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91
The Pub / Re: The RANT thread (often contains fruity language)
« Last post by Mrs Pingu on Yesterday at 09:00:21 pm »
Thing is, don't the insurers basically tell you never to admit liability, even if it is your fault?
If his insurers don't pay up he should.
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Audax / Re: Dutch brevets in 2020
« Last post by Zed43 on Yesterday at 08:56:16 pm »
Boredom?
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Audax / Re: Dutch brevets in 2020
« Last post by farfetched on Yesterday at 08:54:19 pm »
Be careful in Helmond... We have had street riots and a curfew down here in recent weeks.
Nobody seems to know why though  ;D
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Parboiled rice (like Uncle Ben’s) has more nutrients than non-parboiled white rice.

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Tell me, is it me being dumb?

[snip]

Your not being dumb.

[snip]

Why not leave it all on DHCP and statically reserve IP addresses for the adaptor on your DHCP server ?

^^^ This ^^^

Friends don’t let friends hard code IP addresses.
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I feel at this point, I should put rice in its place. It may have 2.5x as many genes as the humble human, mighty wheat knocks it into a bucket with a mighty 108,000 genes, so about double that. But it cheats by being hexaploid (humans are diploid, so we have two sets of chromosomes – other than our gametes which are haploid and have one – whereas wheat has six sets) so is, in fact, a menage à trois of different plants. It's so large that the fully annotated reference genome took till last year to be published. I, for one, look forward to the final completion of the triffid genome project.
This got me wondering about triticale. According to Wikipedia it's "amphidiploid".
Quote
The triticale hybrids are all amphidiploid, which means the plant is diploid for two genomes derived from different species. In other words, triticale is an allotetraploid. In earlier years, most work was done on octoploid triticale. Different ploidy levels have been created and evaluated over time. The tetraploids showed little promise, but hexaploid triticale was successful enough to find commercial application.[3]
If I claimed to really understand that, you wouldn't believe me.
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I can see how that might be appealing when camping. Uncle Ben's rice that is, not triffids.
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Freewheeling / Re: VeloViewer Explorer Score and Max Square
« Last post by quixoticgeek on Yesterday at 08:33:38 pm »


First proper ride since lockdown, a nice 88k tour de ice-cream of Noord Brabant. Bagged 6 Gemeente for the long term challenge, as well as bagging 61 tiles.

Slightly miffed that poor route planning means I missed this tile...



Oops.

J
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Easy-cook then, though that's a misnomer, what it means is they process the rice by soaking and heating or steaming under pressure so the grains make for fluffy, non-glutinous rice. It doesn't actually mean it's any easier to cook (though you shouldn't need to rinse it, etc. though that's not really what I'd call a chore). See Huzenlaub Process. Uncle Ben is the brand of a big Texan rice converter (it used to be called 'converted rice').

I feel at this point, I should put rice in its place. It may have 2.5x as many genes as the humble human, mighty wheat knocks it into a bucket with a mighty 108,000 genes, so about double that. But it cheats by being hexaploid (humans are diploid, so we have two sets of chromosomes – other than our gametes which are haploid and have one – whereas wheat has six sets) so is, in fact, a menage à trois of different plants. It's so large that the fully annotated reference genome took till last year to be published. I, for one, look forward to the final completion of the triffid genome project.
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Kim mentioned Uncle Ben's rice upthread. Apart from being a possibly racist brand name, what is it? I didn't realise it was a distinct thing as opposed to, well, a possibly racist brand name.

Parboiled long-grain.  The company may have invented the process?
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