Yet Another Cycling Forum

General Category => The Knowledge => OT Knowledge => Topic started by: Clare on March 21, 2015, 10:01:28 am

Title: Temperature checking somebody's workflow
Post by: Clare on March 21, 2015, 10:01:28 am
Does anybody have any idea what this actually means and what one has to do to achieve it?

(Serious question, Vernon has already done all the thermometer insertion jokes.)

Title: Re: Temperature checking somebody's workflow
Post by: Polar Bear on March 21, 2015, 10:06:45 am
My experience of the world of globalcorporategreedandbullshit is that the bigmoneygrabbingcunts set the 'temperature' unrealistically high then move in with the sickles to thin out the deadwood.   The temperature being some arbitrarily excessive performance measure or fifty against which all minions have to exceed to receive their shilling each day.

Title: Re: Temperature checking somebody's workflow
Post by: Clare on March 21, 2015, 10:24:22 am
There is no indication of target reaching in what I have been told. In fact all I have been told so far is to go and watch my 'buddy' doing one of their work processes and make notes on what it involves, I can't equate this to anything which would merit calling it a temperature check and am thinking I am missing something vital.
Title: Re: Temperature checking somebody's workflow
Post by: Wombat on March 21, 2015, 10:39:41 am
Being generally sceptical about corporatebollocksspeak, I can only guess that its about assessing whether the person is becoming "overheated" in carrying out that workflow.  As in, how close to their performance limit are they?  Motivation for doing that could be about caring for your workforce, and not wishing them to get excessively stressed over it, but I suspect its far more likely that they want to up the "temperature" and push folk closer to their ultimate limits without quite burning them out.
Title: Re: Temperature checking somebody's workflow
Post by: JonBuoy on March 21, 2015, 10:54:04 am
When people use corporate_bollocks_speak I ask them what they mean.

Sometimes it becomes clear that they don't actually know !
Title: Re: Temperature checking somebody's workflow
Post by: Pickled Onion on March 21, 2015, 10:57:45 am
A "temperature check" is a measure of "staff engagement" done as a quick check, regularly, and on a scale of 1-5, eg:
Quote from: http://www.nhsemployers.org/~/media/Employers/Documents/SiteCollectionDocuments/Do%20OD/eWIN_Case_Study_-_A_Workforce_Strategy_to_Improve_Staff_Engagement1.pdf
Staff engagement Scores – Development of “Staff Temperature Checks”
to measure ongoing progress on a quarterly basis allows engagement to be better monitored. Such scores rose from 3.66 in 2010 to 3.69 in 2011, which is above the national average of 3.62.
The pdf above doesn't actually link to the questionnaire, but there's a link to it from here (http://www.ewin.nhs.uk/resources/item/681/a-workforce-strategy-to-improve-staff-engagement)

I've not partaken of one of these personally. At my last place of work we worked in "sprints" which progressed via "swim lanes". Our output was measured as a "sprint velocity", measured in units of "Story points per man-fortnight". I kid you not. Oh and "story points" were assigned on a fibonacci scale.
Title: Re: Temperature checking somebody's workflow
Post by: Polar Bear on March 21, 2015, 11:20:50 am
Erm, what a load of cods...   
Title: Re: Temperature checking somebody's workflow
Post by: Mr Larrington on March 21, 2015, 12:35:29 pm
To answer your question with a question (for them):

English, melonfarmer?  Do?  You?  Speak?  It?
Title: Re: Temperature checking somebody's workflow
Post by: Kim on March 21, 2015, 12:38:07 pm
I reckon it's an instruction to go away and watch some episodes of Drop The Dead Donkey for research purposes, then come back with a reply in equally impenetrable management bollocks.  The rules of the game mean that they'll have to pretend to have understood you.
Title: Re: Temperature checking somebody's workflow
Post by: Mr Larrington on March 21, 2015, 05:05:17 pm
Interlock brainspaces ftw...
Title: Re: Temperature checking somebody's workflow
Post by: Polar Bear on March 21, 2015, 05:29:30 pm
There is no indication of target reaching in what I have been told. In fact all I have been told so far is to go and watch my 'buddy' doing one of their work processes and make notes on what it involves, I can't equate this to anything which would merit calling it a temperature check and am thinking I am missing something vital.

How can a proper assessment be made of somebody by interpreting the notes of a third person who has no real idea of what is required to be objective?
Title: Re: Temperature checking somebody's workflow
Post by: Tigerrr on March 22, 2015, 07:21:42 am
Buy some cheap thermometers and issue them to team to wear. Then record the temperatures at work and send the data to the thermometer monitor. Fairly obvious I should think.
You could ask if the temperature check is within a full dashboard or a balanced scorecard or if it has sigma 6 interface.
Title: Re: Temperature checking somebody's workflow
Post by: TheLurker on March 22, 2015, 08:03:35 am
A "temperature check" is a measure of "staff engagement" done as a quick check, regularly, and on a scale of 1-5, eg:
Quote from: http://www.nhsemployers.org/~/media/Employers/Documents/SiteCollectionDocuments/Do%20OD/eWIN_Case_Study_-_A_Workforce_Strategy_to_Improve_Staff_Engagement1.pdf
Staff engagement Scores – Development of “Staff Temperature Checks”
to measure ongoing progress on a quarterly basis allows engagement to be better monitored. Such scores rose from 3.66 in 2010 to 3.69 in 2011, which is above the national average of 3.62.
The pdf above doesn't actually link to the questionnaire, but there's a link to it from here (http://www.ewin.nhs.uk/resources/item/681/a-workforce-strategy-to-improve-staff-engagement)

I've not partaken of one of these personally. At my last place of work we worked in "sprints" which progressed via "swim lanes". Our output was measured as a "sprint velocity", measured in units of "Story points per man-fortnight". I kid you not. Oh and "story points" were assigned on a fibonacci scale.
Ah. [Fr]Agile aka Bodge It and Run.  Fucking useless innit?
Title: Re: Temperature checking somebody's workflow
Post by: Biggsy on March 22, 2015, 01:16:25 pm
Vernon has already done all the thermometer insertion jokes.

I hope they included a large rectal thermometer up the boss's workflow.
Title: Re: Temperature checking somebody's workflow
Post by: Mr Larrington on March 22, 2015, 01:39:02 pm
Set The Boss on fire.  You can check his temperature from a distance using a gadget like the one the rangers use for checking front brake temperature on the descent of Pike's Peak.
Title: Re: Temperature checking somebody's workflow
Post by: rogerzilla on March 22, 2015, 07:45:15 pm
"Sprints" is a Deloitte favourite  :sick:
Title: Re: Temperature checking somebody's workflow
Post by: vorsprung on March 22, 2015, 08:47:25 pm
A lot of different disiplines are trying to adopt the "Agile Manifesto (http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?AgileManifesto)" based methods that originated in software engineering into different areas, such as sales

In software engineering, small teams of 3 to 10 people will work together to make a computer system to achieve something on a short timescale

In large organisations the language and some of the often out of context methods of "Agile" are adopted into a leaden work flow often involving the interlocked goals of many dozens of people

Temperature taking in the original sofware engineering context is probably something like this http://www.leadingagile.com/2014/05/safety-check/ and it's a measure of how much influence the individual members of the team believe that they have on "the process"

In the typical large organisation that "Agile" has been shoehornned  into this question will be asked and the answer will always be "oh yes, I think you can hear me and things will happen." but in large organisations this answer is often given in bad faith.  Sorry to be cynical but frankly it's a PITA a useful thing being perverted by wishful thinking project managers