Pale Rider on February 10, 2015, 02:49:35 am
Toe overlap and clipless is not a good combination, in my opinion.

I ride toe overlap and platform pedals, which is OK because I can withdraw the overlapping toe when necessary.

Even so, I've sill clouted the mudguard a handful of times.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on February 10, 2015, 05:47:12 am
As I say, some don't care as they don't find it to be a problem. I have overlap with the mudguard of my fixed and I mostly track stand at lights during my London suburban commute.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Ham on February 10, 2015, 08:22:18 am
As I say, some don't care as they don't find it to be a problem. I have overlap with the mudguard of my fixed and I mostly track stand at lights during my London suburban commute.

Correct me if I'm wrong (and this is yacf, so hey, correct me even if I'm not wrong) but I would have thought toe overlap and trackstanding is a sub optimal configuration option
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LittleWheelsandBig on February 10, 2015, 08:28:42 am
It simply isn't a problem. My toe hits the mudguard occasionally but doesn't cause a significant drama. I'd be more annoyed with having a good-handling geometry compromised to avoid overlap. I need to have a bike that steers well at speed or with the rear wheel stepping out. What happens when I'm stationary is meaningless.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: hellymedic on February 10, 2015, 01:41:29 pm
As I say, some don't care as they don't find it to be a problem. I have overlap with the mudguard of my fixed and I mostly track stand at lights during my London suburban commute.

Correct me if I'm wrong (and this is yacf, so hey, correct me even if I'm not wrong) but I would have thought toe overlap and trackstanding is a sub optimal configuration option

If you have big feet and a short torso, especially if your legs aren't long, you'll need a small frame with a short top tube. Toe overlap is likely...

If you have long legs and a short back, you might be a Marsh Gibbon...
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: mattc on February 10, 2015, 06:57:07 pm
As I say, some don't care as they don't find it to be a problem. I have overlap with the mudguard of my fixed and I mostly track stand at lights during my London suburban commute.

Correct me if I'm wrong (and this is yacf, so hey, correct me even if I'm not wrong) but I would have thought toe overlap and trackstanding is a sub optimal configuration option
I am not blessed with the relevant skill,  but I think the idea is to turn the front wheel towards your "forward" foot. If  its going well you only make quite small steering movements - shouldn't need to ever turn the bars far enough back the other way to catch your toe.

(I don't like toe overlap,  but am well aware that some deal with it quite happily. Handy!)
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Deano on February 11, 2015, 12:00:19 am
As I say, some don't care as they don't find it to be a problem. I have overlap with the mudguard of my fixed and I mostly track stand at lights during my London suburban commute.

Correct me if I'm wrong (and this is yacf, so hey, correct me even if I'm not wrong) but I would have thought toe overlap and trackstanding is a sub optimal configuration option

I don't find it a big deal either, but it's not as though I'm swinging the front wheel back and forth when track standing.

You have to be aware of it, but I've never found it a problem. Going through tight chicanes on daft anti-cyclist gates, it's just a matter of adjusting your speed and remembering to angle your foot, but for me, that's about as much hassle as I get.

All things being equal, I'd rather not have toe overlap, but I find it a minor issue and it wouldn't put me off a bike.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on February 11, 2015, 02:12:17 pm
I once almost fell off through toe overlap, on a very tight corner - you turn through more than 270 degrees, going uphill and carry on climbing. The next time, I remembered this, so took it really wide - and nearly lost the front wheel on some gravel!
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Nuncio on February 11, 2015, 02:35:18 pm
Toe overlap, very tight corner, badly-trimmed mudguard stay with no plastic cap, open-toed sandals = trail of blood on the road from Craig-cefn-parc to Rhyd-y-pandy.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: La Tortue on February 12, 2015, 01:06:58 pm
I am interested in the performance of Steves Tubeless tires.  My understanding is so far he has only had one  puncture.  Is this correct and what was the situation surrounding this flat?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LeoW on February 12, 2015, 02:43:32 pm
I am interested in the performance of Steves Tubeless tires.  My understanding is so far he has only had one  puncture.  Is this correct and what was the situation surrounding this flat?

He'd shredded the sidewalls on a couple of tyres during the first 3 weeks ..... but I haven't heard any rumours/details since then.
Perhaps Swiss Hat could enlighten us ........

..... also has no.1 bike's front wheel received new bearings yet ?

Leo
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: frankly frankie on February 12, 2015, 03:17:08 pm
[HT2 bearings]
All I seem to read about is how the newer BB bearings need replacing because of water ingress causing failure and corrosion etc
I'd be interested to know exactly what is the Hope BB Steve has on the Raleigh ? [Or maybe there is only the one and that's it].

I think it's the old problem - you read these things but you don't hear from the thousands of users who haven't encountered any problems.  I think the new external-type BBs are a significant advance over the old type, and aside from anything else, they are extremely easy to replace.  If Steve were to arrive back at base complaining of roughness in the BB department, fitting replacement bearings is a 10-minute job.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: swiss hat on February 12, 2015, 03:24:48 pm
The Red bike that had front wheel play is at the LBS for overhaul this week. 

The Red bike work log shows:
780 miles - tyre sidewall damage. Wheel swapped on return to home.
1128 - bad puncture which Steve "helped seal - now ok"
1650 - original wheel installed with new tyre.
2530 - tyre slashed and replaced.   
No further reported tyre problems until front wheel play developed ~ 4500 miles.

The Silver bike that Steve used after the Red bike has no reported problems in 2200 miles. This is the at home spare which is ready to go after chain & cassette change.

The Black bike has been in use this week. No reported problems.

So it looks like there has been only 1 puncture that delayed Steve at 1128 miles and 2 cases of tyre damage where Steve was able to continue home and then replace tyre/wheel. That's excellent in ~7800 miles of winter cycling :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: duncan on February 12, 2015, 03:47:28 pm
2530 - tyre slashed and replaced.

I misread that to start with and assumed Steve had had to replace it at the roadside. If that really is one puncture requiring on the road attention so far, and all that needed was 'help to seal', then that's fantastic.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: swiss hat on February 12, 2015, 03:58:20 pm
2530 - tyre slashed and replaced.

I misread that to start with and assumed Steve had had to replace it at the roadside. If that really is one puncture requiring on the road attention so far, and all that needed was 'help to seal', then that's fantastic.

Yes it may be that he replaced it at the roadside rather than at home as I originally thought. He does carry a spare tyre in the Carradice.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: T42 on February 12, 2015, 04:49:05 pm
How's that reflective tape on the rims holding up?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: swiss hat on February 12, 2015, 05:09:44 pm
How's that reflective tape on the rims holding up?

Fantastic - see pic from thread a few days ago. Also on the frame, forks and rack as shown. It's a Scotchlite product that appears black in daylight but really stands out when illuminated.

(http://www.alfiecat.co.uk/yetacf/DSC_6086.jpg)
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LeoW on February 12, 2015, 05:16:25 pm
It's a Scotchlite product that appears black in daylight but really stands out when illuminated.


I bought some recently from ebay  .....

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/141424356578?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&var=440567170308&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

Leo
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Jaded on February 12, 2015, 06:01:56 pm
How's that reflective tape on the rims holding up?

Fantastic - see pic from thread a few days ago. Also on the frame, forks and rack as shown. It's a Scotchlite product that appears black in daylight but really stands out when illuminated.

(http://www.alfiecat.co.uk/yetacf/DSC_6086.jpg)

You can just make out the tape in this early morning shot of the black bike. Top tube and the front rim between the decal and the floor

(http://www.alfiecat.co.uk/yetacf/DSC_6109.jpg)
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Kim on February 12, 2015, 06:29:23 pm
How's that reflective tape on the rims holding up?

Fantastic - see pic from thread a few days ago. Also on the frame, forks and rack as shown. It's a Scotchlite product that appears black in daylight but really stands out when illuminated.

My experience of Scotchlite on rims is disappointing, but I suppose the combination of disc brakes and getting a regular wipe from non-bored fettlers helps a fair bit.  The advantage over the usual 3M spoke reflectors is no aero penalty.

(I'm a big fan of the black Scotchlite in general though, and it's being used to good effect there.)
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: T42 on February 12, 2015, 09:18:32 pm
How's that reflective tape on the rims holding up?

Fantastic - see pic from thread a few days ago. Also on the frame, forks and rack as shown. It's a Scotchlite product that appears black in daylight but really stands out when illuminated.

(http://www.alfiecat.co.uk/yetacf/DSC_6086.jpg)

Yes, it was that pic that went ping.  I ordered some tape yesterday but not Scotchlite.

I have 3M spoke reflectors on one spoke in 3 but in a strong side-wind they're murderous. When I had them on every spoke they damn near succeeded.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Karla on February 12, 2015, 10:02:42 pm
I wonder how many more miles Steve could do over the year if he routed his gear cables through his tribars like most people do? ;)
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: JonBuoy on February 12, 2015, 10:06:27 pm
I am not convinced by the temperature figures on Steve's Strava logs.  For example today it shows zero degrees for the bulk of the ride apart from the stops whereas the weather reports suggest that it was more like 3-4 degC in the area where he was cycling.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: jsabine on February 12, 2015, 10:53:50 pm
I wonder how many more miles Steve could do over the year if he routed his gear cables through his tribars like most people do? ;)

Two?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Oaky on February 13, 2015, 01:51:45 am
I am not convinced by the temperature figures on Steve's Strava logs.  For example today it shows zero degrees for the bulk of the ride apart from the stops whereas the weather reports suggest that it was more like 3-4 degC in the area where he was cycling.

Well, quoted figures tend to be based on being in a built-up area /conurbation where it does tend to be warmer than out in the sticks where Steve spends most of his rides.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: swiss hat on February 13, 2015, 05:32:40 am
2530 - tyre slashed and replaced.

I misread that to start with and assumed Steve had had to replace it at the roadside. If that really is one puncture requiring on the road attention so far, and all that needed was 'help to seal', then that's fantastic.

Yes it may be that he replaced it at the roadside rather than at home as I originally thought. He does carry a spare tyre in the Carradice.

Checked with Steve:
1128 miles - tyre lost some pressure but sealed and then needed to be pumped up
2530 - slashed tyre replaced at roadside
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: citoyen on February 13, 2015, 10:51:42 am
Interesting. Was the roadside replacement with a tube or does he carry a compressor in that rack pack too? ;D
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on February 13, 2015, 11:09:12 am
How's that reflective tape on the rims holding up?

Fantastic - see pic from thread a few days ago. Also on the frame, forks and rack as shown. It's a Scotchlite product that appears black in daylight but really stands out when illuminated.

(http://www.alfiecat.co.uk/yetacf/DSC_6086.jpg)

Yes, it was that pic that went ping.  I ordered some tape yesterday but not Scotchlite.

I have 3M spoke reflectors on one spoke in 3 but in a strong side-wind they're murderous. When I had them on every spoke they damn near succeeded.
Interesting. I've always been side-wind-phobic but it had never occurred to me the spoke reflectors were making things worse. I don't recall feeling any difference when I first added them, and they are pretty small. Still, viewed simply as reflectors, the tape probably offers a larger area and is less likely to be hidden by the angle of the rims.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: JonBuoy on February 13, 2015, 03:31:30 pm
I am not convinced by the temperature figures on Steve's Strava logs.  For example today it shows zero degrees for the bulk of the ride apart from the stops whereas the weather reports suggest that it was more like 3-4 degC in the area where he was cycling.

Well, quoted figures tend to be based on being in a built-up area /conurbation where it does tend to be warmer than out in the sticks where Steve spends most of his rides.

I agree that Met Office etc forecast temperatures appear to be based on built-up areas but I was looking at recorded temperatures from places like Wittering which has a real 'sticks' feel about it.

On a related thought  -  do you get frost hollows in the Fens ?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: bryn on February 14, 2015, 07:49:04 pm
In the video interview with Hoppo on Tarzan's facebook page, Hoppo says "Steve's done some wheels in".  I remember reading about one puncture and one wheel bearing problem here, but were there more  wheel failures?

Bryn
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Butterfly on February 14, 2015, 09:32:50 pm
I am not convinced by the temperature figures on Steve's Strava logs.  For example today it shows zero degrees for the bulk of the ride apart from the stops whereas the weather reports suggest that it was more like 3-4 degC in the area where he was cycling.

Well, quoted figures tend to be based on being in a built-up area /conurbation where it does tend to be warmer than out in the sticks where Steve spends most of his rides.

I agree that Met Office etc forecast temperatures appear to be based on built-up areas but I was looking at recorded temperatures from places like Wittering which has a real 'sticks' feel about it.

On a related thought  -  do you get frost hollows in the Fens ?

Do the GPSs feel a bit exposed on the bars of the bike?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: citoyen on February 14, 2015, 10:13:10 pm
Depends on the location of the sensor. Supposedly not an issue with the Edge 1000, so if Steve is uploading from that rather than the other devices, you'd expect it to be fairly accurate.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: GrumpyBob on February 20, 2015, 11:14:19 am
Review of Steve's bikes at road.cc:
http://road.cc/content/news/143511-steven-abraham%E2%80%99s-raleigh-sojourn-year-record-bike

Robert
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Vince on March 04, 2015, 10:30:13 pm
Steve's Mug

The picture on FB tonight taken at his hosts in Ashby shows a giant Union Jack mug. This has featured in other pictures. Does he take it with him or does he only stay with hosts who have such a beverage receptacle?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Jaded on March 04, 2015, 10:51:44 pm
WE lent him one of ours when he was with us  ;D
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: jusmith on March 05, 2015, 03:29:35 pm
Not sure where this bit fits in but as someone whose followed this from the beginning I'd be interested in hearing of Steve's 'other' daily tasks.
Just the ordinary things...
Has he had his hair cut yet?
Does he watch TV when he gets in to unwind (or does he have other ways to relax)?
Does he miss anything whilst he's out cycling (apart from beer)?
Did he enjoy his visit to Brooks saddles?
That kind of thing.

Not sure it needs a link of it's own but I'm sure people would be interested how he can do all that cycling and find time to eat, sleep, read etc.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: LeoW on March 15, 2015, 10:55:30 pm
It's a while since we've had any updates on Steve's bikes.

Can any helpers or host shed light on how they are fairing ?

We've had some snippets :

His best (Stans 340) front wheel was in for a hub repair
A couple of tyre problems early on.
Rotated thru all 3 bikes so far.
Bike 1 was on 2nd cassette and 3rd chain (?) early Feb.

Are the tyres wearing thin yet or being replaced routinely ?
Disc pads working /wearing okay ?
Electronics/connectors holding up ?

Need Chris Juden to go for a ride with him...................
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: citoyen on March 16, 2015, 09:17:20 pm
A classic case of "If it ain't broke, fix it until it is"
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: T42 on March 17, 2015, 09:55:59 am
^^^Garmin reinvents Microsoft's marketing policy.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Legs on March 17, 2015, 12:09:23 pm
What I'm interested to know about is Steve's washing.  Do his hosts have enough time to turn around an overnight wash and tumble-dry of his cycling kit?  Does Steve carry a full set of everything in the Carradice?  Does he do his own washing when at home - if so, wouldn't it disturb his precious sleep to have to get the clothes out of the washer and into the dryer?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Kim on March 17, 2015, 12:11:14 pm
Indeed, and what about normal people who don't have tumble driers?  Presumably radiator tactics are required, but I'd have thought that shorts pads for example might still be damp with the number of hours available.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Jaded on March 17, 2015, 12:22:43 pm
We washed his clothes and spun them three times before hanging them up carefully. All dry 5 hours later.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Ningishzidda on March 18, 2015, 07:27:01 am
Indeed, and what about normal people who don't have tumble driers?  Presumably radiator tactics are required, but I'd have thought that shorts pads for example might still be damp with the number of hours available.

Nope. Normal people don’t have tumble dryers, so when I ride to my riverside caravan, I hand wash my kit, hang them on hangers in a doorway with a 2kW blow heater pointing at them. They are dry by time I get back from the site restaurant.  ;) ;D
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: loadsabikes on March 18, 2015, 09:00:06 am
Yes, it does involve the 1200 spin cycle and serious radiator action.
It is a busy time for hosts, especially if the bike is filthy and requires a "proper" clean.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Polar Bear on March 18, 2015, 09:05:01 am
If I need to dry clothing overnight at home the key is a 30o wash with 1200 or greater spin speed followed by a few hours on economy 7 overnight in a room with a dehumidifier*.   Seems to be the ultimate solution.   :thumbsup:

I would never put any synthetics in a tumble dryer, especially lycra.

*  Of course, I appreciate that not everybody has a dehumidifier.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Ningishzidda on March 18, 2015, 09:34:00 am
The trick is to have a movement of dry, air around the garments at a temperature greater than the moisture in the garments.
Refreshing damp air with dry will allow the moisture on the garments to vapourise more readily due to the difference in humidty.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Legs on March 18, 2015, 09:54:07 am
What I'm interested to know about is Steve's washing.  Do his hosts have enough time to turn around an overnight wash and tumble-dry of his cycling kit?  Does Steve carry a full set of everything in the Carradice?  Does he do his own washing when at home - if so, wouldn't it disturb his precious sleep to have to get the clothes out of the washer and into the dryer?
I just want to make it abundantly clear that I do not have a tumble-dryer, and have no idea what proportion of households own one.  I make do (as I'm sure most of you do) with line-drying on fine days, drying smalls on a 'clippy hanger' over the woodburner in winter, radiator-juggling and sticking things in the airing cupboard if they're a smidge damp.  But then, I'm not spending nearly every single waking hour on a bicycle and often being away from home.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: macnark on March 18, 2015, 11:18:28 am
I have one of those oscillating fans (which I set to fixed).

If I need a jersey or tights dried pronto, I do up the zip, and put the lower hem of the jersey or the waistband of the tights around the fan, which is just a bit bigger diameter than my waist, so a good airtight fit.

The air inflates the garment and dries it pretty rapidly.

Fresh air in room is essential, if windows are closed, it all gets too humid and nothing will dry.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on March 18, 2015, 11:23:28 am
I used to do that at work, until the fan broke and they refused to replace it.

I tumble dry lycra. It doesn't shrivel up and disintegrate.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: tonyh on March 18, 2015, 11:30:19 am
Dehumidifiers are good for drying clothes.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: citoyen on March 18, 2015, 11:42:48 am
I tumble dry lycra. It doesn't shrivel up and disintegrate.

You do need to be careful though - I've had various bits of sports kit ruined by tumble drying over the years.

Our current tumble dryer has a synthetics setting, which is fine for lycra, though I still prefer to drip-dry cycling gear if there's no time pressure.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: geraldc on March 18, 2015, 05:27:07 pm
Snagging on zips on other sharp things is my main concern with lycra in tumble dryers (that and the cost)
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: CrinklyLion on March 18, 2015, 08:18:49 pm
I've turned around a set of cycling kit overnight for his Leggship once.  And in under 4 hours while he went for a nap (between getting to the Den post 'Spoons and getting woken up for some macc+cheese before a train back south) for Tynan after an Easter Arrow.  Without a tumble dryer, making judicious use of the super-fast cycle on the washing machine, an extra spin and radiators.  It's do-able, but sleep limiting.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: TGS on March 22, 2015, 12:31:07 am
Steve arrived here at 9, went to be shortly after 10 and threw the kit to be washed outside the bedroom door. I put it all back, clean and dry just after midnight. Tumble dryers do it for me!

The space age ear gizmo that was enquired about recently is a Cardo BK1 bluetooth phone / music thingy.

The exposure light has been retired in favour of a hope 4 LED light (vision 4 ?) with battery pack in the carradice. He's carrying 1 of the BBB lights as opposed to 2 earlier in the year - the bars are now a lot less cluttered.

He's on the red bike, but with the new silver wheels - and the bike is looking good, Everything is as it should be. I asked how many punctures and the obvious answer was "I don't know - they repair themselves" ( :facepalm:). It looks like a new cassette, chains are changed regularly.

The hope light with a spare battery pack (plus of course lengthening days) has simplified charging somewhat - Everything is charged and back on the bike ready for the off. There are a lot of rechargeables - AAs & AAAs - my Maplin rapid charger has got through about 5 sets since 9pm - of course they were not all empty before I started. Looking at his kit it is obvious that all the research is paying off.

And I think by now his arse has moulded itself to the shape of the extra thick leather B17 Pro!
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Mr Larrington on March 22, 2015, 12:01:19 pm
The Hope Vision 4 I have is the size of an avocado and can be used for coning bombers flying at 18,000 feet if wrongly adjusted so it sounds a bit overkilly for Steve's purposes 8)

It's brilliant for tracing anbaric string behind the telly though.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Climberruss on March 22, 2015, 12:48:01 pm
The Hope Vision 4 I have is the size of an avocado and can be used for coning bombers flying at 18,000 feet if wrongly adjusted so it sounds a bit overkilly for Steve's purposes 8)

It's brilliant for tracing anbaric string behind the telly though.

Agreed. Even a Vision2 is probably overkill. They are quite heavy too.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: TGS on March 22, 2015, 09:22:58 pm
It is an R4 light, just checked their website. With 2 ES battery packs
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: T42 on March 26, 2015, 01:54:09 pm
How're the disc rotors holding up?

The missus has been at me to get a new bike (!!!), and since Steve's tested the Sojourn pretty well I had a wee gander.  They're going pretty cheaply on Discount Bicycles (http://www.discountbicycles.co.uk/biz/search.php?xSearch=raleigh%20sojourn&xPriceFrom=0&xPriceTo=0&xSort=pricelh&xPage=1&gclid=Cj0KEQjw3M6oBRDnnIywo5i287ABEiQAXRm7S3mQ0By0nr10TY_815acjc_722VMsBEBdv0-YBdKIbgaAo2A8P8HAQ) if you want to build a standard one, but I don't like the wheels/tyres (too heavy for my decrepit physique) & I'd need a new dynamo for discs.

Bears thinking about, though...
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: mmmmartin on March 26, 2015, 03:28:26 pm

I bought some recently from ebay  .....

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/141424356578?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&var=440567170308&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

Leo
So did I. A brilliant idea, only £2.85 for 15mm by 50mm, it'll go on the black bike.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: offcumden on March 26, 2015, 07:43:51 pm
They're going pretty cheaply on Discount Bicycles (http://www.discountbicycles.co.uk/biz/search.php?xSearch=raleigh%20sojourn&xPriceFrom=0&xPriceTo=0&xSort=pricelh&xPage=1&gclid=Cj0KEQjw3M6oBRDnnIywo5i287ABEiQAXRm7S3mQ0By0nr10TY_815acjc_722VMsBEBdv0-YBdKIbgaAo2A8P8HAQ)

Mmm, I'd be a bit wary about the bit that says, 'Unbuilt, No Warranty'.

Only a few pounds more from Spa Cycles, who can be trusted to put it together properly.
http://www.spacycles.co.uk/products.php?plid=m1b0s21p3059&z=4147
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: hillbilly on March 26, 2015, 10:39:51 pm
What HR chest strap does Steve use?  It must be pretty comfy if he is using in day in day out.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on March 26, 2015, 11:00:15 pm
What HR chest strap does Steve use?  It must be pretty comfy if he is using in day in day out.

STOP

Nobody answer that question unless the brand is sponsoring Steve.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: hillbilly on March 26, 2015, 11:06:13 pm
What HR chest strap does Steve use?  It must be pretty comfy if he is using in day in day out.

STOP

Nobody answer that question unless the brand is sponsoring Steve.

PM me if you know the answer.  Genuinely want to know.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on March 26, 2015, 11:12:02 pm
I don't and I'm half-serious.


Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: fuaran on March 26, 2015, 11:20:01 pm
What HR chest strap does Steve use?  It must be pretty comfy if he is using in day in day out.
I'm wondering how long the strap will last. Is it being washed regularly? Has it had the battery changed?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Mr Larrington on March 26, 2015, 11:21:23 pm
COMB ITS HAIR!
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: T42 on March 27, 2015, 07:51:24 am
They're going pretty cheaply on Discount Bicycles (http://www.discountbicycles.co.uk/biz/search.php?xSearch=raleigh%20sojourn&xPriceFrom=0&xPriceTo=0&xSort=pricelh&xPage=1&gclid=Cj0KEQjw3M6oBRDnnIywo5i287ABEiQAXRm7S3mQ0By0nr10TY_815acjc_722VMsBEBdv0-YBdKIbgaAo2A8P8HAQ)

Mmm, I'd be a bit wary about the bit that says, 'Unbuilt, No Warranty'.

Only a few pounds more from Spa Cycles, who can be trusted to put it together properly.
http://www.spacycles.co.uk/products.php?plid=m1b0s21p3059&z=4147

Right enough, but Spa don't happily export.  I've already built bikes and there's a bloke in the next village but one who'll do the bits I don't.

But I've been mulling this over: the ads are self-contradictory (3x9 gears = 24 speeds???) and are coy about the weight of the thing.  I do like the idea of discs, though.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: jsabine on March 27, 2015, 09:35:42 am
Even the Raleigh  (http://www.raleigh.co.uk/ProductType/ProductRange/Product/Default.aspx?pc=1&pt=14&pg=8075) page on the Sojourn isn't especially helpful - 24 speed on the Features tab, 27  when you look at the Specifications. And no weight quoted, presumably on the grounds that with discs , guards , rack and Brooks, it ain't light.

On a different note, if you scroll down that Discount Bicycles page it seems to offer the Sojourn without the Unbuilt caveat for just a pound more. Also, the shop is just a couple of miles from me: I don't suppose a visit would tell us very much though.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Ningishzidda on March 27, 2015, 09:49:07 am
IIRC, the Raleigh Randonneur was 32 lb all up.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: T42 on March 27, 2015, 10:00:10 am
Even the Raleigh  (http://www.raleigh.co.uk/ProductType/ProductRange/Product/Default.aspx?pc=1&pt=14&pg=8075) page on the Sojourn isn't especially helpful - 24 speed on the Features tab, 27  when you look at the Specifications. And no weight quoted, presumably on the grounds that with discs , guards , rack and Brooks, it ain't light.

On a different note, if you scroll down that Discount Bicycles page it seems to offer the Sojourn without the Unbuilt caveat for just a pound more. Also, the shop is just a couple of miles from me: I don't suppose a visit would tell us very much though.

Yeah. I'm slightly further away and the Channel lies between, which is kinda fiddly if anything goes awry.

What I really need is a new Audax bike.  My current one is built on a Ti frame and has been on the road for 11 years now. Most of the bits have been changed several times, and in principle there's nothing wrong with it except that it's my only option.  I was thinking that the Sojourn looks like a cheap solution, but it's possibly more cheap than solution. Being 27 years older than Steve I don't have the oomph for a heavy bike any more.

IIRC, the Raleigh Randonneur was 32 lb all up.

Oo-errr. That's 14.5 kg.  My current beast is around 12.5 (27.5 lb) and I've just replaced the rack/rack bag with a Koala, so I'm probably down to 11.

I'll look for a nice frame and see what I can build.

Thanks for input, all.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Wowbagger on March 27, 2015, 10:11:15 am
How're the disc rotors holding up?

The missus has been at me to get a new bike (!!!), and since Steve's tested the Sojourn pretty well I had a wee gander.  They're going pretty cheaply on Discount Bicycles (http://www.discountbicycles.co.uk/biz/search.php?xSearch=raleigh%20sojourn&xPriceFrom=0&xPriceTo=0&xSort=pricelh&xPage=1&gclid=Cj0KEQjw3M6oBRDnnIywo5i287ABEiQAXRm7S3mQ0By0nr10TY_815acjc_722VMsBEBdv0-YBdKIbgaAo2A8P8HAQ) if you want to build a standard one, but I don't like the wheels/tyres (too heavy for my decrepit physique) & I'd need a new dynamo for discs.

Bears thinking about, though...

What are bears thinking about?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: T42 on March 27, 2015, 01:13:39 pm
Much the same as Assos, I should think.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: T42 on March 28, 2015, 02:02:47 pm
(click to show/hide)
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: andyoxon on July 14, 2015, 01:32:20 pm
Perhaps this has been discussed, but thinking in the context of a new/concurrent record attempt, about whether Steve would benefit from trying one of these raleigh carbon machines (or similar), given he is sponsored by Raleigh.  Thinking lighter etc... better for the greater elevation targets(?) http://www.raleigh.co.uk/ProductType/ProductRange/Product/Default.aspx?pc=1&pt=14&pg=10660
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: rafletcher on July 14, 2015, 01:46:25 pm
Not unless they do a disc version.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: andyoxon on July 14, 2015, 04:03:13 pm
Not unless they do a disc version.
  Something like this...  arguably marginal gains, perhaps?

(http://media.raleigh.co.uk/bikes/xlarge/RAXT50RD.JPG)

http://www.raleigh.co.uk/ProductType/ProductRange/Product/Default.aspx?pc=1&pt=14&pg=10662

In any event I guess Steve must be fairly well attached to his Sojourns now...   :)
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Mr Larrington on July 14, 2015, 06:34:38 pm
Where do you fit the rack, mudguards and sausage dispenser?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: zigzag on July 14, 2015, 07:24:40 pm
a rack and mudguards can be fitted no problem
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on July 15, 2015, 08:49:52 am
I believe that during the planning Steve did try a carbon speed machine. I reckon he's weighed up <sic> light/fast frame vs comfort and decided that comfort wins.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Clemo on July 15, 2015, 09:41:11 am
I believe that during the planning Steve did try a carbon speed machine. I reckon he's weighed up <sic> light/fast frame vs comfort and decided that comfort wins.
I reckon you are right there, however why not have the faster lighter bike to use on good days, when the weather is just right and Steve could really take advantage of say some aero components to eek out some additional miles and go back to old faithful the following day to recover.

Edit: It has just occurred to me that Kurt has been using aero wheels the whole time, so a pair of aero wheels (disc) could be used to not only gain a few miles but also use less energy for the same distance.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: andyoxon on July 15, 2015, 10:39:54 am
Something I've wondered is a) the 'usual' weight of Steve's carradice rack pack, and b) the difference in the weight of said rack pack when he's doing, say, a Fens loop out from home and back, compared to when he's staying with a host for the night.  I suppose, how much the amount of kit Steve is carrying day to day varies..?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Canardly on July 15, 2015, 11:17:06 am
Is someone keeping notes on the performance of the kit over time?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: aoxomoxoa on July 15, 2015, 03:43:29 pm
I believe that during the planning Steve did try a carbon speed machine. I reckon he's weighed up <sic> light/fast frame vs comfort and decided that comfort wins.

I seem to recall reading that given he's mostly riding on the flat in his view the benefit of a lighter bike is offset by the greater strength/reliability/fixability of a steel job. Once he's rolling the weight penalty is minimal.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: redfalo on July 16, 2015, 04:43:41 pm
I believe that during the planning Steve did try a carbon speed machine. I reckon he's weighed up <sic> light/fast frame vs comfort and decided that comfort wins.

I seem to recall reading that given he's mostly riding on the flat in his view the benefit of a lighter bike is offset by the greater strength/reliability/fixability of a steel job. Once he's rolling the weight penalty is minimal.

yes, I recall this too. However, if you compare Steve's and Kurt's total climbing on Strava, Steve is doing many more hills than Kurt on a heavier bike.

Who am I to comment on  Steve' bike choice - he will have spent months over months contemplating his choice. But for me,  a lighter bike has made a big difference, even when not climbing up the Alps.

I changed from a Moulton TSR 30 to a Specialised Roubaix carbon frame a year ago for long distance rides, and my average speed went ob 2kph instantly. When I did a 400 on the Moulton in April, I was really suffering. Thanks to a professional bike fit, I do have not comfort issues whatsoever on the road bike.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: red marley on July 16, 2015, 05:03:09 pm
Reliability may well be more important to Steve than it is to Kurt. As Kurt has motorised support, a mechanical from a more fragile but lighter bike can be dealt with by swapping bikes with a backup on the van (as he has done on many occasions this year). If Steve has a mechanical 200km from home it will be more difficult to sort out without losing lots of time.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: zigzag on July 16, 2015, 10:33:22 pm
ultra-light bikes aside i can't see how a lighter bike is less reliable. if we were talking about the resistance to angle grinder attack, then probably yes. but for normal steady riding that Steve is doing? i would definitely use a lighter bike; even 3-5km extra per day (in reality closer to 10k, imo) he could ride with a better bike could "buy" him four-five days by the end of year - for no extra effort!!
i'm aware and sure that Steve has thought it through and chose his bikes and luggage that seemed most suitable for the job. however, i can't sit still thinking that he's reluctant to use some of easily available advantages - this challenge is such a massive commitment - why not do it full on?..
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on July 17, 2015, 03:44:11 pm
Is there a lighter carbon framed bike with similar frame geometry to the Sojourn??
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Karla on July 17, 2015, 03:54:22 pm
There will be somewhere, without a doubt.  Probably a Spesh Roubaix or one of the other range of 'endurance bikes' that have come along to give touring geometry with racing looks.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Frank9755 on July 22, 2015, 09:29:30 pm
Agree completely re lighter bike.  My friend, who is a Raleigh dealer, was also very surprised when he heard which bike Steve was going to use. 

The other thing about Steve's bike setup that could be massively improved is his aerodynamics.  Granted he is not going at high speeds most of the time (although he will spend a lot of time in a year going down hills and it will add up), but he looks like he is very high and pushing an awful lot of air, compared to, say, Kurt.  So he needs to use more energy to get the same speed. or ride longer to get the same distance. 

You can't just change your position overnight, you need to get used to it, so it's not a quick fix.  But Steve does have all year, and I am convinced there would be big gains to be had if he worked at it. 
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: rafletcher on July 23, 2015, 09:01:43 am
But will he find a sponsor to provide 3 x carbon bikes (or even one for "fine days" use), if indeed he wanted to ride one?  Or else the support team would need to finance the purchase?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: red marley on July 23, 2015, 09:06:22 am
Let's not forget that a main motivation for Steve's attempt at the OYTT was his admiration for Tommy's 1939 record. The sponsorship of both by Raleigh provides a nice symmetry.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Ningishzidda on July 23, 2015, 09:32:05 am
Let me ask.
If you were attempting the HAM’R, and a bike company agreed to supply the bikes to your liking, would you refuse?

Mouth, gift horse.
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: TimC on July 23, 2015, 11:52:51 am
Let's not forget that a main motivation for Steve's attempt at the OYTT was his admiration for Tommy's 1939 record. The sponsorship of both by Raleigh provides a nice symmetry.

Raleigh do some very, very nice carbon bikes these days! Just sayin' ;D
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: tiermat on July 23, 2015, 12:18:09 pm
Indeed, the new Roker, in carbon does look lovely.  Shame about the spec, though...
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Bobby on July 29, 2015, 04:38:15 pm
Steves Milltag kit looks nice, but has he really been riding with long legs/arms every day?  surely even with long days in the saddle July is the time for warmer/lighter clothing ???
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on September 28, 2015, 02:43:44 pm
Can we bump this to the status of a sticky, please?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Shreds on September 29, 2015, 12:03:55 am
I have no doubt that Steve has agonised long and hard, both before and during his current rides, over kit and clothing.

However a lot of this is very personal, and I would not suggest for a moment that Steve is wrong in any way. He could change a lot of things easily if he so wished, but I think he is doing just fine. He rides differently to Kurt, but I do think that Steve's steady repetitive rhythm obviously suits him best rather than upping the speed at the expense of something else.

If I were in his shoes (but never will be) I would do everything my way, in the way that felt most comfortable to me. Its not a race in the traditional sense and reliability and consistency are the key.

I dare say that if Steve had someone following/supporting like Alicia does, then there would be scope for change, but that simply isn't the case.

(Incidentally I find my 531c frame and the well worn Brooks much more comfortable and satisfying than using my Carbon Fibre framed bike on longer runs, so I am definitely in the TG camp here).
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: crowriver on September 29, 2015, 11:04:01 am
Nothing but respect from me for Steve's efforts.

As a self confessed fan of steel framed bikes, I have to agree with his choice of frame too. The Sojourn's 631 butted steel and relaxed touring geometry will help soak up road shock and vibration better than any carbon or (shudder) alloy steed. I suppose he could have gone for Titanium but it's his choice and steel is tried and tested over decades, centuries even for bicycle frames.

I wouldn't mind a Raleigh Sojourn myself for a touring rig...
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Whippet on October 01, 2015, 08:50:00 pm
Carradice rack bag fitted to my tourer in an attempt to emulate the mighty teeth grinder.   Club mates think it's funny that the only thing currently in it is a gillet  :-)
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: Frank9755 on November 08, 2015, 03:29:07 pm
Has it been reported anywhere what mileage Steve is getting from his Schwalbe One tyres?  I've done just over 3000 km on mine and, while they look fine, I'm wondering when I'm likely to need to replace!
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: zigzag on November 20, 2015, 07:40:34 pm
wondering how his bikes are doing. no news is good news i presume. is he riding one bike and only swapping for another while the first is being serviced?
Title: Re: Steve's Kit
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on November 20, 2015, 08:37:03 pm
He has 3 bikes and they get serviced at regular intervals. There was one small crisis where the service interval was a way off but he needed work doing pronto.