Yet Another Cycling Forum

General Category => The Knowledge => Ctrl-Alt-Del => Topic started by: Biggsy on February 13, 2014, 10:48:58 pm

Title: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on February 13, 2014, 10:48:58 pm
Oh dear, my obsession with multiple drives and partitions means I've only got a handful of drive letters left, or less than none if I plugged in just one more backup disk.  I'm even resorting to A and B (and not with floppies).

Anyone gloating about Linux will be shot!

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on February 13, 2014, 11:35:41 pm
What's a drive le... *ducks*   ;D


I thought Windows started using double letters or something when it ran out?  Or is that just Excel?

Sounds like a pressing need for Unicode support, in the sense of needing a bigger monitor so you can store more files on the Desktop.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on February 13, 2014, 11:57:08 pm
Windows only offers me single letters.  Must admit I haven't actually tested it with absolutely all of the letters used.  I just know I'd need more than 26 with everything I want connected.

I even fitted a toggle switch to the power to my two internal CD drives so they only take letters when required.  (Quicker than me resetting letters manually).  Also saves annoying noises at boot time.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: paulk on February 14, 2014, 07:32:31 am
It is possible in Windows to mount drives in empty directories, so no need for more than 26 letters.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on February 14, 2014, 11:14:21 am
I'll look into that.  Thanks Paul.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on April 19, 2014, 02:12:50 pm
Bah.

I was contemplating upgrading the CPU in my desktop machine (currently a Core i3-540) and chucking a bit more RAM its way. Then I saw the price that LGA1156 CPUs go for these days - if you can find somewhere which still has any! So upgrading the CPU will mean upgrading the motherboard, and while my old DDR3-1333 RAM would "work", it'd probably be enough of a bottleneck to really mean I'd have to change that too. All I'd really be reusing would be the case, PSU, storage and (not-quite-so-ancient-but-still-old) graphics card.

I'm finally convinced that the idea of "futureproofing" a PC is a load of dingo's kidneys - while this stuff is all interchangeable in theory, in practice by the time you actually want to upgrade anything you can't.

I don't suppose any of you know a good source for NOS Intel processors? A cheap LGA1156 Core i5 or i7 would be lovely and would justify me slinging another 4gb of RAM at this thing too.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on April 19, 2014, 04:07:59 pm
Why does win 7 ultimate keep telling me that I need to upgrade my Intel AMT MEI drivers, but then I don't want to have software that allows remote access.  Any one know why I would?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on April 19, 2014, 04:46:12 pm
Bah.

I was contemplating upgrading the CPU in my desktop machine (currently a Core i3-540) and chucking a bit more RAM its way. Then I saw the price that LGA1156 CPUs go for these days - if you can find somewhere which still has any! So upgrading the CPU will mean upgrading the motherboard, and while my old DDR3-1333 RAM would "work", it'd probably be enough of a bottleneck to really mean I'd have to change that too. All I'd really be reusing would be the case, PSU, storage and (not-quite-so-ancient-but-still-old) graphics card.

I'm finally convinced that the idea of "futureproofing" a PC is a load of dingo's kidneys - while this stuff is all interchangeable in theory, in practice by the time you actually want to upgrade anything you can't.

I'm in the same position with the motherboard because I didn't future-proof by getting an 1155 one instead.  I was thinking higher number meant it'll be around longer.  :facepalm:  However, I did get the best CPU I could afford that's still more than good enough...

Quote
I don't suppose any of you know a good source for NOS Intel processors? A cheap LGA1156 Core i5 or i7 would be lovely and would justify me slinging another 4gb of RAM at this thing too.

No, but it's worth a risk on a second-hand one, considering you can get an i7 860 for just £70 off eBay.  I paid £200 for mine new.  4-core (effectively 8-core) 2.8 GHz that you can typically overclock to 3.2 and more.  That's a lot of crunching power for not a lot of real money.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on April 19, 2014, 04:57:21 pm
Bah.

I was contemplating upgrading the CPU in my desktop machine (currently a Core i3-540) and chucking a bit more RAM its way. Then I saw the price that LGA1156 CPUs go for these days - if you can find somewhere which still has any! So upgrading the CPU will mean upgrading the motherboard, and while my old DDR3-1333 RAM would "work", it'd probably be enough of a bottleneck to really mean I'd have to change that too. All I'd really be reusing would be the case, PSU, storage and (not-quite-so-ancient-but-still-old) graphics card.

I'm finally convinced that the idea of "futureproofing" a PC is a load of dingo's kidneys - while this stuff is all interchangeable in theory, in practice by the time you actually want to upgrade anything you can't.

I'm in the same position with the motherboard because I didn't future-proof by getting an 1155 one instead.  I was thinking higher number meant it'll be around longer.  :facepalm:  However, I did get the best CPU I could afford that's still more than good enough...

Quote
I don't suppose any of you know a good source for NOS Intel processors? A cheap LGA1156 Core i5 or i7 would be lovely and would justify me slinging another 4gb of RAM at this thing too.

No, but it's worth a risk on a second-hand one, considering you can get an i7 860 for just £70 off eBay.  I paid £200 for mine new.  4-core (effectively 8-core) 2.8 GHz that you can typically overclock to 3.2 and more.  That's a lot of crunching power for not a lot of real money.

Cheers, I'll go for that. I don't typically chance it on the 'bay, but I should give it a second chance ;)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on April 20, 2014, 05:58:30 pm
Why does win 7 ultimate keep telling me that I need to upgrade my Intel AMT MEI drivers, but then I don't want to have software that allows remote access.  Any one know why I would?

Anyone?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on April 20, 2014, 06:18:48 pm
Why does win 7 ultimate keep telling me that I need to upgrade my Intel AMT MEI drivers, but then I don't want to have software that allows remote access.  Any one know why I would?

To let someone else fix (or invade!) your computer, or for you to access it when away from home, for examples.

In optional updates available in Windows Update, right-click and Hide any that you don't want, then it shouldn't bother you again.  Microsoft sometimes gets the wrong or outdated drivers anyway, so it's best to update drivers via the hardware manufacturer's program or website instead.  Windows 7 once buggered up my graphics driver, so I don't let it touch it again.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on April 20, 2014, 11:04:45 pm
That is what I thought but all those things are not going to happen so it is not an issue.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on April 27, 2014, 03:50:13 pm
Steam on Linux is actually quite good.

Admittedly, the selection of games isn't as good for Windows, but there are some gems in there and I was able to install the Linux versions of some games I used to play on Windows - I had wondered whether they'd consider them separate licences but they don't.

So far I've only played a few Source engine games - Counterstrike: Source, Portal and Team Fortress 2 - but they run really well. I'm quite impressed.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on April 27, 2014, 05:11:58 pm
Today I am learning a new language1 - AngularJS. It's absolutely brilliant, I've not had this much fun since learning FORTRAN-77 from a Dr Seuss book2 or perhaps Perl.  ;D ;D ;D



[1] OK, strictly a framework, but it has its own sub-language and structure
[2] I may be mis-remembering here but it had pictures of furry animals with long arms and crazy American jokes in it.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Jacomus on April 28, 2014, 04:16:39 pm
Good work, phone!

Has been operating unplugged since 0650 this morning, has hotspotted a Gig of data, almost entirely for my tablet (!!!) and still has 20% battery left.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Woofage on April 28, 2014, 05:12:36 pm
I still love the fact that a complete Linux system can be installed and be running in a little over 15 minutes.

I upgraded to Mint 16 Debian at the w/e. Not counting the full backup I did beforehand (not strictly necessary as I really only needed to do an incremental) it took 16 minutes, plus a couple more to restore my /fstab, load a couple more apps, edit the new Mozilla profile.ini files and install the printer. No need for file restore or gui tweaks, of course :smug:.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Wowbagger on May 06, 2014, 11:32:05 pm
I've just received an email inviting me to "Swindon Social Media Training".

Anyone we know?   :P
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on May 07, 2014, 08:36:37 am
Not guilty, m'lud.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on May 08, 2014, 12:45:30 pm
I'm just finding out now exactly how screwed the battery in my old laptop is.

Quote
Energy when full: 8.1 Wh
Energy (design): 47.5 Wh

 :facepalm:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Wombat on May 08, 2014, 01:18:24 pm
Dibdib
Screwed, buggered, utterly shagged.  there, saves you saying it...  ;D
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on May 10, 2014, 03:43:13 pm
Dr Larrington gave me an iPad Mini yesterday.

What's it for?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on May 10, 2014, 03:46:11 pm
Pretending to do Important Stuffs when you could converse with a Real Person,
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on May 10, 2014, 04:53:09 pm
Pretending to do Important Stuffs when you could converse with a Real Person,

I've already got a laptop for that ???
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on May 10, 2014, 08:39:24 pm
Pretending to do Important Stuffs when you could converse with a Real Person,

I've already got a laptop for that ???

Yebbut a loptap is so passé; you need the latest igadget to prove how Important and Up-to-Date you are.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on May 10, 2014, 09:53:56 pm
Here are the things I can't get it to do (yet):


Stupid device...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pedal Castro on May 11, 2014, 08:49:44 am
[2] I may be mis-remembering here but it had pictures of furry animals with long arms and crazy American jokes in it.

I think I may still have that book somewhere up in the attic with all my uni notes...:-)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: perpetual dan on June 02, 2014, 01:24:14 pm
I'm attempting an upgrade the family laptop to windows 8.1 as windows 8 is seemingly unable to untwist its knickers about the upgrades it wants but can't get to stick. I'm amused that the "untick if you don't want us to spam you" control is on the page headed "we want to check that you're a human". Seems at least as reliable as captchas to me.

Of course, quite why an upgrade process needs a human at the end of it (or for me to sign up for yet another account) is beyond me. In my view, a pretty reliable indicator of a system that is going to be more trouble than its worth is forcing human interaction to do basic admin.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: barakta on June 02, 2014, 01:28:39 pm
It's taken me the best part of a morning to set up a laptop for colleagues cos the fucking university won't provide a computer+network point for them to use with students in the "meeting room".  We also have to manually order a dongle for net connectivity cos the fucking university won't extend the wifi coverage to their part of the building.

Have finally managed to make citrix work and that means we can get local files and our case management database if you don't mind it being slow and cranky as fuck. 

I hate this bodging. This should be a proper wired networked desktop supported by central IT, not a bodge job from me poking things with sticks till it works.

Also, M$, fuck off, stop spamming me, don't make me have to have a Microsoft login wankshit to activate the copy of office we paid for (and now probably don't need cos it won't work with Citrix stuff and there is sort of citrixy office already)...   

At least in the "this is how your bodge stuff is going to work" I can tell $colleagues S and K where the cranky bodges are and say "Reasons you do not wish explained cos you'll get bored" and they'll accept that and be appreciative.

I have a second machine to set up but that one doesn't need so much, just dyslexia screening software which I need to usertest and not on the day it's being used for screenings, so not today!

I am not a sysadmin, HONEST!

eta: Oh "Windows cannot search for more updates cos you have to REBOOT again and again and again until eternity yahahahahahaha shit absence of package manager fuckingfail"  *reboots* 
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on June 02, 2014, 06:39:17 pm
Footnote to the above post:  By "dongle", she really does mean the cellular kind (I checked).  They really are paying mobile rates to connect this machine, because someone can't be arsed to run a cable to the next room, or string another wifi access point up, or whatever.

It's almost as if it took them 6 years to sort the fire alarm out...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on June 02, 2014, 08:09:14 pm
Watching HDD regenerator work on a laptop drive.

Anyone got a spare sata 320 or bigger 2.5 inch drive?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on June 12, 2014, 01:20:59 pm
New work computer (I finally have a laptop, so I don't have to dig my own prehistoric one out of the cupboard at home when I need to leave my desk).

It needs some considerable fettling before it's set up just how I like it, but I'm logged into YACF and I've got my nice picture of the white horse at Westbury on the desktop, so that'll do for now.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: darkpoint on June 12, 2014, 02:02:56 pm
This week I met Liz and Eben Upton of Raspberry Pi fame.
I only had a short moment to say hi, and congratulate them on their achievements.

I am sure that I made a complete tool fanboy of myself.  But still I got to meet them, which is kind of cool.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on September 24, 2014, 10:23:41 am
The guy who invented paperclips should be awarded an honorary fellowship of the IEEE.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on September 24, 2014, 12:52:25 pm
The guy who invented paperclips should be awarded an honorary fellowship of the IEEE.

 :D :thumbsup:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on September 26, 2014, 08:27:43 am
Ain't it wonderful how a client can, with just two lines of atrocious grammar containing two nebulous (and possibly ambiguous and/or mutually-incompatible) requirements, cause you to write two pages of precise questions to find out exactly what he meant?

And ain't it wonderful how he'll only find it in him to write an ambiguous reply to just one of them?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 26, 2014, 10:43:46 am
Apple stop nagging me to upgrade to Yosemite every time I open Keynote. Yes I know I absentmindedly clicked the iCloud drive (I've no idea) option during an iOS upgrade but asking me to upgrade to something that doesn't yet exist is about as useful as telling me this function requires a unicorn.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on September 30, 2014, 07:37:17 pm
Code: [Select]
tracert -h 100 216.81.59.173
(click to show/hide)

 ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on October 10, 2014, 04:32:57 pm
Recently I begrudgingly signed up for another Faceache account, as there are some events which are only listed there.

Unsurprisingly, most of the "Add people you know" suggestions are people I've known in the past - old bosses, people I was friends with on my old facebook account, and so on. But weirdly it's also quite (incorrectly) insistent that I'm friends with a West Ham-supporting glamour model. We've no friends in common, either.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: perpetual dan on October 10, 2014, 05:51:49 pm
Time to see who it isn't suggesting that you know. The obvious conclusion being that they are currently posing as a west ham supporting glamour model   ;)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: jsabine on October 11, 2014, 12:39:06 am
Just how much of a hardship would it be to become friends with a West Ham-supporting glamour model?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on October 11, 2014, 08:35:02 am
I'm waiting for her to make the first move. I'm sure it's only a matter of time.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on October 17, 2014, 05:55:24 pm
If you write with indelible ink on a blank CD before burning it you get a spiffy lettering effect as the ink is flung to the periphery of the disc.  Looks way cool when molishing an mp3 disc of for e.g. Monster Magnet to listen to in the motor-car.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on October 21, 2014, 04:05:34 pm
I rescued a hard drive from a second-hand computer that a friend is throwing away.  Amongst files left from the previous previous owner, it contains scans of CVs, bank statements, driving licences and birth certificates - everything needed for identity theft!

I know I'm preaching to the converted here, but do remember to any wipe drive that you're disposing of, or failing that, hit it wiv an ammer.

This one is only a 30 GB 3.5" IDE - of no use to me and not even worth the cost of posting to anyone, so I'll wipe it and bin it.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Woofage on October 21, 2014, 04:30:41 pm
The read head actuator of old HDDs can be a useful source of high strength magnets :).
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on October 21, 2014, 07:51:20 pm
The magnets in this drive aren't all that impressive (and can't be separated from the thingy), but I got a lot of nice Torx screws from it.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on October 21, 2014, 08:12:30 pm
I'm having my usual approximately-half-yearly craving for a new computer. Last time, I shut it up with an eBay CPU upgrade and some RAM, but it started with remembering I had an old late-90s iMac gathering dust in mum's loft and now I'm looking longingly and wistfully at the Fruitbook Air.

I'm sure it'll pass. I hope.

As an aside, does anyone have any ideas for cool things I can do with a strawberry pink 233mhz G3 iMac?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: barakta on October 21, 2014, 10:51:22 pm
No, I have a working G4 450 (upgraded CPU) 1999 era fruitbox sitting behind me from my uni days (I did chemistry so DSA paid for it, I never had that kind of quids and it outlasted my friends' computers by about 3x). 
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biff on October 24, 2014, 01:15:40 pm
(https://i.chzbgr.com/maxW500/8353552640/h7326C87A/)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on October 24, 2014, 02:02:57 pm
I'm having my usual approximately-half-yearly craving for a new computer. Last time, I shut it up with an eBay CPU upgrade and some RAM, but it started with remembering I had an old late-90s iMac gathering dust in mum's loft and now I'm looking longingly and wistfully at the Fruitbook Air.

I'm sure it'll pass. I hope.

As an aside, does anyone have any ideas for cool things I can do with a strawberry pink 233mhz G3 iMac?
I have its identical twin,festering under the dining room table...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on October 25, 2014, 10:26:20 pm
Episode 6 of Aussie conspiracy thriller "The Code": a cop identified only by his chest camera is "Sgt. L. Torvalds" :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on October 29, 2014, 04:34:16 pm
Quote from: LOL program
Error log timestamp Wed. 29/10/2014 16:08:17

Processor healThyself! (no processes ready)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on November 01, 2014, 02:30:40 pm
EE website states there is £13.57 credit on the PAYG account used for David's iPhone.
We get weekly £1 Packs.
EE website states there is not enough credit to buy another £1 Pack.
WTF????
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on November 02, 2014, 07:59:13 pm
Hmm, whilst doing a round of updates on my servers, I've discovered why my main Domain Controller / DNS server was super-slow to boot.

Buried deep in Active Directory was a reference to an old Domain Controller wot has not been on the network for years.

The new DC would not start up DNS until AD replication with a dead server had completed.
The long timeout on DNS starting caused everything else to fail for ages.

Lemon-soaked paper napkins all round.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on November 02, 2014, 10:06:03 pm
Reminds me of an issue I found this week where an AD server wouldn't resolve local host because of an old DNS search suffix appended to the configuration of one of it's NICs.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on November 02, 2014, 11:27:07 pm
It's not a good idea to let Windows Update attempt 120 updates.

I've been a bit slack and left my server machines just get on with their job.
They are 2 x Win Server 2008R2 boxen.

I decided to let all the updates run.
It appears that the last time I run the updates was back in 2011!
Anyways, it fails big-time, and reverts the updates at reboot-time.

So I have to apply the updates in bite-size chunks, after deleting the Win Update Cache directory.
And that works.

Got there in the end, but a bit Bah Humbug.
Seriously, it's been about 6 hours on this crap.

Oh, and if an update has .NET in it's name, it's gonna grind ur HDD for at least 15 minutes.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Clare on November 03, 2014, 08:54:39 pm
Vernon's just received a text:

"The best present in the world just arrived! Thank u :)"

Raspberry Pi + camera module = happy nephew  :D



Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: barakta on November 03, 2014, 09:26:28 pm
Ace!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: matthew on November 03, 2014, 10:32:26 pm
(https://i.chzbgr.com/maxW500/8353552640/h7326C87A/)

But that should read

Product 1: 1, 2, 3, 3.1, 95, 98, We can do this better with NT but produced Vista anyway

Product 2: NT 3, NT3.5,  NT 4, 2000, XP, 7

Now we are really going to confuse you 8, 10
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on November 18, 2014, 04:08:18 pm
Anyone installed iOS 8.1.1 on their fondleslab yet?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on November 19, 2014, 10:14:52 am
My mobile has turned into a lollipop
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: tiermat on November 19, 2014, 10:17:39 am
My mobile has turned into a lollipop

Ooooooooo, which one? Phone, that is...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on November 19, 2014, 10:27:53 am
Nexus 5. Android Lollipop has been released.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: tiermat on November 19, 2014, 10:31:11 am
I know that Lollipop is out, for some reason I thought you had a HTC.  HTC ONE M7 and M8 are slated for upgrade in the new year.  Good to hear that the Nexus has an update, others shouldn't be too far behind.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on November 19, 2014, 10:36:59 am
My 1st gen Nexus 7 got its Lollipop update last night too.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Woofage on November 19, 2014, 11:56:47 am
(https://i.chzbgr.com/maxW500/8353552640/h7326C87A/)

But that should read

Product 1: 1, 2, 3, 3.1, 95, 98, We can do this better with NT but produced Vista anyway

Product 2: NT 3, NT3.5,  NT 4, 2000, XP, 7

Now we are really going to confuse you 8, 10

<pedant>I thought Vista was based on NT?</pedant> Also, you forgot ME...

I remember when I first got NT (probably v3.51) which was like a breath of fresh air after the crash-a-minute 3.1/3.11. My left hand still naturally falls into the position on the kb ready to hit ctrl+S every few minutes despite not having a DOS-based computer for what must be nearly 20 years. I just wish they wouldn't mess with the interface. The last win computer I had ran xp but I had all the "my first computer" stuff turned off so it looked pretty much like NT4/2000.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on November 19, 2014, 12:05:38 pm
I think for vista they ditched the hardware abstraction layer as nobody was bothered about running Windows on non-pc platforms.

I'd like a version of windows that allowed for numpty users, so you could press a 'Revert' button and get the original setup immediately, without erasing data.

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on November 19, 2014, 12:33:07 pm
Also, you forgot ME...

That's probably for the best...  ::-)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on November 19, 2014, 02:17:40 pm
MS SQL Server.   First time I've touched one in years.
Install a test server on my local PC. Fine.
Run the app that needs the database.   It connects, builds all the tables it needs etc.
SQL Server Management Studio connects, and I can poke the tables manually, run queries etc.
All seems fine.

Cannot connect from external machine.
My firewall settings seem fine.

1) Turns out the SQL server is not an , er, server by default.
It's configured itself for 'Shared Memory' connections only, which only work from apps on the local machine.
Poke TCP/IP on.

2) The server runs on Dynamic Ports when installed with default options!
In order for a client to find it you need to start up the SQL Server Browser Service, which associates a server instance name with a port. Or nail it's port number down manually.  Or both.

Finally working, but that was way more hassle than I needed.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: jsabine on November 19, 2014, 02:24:05 pm
I'd like a version of windows that allowed for numpty users, so you could press a 'Revert' button and get the original setup immediately, without erasing data.

I've always wanted a universal undo.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on November 19, 2014, 02:39:08 pm
Of course the internals of NT were heavily influenced by the One True Operating System 8)  Hurrah! for Dave Cutler.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: billplumtree on November 20, 2014, 07:50:39 am
We use FreeFileSync in t'office in an attempt to keep laptops, desktops, etc synchronized.  Our IT bod has just sent an email round asking everyone to run "Standard Desktop Shortcuts.FFS", which probably conveys just about the right amount of exasperation.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on November 20, 2014, 09:57:12 am
Am downloading win8 on a cetrino dual core laptop....direct from microsoft.

What can go wrong? Shall go straight to 8.1?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on November 20, 2014, 10:41:20 am
Am downloading win8 on a cetrino dual core laptop....direct from microsoft.

What can go wrong? Shall go straight to 8.1?

My lapdancer came with Win 8 already installed but I went straight to 8.1 in an attempt to get rid of the foulness that is the Start Screen.  Classic Start Menu is your, or at least my, friend.

I've just had a shocker of a 419 e-mail - it's almost literate :o
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on November 20, 2014, 11:16:12 am
I have to update it first  :-\

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on November 20, 2014, 01:26:39 pm
Ah, yes, forgot about that.  Not hoping to use it this week, are you?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on November 20, 2014, 02:58:08 pm
How many downloads?  So I have downloaded 8.1 and it is setting up.

Can't be long now?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on November 21, 2014, 04:19:20 am
Well that was several hours I won't get back but I have a lappy with win 8.1 pro and so far nothing installed.  So microsoft office starter and  libra office?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on November 22, 2014, 05:24:24 pm
I am setting up my NAS.  This involves plugging the laptop into the router.  This in turn involves babbaging while simultaneously standing up and bending over.

For Christmas, a three metre notwork cable plz.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on December 01, 2014, 01:43:33 pm
A tweet from our Uni IT service. "Unlimited file storage for all your work and devices... Coming Soon!  The Countdown begins..."

Is that a threat, a promise, or a challenge?

Have they ever met bioinformaticians with a point to prove?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: matthew on December 01, 2014, 06:13:08 pm
A tweet from our Uni IT service. "Unlimited file storage for all your work and devices... Coming Soon!  The Countdown begins..."

Is that a threat, a promise, or a challenge?

Have they ever met bioinformaticians with a point to prove?
I can see it coming, the full DNA sequence of every member of staff, student, plant and lab rbat

How many terrabytes of data can your team generate in a yearweek?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on December 01, 2014, 06:44:28 pm
In a week? If we don't include the microscopists then not much, only about 10 Tb. 
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on December 01, 2014, 07:10:09 pm
A tweet from our Uni IT service. "Unlimited file storage for all your work and devices... Coming Soon!  The Countdown begins..."

Is that a threat, a promise, or a challenge?

Sounds like something just got outsourced...


Quote
Have they ever met bioinformaticians with a point to prove?

They may already have their own point to prove.  Only seems fair that you help them along a bit.   :demon:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on December 04, 2014, 03:20:47 pm
I've just found out that the application I look after at work has a user role called SCI_FI. Should I create a user called James T. Kirk or somesuch and wait to see how long it takes for anyone to notice?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on December 06, 2014, 05:45:06 pm
Our IT people are keen for us to test it. Maximum file size 5G. Looks like some wrappers to fragment files over many smaller files may be in order.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Somnolent on December 06, 2014, 07:19:15 pm
Bugger damn and blast !
Changed out a thoroughly prehistoric router that had been giving sterling service since some time in noughties for one that is only slightly less long in the tooth ( I bought as an emergency replacement some time back and then found I was able to resurrect the old one.)
Hoping for slightly better speed & range but no luck, still at least I can go to WPA2 security.

Start thinking about range extenders, decide they are probably a waste of space and far better bet to use the old router as an access point plugges into an ethernet port sited fortuitously at the other of the house.
 
Bugeration 1 : it seems I need same encryption on router and AP .... oh well, all back to WEP then (to the frustration of family who've just got over change to WPA2)
Buggeration 2: Old router decides it doesnt want a static IP all of it's own and goes off in a huff... and now cannot be accessed from browser.

Research of t'internet reveals the magic incantation needed to restore it's factory default and it can now be accessed.

Bugggertion 3:  not only does it not want to save a static IP but it refuses to save any settings when you select Disable on the DHCP

Half a day after reading  "Turning an old router into a wireless access point is simple and takes about 15 minutes"....I give up in disgust
 
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on December 06, 2014, 08:46:26 pm
Re-populating an iPod Classic with the thick end of 14,000 tracks takes a Very Long Time when they have to be fired wirelessly across the room before slithering down the USB cable.  I started at 13:00 and there's still nearly 3,000 to go :o
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on December 06, 2014, 09:31:34 pm
I've been playing with my Doxie scanner today, after digging it out of a box earlier. I think I'm going to give "going paperless" another crack in the new year, so I'm trying to figure out the perfect workflow.

I think I'm going to have to stump up some cash... The problem is that I'm in a mishmash of ecosystems - iOS for a phone, Android on a tablet, Win7 on the desktop, Google Chrome, and so on. So it's either a few grand's worth of new FruityTech or however much Evernote Premium costs.

I just want everything to talk to everything else, is that so much to ask?  :facepalm:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on December 07, 2014, 07:32:48 am
I just want everything to talk to everything else, is that so much to ask?  :facepalm:
Yes. Yes it is.  All that bollocks about connectivity is just that, bollocks.  Companies want to lock you into their particular walled garden so that you'll keep giving them your money rather than giving it to a.n.other company.  Some, like Apple, are quite blatent about it.  Others, less so.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on December 07, 2014, 09:44:39 am

Bugeration 1 : it seems I need same encryption on router and AP .... oh well, all back to WEP then (to the frustration of family who've just got over change to WPA2)
Not sure why this would be so - I run WEP from an AP for my squeezeboxes and WPA2 from the router.

Quote

Buggeration 2: Old router decides it doesnt want a static IP all of it's own and goes off in a huff... and now cannot be accessed from browser.

That is odd behaviour from a device you need to find by IP address!

Quote
Research of t'internet reveals the magic incantation needed to restore it's factory default and it can now be accessed.

Bugggertion 3:  not only does it not want to save a static IP but it refuses to save any settings when you select Disable on the DHCP

Half a day after reading  "Turning an old router into a wireless access point is simple and takes about 15 minutes"....I give up in disgust

You could turn off DHCP from the new router and use DHCP on the old one. But then again it does sound like it's suffering from the strange behaviour old tech mysteriously starts to develop with age.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on December 07, 2014, 01:08:33 pm
I just want everything to talk to everything else, is that so much to ask?  :facepalm:
Yes. Yes it is.  All that bollocks about connectivity is just that, bollocks.  Companies want to lock you into their particular walled garden so that you'll keep giving them your money rather than giving it to a.n.other company.  Some, like Apple, are quite blatent about it.  Others, less so.

You can religiously stick to open standards, of course.  Given a Stallman beard and enough mucking about with decades-old technology you'll probably arrive at a system that mostly works.

But it won't have any of the Shiny! that the Mega-Global Fruit Corporation of Cupertino, USAnia are famed for, and you'll be permanently out of the loop as everyone you want to communicate with uses their proprietary but oh-so-easy FriendFace/Twatter/Outhouse/Bloated Goats/etc systems.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on December 08, 2014, 03:23:23 pm
Apparently [my] Yahoo! Mail! Box! Has! Exceeded! The! Storage! Limit! Is! 1GB! and Am! Running! At! 99.8! Gigabytes! And! Cannot! Send! Or! Receive! New! Messages! Until! Re-validate! My! Mailbox!

Does anyone ever fall for this kind of nonse?

(I may have exagerrated the punctuation.  A! Bit!)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on December 08, 2014, 04:24:42 pm
There's a virus doing the rounds of the mothership (nice little misnamed exe in a zip file, probably uploaded by Mssrs Goldblum and Smith). The kind of thing that couldn't be more obviously a nasty if it kicked you in the shin. Hey, random person in the company has sent me a file and 'please look your attached document'.

The number of people who are trying to open the damn thing...

So now I have inbox full of messages telling everyone not to open them. And idiots then reply-all'ing to say they have.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on December 08, 2014, 06:57:50 pm
Bugger damn and blast !
Changed out a thoroughly prehistoric router that had been giving sterling service since some time in noughties for one that is only slightly less long in the tooth ( I bought as an emergency replacement some time back and then found I was able to resurrect the old one.)
Hoping for slightly better speed & range but no luck, still at least I can go to WPA2 security.

Start thinking about range extenders, decide they are probably a waste of space and far better bet to use the old router as an access point plugges into an ethernet port sited fortuitously at the other of the house.
 
Bugeration 1 : it seems I need same encryption on router and AP .... oh well, all back to WEP then (to the frustration of family who've just got over change to WPA2)

WEP? If you live in an area that's got any population density you might as well not bother!

Quote
Buggeration 2: Old router decides it doesnt want a static IP all of it's own and goes off in a huff... and now cannot be accessed from browser.

Research of t'internet reveals the magic incantation needed to restore it's factory default and it can now be accessed.

Bugggertion 3:  not only does it not want to save a static IP but it refuses to save any settings when you select Disable on the DHCP

Half a day after reading  "Turning an old router into a wireless access point is simple and takes about 15 minutes"....I give up in disgust

My answer to this is always DD-WRT, which does just mostly work.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on December 08, 2014, 07:37:49 pm
My answer to this is always DD-WRT, which does just mostly work.

+1

It's a bit feature-heavy, perhaps, but once correctly set up it just gets on with it without any obvious stupid bugs.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Basil on December 12, 2014, 10:55:41 pm
Much happier with 5.0.1 or bleeding lolipop or whatever the fuck its called now that I've discovered how to set the keyboard back to how it used to look.  Hurumph!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on December 24, 2014, 02:41:41 pm
There is a now a triple tuner version of BlackGold's PCI-e DVB-T/T2 DVB-C card tempting me.  It can receive up to three Freeview HD channels at once, which you can record via Windows Media Center or alternative.  They still seem to be having problems with the quad version, which remains unavailable.  The dual version I have already works very well.

(http://shop.blackgold.tv/WebRoot/BT/Shops/BT3159/4E9E/8DF9/C2C6/65EF/66A7/0A0C/05E7/D806/BGT3650-BGT_0176_ml.jpg)

http://shop.blackgold.tv/epages/BT3159.sf/en_GB/?ObjectPath=/Shops/BT3159/Products/BGT3655
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Canardly on December 24, 2014, 03:31:36 pm
I would really like a new card along those lines, whilst still soldiering on with an old Avermedia USB stick.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on December 27, 2014, 03:40:14 pm
Not necessarily in stick form, but I suppose there's no reason why a USB tuner can't be just as good - as long as it can take an external aerial.  But perhaps the bandwidth of PCIe (or USB 3.0) is needed for multiple simultaneous HD?

Anyway, the BlackGold BGT3620* PCIe card I have works flawlessly.  Shame that Windows Media Center doesn't.  Many channels are missing from its program guide - until you fix it with http://1geek1tool.com/guidetool/ - and it stutters with live TV, though recordings are fine.  www.progdvb.com manages live TV ok, but its interface is not as slick, and the free version doesn't record.

For low noise storage, I can recommend the Seagate "Video" ST500VT000 500GB 2.5" HHD (off eBay), or a WD Green 4TB 3.5" HDD, or even a Samsung 850 Pro SDD (guaranteed for 40GB writes per day for ten years).

* Seems to have been replaced by the BGT3635 (includes a Freesat tuner).  BGT3620/3635 is tiny; the triple version is taller.
http://shop.blackgold.tv/epages/BT3159.sf/en_GB/?ObjectPath=/Shops/BT3159/Categories/%22Retail%20Products%22/PCIe_Tuner_Products
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: tiermat on January 05, 2015, 02:50:39 pm
Today I got to work and realised I hadn't set my laptop's wireless card up.

I can only connect to the internets using the wireless.

My phone is already connected to the wireless, so I used that to download the required files, then BT them across the laptop and do the stuff and away we go!

Yippee for multi-stage file transfer shenanigans :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on January 08, 2015, 08:40:13 am
In the red corner, a Win 8 laptop bought last summer.  In the blue corner a Win XP laptop bought in 2009.  Guess which one is faster at reading and exporting a metric fuckton of mp3 tags from/to a NAS ???
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on January 08, 2015, 11:12:10 am
Still, it's not all BLEAN news.  The 300GB external drive which I had held to have killed itself utterly to DETH turns out to be very much alive and is now sitting on the shelf under the coffee table populating itself.

It also means that I have not lost a shedload of musical tunes which I had wossnamed from vinyl/cassette.  Including a bunch of live Robyn Hitchcock recordings of dubious provenance bootlegs :thumbsup:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on January 08, 2015, 07:31:10 pm
In the red corner, a Win 8 laptop bought last summer.  In the blue corner a Win XP laptop bought in 2009.  Guess which one is faster at reading and exporting a metric fuckton of mp3 tags from/to a NAS ???
The BeOS box hiding behind them? :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on January 09, 2015, 02:10:46 am
Reports of the renaissance of that ^^^^ drive may be a bit premature.  I am giving it the CHKDSK treatment during which time it has gone "KLUNK" with depressing regularity and indicated that it doesn't like national flags, Tangerine Dream or Hawkwind.  In fact it seems really to hate Hawkwind with a passion rare in one so young, though that could be because there was more Hawkwind in the old iThings library than anything else.

Bah!

Edit: 333184 KB in 79 recovered files ???  Fortunately they all seem to be in the old iThings library but getting Stuffs off it is now a priority.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on January 10, 2015, 06:35:55 pm
I'm liking Remote Potato for remote web control of Windows Media Center's TV programme guide.  (Also does streaming).

www.remotepotato.com  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on January 11, 2015, 01:36:35 pm
It seems I get a $75 Walmart voucher if I just click there.

This information comes to me courtesy of AsianDating.

Lack of joined-up thinking there, Mr Spammer.  Very poor.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on January 13, 2015, 09:27:49 am
Started listening to some Podcasts and decided I wanted to download the back catalogue without resorting to dreaded FruityTunes or any other client software. A quick look at the RSS feed and a Powershell script later and I has a shed load of listening.

Code: [Select]
$mp3sToDownload = @(([xml] (iwr http://foo.bar/podcast/psw.xml).content).rss.channel.item.enclosure | select url)
$myPodcasts = "E:\Podcasts\"
$PodcastsPreviouslyDownloaded = @(Get-ChildItem -Path $myPodcasts)


foreach($mp3ToDownload in $mp3sToDownload)
{
    $mp3ToDownloadFileName = $mp3ToDownload.url.Substring($mp3ToDownload.url.LastIndexOf("/")+1)
    if (-not $PodcastsPreviouslyDownloaded.Name.Contains($mp3ToDownloadFileName))
    {
    $outFile = $myPodcasts + "\" + $mp3ToDownloadFileName
    Write-Host "Downloading $mp3ToDownloadFileName ..."
    iwr $mp3ToDownload.url -OutFile $outFile
    write-host "Complete. Waiting 2 minutes..."
    Start-Sleep -s 300
    }
    else
    {
        Write-Host "Skipping $mp3ToDownloadFileName, already downloaded"
    }
}
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on January 23, 2015, 05:20:09 pm
How odd.  Slave trader spam from Germany (in German).  It looks as though Computer Futures may now be sharing CVs europe-wide possibly even world-wide; who knows?

So if you're up to snuff on WPF / XAML / C# and want to work in Frankfurt-am-Main from March to November (with the possibility of an extension) then they're the people to contact. I'd tell you more, but my German is, to put it generously, rudimentary.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on February 12, 2015, 01:06:09 pm
Uh-oh. I've just run a SQL update which contained a semicolon instead of a comma. There are 2.5 million rows in the relevant table  :-[






Thankfully it's the development and not the live database  ::-)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on February 12, 2015, 03:42:17 pm
Did a rollback which took ages - no damage done  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on February 14, 2015, 12:15:43 am
#! Developer/inventor has packed his bags and gone home and is leaving it to the community.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: nicknack on February 14, 2015, 10:45:34 am
I'm sure this doesn't warrant its own thread because I suspect I know the answer.
I've got 2 old pcs that seem to have entered a suicide pact. Up until yesterday morning I was happily using one that was dual booted with XP and Ubuntu Studio. It suddenly decides, on a reboot, that it won't work at all. Black screen and processor fan going full blast. I try it a few times with the same result.
The other pc (XP only) has been sitting there, surplus to requirements, since we moved house (18 months ago). Before we moved it was used a lot and didn't seem to have anything wrong with it. So I connect it up. It trundles through the first screen and then the screen saying it's booting into XP and to a BSOD. It didn't like something about the bios apparently. When I go back to it after rummaging around on the internet trying to find someone who could explain the error message and try to start it again it does the same as the other one. Black screen (no signal to it) and fan running constantly.
I presume they're both fubared but it seems odd they should both fail at the same time in the same way.
Before they get binned, has anyone got any ideas?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on February 20, 2015, 10:23:17 am
Junior #2 came home from kickball training last night clutching a bit of paper.
It's the club membership renewal form, like we get every year.

Looks like the club secretary has created it as a PDF, and uploaded it to a file sharing website, and sent out a link to it in an e-mail to all the team coaches.

Our coach has clicked the link, which has taken him to the file sharing website.
The page has a big banner at the top with a PDF icon, the file name, and a durty great big green 'Download'  arrow lcon.
At the bottom of the page, there's a row of adverts.
In the middle, there's a low-resolution preview image of the PDF.

He has not downloaded the PDF: he's just hit 'print' in the web-browser, printing out the download page complete with illegible preview image of the document.


Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on February 20, 2015, 05:06:39 pm
I'm sure this doesn't warrant its own thread because I suspect I know the answer.
I've got 2 old pcs that seem to have entered a suicide pact. Up until yesterday morning I was happily using one that was dual booted with XP and Ubuntu Studio. It suddenly decides, on a reboot, that it won't work at all. Black screen and processor fan going full blast. I try it a few times with the same result.
The other pc (XP only) has been sitting there, surplus to requirements, since we moved house (18 months ago). Before we moved it was used a lot and didn't seem to have anything wrong with it. So I connect it up. It trundles through the first screen and then the screen saying it's booting into XP and to a BSOD. It didn't like something about the bios apparently. When I go back to it after rummaging around on the internet trying to find someone who could explain the error message and try to start it again it does the same as the other one. Black screen (no signal to it) and fan running constantly.
I presume they're both fubared but it seems odd they should both fail at the same time in the same way.
Before they get binned, has anyone got any ideas?

Do you see any output on the display between switching them on and Windows starting?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: nicknack on February 21, 2015, 10:25:20 am
I'm sure this doesn't warrant its own thread because I suspect I know the answer.
I've got 2 old pcs that seem to have entered a suicide pact. Up until yesterday morning I was happily using one that was dual booted with XP and Ubuntu Studio. It suddenly decides, on a reboot, that it won't work at all. Black screen and processor fan going full blast. I try it a few times with the same result.
The other pc (XP only) has been sitting there, surplus to requirements, since we moved house (18 months ago). Before we moved it was used a lot and didn't seem to have anything wrong with it. So I connect it up. It trundles through the first screen and then the screen saying it's booting into XP and to a BSOD. It didn't like something about the bios apparently. When I go back to it after rummaging around on the internet trying to find someone who could explain the error message and try to start it again it does the same as the other one. Black screen (no signal to it) and fan running constantly.
I presume they're both fubared but it seems odd they should both fail at the same time in the same way.
Before they get binned, has anyone got any ideas?

Do you see any output on the display between switching them on and Windows starting?

Nuffink.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on February 24, 2015, 09:00:45 am
I am now almost certain that the Noises Off (sounds like one of The Borrowers has borrowed an angle grinder) emanating from the innards of my laptop are caused by the fan.  Teh Intarwebs suggests that, unlike the old one, the thing may be unmantled with nothing more than a screwdriver and a "spudger".  I am not entirely sure what a "spudger" might be but suspect it is not a USAnian word for "cold chisel".
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Vince on February 24, 2015, 09:03:43 am
I think a spudger might be something like a guitar pick, thumb nail or soft cold chisel. Used for separating plastic mouldings that have been irretrievably clicked together.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on February 24, 2015, 09:28:38 am
I've got a thumb nail :thumbsup:  Two, in fact, neatly arranged with one on each hand :thumbsup: :thumbsup:  Might have a go at it later.

(Later)

Anyone got a nail file?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: rafletcher on February 24, 2015, 10:23:51 am
I've got a thumb nail :thumbsup:  Two, in fact, neatly arranged with one on each hand :thumbsup: :thumbsup:  Might have a go at it later.

(Later)

Anyone got a nail file?

Re-purpose a spoon from a tub of ice cream?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: tiermat on February 24, 2015, 10:41:53 am
I find cheap tyre levers useful as spudgers.

The more expensive ones are too thick, but the cheap plastic ones you get in the Pundland kits etc are just right.  They, generally, don't need to have a lot of strength.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on February 24, 2015, 01:35:01 pm
Alas I possess neither tubs of ice cream nor cheap-donkey tyre levers.  I do have a guitar pick, though I have no idea why as there has never been a guitar in Larrington Towers ???
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on February 24, 2015, 01:41:08 pm
Get a set of spudgers off eBay.

www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=p2060778.m570.l1313.TR7.TRC2.A0.H0.Xspudger+set.TRS0&_nkw=spudger+set&_sacat=0
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Vince on February 24, 2015, 02:26:50 pm
Alas I possess neither tubs of ice cream nor cheap-donkey tyre levers.  I do have a guitar pick, though I have no idea why as there has never been a guitar in Larrington Towers ???
Maybe Larrington Towers is at the other end of the worm hole through which my picks have been escaping.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on February 24, 2015, 04:56:59 pm
A USB 3.0 2.5" disk enclosure that I recommend: www.ebay.co.uk/itm/371130243136
    - Except that a super-slim drive will need some padding.

A USB 3.0 2.5" disk enclosure that I DO NOT recommend: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/351185502963
    - Doesn't work at all half the time, and when it does, it's 20 MB/s slower than the other one (with the same SSD inside).
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on February 25, 2015, 03:53:10 pm
Get a set of spudgers off eBay.

www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=p2060778.m570.l1313.TR7.TRC2.A0.H0.Xspudger+set.TRS0&_nkw=spudger+set&_sacat=0

I thought I might look for spudgery in the old-skool Babbage-Engine shop in the High Street today but it seems now to be concentrating on selling Trousers.  I don't think a pair of 501s will be much use for this task.

Thanks for the link; the "Collect at Argos" option is handy as there's one a couple of doors down from IKEA (a visit to which I have been carefully avoiding since Christmas).
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: jsabine on February 26, 2015, 12:28:53 am
I've generally found old bank cards satisfactory for the limited amount of spudging I've had to indulge in.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on February 26, 2015, 01:56:55 am
I aten't got any of them either, though a USAnian petrol station loyalty card might do the trick :D

All this talk of spudgitude has reduced the fan noise by about 75%.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on March 02, 2015, 09:48:15 pm
I've got a first world problem of deciding what SSDs in my collection to use with what PCs in my collection.   (The riches amass thanks to the second-hand market).

It's interesting that the SATA II limitation in my old laptop doesn't make all fast SATA III SSDs go the same speed, for large as well as small transfers.  It's not a simple bottleneck.  It's a complicated bottleneck!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on March 03, 2015, 06:13:27 pm
Got any skinny 7mm? 2.5 sata hard drives ;)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on March 03, 2015, 07:16:49 pm
The American voices in my Mac can't pronounce Irish names like Siobhan and Niamh, but the British ones can. It's just like real life.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on March 06, 2015, 10:42:49 am
Got an email from Plusnet last night telling me that I was getting close to my bandwidth allowance for the month.

Annoyingly the email doesn't say how close, or when the billing month ends, so this morning I logged into the control panel to take a look. I've got about 3gb of the 40gb allowance to last me until Monday, or it'll cost me a fiver for another 5gb.

Ho hum, I think, but with the spring classics starting I can see me using plenty of Eurosport Player over the next few months so I might as well see what my upgrade options are. Turns out that not only can I get unlimited bandwidth at my current speeds (40 down, 20 up) but it's a quid a month cheaper than what I've been paying.

Would have been nice if they'd told me, non?  :facepalm:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on March 06, 2015, 09:24:22 pm
Oddly enough plusnet called on Monday evening to talk to me about cheaper options, I was busy and asked them to call back in half an hour...  still waiting. 
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on March 09, 2015, 12:42:50 pm
I have scanned something over teh Network :thumbsup:  Hurrah for SCIENCE!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on March 09, 2015, 03:00:37 pm
Ur DVD-RW drive may not work if connected via a USB hub, say Asus.

They lie.  It does.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on March 09, 2015, 03:13:10 pm
To be fair, may not doesn't mean will not.  It depends on the hub and what's powering it, and cable length.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on March 12, 2015, 05:11:48 pm
The sheer amount of graphics in simulators like this blows my mind.  Thousands of miles worth of background landscape and urbanscape.  How do they do it?

https://youtu.be/JFz7xhHxbek
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on March 13, 2015, 01:11:02 pm
Plan to route AV output from Babbage-Engine direct to Anbaric Distascope thwarted by lack of length in HDMI cable.  Arse.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on March 13, 2015, 04:42:51 pm
Oddly enough plusnet called on Monday evening to talk to me about cheaper options, I was busy and asked them to call back in half an hour...  still waiting.

They called back.  So now we get unlimited broadband (no usage cap - I checked, repeatedly) for not quite 13 quid a month instead of 60Gb/month for not quite 20 quid a month.  Means I no longer need make a point of making sure large downloads (Windows Update I am looking at _you_). are finished before 08:00. Nice.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on March 17, 2015, 04:43:01 pm
In case not everyone realises this is possible and easy.........

With many ordinary laptops (maybe more so with older ones?): after undoing a screw or two on the bottom (without having to open the whole laptop), you can prise out the CD/DVD drive and push in a second hard drive in a caddy*.  It's particularly handy after you've upgraded the main drive for an SSD with limited capacity.  It only works at USB 2 kind of speed in my old Dell Inspiron 1501, but it's more convenient than using an external drive.  It's quick enough to bung back the DVD for rare needs, or you can get a cheap external USB DVD drive.

* Search eBay for "laptop caddy" + "SATA" or "IDE", depending on what type you need, and perhaps the laptop model.  There are even combinations to take SATA drive in an IDE computer.

(http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/NzUwWDc1MA==/z/Vn0AAOxycgVTf1Kk/$_12.JPG)
* eg.  www.ebay.co.uk/itm/181419531576
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on March 18, 2015, 11:28:01 pm
Epic want.

(http://i.imgur.com/iMdLBKi.jpg)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on March 19, 2015, 12:24:52 am
Don't see anything computery there, unless that's an iWelly just poking into shot :P
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on March 19, 2015, 12:36:43 am
It's a video game reference, m'lud.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on March 20, 2015, 11:09:05 am
VLC!  If Windows can find a directory called "1997 - F♯A♯∞" then I don't see why the SCIENCE that does your playlist Stuffs can't :(
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on March 21, 2015, 10:30:23 pm
Has picked up a microsoft phone Lumia 435 £25 on pay as go upgrade and will go to windows 10...

Interesting that the phone says to go to windowsphone.com and the phone isn't listed.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on March 22, 2015, 05:55:39 pm
Barakta: "I've never actually been in an Apple Store, have you?"
Kim: *thoughtful look*
Kim: "We must troll them immediately!"
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on March 24, 2015, 11:31:51 am
Barakta: "I've never actually been in an Apple Store, have you?"
Kim: *thoughtful look*
Kim: "We must troll them immediately!"

Advice from Apple Employee on how to get an appointment at an Apple Store:
Go to the website at midnight when the slots are released, if you're lucky you might get one...  ::-)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on March 24, 2015, 03:23:34 pm
How is it that I am able to post this without, at least according to the wossname in the system tray, an internet connection ???
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on March 26, 2015, 01:47:38 pm
Why:

When I plugged a network cable directly from computer to router, only the router end lit up to say it was connected (and it didn't work)

but

When I put a switch in the middle, all four network ports lit up properly, and it worked?

 ???
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: pcolbeck on March 26, 2015, 01:53:55 pm
Why:

When I plugged a network cable directly from computer to router, only the router end lit up to say it was connected (and it didn't work)

but

When I put a switch in the middle, all four network ports lit up properly, and it worked?

 ???

Cat5 or fibre cable ?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: neilrj on March 26, 2015, 05:26:16 pm
Why:

When I plugged a network cable directly from computer to router, only the router end lit up to say it was connected (and it didn't work)

but

When I put a switch in the middle, all four network ports lit up properly, and it worked?

 ???

Wrong cable with old hardware at one end, the new switch in middle doesn't care about crossover and translated for the old hardware end?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on March 26, 2015, 11:15:24 pm
Lt. Col. Larrington (retd.) has b0rked his trackball.  I do not know how.  In searching for a replacement I came across this on Nozama:

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7287/16317996394_6532223a47_c.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/qRXZPq)
HOW much??? (https://flic.kr/p/qRXZPq)
by Mr Larrington (https://www.flickr.com/people/41768085@N05/), on Flickr

Yes, four hundred and fifty smackers for a fifteen year old NOS rodent :o :o
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on March 27, 2015, 08:55:20 am
Cat5 or fibre cable ?
CAT5e

Wrong cable with old hardware at one end, the new switch in middle doesn't care about crossover and translated for the old hardware end?

Probably something like that... The router is a new bipak which is presumably just a standard switch on the ethernet end. Cable is straight-through, buried in the floorboards so I couldn't easily try a different cable. The computer end is fairly old, on-board NIC, linux. I'm still not sure why the switch internal to the bipak would be any different to a standalone switch, oh and using the uplink port on the switch didn't work either.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: tiermat on March 27, 2015, 10:36:31 am
Need to borrow a cable tester? I have 2, so I could stick one in the post to you to return when you have finished.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on March 27, 2015, 11:38:44 am
Cable marginal for gigabit, but switch only does 100M?

Else some auto-negotiation fail.  Possibly because the cable's mis-wired?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on March 30, 2015, 08:39:36 pm
Contemplating the lesser of two weevils.

It seems like a lark to join up with Uber. You can either sign up with them and hand them your credit card details - something I really try not to proliferate across t'Internets. Or, join Google+  something that I have avoided thus far. Oh yeah, there's a Facebook option too, but as that has so much wrong information about me, I don't even consider that.

Think it has to be Uber direct - the ramifications are fewer. but then, if I do G+ that will stop the youtube age restriction, that appears to be intimately linked to G+.

Third option, join G+, join, leave G+.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on March 31, 2015, 10:20:43 am
Get a pre-paid credit card and join up directly with that?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on March 31, 2015, 11:29:05 am
The joke is on me, I've joined G+  (with 2 of my 3 G accounts - confused? I soon will be) and the Uber sign up doesn't work.

The G+ interface appears to have improved substantially since the last time I tried,  I might well stick with it, I don't have to sell any more bits of my soul to join.

Meh. Looks like single use credit cards have died a death. Shame.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on April 03, 2015, 02:31:15 pm
Mum insists she sent me an email yesterday.
I never received one from her, though had some from other sources.
What's happening?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on April 03, 2015, 02:33:07 pm
Probably sitting in her draft folder, I have done that :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on April 03, 2015, 02:34:49 pm
Mum insists she sent me an email yesterday.
I never received one from her, though had some from other sources.
What's happening?

Very hard to know, if there isn't something detectably broken about your email system.  The absence of a bounce would suggest that she either never sent it, it went *somewhere*, or it's still in transit.

We used to have this problem with a Hotmail-using luddite friend of barakta's.  For some unknown reason Hotmail took objection to sending email to barakta's domain, which was of course *our* fault.  As the problem was at Hotmail's end, there was nothing we could do to fix it.   :facepalm:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on April 03, 2015, 03:18:26 pm
Mum insists she sent me an email yesterday.
I never received one from her, though had some from other sources.
What's happening?

Very hard to know, if there isn't something detectably broken about your email system.  The absence of a bounce would suggest that she either never sent it, it went *somewhere*, or it's still in transit.

We used to have this problem with a Hotmail-using luddite friend of barakta's.  For some unknown reason Hotmail took objection to sending email to barakta's domain, which was of course *our* fault.  As the problem was at Hotmail's end, there was nothing we could do to fix it.   :facepalm:

Mum definitely received no bounce and says the mail was sent.

I also failed to receive an iMessage from David a few days ago. I don't know if this was routed via SMS or data but it does seem messaging is rather hit and miss!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on April 04, 2015, 03:25:14 am
Trying to clear a malware infestation, that is stopping from malwarebytes anti malware from running.  Been at it all night, so far.  Running through the chameleons don't seem to work, currently at number 10.  Tried rkill and that didn't work either.  So adwcleaner next...

Am downloading hirens as we speak, am amazed that I'm in a different country and I'm ITing
 
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: neilrj on April 04, 2015, 08:01:46 pm
Trying to clear a malware infestation, that is stopping from malwarebytes anti malware from running.  Been at it all night, so far.  Running through the chameleons don't seem to work, currently at number 10.  Tried rkill and that didn't work either.  So adwcleaner next...

Am downloading hirens as we speak, am amazed that I'm in a different country and I'm ITing

Just boot into safe mode with network to download newest updates, then reboot (without network) and run a scan - that should sort it.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on April 04, 2015, 09:56:55 pm
Doesn't seem to want to go into safe mode.  Have removed the hd and stuck in an external enclosure. Runing Malwarebytes from my PC.

20 euro for an enclosure seems a bit steep in my opinion but am stuck in Paris.

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on April 05, 2015, 11:13:41 am
Worth a listen, I reckon: Codes That Changed The World (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b05pmpf5).  In this 5 part series Aleks Krotoski tells the story of the languages we've used to talk to the machines. Starts 13:45 Easter Monday, BBC R4; goes on all week.  FORTRAN tomorrow and remember, kids, if it can't be done in FORTRAN it's probably not worth doing at all ;)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Valiant on April 06, 2015, 11:36:41 am
No fair. We've had fibre in the cabinet my studio for ages. It is 4metres from our front door. But stupid utility companies have used up the space allocation going in/out of the cabinet so we can't have fibre so will have to continue with multiple ADSL connections over ancient copperlines.

Half tempted to get out the DeWalt, hole saws and punchtool and do it myself. Grrrrr.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on April 07, 2015, 09:26:26 pm
If one orders a standard fruitThing on the fruitWebSite, it is delivered the next day. If you want it configured slightly non-standard, that takes 1-3 days before dispatch.

Fair enough.

But why, once they've configured it, do they send it by a service that takes another TEN FUCKING DAYS to deliver??? Not only that, but as the biggest tech firm in the solar system, why can't they use a courier that actually has a working tracking website?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on April 08, 2015, 06:42:43 pm
News for OCZ SSD users who don't subscribe to the newsletter:

OCZ Toolbox has been replaced with SSD Guru.  OCZ previously have said that you don't need to twiddle anything to use an SSD perfectly well, but now they seem to be admitting that extra over provisioning and changing some OS settings are worthwhile.

Disabling Pre/SuperFetch is included.  I don't fancy that, personally.  RAM is still faster than SSD.

http://ocz.com/ssd-guru - works with more models than stated (although it's not working at all yet on one of my PCs).
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on April 08, 2015, 08:17:34 pm
Thank you, worth it just to see I haz 99% life left  ;D

lord knows what the SSD has
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on April 09, 2015, 07:36:55 am
Worth a listen, I reckon: Codes That Changed The World (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b05pmpf5).  In this 5 part series Aleks Krotoski tells the story of the languages we've used to talk to the machines. Starts 13:45 Easter Monday, BBC R4; goes on all week.  FORTRAN tomorrow and remember, kids, if it can't be done in FORTRAN it's probably not worth doing at all ;)

Thanks for that link!

But... at the end of the podcast: "To find out more about the BBC's Make It Digital Season, go to the Radio 4 website".
So I do.
Nothing.
Use the search.
Nothing.
Google.
Ah! There it is!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on April 09, 2015, 01:12:03 pm
SSD Guru has also revealed to me that my Dell laptops don't have ACHI mode (Inspiron 1501 and Latitude D620).  I had been assuming ACHI was not in the BIOS settings because it was on by default, but, no, it's not even possible to have it at all.  (I have the latest BIOS updates).  :(

Does this mean my SSDs are running slower than they would otherwise?  Does it mean Trimming doesn't happen automatically?  (I can Trim manually via SSD Guru or OCZ Toolbox).
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: barakta on April 10, 2015, 05:45:06 pm
Iceweasel is rubbish and is just getting more and more unusable.. Now it's decided to completely fuck up a site I read on a daily basis.  The "Flash is out of date do you want to load it" is tedious cos I click "allow and remember" every single sodding time and it forgets, every single sodding time.

Swapping Chromium to main browser and Iceweasel to secondary browser. Kim did something clever to my Chromium so it has working Flash and it displays the b0rky site properly.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on April 11, 2015, 04:10:00 am
OK, riddle me this:

How did my NAS end up looking like this:

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7697/16916951898_b3fd00f15a_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/rLTNqs)

i.e. with this picture:

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7555/15959243522_e13506e601_o.png) (https://flic.kr/p/qjgi65)

showing for most folders.  And how can I make it go away ???
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on April 11, 2015, 12:23:08 pm
What software have you installed recently?

Anyway, I'm reporting you to the RSPCA.  Shouldn't keep badgers in little folders like that.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on April 11, 2015, 01:18:59 pm
@Mr L: http://www.howtogeek.com/63359/how-to-customize-folder-backgrounds-and-icons-in-windows-explorer/
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on April 11, 2015, 01:33:54 pm
It's stopped doing it.  I am now more confuzzled than ever ???
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on April 12, 2015, 08:53:43 am
Temptation, thy name is Aquarius

http://www.bq.com/gb/ubuntu.html#aquaris-e4-5

Or would be if you didn't have to HDMI connect it to turn it into a reeeel 'puter

OK, I'm still tempted.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on April 12, 2015, 08:59:08 am
I wonder why that web page doesn't show the original cover of "Electric Ladyland" :demon:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on April 13, 2015, 03:53:14 pm
Lapdancer making funny noises again.  CoreTemp says 58 degrees.  Unlikely to be the fan.

Arses >:(
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: barakta on April 14, 2015, 06:11:15 pm
I just read "Iceweasel" as "pissweasel"... That's about the level given it's been relegated to "2nd backup browser" for lots of fail reasons...

Stupid laptop which keeps refusing to boot is now happily booting and working all innocent like having had several months in the "Broken laptop filing cabinet drawer of shame"...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: BrianI on April 14, 2015, 06:48:19 pm
 >:(  'Puter related woes!

My old Samsung NC10 Netbook (which is running Xubuntu 14.04.2) is suffering from what I think is a dodgy cable from the motherboard to the screen.  Depending on the angle I tilt the screen at, the screen goes all white!  Waggle it back and forth, and it comes back again.

Desktop PC (a somewhat oldish hodge podge of bits, Intel Core2 Duo E5200, Socket 775 mobo, 4gb ram, some flavour of nvidia PCI-E Gforce graphics card) is also playing up.  High pitched whines (motherboard capacitors on way out? PSU on way out?) from it's innards somewhere, and every 20 minutes or so the machine hangs up completely!  Not sure what is at fault, and sounds like it is terminal.

Been a while since I purchased computer parts, question is, have things moved on so much that it'll be easier just to replace the current system with an osless desktop base unit and transfer hard drive across?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on April 14, 2015, 07:31:34 pm
Been a while since I purchased computer parts, question is, have things moved on so much that it'll be easier just to replace the current system with an osless desktop base unit and transfer hard drive across?

Not entirely.

If mobo does need replacing (first stick fingers in all fans to eliminate fan noise), I think the sensible options are:

1.  Replace mobo with a second-hand similar model (for CPU compatibility), and the graphics card for a brand new one, and maybe the PSU if suspect.

2.  Get a new up-to-date mobo and CPU and graphics card (and PSU and case if old ones incompatible or faulty), if you enjoy building up your own specification.

3.  Get a whole new ready-built computer unit.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Wombat on April 15, 2015, 08:18:53 am
>:(  'Puter related woes!

My old Samsung NC10 Netbook (which is running Xubuntu 14.04.2) is suffering from what I think is a dodgy cable from the motherboard to the screen.  Depending on the angle I tilt the screen at, the screen goes all white!  Waggle it back and forth, and it comes back again.

Desktop PC (a somewhat oldish hodge podge of bits, Intel Core2 Duo E5200, Socket 775 mobo, 4gb ram, some flavour of nvidia PCI-E Gforce graphics card) is also playing up.  High pitched whines (motherboard capacitors on way out? PSU on way out?) from it's innards somewhere, and every 20 minutes or so the machine hangs up completely!  Not sure what is at fault, and sounds like it is terminal.

Been a while since I purchased computer parts, question is, have things moved on so much that it'll be easier just to replace the current system with an osless desktop base unit and transfer hard drive across?

We've got an old Samsung NC10 going spare.... Works fine, got Winders on it at the mo, but i'm sure you would soon sort that.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on April 15, 2015, 05:17:01 pm
>:(  'Puter related woes!

My old Samsung NC10 Netbook (which is running Xubuntu 14.04.2) is suffering from what I think is a dodgy cable from the motherboard to the screen.  Depending on the angle I tilt the screen at, the screen goes all white!  Waggle it back and forth, and it comes back again.

Desktop PC (a somewhat oldish hodge podge of bits, Intel Core2 Duo E5200, Socket 775 mobo, 4gb ram, some flavour of nvidia PCI-E Gforce graphics card) is also playing up.  High pitched whines (motherboard capacitors on way out? PSU on way out?) from it's innards somewhere, and every 20 minutes or so the machine hangs up completely!  Not sure what is at fault, and sounds like it is terminal.

Been a while since I purchased computer parts, question is, have things moved on so much that it'll be easier just to replace the current system with an osless desktop base unit and transfer hard drive across?

We've got an old Samsung NC10 going spare.... Works fine, got Winders on it at the mo, but i'm sure you would soon sort that.

Um hackintosh potential.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on April 15, 2015, 05:18:49 pm
>:(  'Puter related woes!

My old Samsung NC10 Netbook (which is running Xubuntu 14.04.2) is suffering from what I think is a dodgy cable from the motherboard to the screen.  Depending on the angle I tilt the screen at, the screen goes all white!  Waggle it back and forth, and it comes back again.

Desktop PC (a somewhat oldish hodge podge of bits, Intel Core2 Duo E5200, Socket 775 mobo, 4gb ram, some flavour of nvidia PCI-E Gforce graphics card) is also playing up.  High pitched whines (motherboard capacitors on way out? PSU on way out?) from it's innards somewhere, and every 20 minutes or so the machine hangs up completely!  Not sure what is at fault, and sounds like it is terminal.

Been a while since I purchased computer parts, question is, have things moved on so much that it'll be easier just to replace the current system with an osless desktop base unit and transfer hard drive across?

Er can remember how local you are to London as I'm sure I have a spare power supply  that could help and a quick replacement of heat transfer paste and clean and light lube of the fan will help the nc10.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: BrianI on April 18, 2015, 06:57:09 pm


3.  Get a whole new ready-built computer unit.

That's what I did as an "anniversary of new job" treat to myself!

I went with an Overclockers UK "Primo Pro AX" Configurable AMD A Series APU Office PC, with a few customisations:
specs: 
Case: Raijintek Arcadia Mid Tower USB 3.0 Case - Black
- Power Supply: BeQuiet System Power 7 350W '80 Plus Bronze' Power Supply
- CPU: AMD A8-6600K 3.90GHz (Socket FM2) APU Richland Quad Core Processor
- Motherboard: Gigabyte F2A58M-HD2 AMD A58 Chipset Micro ATX Motherboard
- Cooler: AMD Approved Cooler
- RAM: Kingston HyperX 8GB (2x4GB) PC3-14900C9 1866MHz Dual Channel Kit - Black/Gold (HX318C9BGK2/8-OC)
- Primary Hard Drive: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 7200RPM SATA 6Gb/s 64MB Cache - OEM (ST1000DM003) HDD
- Graphics Card: Onboard AMD HD Graphics
- Sound: High Definition 7.1 Onboard Sound Card
- Optical Drive: OcUK 24x DVD±RW SATA ReWriter (Black) - OEM
- Networking: Gigabit LAN

£301

OS will be Linux Mint 17.1 KDE edition

OK, so I could have saved a bit by building my own, but can't be bothered with that nowadays.

SHould be a a good rig for my photo editing / panorama stitching - quad core @ 3.9GHz!  :o  I remember my first PC way back in 1997 had a Cyrix PR233Mhz cpu, http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/6x86/Cyrix-6x86MX-PR233%20%2875MHz%202.9V%29.html (http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/6x86/Cyrix-6x86MX-PR233%20%2875MHz%202.9V%29.html)  How things have moved on since then!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on April 18, 2015, 07:34:57 pm
I asked you to use that picture on the new box, so why did you apply it to the lapdancer as well, eh?  EH??
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on April 18, 2015, 11:07:36 pm
Similar spec to my new one, Brian.  The difference between two cores plodding along at 1GHz with 4GB of RAM and four cores at high revs and 16GB is this: quite astonishing.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on April 20, 2015, 09:24:06 pm
Made a flowchart with M$ Word 2003*. That's two hours of my life I won't get back.




*Don't ask  ::-)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on April 21, 2015, 01:24:22 am
I have successfully persuaded the two Win 8.1 boxen at Larrington Towers to retain their own desktop and sign-in screen pictures using some feature buried in the Playmobil side of the user interface to turn off the syncing which I was never asked about in the first place.  Can you do this from the Control Panel?  I think not.

For the record, Microsith, the monitor on the desktop machine dates from the late Cretaceous and has a 4:3 aspect ratio so no, it isn't a fucking touchscreen.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on April 21, 2015, 10:50:19 pm
Learned how to use "screen -r" today. Sadly Finch don't want to connect to IRC but only ICQ on the remote laptop/server. So the point of learning screen is a bit mute.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on April 22, 2015, 12:37:28 pm
Screen is one of those really useful tools.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on April 23, 2015, 08:09:27 pm
Writing my first C# in anger today. A widget to automatically enable extra monitors and set them to their native resolution on the Windows Server 2008 workstations. From Windows 7 onwards there is a nice command line utility to do it, but Server 2k8 is takes after Vista so that means using a native C library and a small plethora of unmanaged objects.

Still, it hopefully means no more late nights/weekends when we re-image the fleet of developer PCs.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on April 23, 2015, 10:53:52 pm
Uploading my image library to Box. This could take some time as it is half a terabyte.

Via sFTP where each file is a separate command so it is pretty resilient to moving from home to work etc.

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on May 01, 2015, 09:18:19 pm
Just got a SPAM today telling me that my hearth attack is only hours away, with the date 9 Apr 2015 8.35am ...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on May 04, 2015, 03:28:08 pm
Found a previously-unsuspected feature in mp3tag yesterday, which is that clicking at the top of the very leftmost column with the little file type icons1 in it will "sort" the files into an order that's random enough for my purposes.  This is approximately a gazillion times quicker than any other method I've found.

Now if I could just find a way of telling the media player on the NAS and/or AV receiver to start a playlist where it left off the previous time2.  And/or to understand the concept of "play counts".
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on May 04, 2015, 05:52:59 pm
I have paid for a DVD. With money. I'm told I am "Supporting the movie industry".

All I want to do is watch it on my lappie, perhaps avoiding the titles and/or logos that apparently it's "not permitted" to skip.

But no, some stupid, brain-dead anti-piracy thing means that about half way through watching the film (that I've paid for. With money. Supporting the movie industry) it starts jumping from scene to scene. So fucking clever. Do you really think that will stop someone pirating it? Or will it just piss off people who have paid money thinking they were supporting the movie industry? Perhaps next time I'll just download it.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on May 04, 2015, 06:09:17 pm
Some films are meant to do that.  Are you sure you haven't bought the Director's Über-Poncey Cut by accident?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ruthie on May 04, 2015, 08:12:14 pm
It seems my posh laptop isn't keen on my excellent coffee  ::-)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on May 05, 2015, 12:02:21 pm
I really can't wait for the movie industry to catch up and offer reasonably priced "paid for downloads" which are DRM-free.

For instance, it's 10 squidlets to "rent" some fillums from Amazon.  You imagine without the effort of producing a optical disk, producing a case for it, distributing it etc. etc. that for 10 squidlets you would get to KEEP the film.

bah.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on May 05, 2015, 12:34:06 pm
Moreover you can buy the complete Matrix Trilogy, for e.g., from Sainsbury's on Blu-Ray for a tenner...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on May 06, 2015, 08:08:58 pm
I have paid for a DVD. With money. I'm told I am "Supporting the movie industry".

All I want to do is watch it on my lappie, perhaps avoiding the titles and/or logos that apparently it's "not permitted" to skip.

But no, some stupid, brain-dead anti-piracy thing means that about half way through watching the film (that I've paid for. With money. Supporting the movie industry) it starts jumping from scene to scene. So fucking clever. Do you really think that will stop someone pirating it? Or will it just piss off people who have paid money thinking they were supporting the movie industry? Perhaps next time I'll just download it.

I suspect it's just a clunky DVD, QA has always been a bit shonky and cheap(er) DVDs tend not to have the robust error correction that computer optical drives have (so try playing it in a computer). There's no mechanism that I know of that introduces logic into playback to enable a DVD to randomly switch between titles/chapters based on something that happened earlier during playback. They'll follow the index.

Beyond that, yes, rental and purchase for downloads is clearly out-of-whack. You can often buy the physical DVD for less than a digital rental.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on May 06, 2015, 08:44:08 pm
I have paid for a DVD. With money. I'm told I am "Supporting the movie industry".

All I want to do is watch it on my lappie, perhaps avoiding the titles and/or logos that apparently it's "not permitted" to skip.

But no, some stupid, brain-dead anti-piracy thing means that about half way through watching the film (that I've paid for. With money. Supporting the movie industry) it starts jumping from scene to scene. So fucking clever. Do you really think that will stop someone pirating it? Or will it just piss off people who have paid money thinking they were supporting the movie industry? Perhaps next time I'll just download it.

Is it a actually a DVD, or is it a Blu-Ray?
( People often use the term DVD to refer to both.)

Some Blu-Rays do indeed use such behaviour as a 'copy protection'.

It's called 'playlist obfuscation'.
Google 'screenpass' for deatails.

Here's how it works:

Blu-rays can contain the main movie in a single big file, or as a daisy-chain of shorter clips.
The daisy-chain of shorter clips is called 'seamless branching', and allows the disk to contain different versions of the movie; eg a directors cut, or on-screen language variations.
All the versions may share most of the same content, but branch out to different clips as required.

This is controlled via the Blu Ray menus.
Depending on the menu choices you make, you are directed to different 'playlist' files, which list the clips to be played, and in which order.
If you play the movie on a 'legitimate' player, this works OK.

Now, Screenpass protection adds a bunch of fake playlist files which serve up the movie in random orders.
These fake playlists will never be reached by legitimate players which use the menus.

But ripping software will often try try to rip the 'main movie' by simply choosing the longest playlist.
They don't try to process the menus.
So they will usually get a garbled movie.

Any software players that don't properly support Java menus will also fail in the same way ( eg VLC ).
If they try to ignore the menus, and choose an incorrect playlist, this will give an out-of-sequence movie.

Fixes:
1) Use a proper player program that properly supports the Java menus.

2)Use AnyDVD-HD in the background, which will report the 'valid' playlists.
Then point the inadequate player to the 'valid' playlist file.








Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on May 07, 2015, 09:04:49 am
Indeed, Blu-Ray is an entirely different kettle. Some DVDs did something far simpler, but similar, by hiding the most likely title, so you'd end up with a version in Swedish. Admittedly, it'll add to the flavour of Die Hard 7: Smorgasbord when an aging Bruce Willis has to get through Croydon Ikea that's been infiltrated by terrorists posing as 'co-workers'. On a bank holiday. He also has a sofa to return. Blu-Ray offers a lot more scope for playlist complexity and obfuscation, but as Feanor says if it's an actual player and a legit disk, it should play.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on May 07, 2015, 01:23:11 pm
There's no mechanism that I know of that introduces logic into playback to enable a DVD to randomly switch between titles/chapters based on something that happened earlier during playback. They'll follow the index.

After a bit of searching around, I have worked out what's happening. The DVD contains around 35 titles. The first few are the stupid adverts you're not allowed to skip and the coming soons. Followed by 25+ versions of the film in different random orders apart from one which is in the right order. If you try to play any of the wrong order ones via the menu you get "not permitted", however Handbrake obviously doesn't know which is the main feature as they all look the same.

You might imagine the way round this is easy - tell Handbrake which title to rip. Unfortunately that one has some further magic that skips straight to the end, so you can only rip from chapter 2 onwards.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on May 07, 2015, 02:51:04 pm
Hmm, that still sounds like a DVD glitch. It's rumoured that film companies deliberately manufactured data glitches in DVDs to thwart ripping, but they mostly seemed to have stopped. I find the correct title by playing the movie briefly. I still know of no DVD mechanism to force this sort of behaviour. DVDs are logical in the way they structure content for playback. If Handbrake can't handle a title, you may need to rip it separately.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on May 08, 2015, 09:18:09 am
My desktop machine doesn't seem quite to have got the hang of this hibernating business.  It goes to sleep OK but later wakes up of its own accord ???
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on May 09, 2015, 11:04:33 pm
Moved house. 'Network', dynamic DNS, VPN all reconfigured and working.
A whopping 2.5 Mb/s. I'm underwhelmed.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: perpetual dan on May 12, 2015, 09:33:03 pm
Visiting year 10ish person said today "programming's just like algebra".
My work here is done :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on May 14, 2015, 09:44:11 pm
Hmm, this week I am a programmer.
I have to hack out a class library that encapsulates an obscure file type that I seem to be the only person old enough to know about!

So I have learned some of the finer points of C# ( which I've had some previous with ) and hacked up a DLL that encapsulates the file type.

I've passed it onto the Real Programmers to use in their real applications.

I await the complaints.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Woofage on May 19, 2015, 08:43:34 am
The TV recording box seems to have died and will not re-boot. I plugged in a display and nothing appeared on that either so I suspect a dead mobo :(. The other bugger is that I use this box for my personal network storage so I'll have to make other arrangements.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Tim Hall on May 19, 2015, 09:47:16 am
The Mothership (more of a life raft really) has installed Adobe Acrobat Pro DC on my  lapdancer.

I notice that the paper size is reported in inches.
I drill down in the preferences and change the units to mm.
It now tells me my A4 paper is 209.97mm x 296.93mm

I think not.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on May 19, 2015, 09:49:30 am
Write a Stern Letter to that nice Mr Obambi.

On A4 paper.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: tiermat on May 21, 2015, 08:30:00 am
I was surprised, at breakfast this morning, when the waiter came over to replenish my coffee, that he recognised my mobile to be OnePlusOne.  This is not a slur of the intelligence of front of house staff, but rather that most people, when they see my phone, say "What is that?" or "Is that an iPhone 6?".  We then had a conversation about the OnePlusTwo.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on May 21, 2015, 09:01:44 am
Nothing to be ashamed about (http://www.oneplusone.org.uk/content_topic/sex-and-intimacy/)  :demon:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: tiermat on May 21, 2015, 09:16:55 am
Nothing to be ashamed about (http://www.oneplusone.org.uk/content_topic/sex-and-intimacy/)  :demon:

LOL! :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: barakta on May 27, 2015, 01:03:18 pm
Upper Management refused to allow those of us in our two teams without two computer screens to get them "cos money" (which is bollocks cos we have plenty of money and we could purchase from internal budgets but that would be disobedient or something)...  However they told MY boss who has two screens that those who have two screens will get to keep them in the office move of fail... 

"O Rite" says I and goes on a thieving scrounge around the building... I need 5 screens, I have three in my equipment stash, three on stupid monitor arms (must extract the arms, they cost £££ and are irreplaceable now) and discovered three in unused PCs in random offices.  Thank deities for the stupid WEEEE disposal system which makes it so difficult to get rid that tech-stuff just accrudulates around the building...  I now have 6 screens of varying types and think I can do some various swappy roundy to get everyone a reasonable setup including two of the more decent screens for the person with dyslexia who is complaining that their screen is crappy (it is).

And if I can't config them, folk can phone IT and get them to do it once the screens are in situ...

Dear management, we now all have two screens :D 
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on May 27, 2015, 01:07:02 pm
barakta could you please come and run UK PLC :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: barakta on May 27, 2015, 02:07:31 pm
To be fair, if I was in charge of UK PLC - many many things would differ!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on May 27, 2015, 02:15:10 pm
For the good I'm sure.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: perpetual dan on May 27, 2015, 03:40:37 pm
Last time we did a clear out of my old equipment hoard I think we donated half a dozen surplus but perfectly serviceable screens to various admin types who couldn't otherwise get them.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: barakta on May 27, 2015, 03:51:37 pm
I have bagged an admin to help me sort the equipment cupboard on Thursday.  It's largely overpriced underutilised 'assistive' technology from Alumni funding where we HAD to buy ALLTHETHINGSNAO rather than think more carefully about what would be used... Hence 6x £600 gadgets which most studes WON'T use cos they suck and library won't take cos EsteemedExColleague didn't ask nicely enough or something...

I've been slowly binning win95 era software for ages but have to make a WEEE request by calculating the volume and asking them to give us a quote to take it away... Or we could just hide it somewhere else randomly around the building for the next lot of fuckers to find (tempting cos they're decorating the building under us after refusing to make it even safe for us for 6 years).
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on May 27, 2015, 04:14:14 pm
Just a side note : Our local WEEE is outside, which probably kill off a few items for sure that could have been saved if undercover.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on May 29, 2015, 07:07:25 pm
As far as I can tell I have had no spam whatsoever since quarter to one this morning :o
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on May 31, 2015, 02:04:48 pm
Note to self: if you Do Things to the master copy of the NAS-stored music library such that every single file is modified then it will be way quicker to get a backup copy onto the lapdancer's internal HDD via a USB 3.0 external drive from the desktop, due to the steam-powered nature of the lapdancer's notwork adapter.  FFS, it's been running since midnight and has just reached Half Man Half Biscuit  ::-)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on June 03, 2015, 03:20:46 pm
As far as I can tell I have had no spam whatsoever since quarter to one this morning :o

Ah.  Thunderbird is no longer downloading messages that the Mega!-Global! Exclamation! Mark! Corporation! of! Sunnyvale!, USAnia! thinks! is! spam!  I do not know how this changed but it does mean I have to use the Mega!-Global! Exclamation! Mark! Corporation! of! Sunnyvale!, USAnia!'s poxy! web! interface! every so often to check the crap.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on June 15, 2015, 11:00:09 am
Why is it that one's unbent paperclip is always swanning about the desk but when you need the bugger it's buggered off and you have to massacre another one?  Whereupon the first one creeps out from the shadows, smiling bashfully?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on June 15, 2015, 11:58:34 pm
(http://vignette4.wikia.nocookie.net/uncyclopedia/images/5/5c/Clippy.PNG/revision/latest?cb=20070418123249)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on June 17, 2015, 05:49:29 pm
I'm sure I didn't imagine, while playing Euro Truck Simulator 2, the placard-waving protestors on a bridge in southern Portugal or the hovering flying saucer near Montpellier...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on June 22, 2015, 11:29:23 pm
Do we think this is real?

http://www.geekfill.com/2013/02/12/best-reply-to-a-relationship-complain-ever-this-is-genius/

Who cares
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on June 23, 2015, 11:26:32 am
Variations on that theme have been doing the rounds for about twenty years.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on June 23, 2015, 11:34:56 am
Well at least they have updated it :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: billplumtree on June 23, 2015, 12:54:28 pm
Just a side note : Our local WEEE is outside,

What, nobody's going to pick this one up and run with it?  Standards are slipping...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on June 23, 2015, 05:31:17 pm
I've just moved to Taiwan, at least for the sake of my new AP (https://store.ubnt.com/unifi/unifi-ap-52.html)

Just curious, what do the panel think the impact local residents might experience if - for arguments sake - the Tx power is cranked up from the maximum UK/USA 20db to 28db? Hypothetically of course.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Deano on June 24, 2015, 11:10:57 pm
A minor victory at work today, but the little things matter!

We have to complete a database (in Lotus Notes) which has become progressively more unusable as newer versions have emerged. Partly this is down to our creaking infrastructure, but my main frustration was the inability to navigate from field to field using the tab key. Previously this was easy, and made the task - well, hardly a joy, but far less onerous. In more recent versions, we've had to resort to mousing, as using the tab key navigated to random other fields in different parts of the file.

I'd whinged about this for ages, as had others, but nowt changed.

Today I emailed the developer, who not only fixed it immediately, but replied along the lines of "I wish this had been raised sooner, it's the sort of good practice which I was trying to teach to my underling, but he didn't listen, we've sacked the useless little squirt, and now I can't wave this email in his face to show I was right".

I suspect he's a bit old school, that developer. Anyway, hurrah!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on June 24, 2015, 11:48:42 pm
A minor victory at work today, but the little things matter!

Barakta will no doubt be along in a minute to explain why this sort of thing isn't as minor as it might first appear.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: barakta on June 25, 2015, 12:24:27 am
ObOnCue....

I am currently refusing with managerial support to use our new "enquiry and queue management system" as they don't have keyboard navigability and I can only manage the level of typing that I do by avoiding mousing as much as possible...

I spent 3 years telling them what it needed to do; come development it didn't do it... For extra lolz the developers are Dutch and while they have excellent English there's definitely cultural language issues.  And any request is filtered through IT numpty project managers...

I got asked if I couldn't just "try harder" to use their inaccessible system - I said "No, I'm breaking as it is and this is an industrial injury and disability discrimination claim WAITING to happen cos I can prove I told you years ago repeatedly"...

So yeah, everyone else has to use this unstable beta piece of shit and I'm simply refusing to do more than set up my login and smirk at them... I'm encouraging another colleague who has RSI and upper limb disabilities to complain about the mousy mousy cos its causing her pain... I know if I don't have a 100% hardline it'll erode horribly...  As it is they broke my hardline no phones by making me do voice conference call with the developers - if they try forcing that again I will simply refuse to comply cos it was a nightmare.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: jsabine on June 25, 2015, 01:08:07 am
But there's only two of you and no-one else has complained and it can't be that important really and why can't you try a bit harder because surely you can use a mouse just a little because everyone can use a mouse and just because you think using the keyboard is better and and and ...

Glad about this bit: "with managerial support."
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: barakta on June 25, 2015, 07:49:28 am
Yeah that...  My manager is pretty good; she "gets it" which she ought to do given our job but my last one didn't so...  The project team are learning the hard way, if you don't build in accessibility then you have to do unscaleable extra work... 
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on June 25, 2015, 11:54:21 am
Absolutely, and was accessibility in the project brief, so do you (the uni) have them by the purse strings if they do not deliver?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on June 25, 2015, 12:19:11 pm
Getting tab order correct is in GUI programming 101
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on June 29, 2015, 10:29:25 pm
There is a cute Easter-Eggy thing in the new Google maps when you are looking at Loch Ness. I wonder if there are others?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on June 30, 2015, 12:03:18 am
I have a surfit of Macs.  A g4 non imac, 2 twin processor aluminium cased g5, (one of which works) the other was a project as it had water leakage issues, a core duo (dual core) imac and the bits of another imac.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on July 01, 2015, 07:47:30 am
Too bad that I don't hack code much any more. Just found the atom (http://www.atom.io) editor "from" github. It looks like it behaves just like I want an editor to do and you can hack/edit/modify it to do stuff like you want it.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Deano on July 08, 2015, 10:40:59 pm
Getting tab order correct is in GUI programming 101

That's what our man said. He was quite annoyed that a) it hadn't been done in the first place and b) no one had mentioned it to him (plenty had whinged about it, but it's about whinging to the right people).

Plus everything barakta said. I do try to educate my colleagues about keyboard shortcuts, and I don't want RSI from endlessly mousing.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on July 17, 2015, 08:20:03 am
So what's the point of a USB lead with magnets built into the plugs?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on July 17, 2015, 12:14:41 pm
Dunno. FruityCorp make power leads which are held in by magnets rather than friction, so that when you inevitably trip on the cable you don't send your expensive shiny laptop hurtling towards the floor.

Perhaps they're aiming for something similar, with similarly engineered sockets?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on July 17, 2015, 12:58:51 pm
I've seen USB cables with connectors that break away as per the Apple power leads - a short stub connects to the USB port, and the cable connects magnetically onto that?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Vince on July 17, 2015, 01:01:19 pm
It's better than using elestic bands to hold in a word plug (yeah, thanks Samsung!)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on July 17, 2015, 01:17:34 pm
The magnets are about the same strength as a fridge magnet. Friction holds the plugs in pretty strongly, so I don't think the magnets are meant for that.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on July 17, 2015, 03:24:09 pm
To store the cable on your fridge, perhaps, or to dangle it from the edge of a metal-framed desk.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on July 17, 2015, 03:42:32 pm
The two ends do stick to each other so that the thing makes a nice wee loop. Could hang it from a peg. If I had a peg. Ah, what the hell.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on July 24, 2015, 02:07:28 pm
I half-remember some yacfers - possibly Mr Larrington - bemoaning Apple's decision to kill off the big iPod Classic.

Well it's (kind of) back, with a new 128gb option:

http://arstechnica.co.uk/apple/2015/07/the-ipod-lives-mid-year-bump-adds-new-colors-and-128gb-64-bit-ipod-touch/
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on July 24, 2015, 04:25:57 pm
Not big enough >:(
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on July 24, 2015, 04:33:37 pm
Ah the joy of not using ones passwords often enough, after one have updated them, so therefore one can't remember them ...  ::-)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Oaky on July 27, 2015, 04:33:17 pm
So what's the point of a USB lead with magnets built into the plugs?

Probably to prevent them from getting rheumatism, or travel sickness or something.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on July 27, 2015, 05:49:14 pm
A constipated USB connection I can imagine, but rheumatism?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on August 04, 2015, 11:53:46 am
Please would whatever it is that has turned the external sounds in ETS2 up to 11 please turn them down again?  It sounds like I'm driving with the truck's windows open ???  And the cheesy Russian pop music no longer sounds like a bad Tom Waits impersonator1, which at least had a certain joke comedy value.

1: Is there such a thing as a good Tom Waits impersonator?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on August 09, 2015, 09:08:44 am
Mention of sound cards elsethread prompts me to ask:

My desktop Babbage-Engine has its sound wossname on the mofoboard and, at times of stress, sometimes decides to go all quiet.  Well, apart from the fan.  Might a sound card prevent this reprehensible behaviour?  It's only doing stereo coz the amp it's plugged into was not designed for people with four ears, and through shit speakers at that, so doesn't need earthquake-triggering levels of 9:11 7.1 sonic badassness

I should have robbed the sound card out of the ancient XP box I gave Lt. Col. Larrington (retd.) last month but it probably wouldn't fit or wouldn't have drivers available or something.  I can probably nab it anyway the next time I'm there coz the chances of him connecting loudsqueakers to it are this: p<0.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on August 09, 2015, 11:44:05 am
Adding a sound card could solve the problem if there's a hardware fault (unlikely), or just if it uses a different driver, as rather brutey forcey solution.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on August 09, 2015, 03:12:11 pm
Build up my laptop with a basic Debian 8 install. It now boots up with Openbox, Tint2 at under 200Mb RAM used, with a terminal window with ssh onto the "server" to my favourite IRC channel to idle on. With Chrome, two taps open (gmail and yacf) it is at 1Gb. Easy had 500Mb RAM extra lost on boot before, not too bad on a laptop with 3Gb and 1.2Ghz/800Mhz dual core.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: citoyen on August 17, 2015, 04:36:09 pm
I don't think this really warrants a thread of its own...

Does this laptop look suitable for a student to do their homework on?
Acer Aspire V3 112P – £170 at PC World (http://www.pcworld.co.uk/gbuk/computing/laptops/laptops/acer-aspire-v3-112p-11-6-touchscreen-laptop-silver-10104717-pdt.html)

Doesn't need to be used for games or heavy photo editing or anything like that. First impression is that the processor might be a bit feeble and there's not a lot of memory, but it seems to be quite reasonable for the price (as far as I know what to expect for my money), and the memory can be upgraded to 8GB. I would also consider upgrading the HD to an SSD but maybe not immediately.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on August 18, 2015, 02:16:23 pm
I don't think this really warrants a thread of its own...

Does this laptop look suitable for a student to do their homework on?
Acer Aspire V3 112P – £170 at PC World (http://www.pcworld.co.uk/gbuk/computing/laptops/laptops/acer-aspire-v3-112p-11-6-touchscreen-laptop-silver-10104717-pdt.html)

Yes, but it would hardly be better than a second-hand laptop off eBay for nearly £100 less, eg, Dell Inpsiron 1525.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on August 30, 2015, 11:06:55 am
Laptop, why are you not rebooting?  Just sitting there saying:

ASUS
Inspiring Innovation * Persistent Perfection

may be persistent but is totally uninspiring, not at all innovative and very far from perfect.  Get with the programme, ratso >:(
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: matthew on August 31, 2015, 11:37:21 am
My desktop is not booting, I just checked and the bios is not seeing the hard disk with the boot partition.

Fortunately I have my personal files on a separate additional disk so my data is safe, unfortunately I don't have access to a different machine to check the disk to see what state it is actually in.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on August 31, 2015, 03:07:16 pm
Gave the laptop the full duration of some rubbish I'd recorded off the telly about the Loch Ness Monster before giving it the "have you tried switching it off and on again" treatment.  At which point it decided it couldn't see Pop Tart Mark, the external HDD.  Gave that the "have you tried switching it off and on again" treatment.

Nothing.  Arse.  Fortunately some jibbling in Device Mangler has restored Pop Tart Mark to rude health.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on September 06, 2015, 01:06:15 am
I proved the Monty Hall Problem (https://youtu.be/4Lb-6rxZxx0) Solution to myself tonight by writing a Commodore 64 BASIC program.  Now I finally accept it.

Code: [Select]
4 REM ********** MONTY (C) BIGGSY **********
6 INPUT"NUMBER OF GOES: ";N
7 REM ****** WELL, IT CHECKS THE RANDOM NUMBER GENERATOR ******
8 PRINT:PRINT"**** STICK ****":PRINT
10 FOR I=1 TO N
100 P=INT(RND(1)*3)+1:PRINT"CAR:  "P
110 G=INT(RND(1)*3)+1:PRINT"GUESS:"G
120 IF G=P THEN S=S+1:PRINT"WIN":GOTO 140
130 PRINT"LOSE"
140 PRINT:NEXT
150 REM****** AND NOW TO SWITCH EVERY TIME ******
200 PRINT:PRINT"**** SWITCH ****":PRINT
210 FOR I=1 TO N
220 P=INT(RND(1)*3)+1:PRINT"CAR:  "P
230 G=INT(RND(1)*3)+1:PRINT"GUESS:"G
240 IF P<>G THEN GOTO 340
250 IF P=1 THEN X=INT(RND(1)*2)+2:GOTO 400
260 IF P=3 THEN X=INT(RND(1)*2)+1:GOTO 400
270 X=INT(RND(1)*2)+1:IF X=2 THEN X=3
280 GOTO 400
340 IF (P=1 AND G=2) OR (P=2 AND G=1) THEN X=3:GOTO 400
350 IF (P=1 AND G=3) OR (P=3 AND G=1) THEN X=2:GOTO 400
360 IF (P=2 AND G=3) OR (P=3 AND G=2) THEN X=1
400 PRINT"GOAT: " X
410 IF (G=1 AND X=2) OR (G=2 AND X=1) THEN G=3:GOTO 500
420 IF (G=1 AND X=3) OR (G=3 AND X=1) THEN G=2:GOTO 500
430 G=1
500 PRINT"SWITCHED GUESS:" G
520 IF G=P THEN SW=SW+1:PRINT"WIN":GOTO 540
530 PRINT"LOSE"
540 PRINT:NEXT
600 PRINT:PRINT"STICK WINS:   "S "/"N
610 PRINT"SWITCHED WINS:" SW "/"N

...
STICK WINS:       3342 / 10000
SWITCHED WINS: 6754 / 10000

The Commodore 64 has a true random number generator that samples analogue white noise from the sound chip, although I must admit that I ran this program on a PC, with Vintage BASIC with a pseudo-random number generator.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: SteveC on September 23, 2015, 10:13:57 pm
Voice mail from Mother (77 next birthday). I'm locked out of my computer, can you help? ...but not until after the Bake Off!

So I phone from the hotel having managed to download another copy of Team Viewer and discovered that the Cloud has remembered my password!
A bit strange thinks I. If she's locked out, how come I can see the screen and everything via Team Viewer?
So she types away and nothing appears in the password box. So I try typing and the dots appear.

Is your keyboard unplugged, Mother?  Try using the one on the laptop itself.

I wish all support calls were that easy!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on September 25, 2015, 02:26:40 am
The Monty Hall problem is easy to comprehend if instead of considering it as two doors, you consider it as one door and (all the other doors at once).
Expand the problem to 100 doors and the answer is always switch.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on September 28, 2015, 06:12:49 pm
Have an dell inspiron zino htpc with 8gb and dual core athlon.  Currently running 32bit version will I gain anything running the 64bit version?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on September 28, 2015, 06:20:45 pm
My mouse pointer disappeared when I had the Islam Channel open on one tab of Safari and surfed on other open tabs.
Weird!

It showed the pointer on the Islam channel but not on the other tabs.

(Partner is being interviewed on Islam Channel shortly.)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: fuaran on September 28, 2015, 06:59:17 pm
Have an dell inspiron zino htpc with 8gb and dual core athlon.  Currently running 32bit version will I gain anything running the 64bit version?
What version of Windows? I think most of the 32-bit versions won't let you access more than 4GB. Check System properties to see how much memory it says is usable.

Apparently there's way of hacking 32-bit Windows to access more memory, not tried it myself. eg http://www.unawave.de/windows-7-tipps/32-bit-ram-barrier.html
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: simonp on September 29, 2015, 10:36:32 am
traceroute bad.horse
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 29, 2015, 10:53:19 am
Have an dell inspiron zino htpc with 8gb and dual core athlon.  Currently running 32bit version will I gain anything running the 64bit version?
What version of Windows? I think most of the 32-bit versions won't let you access more than 4GB. Check System properties to see how much memory it says is usable.

Apparently there's way of hacking 32-bit Windows to access more memory, not tried it myself. eg http://www.unawave.de/windows-7-tipps/32-bit-ram-barrier.html

Hmm, I'm not convinced. How does a 32-bit OS address that additional memory space?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on September 29, 2015, 11:01:57 am
Have an dell inspiron zino htpc with 8gb and dual core athlon.  Currently running 32bit version will I gain anything running the 64bit version?
What version of Windows? I think most of the 32-bit versions won't let you access more than 4GB. Check System properties to see how much memory it says is usable.

Apparently there's way of hacking 32-bit Windows to access more memory, not tried it myself. eg http://www.unawave.de/windows-7-tipps/32-bit-ram-barrier.html

Hmm, I'm not convinced. How does a 32-bit OS address that additional memory space?
So they are suggesting running some code from a Russian programming group that hacks your kernel? No thanks.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: simonp on September 29, 2015, 11:07:45 am
Have an dell inspiron zino htpc with 8gb and dual core athlon.  Currently running 32bit version will I gain anything running the 64bit version?
What version of Windows? I think most of the 32-bit versions won't let you access more than 4GB. Check System properties to see how much memory it says is usable.

Apparently there's way of hacking 32-bit Windows to access more memory, not tried it myself. eg http://www.unawave.de/windows-7-tipps/32-bit-ram-barrier.html

Hmm, I'm not convinced. How does a 32-bit OS address that additional memory space?

Whether or not it's a dodgy hack that will give away your bank details, having a larger physical memory than per-process virtual address space is entirely feasible, and I don't really understand why a 32-bit system should be in principle limited to 4GB of RAM.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on September 29, 2015, 11:31:07 am
Have an dell inspiron zino htpc with 8gb and dual core athlon.  Currently running 32bit version will I gain anything running the 64bit version?
What version of Windows? I think most of the 32-bit versions won't let you access more than 4GB. Check System properties to see how much memory it says is usable.

Apparently there's way of hacking 32-bit Windows to access more memory, not tried it myself. eg http://www.unawave.de/windows-7-tipps/32-bit-ram-barrier.html

Hmm, I'm not convinced. How does a 32-bit OS address that additional memory space?

Whether or not it's a dodgy hack that will give away your bank details, having a larger physical memory than per-process virtual address space is entirely feasible, and I don't really understand why a 32-bit system should be in principle limited to 4GB of RAM.

It isn't, that's why you could use more RAM if you paid for 32 bit windows server edition.

If you had to directly address all of RAM then 16 bit architectures would have been limited to 64 kB. I suddenly feel very old because I remember the grief of HIMEM.SYS and far pointers.  :-\
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 29, 2015, 11:40:57 am
Well, you can do it, but with a kludge, it's like counting to ten using five fingers. Given that most OSes are 64 bit, direct access makes a lot more sense.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on September 29, 2015, 12:14:26 pm
In reality all 32-bit Intel Processors since the Pentium Pro have been able to address a memory address space > 4GB using PAE (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physical_address_extension).

As already stated, Microsoft opted not to include support for it in their desktop versions of Windows. I suspect the kludge involves copying binaries over from equivalent Server versions of Wind0ze.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on September 29, 2015, 12:14:44 pm
Have an dell inspiron zino htpc with 8gb and dual core athlon.  Currently running 32bit version will I gain anything running the 64bit version?
What version of Windows? I think most of the 32-bit versions won't let you access more than 4GB. Check System properties to see how much memory it says is usable.

Apparently there's way of hacking 32-bit Windows to access more memory, not tried it myself. eg http://www.unawave.de/windows-7-tipps/32-bit-ram-barrier.html

Hmm, I'm not convinced. How does a 32-bit OS address that additional memory space?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physical_Address_Extension
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: simonp on September 29, 2015, 12:34:59 pm
Have an dell inspiron zino htpc with 8gb and dual core athlon.  Currently running 32bit version will I gain anything running the 64bit version?
What version of Windows? I think most of the 32-bit versions won't let you access more than 4GB. Check System properties to see how much memory it says is usable.

Apparently there's way of hacking 32-bit Windows to access more memory, not tried it myself. eg http://www.unawave.de/windows-7-tipps/32-bit-ram-barrier.html

Hmm, I'm not convinced. How does a 32-bit OS address that additional memory space?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physical_Address_Extension

So it's only 20 years since Intel added support in the page table for a larger than 4GB physical address space, no wonder Windows doesn't support it.

There are significant disadvantages to using 64 bit pointers, mainly in terms of bloat. How many applications genuinely need a >32bit address space?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 29, 2015, 12:40:10 pm
Because Windows users scream like banshees if Microsoft do anything that stop a 10-year old scanner driver working?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on September 29, 2015, 12:56:59 pm
Because Windows users scream like banshees if Microsoft do anything that stop a 10-year old scanner driver working?

Quite.  The transition to 64bit on Linux was pretty much painless, because for 99% of everything it was basically just a recompile, and the users are used to new distros breaking the stuff that needs proprietary drivers in exciting new ways.

I did run 32bit Linux with a PAE kernel for a while, because I'd bunged some extra RAM in an old machine and couldn't be arsed with a reinstall to 64-bit.  Naturally, it Just Worked.


I reckon Microsoft are weaning users off the expectation of backward compatibility.  Vista made great progress in that respect...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on September 29, 2015, 04:14:19 pm
32-bit Windows users can also access memory beyond 4GB with a RAM disk and use it for caching and paging, etc.

http://memory.dataram.com/products-and-services/software/ramdisk
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on September 29, 2015, 05:58:30 pm
So after a Several of months you've finally got used to all the foibles and idio(t)syncracies of iOS v.N and the the Mega-Global Fruit Corporation of Cupertino, USAnia introduces iOS v.N+1 and with it a whole new slab of things to get annoyed with.  Gits >:(
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on September 30, 2015, 12:58:40 pm
Must admit I hadn't always realised Cupertino was a real place.  I thought Mr Larrington had made it up from "cup of tea, no?".
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on September 30, 2015, 01:02:00 pm
So after a Several of months you've finally got used to all the foibles and idio(t)syncracies of iOS v.N and the the Mega-Global Fruit Corporation of Cupertino, USAnia introduces iOS v.N+1 and with it a whole new slab of things to get annoyed with.  Gits >:(


Do bear in mind http://www.engadget.com/2015/09/28/ios-9-wifi-assist/

and

http://www.zdnet.com/pictures/iphone-ipad-ios-9-privacy-security-settings-immediately/

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on September 30, 2015, 01:07:36 pm
"Cupertino" is in fact1 derived from the Spanish word for "lair of thieves and vagabonds".

1: Lie
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 30, 2015, 01:16:12 pm
El Capitan, I believe, is out today. The OS, not the mountain, that's already out there. The internet will probably slow down later.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on September 30, 2015, 01:18:31 pm
So after a Several of months you've finally got used to all the foibles and idio(t)syncracies of iOS v.N and the the Mega-Global Fruit Corporation of Cupertino, USAnia introduces iOS v.N+1 and with it a whole new slab of things to get annoyed with.  Gits >:(


Do bear in mind http://www.engadget.com/2015/09/28/ios-9-wifi-assist/

and

http://www.zdnet.com/pictures/iphone-ipad-ios-9-privacy-security-settings-immediately/

Ta Ham, though most, if not all, the above pertain to "features" which I haven't got...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on September 30, 2015, 01:20:52 pm
El Capitan, I believe, is out today. The OS, not the mountain, that's already out there. The internet will probably slow down later.

Any Internet would slow down with this on top of it:

(https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2929/14778145074_710b36650f_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/ovTREJ)
47_Yosemite_El_Capitan (https://flic.kr/p/ovTREJ) by Mr Larrington (https://www.flickr.com/photos/mr_larrington/), on Flickr
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: simonp on September 30, 2015, 01:42:53 pm
That fuss over wifi assist is hilarious. I have stopped connecting to the work wifi network because it's so throttled for guest users as to be beyond useless. I might be tempted to try connecting again in if this wifi assist actually does what it says on the tin.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on September 30, 2015, 01:55:38 pm
That fuss over wifi assist is hilarious. I have stopped connecting to the work wifi network because it's so throttled for guest users as to be beyond useless. I might be tempted to try connecting again in if this wifi assist actually does what it says on the tin.

Sounds like you work for us!
Seriously tho, 'dem bring your own devices have a hellish appetite for bandwidth.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on September 30, 2015, 11:29:52 pm
Anyone know of a safe place to download a 64bit win7?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: tiermat on October 01, 2015, 07:43:05 am
Anyone know of a safe place to download a 64bit win7?

DigitalRiver
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on October 01, 2015, 10:46:46 am
Copying music, photos and videos from network drive to new PC is taking a Very Long Time.  I am not looking forward to the subsequent move of said music, photos and videos from network drive to new network drive.  At all.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on October 01, 2015, 11:14:38 am
I'm now El Capitan. The mountain did truly come to Mohammed. Took about six hours to download. Installed fine and everything apparently peachy on my desktop. Less stupid font. For some reason it bought back some desktop backgrounds that I used about a year ago.

For some reason the Macbook failed to connect to iCloud on installation which meant the email settings were inactive. Unfortunately they then refused to believe my password was my password. Had to nuke and re-create. To be fair, I think that's BT's fault, it used to be Yahoo Mail and now it's not, but my Macs have trouble forgetting the old Yahoo details.

Anyhow, fairly painless. Not much to report, everything seems to work as before. New improved font, everything feels very spritely but neither computer was very slow to start with, and various bits and pieces. Incremental and no Windows 10 tale of woe. Have yet to check if it fixed the bluetooth audio that Yosemite so handsomely and thoroughly broke.

PS if you have multiple Macs and don't fancy multiple 6 GB downloads, grab a copy the installer file from applications before you install, it can then be copied to subsequent machines. Once you install, it deletes the installer.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on October 01, 2015, 11:21:14 am
Copying music, photos and videos from network drive to new PC is taking a Very Long Time.  I am not looking forward to the subsequent move of said music, photos and videos from network drive to new network drive.  At all.
Sometimes it can make a difference to encapsulate all the files in one zip file (no compression), copy that, then unzip.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on October 01, 2015, 11:37:11 am
Also, how the blazes did Chrome end up with Yahoo! as! its! default! search! engine!?  Even after I'd gone into the Settings wossname and binned every search engine except that of the Mega-Global Chocolate Manufactury Corporation of Mountain View, USAnia ???  I had to shoot the wretched thing down in flames and reinstall it.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on October 01, 2015, 03:09:09 pm
Also, how the blazes did Chrome end up with Yahoo! as! its! default! search! engine!?  Even after I'd gone into the Settings wossname and binned every search engine except that of the Mega-Global Chocolate Manufactury Corporation of Mountain View, USAnia ???  I had to shoot the wretched thing down in flames and reinstall it.

That'll be you that did that, somehow. some install, some download.

Soz.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on October 01, 2015, 04:59:14 pm
Anyone know of a safe place to download a 64bit win7?

DigitalRiver

Not anymore :(
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on October 01, 2015, 07:56:12 pm
Anyone know of a safe place to download a 64bit win7?

Direct from Microsoft now if you have a valid product key: www.microsoft.com/en-gb/software-download/windows7

Failing everything else, I can post you a copy of W7 Pro 64-bit on disc, but i don't think it'll be necessary.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on October 01, 2015, 09:17:00 pm
Doesn't work with OEM codes  ::-)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on October 01, 2015, 09:38:36 pm
Just PM your address if you want it on DVD.  It'll be online somewhere though.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on October 02, 2015, 08:23:10 am
Living as we do in an era of shortages of natural resources, breathable air and adequate claret, and in which software updates are almost invariably accompanied by howls of anguish from the usersphere, it is nice to be able to report that the combination of iOS 9, iPad and Chrome no longer requires that you tap the "Jump to" wossname on yacf three times before selecting your destination.  Just once is all that is required now.

Hurrah for SCIENCE :thumbsup:

Mind you, moving the cursor is even more hit and miss.  If the Write app can have left and right arrow keys, Mega-Global Chocolate Manufactury Corporation of Mountain View, USAnia, why can't Chrome?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on October 02, 2015, 09:11:07 am
Just PM your address if you want it on DVD.  It'll be online somewhere though.

Thank you, but am sure there are easier sources ;)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on October 02, 2015, 06:19:10 pm
Have two copies iso , one from intopc and the other softpedia, they are  both the same size so...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on October 03, 2015, 10:14:51 am
Md5sum ... somewhere someone will have written the md5 hash of these ISOs and there is a windows utility knocking around that will show you the md5 check sum of a file. I could tell you what it is if I were at work. It is a portable exe available from Microsoft themselves.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on October 04, 2015, 07:15:47 pm
Having acquired a new sub-desk machine the old desktop has migrated downstairs.  Install Thunderbird and copy complete directory wossname from C:\Users\Dave\AppData\Roaming\Thunderbird\Profiles on the laptop.  Fire up Tbird.  It all works :thumbsup:

Two days later either Thunderbird or Yahoo! decides! there! is! something! wrong! with! my! password!  Which has been the same for a Several of years.  Log into Yahoo via the web.  Password works.  Try again with Thunderbird.  Password works again.

Pls to not be doing that again, machine >:(
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on October 05, 2015, 05:05:42 am
Mind you, moving the cursor is even more hit and miss.  If the Write app can have left and right arrow keys, Mega-Global Chocolate Manufactury Corporation of Mountain View, USAnia, why can't Chrome?

Actually
Though finding out about the latter by putting "iOS9 cursor totally f****d" into a FWSE is not the best way to find out about New! IMPROVED!! features.

And Write doesn't work at all under iOS9 chiz.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on October 05, 2015, 06:45:14 pm
Plex Media Server, I do not know how you determine which Popular Beat Combos qualify for the "Seen live" tag but for the record, John Fogerty, Mastodon and the Montréal Symphony Orchestra are among the acts that I have not even seen dead.

Also that's a really shit picture of Johnny Winter.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on October 06, 2015, 02:27:55 pm
Plex Media Server has joined the foot-operated dip switch and touch-screens for desktop PCs in the "It seemed like a good idea at the time" pile.  Because it cannot cope with Popular Beat Combos whose name contains a "/".  And thus makes an unholy mess of trying to import the Compleat AC/DC into its library.  And when you then try deleting AC/DC and re-adding each album manually it doesn't just remove AC/DC from its library but also all the tracks from the source you were importing them from.

Fortunately I am paranoid enough to keep four backup copies of the mp3 collection...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on October 06, 2015, 02:33:35 pm
Plex Media Server has joined the foot-operated dip switch

/me wonders how on earth you're supposed to operate DIP switches with your foot, then realises she's showing her youth.

Actually, given some of the frustration you had to go through back in the day to make your Epson dot matrix produce a BRITONS '£' character, it would make a certain kind of sense.


Quote
Because it cannot cope with Popular Beat Combos whose name contains a "/".

What's it like with &amp;ersands?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on October 06, 2015, 02:59:06 pm
Plex Media Server has joined the foot-operated dip switch

/me wonders how on earth you're supposed to operate DIP switches with your foot, then realises she's showing her youth.

Actually, given some of the frustration you had to go through back in the day to make your Epson dot matrix produce a BRITONS '£' character, it would make a certain kind of sense.


Quote
Because it cannot cope with Popular Beat Combos whose name contains a "/".

What's it like with &amp;ersands?

Seems happy enough with them.  There's probably a setting buried under the boot floor to make it leave my laboriously-consistentificated mp3 tags the fuck alone but it still insists on changing "X And The Y" to "X and the Y", except when it doesn't.

Part of me wants to beat it into submission, another says to leave it until other important things are attended to (like for e.g. learning to fly a space shuttle or juggle chainsaws) and a third says that I don't need yet another way of listening to music over and above the half-dozen alternatives already available.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: citoyen on October 06, 2015, 03:29:49 pm
cannot cope with Popular Beat Combos whose name contains a "/"

I was going to say isn't that a security measure to do with escape characters, but I'm thinking of \ aren't I?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on October 06, 2015, 03:59:56 pm
I imagine it's as simple as the group name being used as the directory name in the filesystem, so it's limited to names which are legal in the filesystem in question.

Not a great design, for obvious reasons.

( I wonder if that weird symbol Prince used is available as a Unicode character somewhere? )
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on October 06, 2015, 04:35:25 pm
I've found PlexMediaServer to be great with the ripped DVD/BD collection, but MP3s - naming them consistently is a dark art.

I've had limited success renaming the MP3 collection with MusicBrainzPicard - in that sometimes it works, sometimes it partially works (losing MP3s in the process) and most times it doesn't work at all - doesn't actually save the renamed MP3s to the new location.

So, if anyone can recommend something that will go through MP3s ripped at various times using different software/naming conventions, identify them and rename them properly to work with Plex Media Server, I'd be eternally grateful.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on October 06, 2015, 04:56:44 pm
So, if anyone can recommend something that will go through MP3s ripped at various times using different software/naming conventions, identify them and rename them properly to work with Plex Media Server, I'd be eternally grateful.

I don't know what Plex requires, but try MP3Tag, which can modify file names as well as tags.  It'll be one simple batch job to create new file names if the tags are correct and consistent, or vice versa, otherwise it might need multiple jobs, which could still be worth doing.  It can search and replace with wildcards, etc.

Tips: Once MP3Tag is installed, right-click on your media folder(s) in your file explorer to load them into the program; do any jobs; then close the program and it'll save automatically.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on October 06, 2015, 04:58:48 pm
I used a combination of Mp3tag, Excel, Word and a certain amount of manual jibbling (usually with Canadian post-rock outfits ruthless individualists who use quotes in their song titles) to achieve consistency at the file level only to have Plex bugger it all up again.  What possesses it to change "The 13th Floor Elevators" to "13'th Floor Elevators" is as yet a mystery, and is likely to remain so until I've acquired fluent Portuguese, sussed why a Robocopy script works until I try to run it under Task Scheduler and built a wall ten thousand feet high around Tony Blair.

The "/" business also remains a puzzler, not least because it renamed both studio albums by "Leo Kottke/Mike Gordon" to "Gordon" but got a live bootleg one right ???

XP with Biggsy
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on October 06, 2015, 08:27:34 pm
Colonel Larrington,
Plex isn't actually renaming your files though is it? It's just the displayed metadata that's incorrect?

MP3tag sounds rather Windowsy but I'll take a look. Thanks Biggsy.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on October 06, 2015, 09:38:44 pm
I have EasyTAG on my Ubuntu box which seems to work OK.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on October 06, 2015, 10:55:57 pm
Plex creates its own database mashing the metadata with stuff it finds on the web. When it works, it is rather cool. It doesn't always.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on October 07, 2015, 06:19:16 pm
Colonel Larrington,
Plex isn't actually renaming your files though is it? It's just the displayed metadata that's incorrect?

Correct, it just messes up AC/DC metadata to the extent that it's impossible to unravel.  Mashing several albums into one non-existent one is its latest trick.

Also, becuase it's running on a NAS with a very little brane, it's limited in the types of video formats it can play and as a result I'm beating my own branes out trying to convert a bunch of old .mov files to for e.g. .mp4 without rendering the already rubbish sound completely inaudible ???

Plex creates its own database mashing the metadata with stuff it finds on the web. When it works, it is rather cool. It doesn't always.

Is there any way of telling it to leave the web alone and just use my lovingly hand-crufted metadata?  I don't need the last.fm biographical bobbins, especially when it gets completely the wrong artiste.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on October 07, 2015, 07:27:13 pm

Is there any way of telling it to leave the web alone and just use my lovingly hand-crufted metadata?  I don't need the last.fm biographical bobbins, especially when it gets completely the wrong artiste.

Settings -> Agents uncheck all the stuff you can on each
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Clare on October 08, 2015, 08:50:15 am
Reboot number 1 please.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Clare on October 08, 2015, 09:12:05 am
Reboot number 2 please.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Clare on October 08, 2015, 10:38:06 am
Reboot number thr...fuck it I'm going for a coffee and then I'm going to poke Maximizer with a cattle prod - worthless heap of shit.

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on October 08, 2015, 02:52:07 pm
There is also a Mac version of MP3Tag, but I guess you want Linux, Afasoas.  I hope you've got at least one Windows PC in your abode, though.

An alternative I've thought of would be to use a good audio converter and do a dummy or double conversion* just for the sake of generating new file names from tags (and even re-arrange the folders as well, if desired).

* eg. Convert existing MP3s to FLAC and then back to MP3, if that doesn't lose quality and MP3 to MP3 isn't possible.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: barakta on October 08, 2015, 06:58:18 pm
Reboot number thr...fuck it I'm going for a coffee and then I'm going to poke Maximizer with a cattle prod - worthless heap of shit.

I believe we dodged a bullet if that's the same Maximiser that's sort of Canadian we nearly got.  Manchester say its great but they do have a minion employed 2.5 days a week to coax it and minion is a receptionist the other 2.5 days so is 'always' available... 

We have a piece of shit called KANA and another piece of shit called Netpractise instead of Maximiser - neither of which work. Netpractice can't let students "check in for appointments" today and KANA is double booking rooms or just not securing a room booking with hilarious (not) consequences.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Clare on October 08, 2015, 09:20:25 pm
Our Maximizer (and yes, that 'z' bloody annoys me) is CRM software it is a pain in the arse to use but also has a number of 'features' that mean it fucks with my computer without even being opened, one being that if it suffers a 'network error' just at the point I do anything with my computer (turn it on, log in, open a programme, open an e-mail, type anything, log off etc) it freezes the computer.

I've had two events in the past fortnight when I couldn't log off at the end of the day and had to perform a denial of electrons to make the damn thing behave, both caused by a Maximizer network error - I hadn't opened Maximizer at all on either day. This morning three attempts to open Google Chrome, three reboots all caused by Maximizer network errors, again the damn thing hadn't been opened.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on October 09, 2015, 07:13:21 am
Is it hour own computer or a company supplied one?

I really can't see why an application would be fiddling with the network stack unless it was trying to run a VPN or virtualizing itself.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on October 09, 2015, 08:25:21 am
There is also a Mac version of MP3Tag, but I guess you want Linux, Afasoas.  I hope you've got at least one Windows PC in your abode, though.

An alternative I've thought of would be to use a good audio converter and do a dummy or double conversion* just for the sake of generating new file names from tags (and even re-arrange the folders as well, if desired).

* eg. Convert existing MP3s to FLAC and then back to MP3, if that doesn't lose quality and MP3 to MP3 isn't possible.

I'll give EasyTag a go.
Most Linux boxen dual boot Windoze 10, which is occasionally used for LightRoom and Photoshop. I've even got a Macbook Pro on loan, but I've got to replace the HDD before I can use it.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Clare on October 09, 2015, 11:01:15 am
Is it hour own computer or a company supplied one?

I really can't see why an application would be fiddling with the network stack unless it was trying to run a VPN or virtualizing itself.

It's part of the university system and we have the finest brain in our IS dept ignoring it even as I type.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on October 09, 2015, 03:13:53 pm
Is it hour own computer or a company supplied one?

I really can't see why an application would be fiddling with the network stack unless it was trying to run a VPN or virtualizing itself.
I'd guess that it is running some really shitty security process, or a license verification process, that involves constantly bouncing "Are you there, am I allowed to run" messages. When no reply is received it goes into an insane frenzy; "OMG, I'm alone in the universe, is ANYONE out there." and uses 100% of network resources.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on October 09, 2015, 06:40:37 pm
I am rapidly losing patience with Plex.  Any so-called media server that cannot tell the difference between albums called "Groovy Decay" (1982), "Groovy Decoy" (1986 demos from Groovy Decay sessions) and "Gravy Deco" (the complete Groovy Decay/Groovy Decoy sessions) deserves to be stuffed into a sack with a half-dozen flettons and passed to Mr Plumtree otp for disposal at the top end of the Lanky.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: barakta on October 09, 2015, 10:31:42 pm
KANA our software isn't that bad yet but it is slow and laggy - 2-10 seconds to display from one row of contact data to the next...  I may insist they develop a DESKTOP application - web inherently slows it down and makes it harder to do accessibly.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on October 09, 2015, 11:44:35 pm
KANA our software isn't that bad yet but it is slow and laggy - 2-10 seconds to display from one row of contact data to the next...  I may insist they develop a DESKTOP application - web inherently slows it down and makes it harder to do accessibly.

No a web based implementation doesn't make it harder to do either of those thinks. A bad implementation does.If the developers, architects and financiers are not arsed doing it in a web app then they won't be arsed doing it in a desktop app.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on October 11, 2015, 04:10:05 am
Giving one of my external USB hard disks the name "Duff Leg Bryn" was asking for trouble, I suppose...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on October 11, 2015, 10:23:59 am
KANA our software isn't that bad yet but it is slow and laggy - 2-10 seconds to display from one row of contact data to the next...  I may insist they develop a DESKTOP application - web inherently slows it down and makes it harder to do accessibly.

No a web based implementation doesn't make it harder to do either of those thinks. A bad implementation does.If the developers, architects and financiers are not arsed doing it in a web app then they won't be arsed doing it in a desktop app.

Software houses that produce inaccessible software have been, for some time, a pet hate of mine. Particularly when the software is used within businesses and the end users literally have no choice but use it.

As for slow and laggy, the browser page itself shouldn't be reloading between switching records, thus when you switch records, it's only the raw data that needs returning to the browser and no HTML/CSS/JS. If users switching between the next and previous record is a common usage scenario, that data could be pre fetched by the web browser.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on October 15, 2015, 09:31:47 am
Note to self: you will find the printer works a lot better if the Babbage-Engine you're trying to print from has been told that said printer is not attached to a USB port any more :facepalm:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ruthie on October 19, 2015, 11:40:23 am
Just got this, with attached attachment.  On checking my Google account, I see there haven't been any security events.  Hmmm.   
Quote
Sign-in attempt prevented   
Hi Ruth,
Someone just tried to sign in to your Google Account ruthirvingturner@gmail.com from an app that doesn't meet modern security standards.
Details:
Monday, 19 October 2015 10:57 (British Summer Time)
Darlington, UK*
We strongly recommend that you use a secure app, like Gmail, to access your account. All apps made by Google meet these security standards. Using a less secure app, on the other hand, could leave your account vulnerable. Learn more.

Google stopped this sign-in attempt, but you should review your recently used devices:

REVIEW YOUR DEVICES NOW
Best,
The Google Accounts team
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Chris S on October 20, 2015, 09:30:41 am
I have a project coming up that requires a single page web app, with dashboard and server-side REST api, that will require some third party plugins.

Despite being a C#,.NET,SQL Server kinda guy, once upon a time I'd have just defaulted to LAMP for webby stuff. But apparently that is old skool these days. Now, the kids are all doing MEAN.

Lets hope I haven't forgotten everything I ever knew about Javascript and CSS  :-\.

Sigh... I'm too old for this shit.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on October 20, 2015, 01:03:29 pm
At the current rate I shall soon have enough blinkenlights in the Great Hall to allow me to dispense with actual lights altogether.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: tiermat on October 25, 2015, 06:48:01 am
Garmin, recently, updated Connect Mobile.

What a difference! It is now useful and usable!

I don't mind syncing my vivofit now (I used to leave it about a week between syncs) as all the information I want to see can be found easily, not buried 3 levels down!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on October 27, 2015, 01:34:20 pm
My connection to that Internet, that they have now, has just reset itself.  At least I hope it's that rather than the router displaying early symptoms of DETH.  But it seems to have hosed an accumulation of cruft out of the pipe and it's working at a sensible speed all of a sudden.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on October 27, 2015, 02:32:26 pm
Just got this, with attached attachment.  On checking my Google account, I see there haven't been any security events.  Hmmm.   
Quote
Sign-in attempt prevented   
Hi Ruth,
Someone just tried to sign in to your Google Account ############### from an app that doesn't meet modern security standards.
Details:
Monday, 19 October 2015 10:57 (British Summer Time)
Darlington, UK*
We strongly recommend that you use a secure app, like Gmail, to access your account. All apps made by Google meet these security standards. Using a less secure app, on the other hand, could leave your account vulnerable. Learn more.

Google stopped this sign-in attempt, but you should review your recently used devices:

REVIEW YOUR DEVICES NOW
Best,
The Google Accounts team
You should remove your email address from that post, Ruthie
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on October 27, 2015, 02:35:57 pm
I've discovered that if you copy over the recent, smallish last few Time Machine backups from the cranky drive, that smallish = half a terabyte. Hardlinks don't take up much space. The files they link to obviously do.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on October 27, 2015, 03:35:39 pm
I've cunningly hidden the mothership Dell laptop under my desk, where it can sit on a docking station and feed a big monitor, and thusly use my old Apple Bluetooth keyboard and mouse, while keeping a wonderfully clear desk. Very clever, think I.

Except ctrl-alt-del.

Which my damn computer asks for every fifteen minutes unless I manage to jib the mouse in time.

Now I'm going to have to build a time machine so I can back and beat the person responsible from that damnable key press with the small canoe of sense. There's no frikkin delete key.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on October 27, 2015, 05:16:41 pm
Get a 32u4-based Arduino in keyboard emulation mode, and hook it up to a tub of vegetarian shoe polish to act as a ctrl-alt-delete button.  Obviously.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on October 28, 2015, 01:40:12 pm
Doesn't Function-Backspace send a DEL from a fruitarian keyboard? Failing that it's possible to create a custom keyboard map in Windows (mine swaps the @ with the " while leaving £ and € alone)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on October 28, 2015, 02:08:24 pm
Apparently not. I need to investigate, but as it's a mothership machine, messing with Ctrl-Alt-Del is probably restricted. That's the reason it locks up every fifteen minutes. And no, they won't let me switch that off. Security! Despite the fact the main security threat in my office is a pair of cats of limited typing ability.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on October 28, 2015, 02:32:39 pm
Whatever happened to that keystroke recorder wossname that used to come with Windows?  Record a sequence of <RETURN> & <DELETE> and loop it in an empty Notepad file :demon:

Or you could rig up a bass drum or hi-hat pedal to allow you to tap the space bar to the rhythm of of the war drums.

At least the NAS which goes under the name of "El Gordo" has been restored to health by unplugging it from the mains, plugging it back in, rebooting the PC, downloading a program from Seagate, discovering I already have it, shouting abuse, running the program, forgetting my password, poking it with the stick I normally save for the lion-taming act and swearing.

Now, VLC.  Why does that particular skin switch from full-screen to titchy window every time a new track starts playing?  Twattish is what it is.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: menthel on October 28, 2015, 03:23:42 pm
You need a mouse nudger.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Oaky on October 28, 2015, 03:36:24 pm
You need a mouse nudger.

Now you make it sound like a job for ian's cats-of-limited-typing-ability.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: simonp on November 04, 2015, 10:39:10 am
So my 2011 MBP died last night - possibly the known issue with GPU failures due to dodgy solder.

Waiting for a call-back from Apple Support. Would quite like the free repair.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on November 04, 2015, 10:45:25 am
So my 2011 MBP died last night - possibly the known issue with GPU failures due to dodgy solder.

Waiting for a call-back from Apple Support. Would quite like the free repair.

Yeah, don't try to book an in-store appointment, they're unavailable forever as I just discovered when I planned to take a noisy mouse in for a swap. Great advice, support drone.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: simonp on November 04, 2015, 10:49:44 am
Checked online already. There was one slot in a week and the cribbs store and nothing at Cabot circus. Probably gone now. Clearly geniuses are in short supply.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on November 04, 2015, 10:59:34 am
That's going to be my joke. Nothing in London or the burbs for the next six days. I just wanted to pop over to Bromley and wave it under someone's nose. Who knew Bromley on a Wednesday afternoon was so busy.

Anyway, I was doing them a favour, I can't be bothered wrestling for an appointment, I think I'll just ask for a replacement.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on November 05, 2015, 07:05:37 pm
OK, Mozilla, what the blazes does this mean:

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5770/22782547316_608d8d54d3_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/AHdvzW)
Thunderbird message (https://flic.kr/p/AHdvzW) by Mr Larrington (https://www.flickr.com/photos/mr_larrington/), on Flickr

And should I be worried about it?  I don't know how that "t" got into the "Location" box, though my stubby peasant fingers are probably to blame.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Phil W on November 05, 2015, 07:08:15 pm
It means click cancel
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on November 05, 2015, 07:15:34 pm
I did, but this is about the third time it's come up in the past twenty-four hours so I'd quite concerned to find out what's causing it so I can conduct an experiment to determine the exact temperature at which the culprit's face catches fire.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on November 06, 2015, 02:29:38 am
I started the day with a stonking migraine.
The home server did too. I realised something was wrong when I couldn't get a network connection on any devices around the home - which wasn't ideal with an overdue bill to pay.

I plugged a monitor into the server and any numpty would have seen the sad state of affairs. The SSD boot disk in the home server expired. *sigh*
The good news I did have a backup.
The bad news - it was 18 months old.

I've got Stan's latest and greatest mutation of a cold virus, so I've not been able to do much except scavenge an SSD and restore the backup, which was at least enough to make the t'interwebs work again.

I've got a great big long list of things I need to do. Which ends with,
1 - take new backup
2 - configure backup server


I'm almost loathed to configure the backup server just now. On account the hardware I've got is crappy - it needs it's own power station to turn something that's commensurate with a hamster wheel.
My preferred option is actually adding a dual port Intel network card to the home server and some more ram. Then I can virtualize the firewall with PCI pass through on the network cards. That would mean reducing energy consumption by a bit and freeing up it's rather splendid (server grade-ish) atom board to use in the backup server instead of the current P-o-S.

And next year I'd like to do some jiggery pokery with disks in the home server so that I can mdadm RAID the boot drive and avoid a recurrence of this sorry state of affairs. Sadly it all requires DOSH and time and both are in rather short-supply.

Anyway. that's enough rambling on.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: simonp on November 06, 2015, 02:03:47 pm
That's going to be my joke. Nothing in London or the burbs for the next six days. I just wanted to pop over to Bromley and wave it under someone's nose. Who knew Bromley on a Wednesday afternoon was so busy.

Anyway, I was doing them a favour, I can't be bothered wrestling for an appointment, I think I'll just ask for a replacement.

Looking like a new logic board, which would be over £500.

Not sure that's an economic repair for a laptop that's nearly 5 years old.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on November 06, 2015, 03:20:34 pm
That's going to be my joke. Nothing in London or the burbs for the next six days. I just wanted to pop over to Bromley and wave it under someone's nose. Who knew Bromley on a Wednesday afternoon was so busy.

Anyway, I was doing them a favour, I can't be bothered wrestling for an appointment, I think I'll just ask for a replacement.

Looking like a new logic board, which would be over £500.

Not sure that's an economic repair for a laptop that's nearly 5 years old.

It isn't. But I'd ask if the expected lifespan for a logic board should be fewer than five years? I'd hazard that that the main component in a modern computer should have a lifespan beyond that. If so, they owe you.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: simonp on November 06, 2015, 05:07:59 pm
That's going to be my joke. Nothing in London or the burbs for the next six days. I just wanted to pop over to Bromley and wave it under someone's nose. Who knew Bromley on a Wednesday afternoon was so busy.

Anyway, I was doing them a favour, I can't be bothered wrestling for an appointment, I think I'll just ask for a replacement.

Looking like a new logic board, which would be over £500.

Not sure that's an economic repair for a laptop that's nearly 5 years old.

It isn't. But I'd ask if the expected lifespan for a logic board should be fewer than five years? I'd hazard that that the main component in a modern computer should have a lifespan beyond that. If so, they owe you.

It's a valid question, but it took a petition with 18,000 signatures and a class action lawsuit to get them to move on the widespread GPU issues.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on November 06, 2015, 06:07:30 pm
When they got sniffy about my wife's out-of-warranty Mac I merely pointed out that they were perfectly fine to disagree with my interpretation but as a senior partner at Boze and Hartford specialising in consumer law I was more than happy to dispute their disagreement.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on November 07, 2015, 12:27:50 pm
Home server is now somewhere near. I've still got to create new single use SSH keys/re-write the scripts for backing up three VPS. Oh, and re-install/re-configure the UPS monitoring software.

Various experiments now under way with the backup server. It's Mobo is suppose to support Wake-On-Lan. Does it bu**ery. The embedded NIC might very well do, but I suspect it's not plumbed into the MoBo in such a way as to receive any electrons when the server is powered off and plugged in. I've enabled the various BIOS options and also tried waking it from a suspended state versus a powered-off state. No dice.

The whole point is that the main home server can wake up the backup server, run the backups and shut it down again. Bah.
It looks like there's a wake on timer option which I'm going to try shortly. I don't hold out too much hope - it looks more of a wake from suspend, rather than a wake from powered off. And I'm wondering if it's a one time use thing, rather than a wake up daily at x time. The BIOS and the manual are all in chinglish, which doesn't help much.

At this point I'd dearly take recommendations for a motherboard
 - with an embedded processor (atom/celeron - CPU power is not important)
 - 5x SATA ports (or PCIe slot to add a SATA controller)
 - supports wake-on-lan
 - < £50
 - Linux friendly

Cheers
A
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on November 07, 2015, 12:46:50 pm
After discovering that iTunes can be made to use different libraries, I seem to have reverted to using it for playing audio.  Although the Babbage-Engine in the Great Hall is wired to route both its sound and vision via the anbaric distascope, iTunes allows me to send audio direct to the (networked) amp, so I doan 'ave to have the telly on once I've told it what to play.  As a bonus, DJ Random automatically updates himself when new Stuffs are added.

You may now start collecting faggots in order to burn the heretic.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on November 07, 2015, 05:23:44 pm
Sound Taxi on my Babbage-Engine has punished iTunes by making it play 12 hours of Morrissey reading his autobiog*, to convert the Audible files, in real time.  Bit strange as I don't use iTunes for anything else.

* Heaven knows why I bought this.  I've never much liked the man, and I like him slightly less now.

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on November 07, 2015, 08:49:28 pm
Sound Taxi on my Babbage-Engine has punished iTunes by making it play 12 hours of Morrissey reading his autobiog*, to convert the Audible files, in real time.  Bit strange as I don't use iTunes for anything else.

* Heaven knows why I bought this.  I've never much liked the man, and I like him slightly less now.

You're miserable now?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on November 07, 2015, 08:51:41 pm
So my 2011 MBP died last night - possibly the known issue with GPU failures due to dodgy solder.

Waiting for a call-back from Apple Support. Would quite like the free repair.

Mine has been through that and survived. I am typing this on it now.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Chris S on November 19, 2015, 05:59:04 pm
Enabling concurrent project builds in Visual Studio 2012 on a multi-core PC sure does find holes in the dependency tree quickly  :thumbsup:.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Torslanda on November 20, 2015, 10:34:26 pm
So the kittens walked, sat, fought and generally f*///*d up the laptop. It still works - I'm typing this on it now - but the header and the footer have disappeared and i have no idea how to bring them back.

Windows 7 OS. any suggestions?

ETA. Teh Kittehs managed to hide the toolbar and taskbar simultaneously. Not something I have a clue how to do . . .
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: fuaran on November 20, 2015, 10:52:32 pm
Press F11 to switch full screen mode on or off, which hides the toolbars etc. Sounds like your kittens have done that.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Torslanda on November 20, 2015, 11:14:44 pm
Fab. Thank you.

Order is restored...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on November 23, 2015, 11:27:31 am
Every ten minutes, on a minute ending with a 7, the computers in this office 'freeze' for a couple of seconds  ::-)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on November 23, 2015, 06:10:17 pm
Will whatever it is that has decided to start Internet Explorer at system startup kindly stop it?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on November 29, 2015, 04:59:23 pm
Funny how ISP and IP's work. Installed wordfence on my blog, which can email you if various things happens on your wordpress installation. Depending on which IP my ISP have given me, I either reside in Manchester or Leeds :)

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on November 29, 2015, 05:32:58 pm
Yes, I periodically get an advert telling me that there are girls in Bracknell looking for podgy bald 50-something year old like me.

Seems a long way to go.
Presumably, there are enough podgy bald 50-something year olds in Bracknell to keep them happy.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on November 29, 2015, 07:39:42 pm
Presumably, there are enough podgy bald 50-something year olds in Bracknell to keep them happy.

Isn't there an IRC channel for that?  ;)


Ob-xkcd:

(https://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/geoip.png) (https://xkcd.com/713/)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on November 29, 2015, 08:08:03 pm
Presumably, there are enough podgy bald 50-something year olds in Bracknell to keep them happy.
Isn't there an IRC channel for that?  ;)
;D
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on December 04, 2015, 09:19:23 am
I have made VLC stop turning everything into a silent movie :thumbsup:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on December 04, 2015, 09:39:47 am
The Win 7 box, on the other hand, is being obstreperous.  At 1 this morning it had installed 124 of its 218 updates.  It's been doing #125 for eight hours.  This I find unreasonable.  Will the world come to an end if the mains lead "accidentally" fell out (run time on batteries being about thirty seconds)?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on December 04, 2015, 02:57:16 pm
The power cable "falling out" has had some interesting consequence:


It'll probably remember the other 88 in the middle of the night, and catch fire.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on December 05, 2015, 12:15:55 am
Did I say 88?  What I of course meant was 205 :o
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on December 06, 2015, 11:05:14 am
ha! The NHS appointment reminder email subject line is :  SQL Server Message
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on December 06, 2015, 11:55:50 am
Power off again in mid not-update.  Restart, install offending update manually.  Improbably this works.  Tell it to install the rest of the updates.  Lack-of-progress bar shuttles across the window lackadaisically and then stops.  Tell it to reboot.  Installing update 164 of 178 it says.  I think it is lying but who knows?  I will keep an eye on it.  I really don't want to nuke the W7 install and start again and not just because I don't think it'll help.

Bah!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on December 06, 2015, 12:17:07 pm
I find it irritating when programmer-speak is allowed to leak out to the user interface. Companies should really not let their programmers write stuff to be read by the public without it being checked by a normal person. Not least because of the high level of dyslexia amongst coders.

Things like the online banking screen that says: "Error: Bad Format or out of range or Two Decimal Digits missing" when you try to enter a whole number of pounds.

The oddest is the Vitality insurance page where it gives you points for activities.

"Cycling Base Point Event: >=30 mins AND <60 mins"

Srsly? Boolean operators and relational signs used as they would in a programming language? What's wrong with the clearer and much shorter "30-60 minutes cycling"?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on December 07, 2015, 08:02:24 am
Slowly whittling down the pile of outstanding updates to the point where I can check whether I actually need them.  Remote desktop?  Nope.  Printing?  Nope.  Proper rendering of the currency symbol for the rouble?  Nyet.

But soft!  What is this?  You want me to install Windows 10?

Fuck

Right

Off

 >:(
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on December 07, 2015, 12:53:03 pm
So after all that I tried Airfoil Speakers again.

Did it work?  No.  No, it did not.  Arses!

Fortunately Plan C, in the shape of an eBay Airport Express, is on its way.  I may as well install Windows 10, just for laffs.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mcshroom on December 07, 2015, 04:40:49 pm
I installed Windows 10 overnight on Saturday and other than forgetting my network printer existed it went ok
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on December 08, 2015, 11:00:43 am
Finally getting rid of ye olde version of Illustrator. I'm not paying the subscription for CC. Been tinkering with Affinity Designer and it ticks all the boxes with a nice, clean UI that's not too far removed from the old beast but without the bloat. It doesn't make me draw any better though, which is disappointing.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on December 08, 2015, 12:33:02 pm
Windows 10 seems little different from Windows 7 on the Eeeeee-Bah-Gum PC, in that Airfoil Speakers still doesn't work >:(  And the postie tried to deliver the Airport Express while I nipped out to Mr Sainsbury's House Of Toothy Comestibles.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on December 09, 2015, 10:56:53 pm
Just went into the other room to hear an odd chanting:

four-point-one-plus-seven-point-two-minus-ten-point-one  etc etc.

It's junior#2, doing maths homework.
Where we might have typed the arithmetic into a calculator, he's talking it to Siri.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on December 09, 2015, 11:05:02 pm
Trying to get rid of the XP partition on the Stupid Laptop appears to have b0rked the whole thing.  Bah >:(
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on December 10, 2015, 09:09:14 am
Ten hours later and it's just hit the 12% mark for installing W10.  Together with one of the NAS boxes having a twitch and reinventing itself with a different IP address and the odd backup dying on its arse means it has been a long night chiz.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: barakta on December 10, 2015, 07:08:23 pm
Just went into the other room to hear an odd chanting:

four-point-one-plus-seven-point-two-minus-ten-point-one  etc etc.

It's junior#2, doing maths homework.
Where we might have typed the arithmetic into a calculator, he's talking it to Siri.

Living in the future!

My generation might type it into a computer and the previous generationish would have used calculators to make their elders tut "young'uns etc" ;)

But talking to computers, that IS wrong </getting old>
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on December 10, 2015, 07:35:54 pm
A further ten hours into the process after discovering that this time round Win 10 said "800x600 - take it or uninstall me".  Just finished Win 7 SP1 install and will let it do Win 10 in its own good time rather than trying to force the issue with a USB stick.  Bored now.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on December 10, 2015, 11:20:39 pm
Larrers, the 800x600 thing just means the win10 update couldn't find a better video driver.

If your hardware is anything like contemporary mainstream, you can download and apply a proper driver after the update has happened.
That will include all nVidia and ATI from living memory, and most chipset embedded Intel too.

If you have something like a Matrox G200 from yesteryear, you're fsckd.
Either change the card, or revert to Win95 :-)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on December 11, 2015, 08:25:03 am
Larrers, the 800x600 thing just means the win10 update couldn't find a better video driver.

Bum.  Stupid Win 10.  Though when it did the upgrade by itself it was, like, totes able to have the screen at the same resolution it had before.  Stupid Microsith.

I think the video wossnames are Intel and it's a 2009-vintage Asus EeePC so I would expect bignums of them still in the wild.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on December 12, 2015, 02:12:26 pm
This post comes from ye olde EeePC, aka "Spencer The Halfwit", running a barebones install of Windows 10 :thumbsup:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on December 12, 2015, 10:50:54 pm
Now that is an idea - I have a Toshiba NB100 that is painful with XP..
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: simonp on December 13, 2015, 05:51:34 pm
Got my github set-up with my new iMac and deleted old public keys lying around.

Now I can push the weights graphing code so I have a copy of the last however many changes online.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Jurek on December 17, 2015, 01:43:22 pm
Here at work, we've invested in something called Mimecast, I think it manages our email traffic. Amongst other things it does is, once a day, it sends me an email with an inventory of what it has diagnosed as potentially junk email for me to white-list, black-list or otherwise.
I tend to delete the email.

We also have something called Zscaler, (or Zslacker, as I prefer to call it) which amongst other things, monitors the appropriatness of sites I visit. As of a couple of days ago Zslacker has started to put the Mimecast email into my junk mail.

Isn't this how Skynet started?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on December 20, 2015, 03:11:52 pm
Here's a plug for software I like enough to plug even with no commission:

Directory Opus - a superior replacement for Windows file Explorer - half price until Dec 26:

www.gpsoft.com.au
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on December 29, 2015, 01:37:00 pm
I've only been away from Fort Larrington 24 hours and Lt. Col. Larrington (retd.) has already b0rked his mouse, or at least have it die on him.  Kensington trackball job bought in March >:(  I have ordered him a slightly more expensive Logitech as it's less likely to be made of cheese ha ha.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on December 29, 2015, 02:15:01 pm
Is that the nice Kensington one with the lovely scrollwheel collar?  I've got one of those, courtesy of barakta who found the mouseclick buttons unsuitable for left-handed operation.  I have to do an arcane incantation with xinput every time I boot up in order to emulate the missing middle button (and chording buttons are always a bit hit and miss), but it's wonderful for scrolling.

Barakta, on the other hand, has the Logitech that looks like a crudely drawn vulva.  The labia minora function as additional buttons, but it lacks scrolling capability.  We've recently set up some USB foot pedals to do page up and down, which sort of works.

What's really needed is a mutant hybrid of the two trackballs.


(Don't get me started on sinister meece.)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on December 29, 2015, 03:12:46 pm
His was one of the old-skool Kensington trackballs without scrolly-thing.  I've got one of each - the scrolly-thing is great but I keep relinquishing my grip on the right button while selecting Stuffs chiz.  However the Number One Rodent at Larrington Towers is an elderly Microsith thumb-operated trackball thing with five buttons (one of which doubles as a scroll wheel).  When asked about updated drivers Microsith's response was "go buy something newer and less good", which makes them officially Dicks.

Some chancer was offering NOS ones on Mega-Global Big River Corporation of Seattle, USAnia earlier this year at four hundred and fifty quid a pop.  Nice to have a nest-egg ;D
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on December 29, 2015, 05:46:03 pm
Is that the nice Kensington one with the lovely scrollwheel collar?  I've got one of those, courtesy of barakta who found the mouseclick buttons unsuitable for left-handed operation.  I have to do an arcane incantation with xinput every time I boot up in order to emulate the missing middle button (and chording buttons are always a bit hit and miss), but it's wonderful for scrolling.

Barakta, on the other hand, has the Logitech that looks like a crudely drawn vulva.  The labia minora function as additional buttons, but it lacks scrolling capability.  We've recently set up some USB foot pedals to do page up and down, which sort of works.

What's really needed is a mutant hybrid of the two trackballs.


I've got one of the Kensington trackballs. I wonder if a bit of judicious scanning and 3d printing might help..
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Wowbagger on January 04, 2016, 04:00:49 pm
Dez just commented that he had transferred 47GB of data in about 8 minutes and commented "How long would that have taken with Laplink?"

My reply was "About a week's civil service overtime, I should think."
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on January 08, 2016, 06:10:17 pm
I read a week or so ago about an IRC channel I was going to poke my nose into.

Obviously now I've got around to installing an IRC client, I've clean forgotten what it was...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on January 08, 2016, 06:20:41 pm
I could tell you a few that I'm busy idling in, if that helps :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on January 08, 2016, 07:26:28 pm
Is there a yacf one hidden somewhere?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on January 08, 2016, 08:02:36 pm
Not that I know but we could always set on up on freenode or the like :)

Edit: might try to set up a server on my raspberry just for a laugh.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on January 08, 2016, 08:21:21 pm
Not that I know but we could always set on up on freenode or the like :)

Edit: might try to set up a server on my raspberry just for a laugh.

cool :) well I'll be in ##yacf in the meantime
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on January 08, 2016, 09:56:54 pm
Not that I know but we could always set on up on freenode or the like :)

Edit: might try to set up a server on my raspberry just for a laugh.

cool :) well I'll be in ##yacf in the meantime

We appear to have made this a thing...

#yacf on irc.freenode.net
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on January 09, 2016, 12:18:06 am
I got it running on my RPI. Server sudomakecake.ddns.net, 6667, #yacf if you are that way inclined :)

Or we could use freenode :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: BrianI on January 13, 2016, 07:38:52 pm
Woohoo!

I seem to be successfully updating my old TomTom One XL Sat Nav, via the TomTomHome V2 software (windows only!), via Windows XP Virtual Machine running on my puter which runs Linux Mint 17.2, via the magic of VirtualBox!!

Despite my not running windows on any computer since Ubuntu 7.10 came out, I'm glad I kept hold of my Winxp cdrom (plus the win98 cd to verify the winxp upgrade cd)

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on January 31, 2016, 02:08:51 pm
Couldn't get the Humax to connect to the wifi until I actually typed in the network name rather than picked it from the list of available networks  ???
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on February 02, 2016, 05:00:28 pm
Our internet connection has taken to dropping out for short periods, usually a minute or less, and always between 17:30 and 18:00, when it'll happen 2 or 3 times. Before that it's fine, ditto after.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ashaman42 on February 02, 2016, 09:02:46 pm
People all getting in from work and firing their computers up maybe?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on February 02, 2016, 09:05:18 pm
REIN causing the DSL to lose sync?  Some noisy appliance nearby that's used regularly at that time of day... go sniffing with a de-tuned AM radio.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on February 02, 2016, 09:05:36 pm
People all getting in from work and firing their computers up maybe?

Shouldn't cause a connection to drop.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on February 02, 2016, 09:26:49 pm
Central heating kicking in on the timer and a noisy thermostat?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on February 03, 2016, 08:27:11 am
I did think it had to do with Mrs. T42 knocking off for the evening and closing her machine down.  I don't see that the router should muck about with my connection when hers is freed up, or why it should do it 3 times as it did last night - especially since she left her machine running. She doesn't turn on anything that would create undue interference, either - just a couple of lights that are on & off all day anyway.

We haven't got central heating.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on February 07, 2016, 04:06:48 pm
I've just been smitten by a sudden urge to hack my old iPod Classic to accommodate a 500 GB SSD.  Will someone please talk me out of this.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on February 07, 2016, 04:44:38 pm
SSDs are not always lighter and more power efficient than 2.5" HDDs, and they can't work any more quickly when the interface is slow.  Use your phone instead anyway.



...That didn't work, did it?  Really, I'm such a fan of SSDs that I even use one with my TV via USB 2.0 just because it's silent.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on February 07, 2016, 08:36:10 pm
Phone?

Ha ha ha ha ha klonk.

^^^^ Sound of Mr Larrington laughing his head off.

I've got an old 60 GB iPod Classic as well as a newer 160 GB one so may well find myself experimenting on the former
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ashaman42 on February 08, 2016, 07:01:48 am
Why, when viewing yacf on tapatalk, does everyone's avatars show up blank except for Phil W's?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on February 08, 2016, 12:59:32 pm
It would appear one of my USB disks has died on its arse.  "The first NTFS boot sector is unwriteable". followed by "All NTFS boot sectors are unwriteable.  Cannot continue.  Format failed.  Format failed."

So bad they told me twice.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on February 09, 2016, 10:17:20 am
iConfess  ;D

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.littleiapps.confession
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on February 10, 2016, 07:22:30 pm
Thought this was cool. Someone on imgur has visualised an old modem handshake and annotated it with what it all means:

http://i.imgur.com/5Dq6K2U.png

There's video too, for extra credit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vvr9AMWEU-c

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on February 11, 2016, 12:18:22 pm
Mega-Global Fruit Corporation of Cupertino, USAnia not the Messiah but rather a very naughty Mega-Global Fruit Corporation of Cupertino, USAnia. (http://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/feb/08/apple-under-pressure-lawyers-error-53-codes)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on February 11, 2016, 01:05:48 pm
Mega-Global Fruit Corporation of Cupertino, USAnia not the Messiah but rather a very naughty Mega-Global Fruit Corporation of Cupertino, USAnia. (http://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/feb/08/apple-under-pressure-lawyers-error-53-codes)

There's actually a very valid reason (in the final paragraph) – payment mechanisms are authorised by the touch ID system.

Crap article anyway. Some people have been affected and US legal firm eye class action suit. Really.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on February 11, 2016, 01:13:26 pm
Mega-Global Fruit Corporation of Cupertino, USAnia not the Messiah but rather a very naughty Mega-Global Fruit Corporation of Cupertino, USAnia. (http://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/feb/08/apple-under-pressure-lawyers-error-53-codes)

There's actually a very valid reason (in the final paragraph) – payment mechanisms are authorised by the touch ID system.

Crap article anyway. Some people have been affected and US legal firm eye class action suit. Really.

A good reason, yes, but a very poor response from Apple. I don't have a problem with Apple locking the touch ID/ApplePay functionality if it suspects the home button has been compromised, but permanently bricking the entire phone seems disproportionately harsh.

I expect at some point their message will change to "if you have this error code please bring your handset to the nearest Genius Bar so we can verify your handset and reset the error code".

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on February 11, 2016, 03:22:20 pm
Apple always respond like that. It's their ironic calling card. Not exactly news. Next up, Microsoft run around headless chickens after Windows problem uncovered.

Mostly a gripe at sloppy journalism, that story is over a week old and mostly about lawyers might sue someone. Yeah, really. Still, it makes a break from those stories were they simply annotate things people have said about something on Twitter.

Anyway, they can't really win. If they didn't lock down compromised phones, there'd be a stories about someone having their credit card maxed out through Apple Pay.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on February 12, 2016, 06:21:55 am
We really need an "effing div"* thread for computery things.

Me. Yesterday. I wrote the following and it didn't even register as utterly, utterly wrong until (inevitably) it crashed.

   if (myCollection.count == 0) {
      anItem = myCollection[0];
      :
      :
   }

Take me out and shoot me now. 

*Although what you'd call such a thread for html idiocies is a puzzle.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Phil W on February 12, 2016, 07:51:10 pm
Why, when viewing yacf on tapatalk, does everyone's avatars show up blank except for Phil W's?

Because I ticked the special checkbox
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on February 18, 2016, 07:06:48 pm
Mega-Global Fruit Corporation of Cupertino, USAnia not the Messiah but rather a very naughty Mega-Global Fruit Corporation of Cupertino, USAnia. (http://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/feb/08/apple-under-pressure-lawyers-error-53-codes)

There's actually a very valid reason (in the final paragraph) – payment mechanisms are authorised by the touch ID system.

Crap article anyway. Some people have been affected and US legal firm eye class action suit. Really.

A good reason, yes, but a very poor response from Apple. I don't have a problem with Apple locking the touch ID/ApplePay functionality if it suspects the home button has been compromised, but permanently bricking the entire phone seems disproportionately harsh.

I expect at some point their message will change to "if you have this error code please bring your handset to the nearest Genius Bar so we can verify your handset and reset the error code".

Apple have apparently rolled out an update to stop this happening, unbrick any affected phones, and are telling users who have bought a new phone out of warranty to contact ApppleCare for reimbursement.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on February 19, 2016, 06:30:28 pm
It would appear one of my USB disks has died on its arse.  "The first NTFS boot sector is unwriteable". followed by "All NTFS boot sectors are unwriteable.  Cannot continue.  Format failed.  Format failed."

So bad they told me twice.

I just plugged it into a different PC.  It works ???
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on February 23, 2016, 09:07:33 am
Clearing out our office store-room on Sunday I turned up my old Stano-Data pica ruler from 1978: one of these:

http://www.amazon.de/Standardgraph-8405-Stano-data-II/dp/B004Z4UWIC

A wee bit yellowed but otherwise still perfect.  Pleased about that.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on February 24, 2016, 01:19:24 pm
Quote from: Famous Internet Search Engine
503. That’s an error.

There was an error. Please try again later. That’s all we know.

Thank-you, very helpful  ::-)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on February 27, 2016, 11:24:28 am
Does it really require 50-60% network utilisation to update a couple of FLAC tags?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on February 27, 2016, 12:25:11 pm
Does it really require 50-60% network utilisation to update a couple of FLAC tags?

Yes, you can't change something in the middle of a file on disc, you have to read the file off the disc and write it back to the disc. So if it's on a disc elsewhere on the network it has to go via the processor that knows how to change the file, and FLAC files are not exactly small.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on February 29, 2016, 07:38:50 pm
Coo.  According to MrsLurker's sea noise generator* today is Friday the 54th of January 2017. Can't wait to see what day it thinks tomorrow is.


*Meditation. For the use of.

Update. 1st of March.  And today isn't Tuesday the 1st of March.  Nope.  It's Saturday the 55th of Jan. 2017.

I would love to know how they're calculating this.  I'm assuming it's on the basis of a tickcount or similar and I can't imagine that they're that pushed for space that they couldn't use a standard library for the conversion.  *Baffled*.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on March 06, 2016, 09:42:10 am
Rummaging in our storeroom for an extension bar just now, I came across a copy of Microsoft C plus utilities on 5-inch floppies - about 15 of them.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on March 06, 2016, 01:17:40 pm
Coo.  According to MrsLurker's sea noise generator* today is Friday the 54th of January 2017. Can't wait to see what day it thinks tomorrow is.


*Meditation. For the use of.

Update. 1st of March.  And today isn't Tuesday the 1st of March.  Nope.  It's Saturday the 55th of Jan. 2017.

I would love to know how they're calculating this.  I'm assuming it's on the basis of a tickcount or similar and I can't imagine that they're that pushed for space that they couldn't use a standard library for the conversion.  *Baffled*.

Fascinating.  How old is it?  Maybe it's run out of lookup table and it'll just keep adding days to Jan 2017...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on March 06, 2016, 04:44:08 pm
Coo.  According to MrsLurker's sea noise generator* today is Friday the 54th of January 2017. Can't wait to see what day it thinks tomorrow is.


*Meditation. For the use of.

Update. 1st of March.  And today isn't Tuesday the 1st of March.  Nope.  It's Saturday the 55th of Jan. 2017.

I would love to know how they're calculating this.  I'm assuming it's on the basis of a tickcount or similar and I can't imagine that they're that pushed for space that they couldn't use a standard library for the conversion.  *Baffled*.

Fascinating.  How old is it?  Maybe it's run out of lookup table and it'll just keep adding days to Jan 2017...
About two years old, although there's no saying how old the code in it is.  It's only a 2 digit display so I'm letting it run on to see what happens at 99.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on March 08, 2016, 12:12:30 am
Since when did just playing an mp3 file via iTunes make it "newer" than the backup copy, at least in the eyes of Robocopy ???
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on March 08, 2016, 06:46:15 am
Has iTunes decided to helpfully update the album art for you, or something like that?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on March 08, 2016, 07:12:55 am
Play count.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on March 08, 2016, 08:45:35 am
AFAIK iTunes only stores play count in the library file, not as an attribute of the mp3.  Robocopy has properly copied files on which I've jibbled artwork, title, etc. etc. but it's also copied ones I haven't edited, just played.  And I'm certain it didn't do that last week ???

Edit: And it gets treated as "newer" as soon as it starts playing, not when the play count is updated at the end of the track.  Double ???
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on March 08, 2016, 01:35:14 pm
Is it updating the rights information on the file?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on March 08, 2016, 03:42:20 pm
I've just bodged a posh 80mm fan in place of the grindy 40mm effort that was cooling vibrating the CPU on the VIA somethingorother board that we use as a router.  Also cleaned all the fluff out of the case, and replaced the dust intake fan with a quieter model.

The change in noise may take some getting used to...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on March 08, 2016, 04:43:01 pm
Aha!

I jibbled a load of disc and track numbers with MP3tag a week or two ago but iTunes only takes note of the changes when it plays a track; this somehow gets fed back to Windows causing the created date & time to change to when it starts playing.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: tiermat on March 10, 2016, 08:13:44 am
The two Pis that I used to replace 1) a firewall and 2) a fileserver, had their first real world test, yesterday.

National Grid, or whoever, decided that they would like to remove the power to our home at $SILLY_OCLOCK, yesterday.

Both boxes shutdown, once power had been removed.  Once power was restored they came back up and carried on working as if nothing had happened! YAY!

Word to the wise, if you decided to use a Pi for something that you don't want to have to log into each time it reboots, to get things working again, bear in mind they have no realtime clock.  There is a way around it, use fake-hwclock, which writes the time to a temp file, and reads it on boot up.  This stops services like Squid crapping out when they see the clock suddenly jump forward 40+ years!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on March 10, 2016, 09:01:37 am
I'd imagine building a UPS for the Pis would be a fairly trivial undertaking for the average DIYer!! :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on March 10, 2016, 02:29:42 pm
Word to the wise, if you decided to use a Pi for something that you don't want to have to log into each time it reboots, to get things working again, bear in mind they have no realtime clock.  There is a way around it, use fake-hwclock, which writes the time to a temp file, and reads it on boot up.  This stops services like Squid crapping out when they see the clock suddenly jump forward 40+ years!

I've never had this cause anything other than a couple of angry messages in syslog about timestamps being in the future, but I'm not running squid on them.  ntpd sorts things out shortly after the network comes up, so conceivably a bit of boot-sequence-fu could be used to make things wait until the clock was valid.  Fake-hwclock is still a useful bodge.

You can add a proper realtime clock to a Pi relatively easily, but I don't really see the point when there's a network available.  Indeed, I was going to add one to the Pi that functions as our alarm clock (so it wouldn't fail to wake us up if it rebooted and couldn't find the network for some reason), but decided I might as well use a GPS module instead and have it be a stratum 1 NTP server, which is much more geeky.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on March 10, 2016, 03:25:14 pm
Performing SSD transplant into iPod.  Little plastic doofer which conjoins power cable to motherboard decides to part company with pins on motherboard, which are very very tiny.  Little plastic doofer does not want to go back on pins.  Harsh words are said >:(
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on March 10, 2016, 06:36:52 pm
Bloody phone died this morning, in the middle of nowhere in Eastern Europe.
Hard crash then failed to reboot.
Cyanogenmod wheel just spins, going nowhere.

Can boot into recovery, and Cyanogenmod image is still on the sd card.
Result.
Spent taxi ride to customer office re-flashing it.
Then leeches the customers Internet to let it sync all my apps back, whilst I ran the training session.

Recovered enough to allow online checking for flights home.

At least it works in the cold, tho   :P
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Steph on March 12, 2016, 05:44:50 pm
I have a Microsoft Surface tablet. I hadn't used it for about a month, and when I turned it on 'bitlocker' had been applied. I obtained the recovery key, but the machine is now asking me to 'activate windows' with my product key and has its date set to February, when I last used it. Help!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on March 13, 2016, 12:57:10 am
Have you tried just activating it? Does it actually ask you for a product key?

From a command shell you can just try running "slmgr /ato". Is the tablet still in warranty?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on March 13, 2016, 10:13:46 pm
So I've just had to buy a new phone.

The old one could not keep it's firmware image un-corrupted for more than a few hours.
I got mightily bored of booting to recovery and re-flashing it twice a day.

I haz a Samsung Galaxy S7 ( non-curvy-edge model ).
I'll leave it on the stock firmware for now.


Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on March 17, 2016, 12:36:20 pm
Yahoo! please! stop! dicking! around! and! send! that! e-mail!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Steph on March 17, 2016, 10:38:41 pm
Have you tried just activating it? Does it actually ask you for a product key?

From a command shell you can just try running "slmgr /ato". Is the tablet still in warranty?
Asks for product key. Out of warranty. I have absolutely no idea what the rest means.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: rafletcher on March 25, 2016, 10:45:03 am
Updated the OS on the iPad yesterday evening.  Done it several times in the past, no problem. This time it requested a sign-in to the Apple ID associated with it.  Could I remember it???!!!  Well  eventually my wife guessed it was an old email addy of hers... but then I couldn't remember the password I'd used  ::-). Luckily eventually I got locked out and could reset it. (I'd forgotten about iforgot @ Apple)  Chose to answer security questions rather than get email. First pet - check (at second try). DOB - fail. I'd used mine, not hers  :facepalm:  Then set new password that met the criteria - but "that's too easy to guess"  :-\. That's an hour of my life I won't get back, but I'll be ok setting up her new iPhone  :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on March 25, 2016, 12:52:18 pm
Don't – don't – install iOS 9.3 on your iPad 2: Upgrade bricks slabs (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/03/23/ios_93_update_bricks_ipad_2s/)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: rafletcher on March 25, 2016, 01:17:03 pm
Don't – don't – install iOS 9.3 on your iPad 2: Upgrade bricks slabs (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/03/23/ios_93_update_bricks_ipad_2s/)

As I'm typing this on said iPad that obvs didn't happen to ours but then it's only a couple of years old and is an "Air".
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on March 25, 2016, 01:34:52 pm
Looks like it's mainstream news now:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-35898788
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on March 25, 2016, 02:20:09 pm
The internal network at bigclient was brought to its knees earlier this week as everyone who'd registered with the "bring your own device" option arrived at work and iOS upgrade commenced...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on March 26, 2016, 10:06:50 am
"iOS 9.2.1 Your software is up to date" quoth my fondleslab.  Looks like the Mega-Global Fruit Corporation of Cupertino, USAnia has pulled this one for now.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Basil on March 30, 2016, 06:55:46 pm
Bugger.  My Nexus tablet has suddenly decided to to take photos sideways.  Wtf?
OK, I can rotate them and re save, but what a pain.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on April 01, 2016, 12:39:31 pm
(http://i.imgur.com/5IdakAT.png)

Seems to work for most towns in Blighty e.g.

Code: [Select]
curl http://wttr.in/Blackpool
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on April 01, 2016, 01:24:11 pm
Code: [Select]
kim@penelope:~$ curl http://wttr.in/Birmingham
Weather for City: Birmingham, United Kingdom

    \  /       Partly Cloudy
  _ /"".-.     6 – 9 °C       
    \_(   ).   ↑ 20 km/h     
    /(___(__)  10 km         
               0.0 mm         
                                                       ┌─────────────┐                                                       
┌──────────────────────────────┬───────────────────────┤ Fri 01. Apr ├───────────────────────┬──────────────────────────────┐
│           Morning            │             Noon      └──────┬──────┘    Evening            │            Night             │
├──────────────────────────────┼──────────────────────────────┼──────────────────────────────┼──────────────────────────────┤
│               Cloudy         │    \  /       Partly Cloudy  │    \  /       Partly Cloudy  │  _`/"".-.     Patchy rain ne…│
│      .--.     6 °C           │  _ /"".-.     8 – 10 °C      │  _ /"".-.     6 – 10 °C      │   ,\_(   ).   1 – 8 °C       │
│   .-(    ).   ↑ 20 – 27 km/h │    \_(   ).   ↑ 30 – 33 km/h │    \_(   ).   ↑ 33 – 35 km/h │    /(___(__)  ↑ 27 – 39 km/h │
│  (___.__)__)  10 km          │    /(___(__)  10 km          │    /(___(__)  10 km          │      ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘  10 km          │
│               0.0 mm | 0%    │               0.0 mm | 0%    │               0.0 mm | 0%    │     ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘   0.1 mm | 72%   │
└──────────────────────────────┴──────────────────────────────┴──────────────────────────────┴──────────────────────────────┘
                                                       ┌─────────────┐                                                       
┌──────────────────────────────┬───────────────────────┤ Sat 02. Apr ├───────────────────────┬──────────────────────────────┐
│           Morning            │             Noon      └──────┬──────┘    Evening            │            Night             │
├──────────────────────────────┼──────────────────────────────┼──────────────────────────────┼──────────────────────────────┤
│     \   /     Sunny          │     \   /     Sunny          │  _`/"".-.     Patchy rain ne…│      .-.      Light rain     │
│      .-.      6 – 7 °C       │      .-.      11 °C          │   ,\_(   ).   8 – 10 °C      │     (   ).    8 – 9 °C       │
│   ― (   ) ―   ↑ 20 km/h      │   ― (   ) ―   ↑ 22 km/h      │    /(___(__)  ← 14 – 23 km/h │    (___(__)   ↙ 8 – 13 km/h  │
│      `-’      10 km          │      `-’      10 km          │      ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘  10 km          │     ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘   9 km           │
│     /   \     0.0 mm | 0%    │     /   \     0.0 mm | 0%    │     ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘   0.1 mm | 35%   │    ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘    1.3 mm | 82%   │
└──────────────────────────────┴──────────────────────────────┴──────────────────────────────┴──────────────────────────────┘
                                                       ┌─────────────┐                                                       
┌──────────────────────────────┬───────────────────────┤ Sun 03. Apr ├───────────────────────┬──────────────────────────────┐
│           Morning            │             Noon      └──────┬──────┘    Evening            │            Night             │
├──────────────────────────────┼──────────────────────────────┼──────────────────────────────┼──────────────────────────────┤
│               Overcast       │  _`/"".-.     Light rain sho…│    \  /       Partly Cloudy  │     \   /     Clear          │
│      .--.     6 – 9 °C       │   ,\_(   ).   10 – 12 °C     │  _ /"".-.     9 – 11 °C      │      .-.      6 – 8 °C       │
│   .-(    ).   ↑ 24 – 30 km/h │    /(___(__)  ↑ 26 – 31 km/h │    \_(   ).   ↑ 13 – 22 km/h │   ― (   ) ―   ↑ 12 – 26 km/h │
│  (___.__)__)  10 km          │      ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘  10 km          │    /(___(__)  10 km          │      `-’      10 km          │
│               0.1 mm | 13%   │     ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘   0.3 mm | 18%   │               0.0 mm | 18%   │     /   \     0.0 mm | 0%    │
└──────────────────────────────┴──────────────────────────────┴──────────────────────────────┴──────────────────────────────┘

Check new Feature: wttr.in/Moon or wttr.in/Moon@2016-Mar-23 to see the phase of the Moon
Follow @igor_chubin for wttr.in updates
kim@penelope:~$


Cute  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Phil W on April 01, 2016, 06:32:45 pm
Code: [Select]
kim@penelope:~$ curl http://wttr.in/Birmingham
Weather for City: Birmingham, United Kingdom

    \  /       Partly Cloudy
  _ /"".-.     6 – 9 °C       
    \_(   ).   ↑ 20 km/h     
    /(___(__)  10 km         
               0.0 mm         
                                                       ┌─────────────┐                                                       
┌──────────────────────────────┬───────────────────────┤ Fri 01. Apr ├───────────────────────┬──────────────────────────────┐
│           Morning            │             Noon      └──────┬──────┘    Evening            │            Night             │
├──────────────────────────────┼──────────────────────────────┼──────────────────────────────┼──────────────────────────────┤
│               Cloudy         │    \  /       Partly Cloudy  │    \  /       Partly Cloudy  │  _`/"".-.     Patchy rain ne…│
│      .--.     6 °C           │  _ /"".-.     8 – 10 °C      │  _ /"".-.     6 – 10 °C      │   ,\_(   ).   1 – 8 °C       │
│   .-(    ).   ↑ 20 – 27 km/h │    \_(   ).   ↑ 30 – 33 km/h │    \_(   ).   ↑ 33 – 35 km/h │    /(___(__)  ↑ 27 – 39 km/h │
│  (___.__)__)  10 km          │    /(___(__)  10 km          │    /(___(__)  10 km          │      ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘  10 km          │
│               0.0 mm | 0%    │               0.0 mm | 0%    │               0.0 mm | 0%    │     ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘   0.1 mm | 72%   │
└──────────────────────────────┴──────────────────────────────┴──────────────────────────────┴──────────────────────────────┘
                                                       ┌─────────────┐                                                       
┌──────────────────────────────┬───────────────────────┤ Sat 02. Apr ├───────────────────────┬──────────────────────────────┐
│           Morning            │             Noon      └──────┬──────┘    Evening            │            Night             │
├──────────────────────────────┼──────────────────────────────┼──────────────────────────────┼──────────────────────────────┤
│     \   /     Sunny          │     \   /     Sunny          │  _`/"".-.     Patchy rain ne…│      .-.      Light rain     │
│      .-.      6 – 7 °C       │      .-.      11 °C          │   ,\_(   ).   8 – 10 °C      │     (   ).    8 – 9 °C       │
│   ― (   ) ―   ↑ 20 km/h      │   ― (   ) ―   ↑ 22 km/h      │    /(___(__)  ← 14 – 23 km/h │    (___(__)   ↙ 8 – 13 km/h  │
│      `-’      10 km          │      `-’      10 km          │      ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘  10 km          │     ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘   9 km           │
│     /   \     0.0 mm | 0%    │     /   \     0.0 mm | 0%    │     ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘   0.1 mm | 35%   │    ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘    1.3 mm | 82%   │
└──────────────────────────────┴──────────────────────────────┴──────────────────────────────┴──────────────────────────────┘
                                                       ┌─────────────┐                                                       
┌──────────────────────────────┬───────────────────────┤ Sun 03. Apr ├───────────────────────┬──────────────────────────────┐
│           Morning            │             Noon      └──────┬──────┘    Evening            │            Night             │
├──────────────────────────────┼──────────────────────────────┼──────────────────────────────┼──────────────────────────────┤
│               Overcast       │  _`/"".-.     Light rain sho…│    \  /       Partly Cloudy  │     \   /     Clear          │
│      .--.     6 – 9 °C       │   ,\_(   ).   10 – 12 °C     │  _ /"".-.     9 – 11 °C      │      .-.      6 – 8 °C       │
│   .-(    ).   ↑ 24 – 30 km/h │    /(___(__)  ↑ 26 – 31 km/h │    \_(   ).   ↑ 13 – 22 km/h │   ― (   ) ―   ↑ 12 – 26 km/h │
│  (___.__)__)  10 km          │      ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘  10 km          │    /(___(__)  10 km          │      `-’      10 km          │
│               0.1 mm | 13%   │     ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘   0.3 mm | 18%   │               0.0 mm | 18%   │     /   \     0.0 mm | 0%    │
└──────────────────────────────┴──────────────────────────────┴──────────────────────────────┴──────────────────────────────┘

Check new Feature: wttr.in/Moon or wttr.in/Moon@2016-Mar-23 to see the phase of the Moon
Follow @igor_chubin for wttr.in updates
kim@penelope:~$


Cute  :thumbsup:

Yes reminds me of 1970s Ceefax. Very retro.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on April 04, 2016, 05:00:41 pm
I likey. Thanks  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Morat on April 05, 2016, 03:40:50 pm
Huh, didn't realise that Windows 10 automagically mounts .iso files.
I'd downloaded a VMWare update iso and it popped up in my drive list.
vHandy :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on April 06, 2016, 06:32:05 pm
Dr Larrington, the next time you fail to plug back in our Aged Parent's wireless router after using your hairdryer, I will charge you a consultancy fee to cover my l33t remote diagnostic 5k1llz >:(
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: citoyen on April 06, 2016, 09:02:52 pm
Dr Larrington, the next time you fail to plug back in our Aged Parent's wireless router after using your hairdryer, I will charge you a consultancy fee to cover my l33t remote diagnostic 5k1llz >:(

Sorry but I find that highly amusing.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on April 06, 2016, 11:27:39 pm
Dr Larrington, the next time you fail to plug back in our Aged Parent's wireless router after using your hairdryer, I will charge you a consultancy fee to cover my l33t remote diagnostic 5k1llz >:(

Sorry but I find that highly amusing.

GIT ;D
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on April 09, 2016, 09:55:14 am
A company I deal with has closed all its incoming email addresses, their main means of contact is now twitter DM. As an email user since the time it was JANET, I officially feel like a dinosaur.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on April 09, 2016, 10:04:23 am
A company I deal with has closed all its incoming email addresses, their main means of contact is now twitter DM. As an email user since the time it was JANET, I officially feel like a dinosaur.

One can only hope they remain in business long enough to rue the error.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: BrianI on April 12, 2016, 08:59:33 pm
I should have been in bed an hour ago (6:30am start at work tomorrow!)

But I have finally managed to figure out using Virtual Box with Win 7 image, so that I can update my new Garmin Nuvi 55 satnav!  It seems the version that ships with Linux Mint doesn't have fully functioning usb, but the latest build from https://www.virtualbox.org/ (https://www.virtualbox.org/) does!   :thumbsup:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on April 14, 2016, 08:02:46 pm
Coo.  According to MrsLurker's sea noise generator* today is Friday the 54th of January 2017. Can't wait to see what day it thinks tomorrow is.


*Meditation. For the use of.

Update. 1st of March.  And today isn't Tuesday the 1st of March.  Nope.  It's Saturday the 55th of Jan. 2017.

I would love to know how they're calculating this.  I'm assuming it's on the basis of a tickcount or similar and I can't imagine that they're that pushed for space that they couldn't use a standard library for the conversion.  *Baffled*.

Fascinating.  How old is it?  Maybe it's run out of lookup table and it'll just keep adding days to Jan 2017...
About two years old, although there's no saying how old the code in it is.  It's only a 2 digit display so I'm letting it run on to see what happens at 99.

Oooh, _exciting_. Today is the Monday the 99th of January 2017... what brave new day will dawn tomorrow?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on April 15, 2016, 05:43:26 am
...what brave new day will dawn tomorrow?

A hexadecimal one.  Tuesday the A0th of Jan 2017. Interestingly the month is "stuck". 
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on April 15, 2016, 11:22:50 am
I for one welcome our sixteen-fingered overlords.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Morat on April 15, 2016, 12:12:18 pm
Just pondering the fact that when I first had a laptop you had to network using a pcmcia card and funky adaptors. Then laptops all had ethernet ports built in. Then Wifi as well. Hurrah!
Now laptops are too thin and sexy to fit an ethernet port in the chassis and we're back to needing dongle and funky cables to do ethernet.
Is it time we came up with a low profile RJ-45 replacement for Cat-5? Surely there's no real need for a cat-5 cable to terminate in anything thicker than a USB port?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on April 15, 2016, 01:08:04 pm
...what brave new day will dawn tomorrow?

A hexadecimal one.  Tuesday the A0th of Jan 2017. Interestingly the month is "stuck".

Perhaps the month will increment after the FFth of Jan?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on April 15, 2016, 02:46:34 pm
Is it time we came up with a low profile RJ-45 replacement for Cat-5? Surely there's no real need for a cat-5 cable to terminate in anything thicker than a USB port?

Didn't we cover this recently?

A resounding 'no'.  Plugging laptops in is an edge-case as far as structured cabling is concerned, and changing all that perfectly good - compatible - infrastructure to facilitate it would be daft.

By all means the next fibre thing can have a ludicrously low-profile connector - that'll come in handy in data centres, I'm sure.  But let UTP die out gracefully.  The Apple users can have their dongles - they should be used to it by now - and most networking to laptops will surely be wireless.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on April 15, 2016, 04:49:44 pm
...what brave new day will dawn tomorrow?

A hexadecimal one.  Tuesday the A0th of Jan 2017. Interestingly the month is "stuck".

Perhaps the month will increment after the FFth of Jan?
Good point,  I wasn't awake enough for hexadecimal arithmetic first thing, but I'm not sure I can be bothered hanging on to find out.   

The apparent swap to hex is a puzzle.  If it had been displaying base 16 since the 29th of Feb (and I'm not convinced that it has) then I'd expect today to be 9A rather than A0. Weird.  One to file under, "yet another example of crap software" and forget.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on April 15, 2016, 05:09:10 pm
Is it time we came up with a low profile RJ-45 replacement for Cat-5? Surely there's no real need for a cat-5 cable to terminate in anything thicker than a USB port?

Didn't we cover this recently?

A resounding 'no'.  Plugging laptops in is an edge-case as far as structured cabling is concerned, and changing all that perfectly good - compatible - infrastructure to facilitate it would be daft.

By all means the next fibre thing can have a ludicrously low-profile connector - that'll come in handy in data centres, I'm sure.  But let UTP die out gracefully.  The Apple users can have their dongles - they should be used to it by now - and most networking to laptops will surely be wireless.

My relatively slim netbook type thing has an an RJ45 port that physically embiggens when you push the connector into it courtesy of a spring and a hinge. TBH I think the omission of Ethernet NICs from laptops has more to do with trimming usage of electrons than physical form factor...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Tim Hall on April 15, 2016, 05:26:55 pm
...what brave new day will dawn tomorrow?

A hexadecimal one.  Tuesday the A0th of Jan 2017. Interestingly the month is "stuck".

Perhaps the month will increment after the FFth of Jan?

I'm waiting for the 35th of May.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on April 15, 2016, 05:53:32 pm
My relatively slim netbook type thing has an an RJ45 port that physically embiggens when you push the connector into it courtesy of a spring and a hinge.

Witchcraft!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on April 15, 2016, 06:48:58 pm
...what brave new day will dawn tomorrow?

A hexadecimal one.  Tuesday the A0th of Jan 2017. Interestingly the month is "stuck".

Perhaps the month will increment after the FFth of Jan?
Good point,  I wasn't awake enough for hexadecimal arithmetic first thing, but I'm not sure I can be bothered hanging on to find out.   

The apparent swap to hex is a puzzle.  If it had been displaying base 16 since the 29th of Feb (and I'm not convinced that it has) then I'd expect today to be 9A rather than A0. Weird.  One to file under, "yet another example of crap software" and forget.

I have a suspicion that BCD is involved, and it hasn't been implemented properly.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on April 15, 2016, 07:16:06 pm
I'm waiting for the 35th of May.
I remember that book!  Roller skating around the equator? Sharks?*

*I haven't seen a copy since 1971 or '72 so the old recall circuitry may be playing tricks.

Feanor: BCD - yes seems quite possible.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Morat on April 17, 2016, 03:45:22 pm
Is it time we came up with a low profile RJ-45 replacement for Cat-5? Surely there's no real need for a cat-5 cable to terminate in anything thicker than a USB port?

Didn't we cover this recently?

A resounding 'no'.  Plugging laptops in is an edge-case as far as structured cabling is concerned, and changing all that perfectly good - compatible - infrastructure to facilitate it would be daft.

By all means the next fibre thing can have a ludicrously low-profile connector - that'll come in handy in data centres, I'm sure.  But let UTP die out gracefully.  The Apple users can have their dongles - they should be used to it by now - and most networking to laptops will surely be wireless.

I must have missed it.

I don't like WiFi for anything more than temporary use or sofa surfing, I'd rather have a cable and dedicated bandwidth. However, I'm not advocating a change to existing infrastructure, just a standard for very slim laptops which could be implemented with a new patch lead, or even a female RJ-45 -> Male New slim connector adaptor on an existing patch lead if you prefer. It would still save you a USB port.

Maybe my office is rare in having users who regard laptops as status symbols but never take them _anywhere_
(Yes, I give them fatter laptops but they're all getting smaller!)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on April 17, 2016, 04:39:53 pm
I don't like laptops other than for temporary use or sofa surfing, but I appear to be increasingly in the minority...

I can see that a standardised patch lead wouldn't be a bad idea.  Although it's probably going to be a USB/Thunderbolt/whatever-Ethernet dongle at this rate.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on April 17, 2016, 04:40:20 pm
I don't like WiFi for anything more than temporary use or sofa surfing, I'd rather have a cable and dedicated bandwidth. However, I'm not advocating a change to existing infrastructure, just a standard for very slim laptops which could be implemented with a new patch lead, or even a female RJ-45 -> Male New slim connector adaptor on an existing patch lead if you prefer. It would still save you a USB port.

That seems perfectly reasonable to me ...if only there were more than thirty-three (wo)men and a dog using ethernet with laptops to justify the expense of making a new standard.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Morat on April 17, 2016, 06:31:16 pm
I don't doubt that people at home nearly all use laptops/tablets/phones and wifi (he says, typing from a wired up desktop that is vastly overpowered for internet surfing) but there's no way I'd want to use it to provide connectivity in the office, where I do still find myself doling out an increasing proportion of laptops vs desktops. I will say that people seem far less blatent in their intent to use them as a freebie home computer than they used to be.  I assume that's due to the rise of fondleslabs of whatever size and flavour.

Good point on the multipurpose socket though, Kim. I guess that'd be the way to go.

Anyway, it's all bollocks and will never happen :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on April 17, 2016, 07:30:11 pm
Code: [Select]
<trkpt lat="57.1593914A ‚@  Á_   „@ ‚a±ìþÁ?ðü ÿÿÿïþÁ?ð &`
€ @  …]  Œ@  ¿a áø¿àìÁðÿ €€0   þÀô|à®þAŸÈû ø ?ò×Ç è¤0,8Æ b0†~@ |Ÿ$$3S[èüa5    0ü A  $Â?ñ/øþàðí8¯OìÿÁ?àøþ@ÿß>Óëúûþ¿øü¿à/  B@$€ðüÿýPÀóƒ?àøÿÿ >œÜC™û¶ø»U4 (  üø'  


That's what was at the end of the gpx file from today's ride  ??? RideWithGPS & BaseCamp didn't like it at all. Replacing it with </trk></gpx> fixed the issue.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on April 19, 2016, 01:59:08 am
OK, so Macrium Reflect creates a file called backup_running in the target directory while a backup is actually running, and deletes it once it's finished.  Except if the system undergoes a spontaneous reboot, like it does sometimes, when one is having one's tea.  And then you can't re-run the backup, because it's still there, and you can't delete because it claims to be locked by another process even if you've restarted the box in so-called "Safe Mode".  Any guesses as to how to nuke the damn' thing?  It's on a NAS if that makes any difference.

Edit: Shut down, checked backup directory from another PC, offending file has buggered off.  Not there when being-backed-up-PC restarted either ???
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on April 19, 2016, 04:19:54 pm
For future/other use, there's an aggressive little utility called Unlocker that can nuke almost any file on a Windows PC.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on April 19, 2016, 04:27:09 pm
Any guesses as to how to nuke the damn' thing?  It's on a NAS if that makes any difference.

Probably a case of waiting for the phantom network connection to time out.  Or killing the relevant process on the NAS (perhaps by restarting Samba, or indeed the whole NAS).
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: simonp on April 22, 2016, 06:17:04 pm
We're finally getting fibre optic broadband early next month. Woo!

Which is nice since I designed and wrote significant parts of the firmware that runs on the line card in the kerbside box that makes it possible... 6 years ago!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on April 23, 2016, 09:55:04 pm
I seem to be getting many 0 byte files downloading from Twitter.
This has just started today.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on April 25, 2016, 08:59:11 am
How does linux(debian) boot? What I get to see before I get to the login screen, is totally random.

Sometimes the font is nice and readable other times it is a basic font large or small, which changes while it boots. Sometimes I get the run down of all the things it loads with a little ok next to them when they are. Sometimes I get to see the NVIDIA logo most times I don't get to. The GRUB menu is often very basic and big letters, other times it is very neatly laid out. I do get GRUB, disk check, login screen every time. Though how they look and what happens in between these steps is utterly random.

It is like a manager have just thrown a list at the staff, with stuff to be done before the end of the day, and said when this is done you can clock off down to the pub, first round is on me. Nothing like a run down order with a check list like for TimC before he heads over to the US again.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on April 25, 2016, 12:06:55 pm
How does linux(debian) boot? What I get to see before I get to the login screen, is totally random.

Quickly and with as much going on in parallel as possible.  So the exact order in which things happen is subject to a sort of butterfly effect as one process gets dibs on the disk IO (or whatever) first and causes another (and its dependencies) to block for slightly longer.


Quote
It is like a manager have just thrown a list at the staff, with stuff to be done before the end of the day, and said when this is done you can clock off down to the pub, first round is on me. Nothing like a run down order with a check list like for TimC before he heads over to the US again.

Exactly.  It gets you to the pub usable system faster.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on April 25, 2016, 03:45:22 pm
My Airbus had to reboot the other week. Panasonic Avonics runs Redhat apparently. I presume that was just the entertainment system. I never trusted Redhat, back in the day it was a home of dependency hell, hopefully it has got better. Could be worse, I could have found out that Airbus A380s run Windows CE.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Wombat on April 25, 2016, 09:32:08 pm
Air New Zealand Boing 777s, do indeed run Windows CE!  And of course the entertainment system needed rebooting several times before we could get going...

Sadly my car's entertainment system also runs Windows CE, and its crap.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on April 26, 2016, 12:26:58 am
A surprising number of embedded systems run Windows CE.  It's cheap and (mostly) works.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: jsabine on April 26, 2016, 01:29:31 am
A surprising number of embedded systems run Windows CE.  It's cheap and (mostly) works.

Aye. For values of 'mostly' that trend down in inverse proportion to the urgency of the task at hand.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on April 26, 2016, 04:10:12 pm
My Airbus had to reboot the other week. Panasonic Avonics runs Redhat apparently. I presume that was just the entertainment system. I never trusted Redhat, back in the day it was a home of dependency hell, hopefully it has got better. Could be worse, I could have found out that Airbus A380s run Windows CE.

I can hardly remember a single flight where the VoD system worked flawlessly.

Lock-ups and eternal re-booting seems to be the order of the day with them.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Chris S on April 28, 2016, 09:55:11 am
(Ex) colleague of mine.

This code of yours you wrote has cost me HOURS that I'll never get back.

double version = double.Parse(doc.Root.Attribute("Version").Value);
if (version == 7.0)
../..


Works until we sell that product to a French company where the float conversion fails because there, the conversion needs "7,0" not "7.0". What was wrong with a simple string comparison?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on April 28, 2016, 01:01:00 pm
Doing an == comparison on a float gives me the creeps, too.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Morat on April 28, 2016, 06:26:02 pm
Nothing so dramatic as avionics, but our stock scanners and table ordering "pads" run on WinCE. I hate them with a passion. I'm waging a campaign to get it all redone for Android so we can buy some devices that don't cost £750 each and will fit into a pocket/apron.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: simonp on April 28, 2016, 09:20:14 pm
I particularly hate if (version==blah) type constructs for other reasons.

What happens in 7.1 or 8.0? Do you have an ever growing cascade of if..else constructs?

As for the appropriateness of treating it as a numeric value, how do you treat 7.10 or 7.28.1 as a double?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on April 28, 2016, 09:27:06 pm
Doing an == comparison on a float gives me the creeps, too.

Quite right.
2 numbers that are nominally equal may not be in the LSBit.

I have had to de-bug shitty code that used floats as a loop index, and where float values were added inside the loop.
And the loop was defined to end when the index == n.
It was a random chance that the loop would exit correctly, if ever.

When comparing floats, I'd only ever use > or < operators.

Anyone using anything other than integers as a loop index is going to have a bunch of extra pain when I'm in charge of Hell.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Chris S on April 28, 2016, 09:37:24 pm
I've re-written it.

There there... all better now.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on April 28, 2016, 09:39:08 pm
Thanks.

<breathes out, and back in>
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on April 30, 2016, 07:48:28 pm
I've been knifed by this sort of thing before only with greater than / less than string comparisons rather than equality so I wouldn't give you the time of day for string based dotted version numbers.

The only safe solution I've found is to deal with version numbers as two or more integer fields rather than as a string.  Yes; you do have to write code to compare the fields in the correct order, but you only need to write the one library function to do so and you can do whatever the hell you like when displaying the version in app. info. popups.

Summat like:   <Version  Major="7" Minor="0" Revision="0" Build="1287" />

As it happens I have a noddy class that does this sort of thing rather than a simple function so I can instantiate VersionNumber types and do equality / greater / less comparisons with (relative) impunity and the ToString() override splats out a "pretty" version for user consumption.   It got written because I was sick to death of fixing broken version comparisons in our major application.  Such things are manifold when dealing with a product well into its second decade where complex business rules regarding backwards compatability exist.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: PeteB99 on May 01, 2016, 10:15:00 am
Not sure if it's a bug or a feature but yesterday I renewed my cars VED via the GOV.CO.UK website. Just looked at the confirmation email and it's actually confirming 2 renewals, this years and last years.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Wombat on May 02, 2016, 02:09:10 pm
Its a feature.  However, if you really did it via a gov.co.uk domain, then you've been had  ;D   ITYM gov.uk....
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on May 04, 2016, 09:07:22 pm
*Possible* compromise of a number of webmail services; username/password combinations published.   If you do use one of the allegedly affected webmail services you might want to change your password just to be safe.

A bit more, but not much more,  info here : http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-36204531 

Be warned, the article contains examples of appalling business jargon. See the quote from Yahoo.



Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: simonp on May 04, 2016, 11:35:03 pm
We're getting 35Mbps after the FTTC upgrade yesterday - guess my code works then.  O:-)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on May 05, 2016, 08:12:06 am
*Possible* compromise of a number of webmail services; username/password combinations published.   If you do use one of the allegedly affected webmail services you might want to change your password just to be safe.

A bit more, but not much more,  info here : http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-36204531 

Be warned, the article contains examples of appalling business jargon. See the quote from Yahoo.
Note: your email *may* have been compromised *only* if you used insecure websites and signed up with a password identical to the one you use for your email account.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on May 05, 2016, 08:29:02 am
(PSA: Google offers two-factor authentication, and if you don't use it I'd strongly recommend considering it: https://www.google.com/landing/2step/ )
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on May 05, 2016, 01:36:04 pm
Me too, though watch out for the app, Google Authenticator, as it have had a problem for the last two years, what it struggles with the summer vs winter time change (the period that US or UK has changed over but UK or US still drag their feet). The Key it tells you is about an hour out.

So I swapped to FreeOTP, which has worked fine for me on Facebook, LogMeIn, Dropbox and Google.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on May 05, 2016, 01:46:14 pm
It does tell you that your IT is getting a bit old when you need to:

1/ Turn on old dead HP All-in-One (where the printer is dead but the scanner works just fine)
2/ Plug USB cable into it and the laptop.
3/ Insert your 2Gb CompactFlash into the HP.
4/ Press scan on HP and tell it to save scan to CF.
5/ Find file of the scan on the mounted CF and copy it over to laptop.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on May 08, 2016, 12:43:17 pm
My Facebook page is talking to me in Spanish.
I have changed nothing on my Babbage engine.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: tiermat on May 08, 2016, 01:41:44 pm
Que? :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on May 08, 2016, 09:29:23 pm
I was wrong; it was Portuguese (Brasil). Seems quite a few others had this or Polish.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Karla on May 10, 2016, 10:09:53 am
I'm on a LabVIEW training course.  We spent the first hour this morning doing for and while loops, with several people having a detailed discussion about these fascinating new concepts that they'd apparently never come across before.   

Give me strength.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on May 10, 2016, 12:04:21 pm
We all started somewhere. Be patient.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Karla on May 14, 2016, 10:15:45 am
True - but the course was very much a case of 'Introduction to programming ... using Labview' rather than 'Introduction to Labview'.  We spent the first couple of days going over the basic constructs that you find in any high level language (data types, boolean logic, different types of loops, arrays) in great detail, then spent the last day covering the bits that are the reasons why people use Labview (e.g. controlling hardware, gathering and exporting data from said hardware) at a gallop. 

I'm a bit less annoyed than I could be though, for two reasons: I paid an academic discount rather than full price, and in the rest of the week I've managed to do what I wanted with Labview so the last day's skim coverage was in fact sufficient.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on May 16, 2016, 09:41:11 am
The monitor I thought would hook up nicely to my Pi has interfaces from before ye Fludde.  Have to pinch the Inlaw Paw's 22" Dell.  Seems incongruous, a thing the size of a box of Swan Vestas driving something that size.

Shame we gave away the old 42" TV...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on May 16, 2016, 09:06:23 pm
Try a £10 hdmi to vga converter. Works just fine for me.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Tim Hall on May 17, 2016, 12:48:12 pm
Try a £10 hdmi to vga converter. Works just fine for me.

There's an olden days output on the Pi too. Component or something. The yellow RCA one anyway.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on May 17, 2016, 12:55:34 pm
Composite video.

Unfortunately, fonts that are readable at sensible sizes on a PAL/NTSC display died out with the Amiga.  So it's only a practical solution for very specific applications.  Playing games in emulators, for example.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on May 17, 2016, 01:02:33 pm
Bruiser McHuge's mouse appears to have drunk itself utterly to DETH on contact cleaner after I tried to cure its annoying habit of assigning no/one/two clicks to a single prod of the right button chiz.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on May 17, 2016, 01:06:22 pm
I successfully replaced the microswitch in my mouse when it got like that.  Even more shockingly, when one of barakta's rodents (of a completely unrelated molishment) went a bit iffy, it turned out to use the same switches (of which I now had a bag of n-1).  It turns out that standardisation is fine when you don't expect people to even think of repairing things.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on May 17, 2016, 02:20:20 pm
Try a £10 hdmi to vga converter. Works just fine for me.

Cheers.  I was looking at DVI converters - the Pi site says to use powered ones, that come in as pricey as a 7" touchscreen.

Just ordered a VGA converter for 7€ on Amazon.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on May 17, 2016, 06:30:21 pm
I successfully replaced the microswitch in my mouse when it got like that.  Even more shockingly, when one of barakta's rodents (of a completely unrelated molishment) went a bit iffy, it turned out to use the same switches (of which I now had a bag of n-1).  It turns out that standardisation is fine when you don't expect people to even think of repairing things.

The clickiness was still there after The Treatment but cursor movement decided it had had enough.  The LED inside the trackball housing lights up but that's all chiz.  A new one was twenty quid :(
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on May 17, 2016, 10:08:55 pm
Try a £10 hdmi to vga converter. Works just fine for me.

Cheers.  I was looking at DVI converters - the Pi site says to use powered ones, that come in as pricey as a 7" touchscreen.

Just ordered a VGA converter for 7€ on Amazon.
I've got one working just fine on the Pi Zero.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on May 20, 2016, 03:56:42 pm
Mine arrived today. Maybe get at it this weekend.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on May 21, 2016, 11:56:41 am
Just had a Pine64 board arrive. Now to decide what to do with it. It is supposedly a grown up version of the Pi with more IO, bigger processor and memory.
And OS distros for android and many other things.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: SoreTween on May 21, 2016, 05:35:15 pm
Ah the sweet satisfaction of success, I have won my battle with Adobe ARM.

I've tried all the suggestions on the net - fecking thing comes back.
I've scoured and cleansed the registry of all related settings - fecking thing comes back.
I've disabled the service  - fecking thing comes back.
I've deleted the service and the executables - fecking thing comes back BUT Mr Adobe you've now made a mistake.  That kind of activity is not self repair, it's virus like behaviour and it WILL get killed.  I'm no longer metaphorically idly hitting delete, you have my full and focussed attention.

I'm slightly disappointed.  All it took was replace the executables with zero byte files marked read only.  Every time in future I run Reader and get two windows errors telling me Mr Adobe's shitware AdobeARM.exe cannot be run I shall smile.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Phil W on May 21, 2016, 07:01:46 pm
Regenerated my osm maps for GB and Ireland to the latest mapping data as in osm upto last night. Edited my style files and finally got it to generate maps where it won't auto route down footpaths, bridleways and off road tracks and will avoid trunk roads unless I explicitly click down them. Yeah routing fit for purpose.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on May 21, 2016, 07:19:19 pm
Been fiddling wif ETS2 Studio to make custom truck paint jobs.  Market value of this l33t 5k1ll: 0 ;D
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: dave r on May 23, 2016, 10:38:58 pm
I upgraded to Lubuntu 16.04 a few weeks ago, I now find that though a DVD operates normally, I insert disc and the little window opens for me to decide what I'm going to do with it, if I insert a CD I get the message Location is not mountable, though I can access it through the music player, strange! It mounts the camera and USB stick normally, very strange.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on May 23, 2016, 10:41:11 pm
Audio CDs *aren't* mountable, except when there's some trickery going on to pretend to the user that they are.  There's no filesystem on them, just an audio stream.

Why it doesn't recognise them as such and offer to open a music player or something is a good question.  It's the sort of thing you'd expect a distro like that to do.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: dave r on May 23, 2016, 10:47:46 pm
Audio CDs *aren't* mountable, except when there's some trickery going on to pretend to the user that they are.  There's no filesystem on them, just an audio stream.

I know, normally inserting one just brings up a little window similar to the one a  DVD brings up, but now I'm getting the error message instead, which is very annoying. It looks like a reacurance of a problem they had a few years ago, I found plenty about it when I searched but it was all old stuff.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on May 24, 2016, 08:21:19 am
Maybe with the upgrade, your music player is no longer associated with playing music CDs or something like that.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: dave r on May 24, 2016, 12:05:19 pm
Maybe with the upgrade, your music player is no longer associated with playing music CDs or something like that.

Yes I suspect the upgrade is the villain of the piece, I'll just have to see if I can work it out, I don't use discs very often so its just annoying, apart from that everything is working well.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on May 26, 2016, 10:43:56 am
hmm someone is standing on the line, downloads and streaming is dead slow and jerky but speedtest says I got ok speed ... 16up/1.2down on really good days we get 18/1.3, which is ok for our use.

As a test I tried to get ubuntu.iso from ubuntu.com (1.4Gb), just to clock up 1Mb took five minutes. Play anything on iPlayer just stops/starts. Same goes when I try to download ubuntu via torrents, dead slow. Our Now.tv struggles with connecting too, keep saying not enough bandwidth. Though streaming the local radio works just fine and hitting sites like guardian and youtube everything loads and play just fine.

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on May 26, 2016, 11:45:28 am
That sounds like the problem lies with your ISP or beyond, rather than your line.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on May 27, 2016, 09:44:19 pm
Just pasted 1 miiiillliiiooon spam post on my blog \o/
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on May 31, 2016, 11:18:59 pm
Can the Learned Members of Thee Panel tell me whether there's any simple way of distinguishing between Cat5 and Cat 6 network cables just by looking at them?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on May 31, 2016, 11:19:34 pm
It's usually printed on the cable, IIRC. (Source: handful of cables I just grabbed out of the box by my desk)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on May 31, 2016, 11:26:51 pm
Should have thought of that :facepalm:  Will have a squint.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on May 31, 2016, 11:27:13 pm
Cat6 will be less flexible than cat5
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on May 31, 2016, 11:27:48 pm
And are often (but not exclusively) an attractive shade of purple.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on June 01, 2016, 12:50:39 am
Cat6 will be less flexible than cat5

Except that the 5a that goes on holibobs with me seems thicker and somewhat less bendy than the 6 which runs up the stairs ???

And are often (but not exclusively) an attractive shade of purple.

The only ones on which I can see the writing without any unpleasant bending are
There are also black, grey, green and red ones around the place but AFAICT no purple ones, though it's pretty dark back there in the medusa's lair behind the distascope.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: fuaran on June 10, 2016, 11:20:19 am
Latest version of Firefox (47.0) doesn't reload the page when you go back/forward, for https sites. It just shows a cached copy.
Which kind of affects the way I read this forum - yes, its quicker to go back/forward, but it doesn't show which threads have new posts, or which have been already read (unless I click refresh).
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on June 10, 2016, 07:36:24 pm
Android Studio. If this was a tool I was relying on for work this'd be in the rant threat.  Thankfully I'm not so I'll just whinge about it here; if that's alright with you?

What a waste flamin' time that was.  Installation went OK, but can I get an emulator to start up and run? Damned if I can.  Not only that but the IDE is_hideously_ slow.  Seventeen (yes 17!) (https://www.flickr.com/photos/41392773@N02/27585398815/in/dateposted-public/) minutes to build "hello world" and that's before it even tries to install the apk on the (non-functioning) emulator.

I uninstalled it an hour or so ago. No point in keeping 15 gigs of electronic dross.  I'll just have to plod on with Eclipse/ADT which means I can't write for anything later than Kitkat (what a bloody _silly_ naming convention) which is a pain, but a build takes mebbe a few tens of seconds to a minute and the emulator actually runs even if takes a couple or three minutes to start.
 
Now I know this machine is old (Win7 pro x32 4GB) and uses a Celeron processor not Intel so the Intel HAXM emulator is a non-starter (hah!), but if Google could get their armeabi emulation to run reasonably well (slowly, but hey it's an emulator) four years ago how in the name of the wee man can they not get it working now?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on June 14, 2016, 10:56:27 am
Just had to share. Someone, somewhere put in this "formula" - and yes, there are no gaps. only missing "SUM" at the beginning.
Code: [Select]
=(I18+I19+I20+I21+I22+I23+I24+I25+I26+I27+I28+I29+I30+I31+I32+I33+I34+I35+I36+I37+I38+I39+I40+I41+I42+I43+I44+I45+I46+I47+I48+I49+I50+I51+I52+I53+I54+I55+I56+I57+I58+I59+I60+I61+I62+I63+I64+I65+I66+I67+I68+I69+I70+I71+I72+I73+I74+I75+I76+I77+I78+I79+I80+I81+I82+I83+I84+I85+I86+I87+I88+I89+I90+I91+I92+I93+I94+I95+I96+I97+I98+I99+I100+I101+I102+I103+I104)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on June 23, 2016, 06:57:30 am
Latest version of Firefox (47.0) doesn't reload the page when you go back/forward, for https sites. It just shows a cached copy.
Which kind of affects the way I read this forum - yes, its quicker to go back/forward, but it doesn't show which threads have new posts, or which have been already read (unless I click refresh).

And with pinned tabs it reloads last night's content.

Other than that I don't mind this effect too much, because with back/forward the thread you just came out of serves as a place-mark on the page.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: tiermat on June 23, 2016, 09:08:14 am
But they have returned the bookmark functionality to it's proper state, in 47. Whoever thought that sticking all bookmarks in one folder, for you to have to expend energy later to categorise, needs shooting.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Vince on June 23, 2016, 09:47:46 am
My understanding of the release notes is that Firefox now responds to cache instructions contained in meta tags. This is the 'correct' way to work but is inconsistent will other browsers.
I would have expected at least to be able to opt in to this behaviour.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on July 02, 2016, 09:33:28 am
Keyboard's getting a bit sticky. No harm to it, it's an electro-mechanical about 15 years old with profiled keys, nicest to use I ever had.  Casing has hollows worn in it where my thumbs rest.  Doubt if I'll find one as good.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on July 02, 2016, 01:26:42 pm
Put it through the dishwasher, and dry thoroughly.  If it survives, it'll be good as new.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on July 02, 2016, 05:49:00 pm
Don't think I'm prepared to face that "if" just yet.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on July 04, 2016, 11:18:49 am
The Mega-Global Fruit Corporation of Cupertino, USAnia seem so keen to push the Home Sharing feature of iTunes that they neglected to tell any one that if your iTunes library and media files live on a network disk then you can point any Babbage-Engine on your network at the same library.  You probably can't have two Babbage-Engines doing it at the same time, but this is not something I actually need to do.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Woofage on July 12, 2016, 02:26:22 pm
The booking and queueing system for blood tests at our local hospital runs on Ubuntu. I know because there was a nag window asking for software updates  ::-).
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on July 13, 2016, 06:56:10 pm
Switched on Slow Dempsey the laptop for the first time in three months.  I can practically hear the cogs grinding as he attempts to back himself up and perform a quarter's worth of updates simultaneously.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on July 15, 2016, 01:27:41 pm
BT informs me of a 'Free Upgrade'.
Wifi Hotspots are a Thing. I look at their map of Hot Spots.
The nearest is Edgware Job Centre, which closed about 5 years ago.
I'd show you Google Street View evidence of how long it's been closed.
But Google Maps seem down...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on July 29, 2016, 10:51:53 am
Fill in the first word that comes to mind: Fit. Bit. [****].
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on July 29, 2016, 10:56:10 am
Fill in the first word that comes to mind: Fit. Bit. [****].

Beer
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ruthie on July 31, 2016, 09:14:15 am
Fill in the first word that comes to mind: Fit. Bit. [****].

Sofa.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on July 31, 2016, 09:29:55 am
Fill in the first word that comes to mind: Fit. Bit. [****].

Sofa.
And that is how the internet is won.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on August 05, 2016, 10:28:19 am
Astounded.  My new printer has its full designation writ large on a plate right on the front for all to see.  I thought this was forbidden by law, that such info had to be carried on a plate somewhere on the back - or better yet, the underside - with the barcode & a bunch of other guff, so that the user would have to be a contortionist dwarf with lite-up eyeballs to read it after installation.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: tiermat on August 09, 2016, 02:07:23 pm
Astounded.  My new printer has its full designation writ large on a plate right on the front for all to see.  I thought this was forbidden by law, that such info had to be carried on a plate somewhere on the back - or better yet, the underside - with the barcode & a bunch of other guff, so that the user would have to be a contortionist dwarf with lite-up eyeballs to read it after installation.

You forgot the bit about it being printed in 4pt Comic Sans, by a printer that the ribbon has just about run out of, or is that just reserved for the printing of Service Tags and Serial Numbers?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on August 13, 2016, 12:52:20 pm
Set-up a Public Wi-Fi access point ... just for the sake of it really.

Uses a captive portal to advise people of limitations of liability etc.
Wireless clients are isolated from each other
WAN access is round-robin between three different VPN connections
Client's sessions are timed out after two hours to discourage public use.
Download restricted to 256 Kb/s and upload restricted to 128 Kb/s.
Firewall rules restrict access gateway management ports and the rest of the network.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on August 22, 2016, 07:53:08 am
Just spent a couple of minutes clapping an ear to my external drives and main box to find out which has been emitting a periodic high-pitched whistling.  Then it stopped, and the truck delivering stuff to the building-site 100 yds up the road drove away. Duh.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on August 22, 2016, 01:41:09 pm
It's not doing a SMART self-test, is it?  That tends to make the drive in my desktop whistle.  It probably makes the ones in the server whistle too, but it's enclosed in a rack that attenuates high pitched noise and those tests are programmed to run in the middle of the night.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: citoyen on August 24, 2016, 06:45:37 pm
I interviewed someone this morning about cycling tech and had to suppress a few giggles because he kept referring to "open house" software.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on August 24, 2016, 09:58:50 pm
I've just found out what happens when you VNC into a machine running VNC server to see if it is working  ;D
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Vince on August 24, 2016, 10:25:32 pm
I interviewed someone this morning about cycling tech and had to suppress a few giggles because he kept referring to "open house" software.
Open source software with very poor update controls? :)
I've just found out what happens when you VNC into a machine running VNC server to see if it is working  ;D
Am I missing something, but isn't this what you normally do?  ???
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on August 24, 2016, 11:05:31 pm

Am I missing something, but isn't this what you normally do?  ???

You may want to Google recursion
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: citoyen on August 24, 2016, 11:24:28 pm
Looking for a protective case for a Macbook Air 13". From my research so far, these are the two favourites:
Incase Icon sleeve
https://www.incase.com/shop/macbook-sleeves/icon-sleeve-with-tensaerlite-for-mb-air-13/heather-black-gray/
Tech21 Impact Snap case
https://www.tech21.com/en_gb/impact-snap-case-for-apple-macbook-air-13

Any other suggestions?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Wombat on August 28, 2016, 09:09:48 am
For a Sony 13" skinny laptop, I bought this: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B009X0K40E/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o08_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

A somewhat lower price point than you were looking at, but its done fine, being carted about all over the place, in the car, on trains, and shoved in boxes of stuff at events.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: citoyen on August 30, 2016, 02:06:14 pm
For a Sony 13" skinny laptop, I bought this: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B009X0K40E/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o08_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

A somewhat lower price point than you were looking at, but its done fine, being carted about all over the place, in the car, on trains, and shoved in boxes of stuff at events.

Cheers, looks good. And I'm all for saving money!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on August 30, 2016, 10:17:42 pm
My MacBook Air has travelled to every continent sans case. I once used it in a game of table tennis.  Oh and it was briefly stolen by monkeys. Despite that its looks suspiciously better than its human attaché. Who hasn't been kidnapped by monkeys. Yet.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Wombat on August 31, 2016, 08:01:49 am
Give it time, Ian.  Them colobuses are tricky monkeys...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on September 02, 2016, 10:11:56 am
Just when I could really do with being able to use speech to text my plastered laptop has decided it doesn't have a microphone anymore
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on September 02, 2016, 12:53:26 pm
Just when I could really do with being able to use speech to text my plastered laptop has decided it doesn't have a microphone anymore

Looks like you managed to get it working somehow.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on September 02, 2016, 01:56:02 pm
I'm using android when I want to do much input or typing one handed
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on September 02, 2016, 02:55:53 pm

Am I missing something, but isn't this what you normally do?  ???

You may want to Google recursion

Alternative search engines are available!
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=recursion&t=ffab&ia=meanings

 8)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: citoyen on September 02, 2016, 04:40:57 pm
My MacBook Air has travelled to every continent sans case. I once used it in a game of table tennis.

I'm sure they're pretty sturdy really, but I prefer to err on the side of caution.

Quote
Oh and it was briefly stolen by monkeys.

That's no way to talk about US Customs officers!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on September 03, 2016, 10:45:53 am
From http://catless.ncl.ac.uk/Risks/29/74 

Quote
Check whether you have an account that has been pwned
Sam Wood <samuel.wood@sri.com>
Fri, 2 Sep 2016 07:18:45 +0000

  https://haveibeenpwned.com

  [As I am typing this, their website shows 129 websites and
  1,388,845.883 accounts that have been pwned!  PGN]"
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on September 04, 2016, 03:01:04 am
ASUS Smart Gesture - last week when I ticked the box marked"Disable touchpad when mouse is plugged in" and plugged in a mouse, you disabled the touchpad.  Now you don't.  Kindly do as you're told.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 05, 2016, 11:13:17 am
My MacBook Air has travelled to every continent sans case. I once used it in a game of table tennis.

I'm sure they're pretty sturdy really, but I prefer to err on the side of caution.

Quote
Oh and it was briefly stolen by monkeys.

That's no way to talk about US Customs officers!

I told a lie anyway, I do have a cover for it (I was thinking of the horrible plastic cases), one of those sleeve things that it comfortably slides into. It was a handmade thing, so cost a small fortune (I try to avoid buying too much crap made by amphetaminised Chinese teens working 20 hour days), but it's very good, like a rather smart jacket.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on September 06, 2016, 05:59:26 pm
The hotel wifi in this place in Majorca is MUCH faster than at the place we visited last year and it's FREE, unlike last year.
Which is nice.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on September 06, 2016, 10:40:45 pm
I am on the interview panel for a maths lectureship (I'm the external rep) and all the CV's and cover letters are beautifully typeset in LaTeX. Some with more craft than others. It's like sinking into a comfy 30 year old armchair..
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on September 07, 2016, 02:32:52 am
This place (Pasadena Inn, Pasadena CA) has WIRED internets FTW :thumbsup:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: barakta on September 07, 2016, 12:30:18 pm
I am on the interview panel for a maths lectureship (I'm the external rep) and all the CV's and cover letters are beautifully typeset in LaTeX. Some with more craft than others. It's like sinking into a comfy 30 year old armchair..

Nice!  I haven't done my CV in LaTeX for years but I did get a compliment from a dyslexic interviewer who told me she couldn't normally read serifed fonts but she could read mine, and what the hell was it. I think it was Real Times TM.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on September 07, 2016, 11:14:42 pm
Playing with lemmings on the computer. https://youtu.be/xG-T2_2rPA0 3d reconstruction from photos. Have to redo this one as there are obvious flaws.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on September 16, 2016, 05:03:13 pm
My AVG was taking longer and longer recently, eventually reaching over 24 hours for a scan. On-line searching yielded nothing better than "if you've got a lot of files...".  Then 2 days back, which much tootling for their trumpet, they did a free upgrade.  Scan times are back to normal now.

So far.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: HTFB on September 20, 2016, 10:53:28 pm
I know Facebook can identify all 7Bn humans on the planet from blurry mugshots just a few pixels wide, so I shouldn't be surprised that mid-twentyteens OCR with our new printer/scanner works. But it actually does. When did that happen?

Jt u5ecl t( givc 0utyut iii<e tnis, thc last tiine J tnecl dOwe5tic OCP..
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on September 20, 2016, 11:30:56 pm
I know Facebook can identify all 7Bn humans on the planet from blurry mugshots just a few pixels wide, so I shouldn't be surprised that mid-twentyteens OCR with our new printer/scanner works. But it actually does. When did that happen?

Early noughties IIRC.

In other news, voice recognition is almost usable these days, as long as it's reasonably formal text with proper sentences and things.  It's still shit for spodding, controlling the computer remains a black art, and it can't cope with barakta's speech.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on September 21, 2016, 01:39:08 am
I told the Ratmobile's voice controlled radio/phone/CD/MP3 wossname to shut up the other day, which it took to mean "Play the album 'Population Four' by the Cranes".  I had to reset both my iPod and the Ratmobile before it would stop.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 21, 2016, 01:08:16 pm
I'm looking forward to being the first person to download macOS today just so I can find something that doesn't work and complain about it on the web. It wasn't like this when uber-dick Steve Jobs was in charge, I'll bleat and tweet.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on September 21, 2016, 04:30:23 pm
I'm looking forward to being the first person to download macOS today just so I can find something that doesn't work and complain about it on the web. It wasn't like this when uber-dick Steve Jobs was in charge, I'll bleat and tweet.

I don't know if I've just missed it, but have we managed to escape headphonejackgate here completely?

Christmas will be fun, with Little Johnny unwrapping his Shiny! New! Fruitphone! and his only-just-compatible Massive! Overpriced! Beats! headphones...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on September 21, 2016, 04:42:00 pm
I don't know if I've just missed it, but have we managed to escape headphonejackgate here completely?

Didn't it get superseded with SillyExpensiveHeadphonesThatPingfuckitOutOfYourEarsGate?


TBH, I don't think it's really a big deal.  Everyone knows that FruitCo customers love buying dongles, and all the other manufacturers have just had their boring ordinary headphone jack become a positive selling point.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on September 21, 2016, 04:49:06 pm
TBH, I don't think it's really a big deal.

Same here, especially as you get the dongle free with the phone. I'm enjoying reminding rabid Android zealots that the first Android phone (and a bunch of others on the market now) also ditched the 3.5mm port... ;-)

Didn't it get superseded with SillyExpensiveHeadphonesThatPingfuckitOutOfYourEarsGate?

The AirPods, on the other hand, do appear to be a pingfuckit-prone pile of toss. I'll be sticking to my (lovely) Phillips bluetooth noise-cancelling headphones for half the price, thankyewverymuch Apple.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 21, 2016, 05:04:31 pm
Yes, that all seems a fuss about nothing given there's an adaptor in the box. But hey, if a 3.5 mm headphone jack is a big deal, then buy a phone that has one. It's the same with people griping that an iPad doesn't have a SD slot. If it's a big deal, buy one of the many tablets that does.

I'll be sticking with Sennheiser £30ish earbuds anyway, cheap and cheerful. The concept of sticking my headphones on and finding they have no battery left isn't going to make my journeys by Southern Trains any more cheerful.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on September 21, 2016, 05:14:51 pm
It's the same with people griping that an iPad doesn't have a SD slot. If it's a big deal, buy one of the many tablets that does.

Not quite, because if you want an IOS tablet, it's got to be an iPad.  Whereas if you want a proper computer with access to the filesystem it's going to have to be something else, which means you don't get to have IOS.  Which is a bit unfortunate for those who've already made half of that decision, but twas ever thus:  Cheap scanners don't always work in Linux.  You can't connect your Garmin to your iThing.  Nobody can find the hash key on a Mac.  You've got to suffer Windows if you want proper Excel.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Jaded on September 21, 2016, 05:43:22 pm
I'm sticking to my mega£ custom fitted earplugs as they fit my ears perfectly and exclude almost all other noise. I'll need the dongle, should I upgrade.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on September 21, 2016, 11:35:21 pm
It's the same with people griping that an iPad doesn't have a SD slot. If it's a big deal, buy one of the many tablets that does.

Not quite, because if you want an IOS tablet, it's got to be an iPad.  Whereas if you want a proper computer with access to the filesystem it's going to have to be something else, which means you don't get to have IOS.  Which is a bit unfortunate for those who've already made half of that decision, but twas ever thus:  Cheap scanners don't always work in Linux.  You can't connect your Garmin to your iThing.  Nobody can find the hash key on a Mac.  You've got to suffer Windows if you want proper Excel.

And is there any way I can transfer photos directly from my Olympus camera to my fondleslab?

Why, no!  No, there is not!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on September 21, 2016, 11:54:47 pm
I bought a Camera Conversion Kit from the fruit people, which meant that my David could connect his Canons to his iFondleslab or feed an SD card into a fruity30pin but he's lost half the kit.

Not quite direct but...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on September 22, 2016, 12:12:26 am
I bought a Camera Conversion Kit from the fruit people

Ah!  So there's a dongle for that!  *makes mental note because that's bound to come in handy*

So you can kinda-sorta do USB OTG on an iThing after all.  Although it doesn't do anything for the lack of filesystem access in IOS, so if you want to do anything other than transfer approved media files to the photo gallery wossname, you're still left wishing you had an Android.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 22, 2016, 07:34:12 am
I don't think it supports USB per se, just cameras and cards. The iOS file system is a minor or non-existent niggle for most people. For the sort of person who wants to manually copy their photos into a nest of folders, it's probably not the device for them. Every just sticks the photos online these days anyway, nudity, incriminating activities and all. Last couple of holidays I confess the Canon has stayed at home anyway, we just use our phones. One less thing to lug around.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: HTFB on September 22, 2016, 08:25:52 am
There's a dongle for that!
Not quite as snappy as the original campaign.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on September 22, 2016, 08:56:41 am
I wanted to send a movie to a colleague to play on her fondleslab. Not some pirated thing but a movie I had made, on a Mac. Could we work out how to actually do that?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 22, 2016, 09:12:52 am
I wanted to send a movie to a colleague to play on her fondleslab. Not some pirated thing but a movie I had made, on a Mac. Could we work out how to actually do that?

Put it on YouTube or similar. Copy it directly via iTunes. Email it. Copy it using one the many apps that handles direct transfers, DB, iCloud etc.

It's a bit of a non-problem.

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Wombat on September 22, 2016, 12:25:59 pm
One's options are somewhat limited if you don't have high speed internet access where you currently are.  Its one of my recurrent whinges, but we shouldn't have to rely on internet access to do something as prosaic as copy a file.  Can't beat a bit of wire...

This lesson is reinforced by a recurrent need to transfer photos when I'm stood in a field in Wales, with no mobile phone signal, let alone internet access.  This situation applies to far more of the country than many city dwellers realise.

My current main camera can transfer directly by wifi to another device, but a series of 85Mb RAWs is going to take a while, just as well the laptop has an SD card slot in it.

I recently video'd a performance of the 1812 overture, complete with real cannons.  Just under 7Gb, I'm not uploading that!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on September 22, 2016, 01:33:24 pm
I don't think it supports USB per se, just cameras and cards. The iOS file system is a minor or non-existent niggle for most people. For the sort of person who wants to manually copy their photos into a nest of folders, it's probably not the device for them.

This is true.  Most people just use fondleslabs as media-playing devices and Facebook access terminals.

Not having access to the filesystem grates as soon as you want to carry more arbitrary kinds of data around with you.  I know I'm not a typical user, but I tend to have reference materials and copies of things I've been working on to hand.  PDFs, HTML trees, arbitrary text files, sometimes even source code.  And of course touring cyclists might reasonably want to manipulate GPX files in the (literal) field without internet access.

Thankfully, Google have cottoned onto this, and the latest revision to the Android security model gives you an exciting new annoying hoop to jump through when doing this sort of thing, breaking various useful apps (so you can't SFTP things directly to an SD card any more, for example).  Bastards.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 22, 2016, 02:51:27 pm
There's plenty of iPad apps that let you manage a range of files – I use Documents – supports an effective file system, works with DropBox, iCloud, NAS, etc, or you can write files directly with WebDav. It also lets me choose which app to open a file in.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on September 22, 2016, 05:03:30 pm
I wanted to send a movie to a colleague to play on her fondleslab. Not some pirated thing but a movie I had made, on a Mac. Could we work out how to actually do that?

Put it on YouTube or similar.
Not an option
Quote
Copy it directly via iTunes.
Doesn't work. You have to sync the slab to a PC to which it is synced, you can't use an arbitrary PC to just add to the existing files.
Quote
Email it.
Too big
Quote
Copy it using one the many apps that handles direct transfers, DB, iCloud etc.
Would be nice but you can't save it into a playable videos directory on the slab - only playable when online
Quote
It's a bit of a non-problem.
No, it is actually much harder than you think, or a rather non-obvious solution

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on September 22, 2016, 05:04:44 pm
There's plenty of iPad apps that let you manage a range of files – I use Documents – supports an effective file system, works with DropBox, iCloud, NAS, etc, or you can write files directly with WebDav. It also lets me choose which app to open a file in.
That presumes that you have access to add that app. Again it is not an 'out of the box' option
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on September 22, 2016, 05:07:13 pm
There's plenty of iPad apps that let you manage a range of files – I use Documents – supports an effective file system, works with DropBox, iCloud, NAS, etc, or you can write files directly with WebDav. It also lets me choose which app to open a file in.
That presumes that you have access to add that app. Again it is not an 'out of the box' option

That is getting a lot closer to a solution than I imagined was possible, thobut.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: citoyen on September 22, 2016, 05:40:15 pm
need to transfer photos when I'm stood in a field in Wales

That does sound like a bit of a #firstworldproblem

It's not that I don't sympathise - my own home internet connection is notoriously shite – but it's easy to take for granted that such things are even theoretically possible these days.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: citoyen on September 22, 2016, 05:42:53 pm
I wanted to send a movie to a colleague to play on her fondleslab. Not some pirated thing but a movie I had made, on a Mac. Could we work out how to actually do that?

Is the fondleslab within wireless range of the desktop mac? And is her fondleslab fruit-flavoured as well? If so, I would airdrop it.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: citoyen on September 22, 2016, 05:44:12 pm
Would be nice but you can't save it into a playable videos directory on the slab - only playable when online

Sorry, missed this bit. That's annoying.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Phil W on September 22, 2016, 05:51:33 pm
Connect the iPad, set it up to trust the Mac. Turn off all auto sync in iTunes options for tha iPad. Manually drag the movie file on the iPad in the ITunes movie window for it. Works on the PC version of iTunes for random music or movie stuff and others iPads.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 22, 2016, 06:15:57 pm
No, it is actually much harder than you think, or a rather non-obvious solution

Well, I just copied a video off my NAS and hit play. It took about 10 seconds and it's now on the iPad and I can watch my cat running around as much as I want, no internet required. Yes, you need an app and it has to be in a codec that iPads understand (h.264) but that's about it.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on September 22, 2016, 06:25:41 pm
So not out of the box and the ithing is set to talk to your home computer, rather than it being someone elses ithing talking to my computer which is set up to talk to different ithings.

ITunes wanted to be very arsey about the whole thing. I can't remember how we eventually got it to behave, but it seemed to involve the same number of incantations and dead chickens and ran between 'you can play it but it isn't on the iThing' to 'it is on the iThing but you can't play it' to 'yes you can get it from that computer but you'll overwrite everything already on the iThing'.

Maybe I am a non-standard use case..

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 22, 2016, 06:42:56 pm
I'm not sure what the argument is – it's how iPads work – there is, after all, an app for that (in this case I use this (https://readdle.com/products/documents)). I can connect with any share, DropBox, iCloud etc. Or I can drop files on it directly from any computers.

Using iTunes to move files back and forth is generally best avoided for non-music media.

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on September 22, 2016, 07:15:01 pm
More to the point that the expectation doesn't match the reality.  The app looks interesting and I will encourage my colleague to install it.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 23, 2016, 03:03:17 pm
I downloaded macOS Sierra because I always like to be the very first monkey in space.

It looks exactly the same as El Capitan, which is good. Other than the notifications, which have changed colour and still don't take on the dark menu theme (seriously Apple, either bother or don't). There's now Siri. I only swear at my computer, so she won't like that. Erm, that's about it. Oh and you can copy and paste from an iDevice. Bless my existential workflow.

It's a bit glitchy, had a colour wheel crash and my iMac went to sleep very slowly early and woke up with an equal lack of alacrity. A restart seems to have cured it. Again it switched off the three finger look-up (which is the most brilliant feature, but Apple insist on turning off with each release). For some reason it asks for my password for shares even though it's in my keychain and populated on-screen and all I have to do is click OK. That maybe my automator action that connects up the NAS though. Never used to ask me.

iTunes still has 'application unresponsive' as its catchphrase. It's like Southern Trains announcing 'we're sorry...'
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Jurek on September 23, 2016, 04:41:03 pm
Mr. Shaky Sausage fingers likes the idea of being able to send texts from the Mac using a grown up's keyboard.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on September 23, 2016, 04:50:13 pm
Mr. Shaky Sausage fingers likes the idea of being able to send texts from the Mac using a grown up's keyboard.

Thicko here (with my Android/Linux setup) didn't think that there might be an app for that.  Turns out there are several.  They all depend on evil cloud services, of course, but it's only SMS and it seems worthwhile to be able to send and receive texts from my phone using tablet and desktop.

</PSA>
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 23, 2016, 05:51:56 pm
Mr. Shaky Sausage fingers likes the idea of being able to send texts from the Mac using a grown up's keyboard.

Wasn't that the last release or have I travelled into the future again? Sending texts and taking calls on my computer is actually really useful. Even more so when my phone is otherwhere.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on September 23, 2016, 06:07:48 pm
Mr. Shaky Sausage fingers likes the idea of being able to send texts from the Mac using a grown up's keyboard.

Wasn't that the last release or have I travelled into the future again? Sending texts and taking calls on my computer is actually really useful. Even more so when my phone is otherwhere.

It definitely used to work for iMessage (I think since Yosemite) but I don't know whether it can now also send SMS, as I'm not on a Mac any more.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on September 23, 2016, 06:52:00 pm
Not sure if I'm missing something but the ability to send texts from a mac has been built-in for as long as I can remember. I seem to remember having to set it up so it would fail-over from iMessage to SMS, and it being obscure enough to have to look it up, but it was a long time ago.

Sending messages with a proper keyboard is great, as is taking calls when there's no signal, having put your phone where there is.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Jurek on September 23, 2016, 09:44:57 pm
Not sure if I'm missing something but the ability to send texts from a mac has been built-in for as long as I can remember. I seem to remember having to set it up so it would fail-over from iMessage to SMS, and it being obscure enough to have to look it up, but it was a long time ago.

Sending messages with a proper keyboard is great, as is taking calls when there's no signal, having put your phone where there is.
Every day, a school day...  ;)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on September 25, 2016, 10:47:08 am
High availability interwebs restored to Chez Afasoas.
Finally managed to speak with someone at Post Office Broadband who knows their onions. She gave me just the information I needed which I duly entered into the modem/firewall. It wasn't very stable at first, even after the first 24 hours (constant dropouts) but switching it out to ADSL rather than ADSL2+ has given stability, albeit with slightly less bandwidth.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on September 27, 2016, 12:33:02 pm
I went to ftp something to the Humax PVR last night and it wouldn't work and I swore foul curses because, unusually for me, I had remembered to switch it on first. And after further foul cursing discovered that because a lot of Stuffs had been powered off while I was on holibobs, it had changed its IP address :facepalm:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 27, 2016, 05:52:13 pm
Not sure if I'm missing something but the ability to send texts from a mac has been built-in for as long as I can remember. I seem to remember having to set it up so it would fail-over from iMessage to SMS, and it being obscure enough to have to look it up, but it was a long time ago.

Sending messages with a proper keyboard is great, as is taking calls when there's no signal, having put your phone where there is.

It always used to be possible with iMessage, from El Capitan onward you can directly send SMS or take or receive calls on your Mac (it needs recent hardware) provided you are in suitable proximity to your iPhone.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: citoyen on September 27, 2016, 06:34:43 pm
It always used to be possible with iMessage, from El Capitan onward you can directly send SMS or take or receive calls on your Mac (it needs recent hardware) provided you are in suitable proximity to your iPhone.

I discovered this feature in the most alarming fashion when my iMac tried to answer a call for me. It's a clever feature but I find it uncomfortably heavy holding the iMac up to my ear.

Tbh, I didn't realise the damn thing had a built-in microphone until that happened. It has probably been broadcasting my bad singing over the internet for ages without me knowing.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 27, 2016, 08:17:01 pm
I discovered it when one iPhone, two iPads, two Macbooks, and iMac started to ring simultaneously.

It was that bloke from 'Microsoft Technical Support' to advise me that they'd detected [hangs up]

I've started singing at them. This week it's Belinda Carlisle's Heaven is a Place on Earth (I bet she's never been to Swindon). I can give it full gusto from my office chair.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on September 27, 2016, 09:31:52 pm
Got an invitation to test drive the new staff desktop as part of the Uni IT development. I agreed, subject to it being on new hardware as my current 6 year old desktop is decidedly non-standard and they are not going to mess with it until there is a proven, working solution in place to move to. So I shall wait to see if new shinies arrive at the office. I do have a spare network connection if needed... (and a spare 100/gigabit cisco 2450 switch on a shelf.)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on October 05, 2016, 11:24:08 pm
https://toggl.com/programming-princess
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on October 05, 2016, 11:26:39 pm
https://toggl.com/programming-princess

Meanwhile, the princess has saved herself using assembly language...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on October 06, 2016, 08:27:45 am
All in all, Pascal seems to offer the best alternative.

Whatever became of C++ in all that?

Just realized that I haven't written a line of C++ since 2007. Jeez.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on October 06, 2016, 12:05:43 pm
All in all, Pascal seems to offer the best alternative.

Whatever became of C++ in all that?

Just realized that I haven't written a line of C++ since 2007. Jeez.

++1

(or earlier)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on October 10, 2016, 08:01:06 pm
The last few months I've been doing rather more JavaScript work than is good for my sanity and today I had to start looking at React because we're going to be using that as well. This evening this link turned up in a code-project e-mail.

  How it feels to learn JavaScript in 2016 (https://hackernoon.com/how-it-feels-to-learn-javascript-in-2016-d3a717dd577f#.icz4lrlrb.)

The best summary of the howling insanity that is JavaScript development I have seen. Ever.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on October 10, 2016, 09:47:21 pm
JavaScript is great, but it does leave rather a lot of freedom to be too clever by half tie yourself in knots. At least once you've learnt that lot you can put your rates up: have you seen what silicon roundabout jobs are offering these days?

I went to a demo this evening, one of which was an OCaml IDE that compiled into JavaScript and ran on each keystroke. Clever but clearly barking. I didn't get a coherent answer to the simple question "WHY?"
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Phil W on October 10, 2016, 10:42:43 pm
Sick and tired of the Google Adwords explosion I finally got round to checking out BT parental controls. Turns out you can block domains of your choice. Bye bye Google Adwords, tonight has been bliss .
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on October 12, 2016, 07:42:06 pm
Kodi is really good forgot how good.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on October 12, 2016, 09:42:19 pm
P-hacking anyone? https://www.r-bloggers.com/introducing-the-p-hacker-app-train-your-expert-p-hacking-skills/

It is scary how easy it is to torture data into confession.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on October 12, 2016, 09:58:01 pm
Visual Studio cheat sheet (DuckDuckGo) is finished, subject to comments ton Pull Request, which I will raise tomorrow.

Then I can carry on wrestling with Jenkins.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on October 12, 2016, 10:01:51 pm
Then I can carry on wrestling with Jenkins.

I wish Jenkins would bugger off and get me a G+T instead of spamming me that my Unit Tests had failed.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on October 12, 2016, 10:35:11 pm
Then I can carry on wrestling with Jenkins.

I wish Jenkins would bugger off and get me a G+T instead of spamming me that my Unit Tests had failed.

The pedant would point out that the unit tests have worked and that it is the code that has failed the Unit Tests. It is when the Unit Tests do not identify issues  that they should that one can say they have failed.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on October 12, 2016, 11:03:11 pm
Then I can carry on wrestling with Jenkins.

I wish Jenkins would bugger off and get me a G+T instead of spamming me that my Unit Tests had failed.

The pedant would point out that the unit tests have worked and that it is the code that has failed the Unit Tests. It is when the Unit Tests do not identify issues  that they should that one can say they have failed.

It's actually a failure in "Things Syncing properly" in Kiln.
SEP.
It involves Kiln, a build server, repos, pushing, pulling, Master, local copies, and a GUI that looks like a PCB with tracks for a 64-bit data bus.
The code itself is fine :-)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: simonp on October 12, 2016, 11:07:15 pm
When you rewrite someone's machine code in C and it's faster and smaller.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: rafletcher on October 13, 2016, 09:51:57 am
Hmm, there seem to be increasingly frequent times when I cannot access Microsoft Outlook (as my old Hotmail account is now entited).   :-\
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Chris S on October 14, 2016, 07:07:54 pm
Well. There's a lot less RED on my server dashboard this evening after I realised Windows Server Backup had given up removing ageing incremental backups from the backup drives, two and a half years ago.

This is what happens when you work at home, and have to (not) do your own sysadmin  :facepalm:.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Steph on October 16, 2016, 09:12:04 pm
Microsoft Surface tablet. Currently stuck on screen message reading "removing failed updates" and when I say stuck I mean weeks. Power off, power on, let battery drain, whatever. Thoughts?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on October 17, 2016, 10:02:52 am
I'm not a Surface person - which model Surface on which OS?

Kicking it back to a restore point is what I would do on a PC, and a Surface is really just a PC. Not sure how you force one into recovery/safe boot mode.


Hmm - seems you need two things; a keyboard and a USB boot stick
https://www.microsoft.com/surface/en-gb/support/warranty-service-and-recovery/how-to-boot-into-safe-mode?os=windows-8.1-update-1&=undefined (https://www.microsoft.com/surface/en-gb/support/warranty-service-and-recovery/how-to-boot-into-safe-mode?os=windows-8.1-update-1&=undefined)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Steph on October 17, 2016, 06:46:27 pm
I have the typing cover, will look for the USB boot stick doobry.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on October 19, 2016, 02:56:19 pm
Ah did it have a super update?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on October 19, 2016, 09:54:10 pm
Dockerised Jenkins instance is now publishing my website to an internal Nginx server. Remarkably simple to set-up. Now I need to work out how I have foo-barred Nginx/PHP*.

*I know, the cool kids don't use PHP anymore!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on October 21, 2016, 06:05:41 pm
Isn't NGINX proprietary and ££Lots?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on October 21, 2016, 09:52:32 pm
Free and open source.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nginx
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on October 22, 2016, 10:28:56 am
(http://i.imgur.com/U76UpwM.png)
40 blocked DNS requests (thank you OpenDNS) looking up DynDNS nameservers.
Looks like something on my home network tried to participate in yesterdays dDOS on DynDNS name servers
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/October_2016_Dyn_cyberattack
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Chris S on October 22, 2016, 01:06:31 pm
Looks like something on my home network tried to participate in yesterdays dDOS on DynDNS name servers
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/October_2016_Dyn_cyberattack

Probably your toaster...  ;)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-37738823
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on October 22, 2016, 02:30:51 pm
With most of the great unwashed being behind NAT, how are these devices exploitable?

Who sets up port forwarding to their toaster?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on October 22, 2016, 02:36:50 pm
Don't you want that lovely fresh toast smell when you get home from work along with a fresh cuppa? I mean you did remember to put a slice of bread in the kettle and fill up the toaster with water as you left at 5am for important meeting you sat up to 1:30am making that PowerPoint presentation for, didn't you?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on October 22, 2016, 10:02:53 pm
With most of the great unwashed being behind NAT, how are these devices exploitable?

Who sets up port forwarding to their toaster?

Router exploit, as most folk are on commodity (SKy, BT, Virgin) routers, then the network is yours.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on October 22, 2016, 10:26:26 pm
But is that really what's being talked about in this current report?

If it were, then there would be a lot of noise about insecure routers.
None allow remote management by default, I think.

The only widespread router exploit I can think of is where a router responds to DNS queries on the WAN port:
http://support.aa.net.uk/Category:Open_DNS_Resolvers

The suggestion here is that it was an exploit on cheap Internet-connected Things, which had default and non-changeable passwords.
These would only be exposed if there was explicit port-forwarding to expose them.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: simonp on October 22, 2016, 10:40:19 pm
Many such devices use uPnP to enable port forwarding for you.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on October 22, 2016, 11:25:58 pm
Many such devices use uPnP to enable port forwarding for you.

How does that work?
( I've never used uPnP. )

If I have 10 internal webcams, all of which run webservers on port 80...
Obviously, the NAT would need to use different external ports for each.
How does the end user know what external port to connect to?


Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on October 23, 2016, 12:28:32 am
Coincidentally I've been involved in a conversation around running two Xboxen on the same network and a fully uPnP compliant 'hub' being the only way to make them play nicely together with regard to external ports. So I'm guessing there's some voodoo involved. Consequently I've started learning how uPnP really works.

I always disable uPnP on any device I get my hands on. And the only externally available ports on the WAN side of my firewall are for OpenVPN.

In light of the original issue, I've configured the internal DNS server to NXDOMAIN and log and requests for dynect.net. There have been none recorded so far. I'm still none the wiser. I suspect there's a device or an app which has some hard-coded DNS servers and perhaps the requests are not exploitive. I'm thinking of tweaking the firewall to block any traffic on port 53 that doesn't come from the internal DNS server.

In other news, OpenDNS's Umbrella is quite awesome. Their offerings to home users are confusing/baffling and the marketing BS on their website conflates matters. They have two offerings for home users. The first VIP home, which seems to have restrictive reporting, in that it won't tell you when a request was made. And then there's Prosumer which has the full reporting, but doesn't offer a 'full network option'. Instead it's five devices per user, with each device running an app to manage/tunnel DNS requests. Both options seem suitably castrated and the business offerings look prohibitively expensive so they won't be seeing any of my ££.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Phil W on October 23, 2016, 11:07:32 pm
Many such devices use uPnP to enable port forwarding for you.

How does that work?
( I've never used uPnP. )

If I have 10 internal webcams, all of which run webservers on port 80...
Obviously, the NAT would need to use different external ports for each.
How does the end user know what external port to connect to?

Very simple you do a port scan to find out which ones are open. Then based on the responses you get you lookup up known or potential exploits and away you go.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on October 24, 2016, 07:19:48 am
I didn't mean to ask how are open ports exploitable, but rather how are they meant to be used properly.

How is an end user meant to connect to their home webcams if they have poked holes through NAT using uPnP?
How does the end user know what  external port number to connect to?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on October 24, 2016, 02:16:43 pm
I didn't mean to ask how are open ports exploitable, but rather how are they meant to be used properly.

How is an end user meant to connect to their home webcams if they have poked holes through NAT using uPnP?
How does the end user know what  external port number to connect to?

End users are running some uPnP-aware webcamming (or gaming, or whatever) application.  The clients connect to a central server in the usual way and exchange such details thorough that.  The user just knows that if they want to play Duke Vapourwear Unlimited against their friends, they need to enable the uPnP tickybox in their router config.

I don't think uPnP helps you much if you want to run something standard on an arbitrary port.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on October 24, 2016, 05:53:27 pm
Ah, a server-in-the-sky.
Yes, that would work.
The uPnP device behind the NAT negotiates with the NAT and then sends the results of the negotiation to a server in the sky which the external client can look up.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on October 24, 2016, 08:59:51 pm
Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) is a network protocol that allows compliant devices to automatically set port forwarding rules for themselves. (Apologies for telling those in the know to suck eggs etc.)

Also, there's no authorisation baked into UPnP - your router will trust any device on the network. There are standards for that sort of thing, but no bu$$er's implementing them.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on October 24, 2016, 09:43:35 pm
Yes, I know that.
But the question was:

Having used uPnP to automagically set port forwarding rules, how do external clients know what has been negotiated?
Several similar devices may exist inside the NAT.
uPnP must allow for that; so the several devices will all have different external port mappings.

A server-in-the-sky is a solution to that; where each device phones home and it's proprietary server-in-the-sky stores it's connection details ( public IP and negotiated port numbers )
Then the proprietary external clients can query the proprietary server for inbound connection details.

What a monumental fuck-up.
NAT is evil.

Anyways, to get back to the original topic...
What is actually happening with these Lucky Dragon Happy Finish Uncle webcams?

Are they punching holes in NAT via uPnP? Perhaps.
What external port are they opening?  Perhaps it doesn't matter.
Are the bad guys port scanning and attempting to use compromised HTTP logins on every port that responds in the off-chance it's a port-mapped weak webcam?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on October 24, 2016, 10:26:38 pm
Having used uPnP to automagically set port forwarding rules, how do external clients know what has been negotiated?

Cloud magic and/or checking a range of ports. The latter is certainly true with some xbox games. Running multiple xboxen* behind the same behind the same NAT (technically PAT?) address is often a ropey affair because lots of routers don't properly support UPnP.

Are the bad guys port scanning and attempting to use compromised HTTP logins on every port that responds in the off-chance it's a port-mapped weak webcam?

I believe so. There are search engines that will show you lists of IPs with known easily-compromisable devices.

*I don't personally own multiple xboxen but a friend does, hence researching the issue.


On a different note, I think I'm left with disabling IPv6 to ensure guarantee of email to Gmail accounts. And using a relay for delivery to Microsoft accounts - or paying hefty sums for whitelisting via ReturnPath. It really does seem like the large email providers are stitching up the market so you're forced to pay for their email services (GSuite, Office365) if you want to send email from your own domain. This makes me want to swear lots.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: simonp on October 28, 2016, 01:15:51 pm
I once made the mistake of plugging a windows PC directly into a cable modem. Infected within seconds. The attacks were basically continuous.

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on October 29, 2016, 09:36:59 am
My Time Machine backups are failing. I've tried all the usual suggestions, it's looking like I'm going to have to trash it and start with a fresh one. A worrying prospect, of course I have copies of everything important but nowhere convenient to temporarily store a full restore image while I delete the 3 years of backup and re-image. It's a TB so is going to take some time...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: perpetual dan on October 30, 2016, 09:01:30 am
I've got an (infrequently used) second backup disk. I wanted to use it to back another machine up before upgrade. So, why can't I find the power supply?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on November 01, 2016, 09:34:06 pm
Dearest little Intel NUC. Why do you insist on powering on at 12:17pm every day?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on November 02, 2016, 09:16:05 pm
WTF? https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/odfb/2016/11/02/onedrive-crash-on-launch/

How can this be a serious effort at a robust system?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Wombat on November 03, 2016, 08:33:34 am
My Time Machine backups are failing. I've tried all the usual suggestions, it's looking like I'm going to have to trash it and start with a fresh one. A worrying prospect, of course I have copies of everything important but nowhere convenient to temporarily store a full restore image while I delete the 3 years of backup and re-image. It's a TB so is going to take some time...

You should try using Acronis True Image on windows!  I think I've only ever once done two backups in succession without it all turning to custard and having to do a full one and reconfigure the whole thing.  It keeps on saying it can't find the backup destination when it is clearly and obviously looking right at it.  It seems to cope with the PC having 3 SSD drives, but can't cope with the one backup drive.  It also insists on setting scheduled backups for times the PC is never likely to be on, despite being told not to.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on November 03, 2016, 09:09:56 am
WTF? https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/odfb/2016/11/02/onedrive-crash-on-launch/

How can this be a serious effort at a robust system?
Onedrive is an effing virus.

I work in a company where any automated copy to external system (dropbox, et al) is forbidden.

You can't uninstall onedrive

We've worked out a way to disable it, but that's it.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on November 03, 2016, 09:40:11 am
My Time Machine backups are failing. I've tried all the usual suggestions, it's looking like I'm going to have to trash it and start with a fresh one. A worrying prospect, of course I have copies of everything important but nowhere convenient to temporarily store a full restore image while I delete the 3 years of backup and re-image. It's a TB so is going to take some time...

USB drives are cheap and capacious these days. I'm not sure why the TM is failing, is it the drive itself? I had one that got inexplicably corrupted, all the old data was there but it just wouldn't write to it any more. Rather than faff around (Google had a million suggestions for fixing it, but life is too short), I just backed up to a new drive and then once I was sure I had everything, deleted the corrupted TM and replaced it with the new one (I don't, tbh, need several years of incremental backups and everything important is copied to my NAS anyway). That drive is still running several months later, so it wasn't a hardware issue.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on November 03, 2016, 06:03:51 pm
What the Wombat said.  Acronis True Image is a big pile of poo.  Macrium Reflect Free does everything I expected from Acronis, including working.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on November 03, 2016, 06:48:25 pm
One Drive, Google Drive, Dropbox etc. are a nightmare when it comes to keeping data secure.

http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/it-security/dropsmack-using-dropbox-to-steal-files-and-deliver-malware/
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on November 04, 2016, 09:49:10 am
One Drive, Google Drive, Dropbox etc. are a nightmare when it comes to keeping data secure.

http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/it-security/dropsmack-using-dropbox-to-steal-files-and-deliver-malware/

Interesting.
Important to note that on reading that article, it is apparent that the Dropbox db is secure (it was penetrated by the hacker getting the user's password and access to their laptop when on an unsecure network). Once they had access to the user's computer, they were able to use Dropbox as a vector to deliver a package into a machine in a secure network. It still relied on the user manually opening the file when in the network.

So the major flaw is still the user.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on November 08, 2016, 06:36:32 pm
My Time Machine backups are failing. I've tried all the usual suggestions, it's looking like I'm going to have to trash it and start with a fresh one. A worrying prospect, of course I have copies of everything important but nowhere convenient to temporarily store a full restore image while I delete the 3 years of backup and re-image. It's a TB so is going to take some time...

USB drives are cheap and capacious these days. I'm not sure why the TM is failing, is it the drive itself? I had one that got inexplicably corrupted, all the old data was there but it just wouldn't write to it any more. Rather than faff around (Google had a million suggestions for fixing it, but life is too short), I just backed up to a new drive and then once I was sure I had everything, deleted the corrupted TM and replaced it with the new one (I don't, tbh, need several years of incremental backups and everything important is copied to my NAS anyway). That drive is still running several months later, so it wasn't a hardware issue.

It's an apple time capsule so capacious but not cheap. I ignored it for a while then it took matters into its own hands, informed me what it was going to do, then deleted itself and created a new backup. And yes, it took the length of 600 km Audax to complete.

Bizarrely, the same week iTunes has told me it can't backup my phone and I must delete the old backup and create a new one.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on November 08, 2016, 10:28:54 pm
Me phone screen cracked and made the phone unusable. So why not try the find and nuke phone option that google/android do. I just about lifted my finger from the down push on the mouse, when the phone restarted and did its deleting. This is freaking awesome and scary at the same time. I know that this information - hey phone how are you, I would like you to reboot and reset please thanks -  had to leave my laptop/home fly around a few servers and then return back to home/phone. 2-3 sec would still be fast and wicked but at the speed of less of a mouse click!!!

New phone ordered and when it arrives all I have to do is to login and a short wait later I got everything back. This freaking awesome and scary at the same time.

Yes I sold my soul to the big G back in 2004 :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: simonp on November 10, 2016, 12:37:12 am
When you launch 560 jobs to the compute farm and one of the servers has a wobbly and decides that all jobs submitted will fail with permission denied when trying to redirect stdout to the results area, and your phone spends 10 minutes beeping with one email per failed job.

Also those at home wonder why your iPad sat on the kitchen worktop is beeping like mad.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Chris S on November 10, 2016, 06:06:21 pm
Note to self. Don't create a mount to an external drive in your local $HOME when that local $HOME is in view of rsnapshot, especially when the mounted drive contains 150Gb of audio files. And definitely don't then try and backup the backup with rsync and wonder why it's taking three days to copy!  :hand: :facepalm:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on November 11, 2016, 06:50:16 pm
Would this help:

Code: [Select]
  -x, --one-file-system       don't cross filesystem boundaries

Adding that to the rsync command should exclude mount points.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: asterix on November 14, 2016, 09:04:58 am
Windows 10 provides an on-screen keyboard. (settings/ease of access/keyboard)

Useful if you want to use a telly as a monitor and only your mouse is wireless. 
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: simonp on November 14, 2016, 04:54:44 pm
Modifying xxxx_model.c

Notice some code. What idiot wrote this?

git blame xxxx_model.c

Oh.  :-[

Well it was 2009. Obviously I wouldn't write that code now.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: asterix on November 14, 2016, 05:02:33 pm
Talking of idiocy:

NHS send-to-all email causes turmoil  (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-37979456)

Quote
This was due to an NHS Mail user setting up an email distribution list which, because of a bug in the supplier's system, inadvertently included everyone on the NHS Mail list.

Obviously none of us have ever done anything like that ...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on November 14, 2016, 06:11:38 pm
Quote
This was due to an NHS Mail user setting up an email distribution list which, because of a bug in the supplier's system, inadvertently included everyone on the NHS Mail list.

Obviously none of us have ever done anything like that ...

That's not idiocy, that's epic configuration fail.

Idiocy is what perpetuates the problem beyond the original message, causing the inevitable spiral of reply-all doom.

By all accounts, the systems seem to have coped surprisingly well, in as much as it was able to happen in the first place.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: simonp on November 14, 2016, 06:13:32 pm
Seen that several times since our takeover. We are roughly 1/50 the size of the NHS though.

reply-all with please remove me from the list is popular.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Vince on November 14, 2016, 06:34:45 pm
Followed by many reply-all messages asking people not to reply to all.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on November 18, 2016, 08:35:07 pm
Someone on an IRC channel I idle, said today - "We've discovered on a conference call that if you start shouting Alexa commands, someone probably has an Echo within listening range."

Now that is fun, if only I knew Alexa commands and did conference calls, hours of fun :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: tiermat on November 24, 2016, 03:11:14 pm
The two Dell laptops I ordered arrived today.

The QHD screens on the XPSs really are very nice, aren't they?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: spesh on December 04, 2016, 08:05:34 pm
Did you switch your 787 off, then on again, today?

Quote from: the Federal Aviation Administration
SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all The Boeing Company Model 787 airplanes. This AD requires a repetitive maintenance task for electrical power deactivation on Model 787 airplanes. This AD was prompted by the determination that a Model 787 airplane that has been powered continuously for 248 days can lose all alternating current (AC) electrical power due to the generator control units (GCUs) simultaneously going into failsafe mode. This condition is caused by a software counter internal to the GCUs that will overflow after 248 days of continuous power. We are issuing this AD to prevent loss of all AC electrical power, which could result in loss of control of the airplane.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/public-inspection.federalregister.gov/2015-10066.pdf
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on December 20, 2016, 03:02:22 pm
Would you use a bios, that has had a whitelist removed, that was obtained from the internet?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Chris S on December 27, 2016, 02:58:08 pm
"Server is running in a degraded state".

 >:(

Mutter Mutter... Merry Christmas...

#techdeath
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on December 27, 2016, 09:12:40 pm
Oh bugger.  Lester Haines has died.  There's an obit. over on The Register.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Tim Hall on December 27, 2016, 09:46:15 pm
Oh bugger.  Lester Haines has died.  There's an obit. over on The Register.

Dated 10th June 2016...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on December 28, 2016, 09:17:29 am
Oh bugger.  Lester Haines has died.  There's an obit. over on The Register.

Dated 10th June 2016...
I missed it when it was first published.  Don't know how.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Bledlow on December 28, 2016, 10:34:59 pm
Deskunder computer has become erratic of late. Freezing at apparently random but shortening intervals. Checked for nasties in several ways, & was told by one bit of software that I had a couple of corrupt file index entries, clearing of which seemed to solve the problem - but it was temporary. After being good for a little while, it rapidly got worse than ever, to the point of being unusable. Inter-freeze time in minutes, not hours.

New deskunder will be collected tomorrow, & I've been working on Mrs B's slow old (even older than the old deskunder) laptop. But I switched on the old deskunder/floortop to copy as much as possible from it* before the next freeze, & the bloody thing's worked perfectly!


*Got most saved in backups, last one able to complete being since the temporary fix, so it's just a matter of capturing recent changes.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: SteveC on December 30, 2016, 07:28:59 pm
I've moved my backup disk so that it is now attached to the new computer I'm actually using as opposed to the one which is currently switched off and on the other side of the room.
Started Time Machine. The disk doesn't have enough space. That'll be because it has the back up for the old machine on.
I'll just delete that (remembering to empty the trash as well).

Code: [Select]
Preparing to empty the Trash...
Items to delete: 3,916,537
...and counting. It's been running for hours. A reformat would have been quicker and made more sense. Oh well.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: SteveC on December 30, 2016, 08:00:43 pm
4.3 million now...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: SteveC on December 31, 2016, 09:06:52 am
Ended up over five million!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on January 07, 2017, 10:20:08 pm
Be careful what you wish for, and what your AI is listening to on the broadcast media.. http://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/01/07/tv_anchor_says_alexa_buy_me_a_dollhouse_and_she_does/

Will 'dollshousing' become a term along the lines of the streisand effect..?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on January 08, 2017, 06:59:06 pm
Bah.

I need to set up webmail access onto my IMAP mail system.
I planned to use Roundcube, and install it on my Asterisk box, which is a convenient Linux box which is not too busy.

I configure the Virtual Host in Apache, and point it to the Roundcube Document Root.
This all works fine, and I now have both the Asterisk admin console and the Webmail on the same box.

However, after that, the initial web-based setup of roundcube fails due to a version dependency of php on the box.
The Asterix box has been up for a long time, and I'm not prepared to fsck around with the php version on it for fear of breaking other things, and things snowballing out of hand.

So I'll put the webmail on a different machine.



Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on January 13, 2017, 04:52:20 pm
Can you not use a docker/lxc container for Roundcube?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on January 14, 2017, 05:59:30 pm
Yes, probably.
But I'm not knowledgeable enough on that technology, so I went with actual silicon.
Which is getting rarer these days, where it's virtualised all the way down :-)

And I did want a nice modern LAMP machine for other stuffs too, and the little HP hums along rather nicely with CentOS7 on it.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: BrianI on February 02, 2017, 08:23:24 pm
Oh, French Fiddle Sticks! (although can we get these, post Brexit?)

Looks like my online-upgrade from Linux Mint 17.3 to Linux Mint 18.1 has failed, leaving my essential packages non functioning... Clean install time from dvd iso I think...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on February 03, 2017, 10:20:37 am
French fiddlesticks, yeah... After being limited to a French-KB laptop for 10 days I managed to find a spare German KB and hook it up.  Nice to be back to full size KB again, but now I'm hitting Ös for Ms, Qs for As and all manner of Gallic aberrations. Bah. It'll pass.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on February 03, 2017, 02:05:24 pm
I feel your pain, T42.  Back in the last century, when Miss von Brandenburg was still a Penniless Student Oafette, she would bring her keyboard with her and plug it into my PC for the duration.  Swearing was copious and not just because it was a nasty plasticky thing instead of an IBM Model M.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on February 04, 2017, 03:50:09 pm
We had a VT 220 (or similar) to access our main server. This had a norwegian VT keyboard but also had the joyous ability to change the coding on the keyboard at the terminal. The joys of trying to login when your colleague had left it set to an other language..
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Bledlow on February 07, 2017, 11:01:06 pm
I sometimes start typing only to discover that the input mode is set to hiragana, with the keyboard set to match  . . .
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: jsabine on February 09, 2017, 01:50:30 am
Do you reckon I should confirm that mynamemysurname@gmail.com is the right address to associate with the Twitter account that someone called 祐也 (Japanese for Yuya, according to google) is trying to set up?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on February 09, 2017, 12:06:21 pm
Do you reckon I should confirm that mynamemysurname@gmail.com is the right address to associate with the Twitter account that someone called 祐也 (Japanese for Yuya, according to google) is trying to set up?

Someone (who may or may not be Kimblerly Wallace of New York, USAnia), has a tweenage girl who's trying to set up an Instagram account.  I can't help feel sorry for her, as in my day luser parents had the sense to stay out of what you did online.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on February 12, 2017, 05:19:51 pm
I've got an old, underpowered laptop which, for Reasons, isn't worth salvaging and is headed for the tip.

Before it goes, I've pulled out the Bluray drive, as £10 for a caddy is a lot more palatable than £100 for an external Bluray drive. The RAM and HDD aren't worth bothering, but is there anything cool I can do with the rest of the carcass before it goes to silicon heaven?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Vince on February 12, 2017, 09:07:59 pm
Viking funeral and post it on You Tube
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Vince on February 12, 2017, 09:15:23 pm
Unless its a Toshiba Satellite C660 and the touchpad works, in which case I could give it a new home.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on February 13, 2017, 01:25:30 pm
Alas, not even a Toshiba. Old HP from about 2009ish. I would have donated it, except that a) Vista  :facepalm: and b) it's cooked its own innards so badly it falls over from heatstroke after an hour or so of work.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on February 13, 2017, 01:30:24 pm
Anyone not feeling old?  http://www.catb.org/esr/faqs/things-every-hacker-once-knew/ should solve that...


(I reckon the demise of RS232 is greatly exaggerated, though I did deposit a box full of 9-25pin adaptors, gender changers, null modem cables and the like[1] at the tip last week.)


[1] The Centronix printer cables had been breeding.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Zipperhead on February 13, 2017, 02:54:47 pm
Anyone not feeling old?  http://www.catb.org/esr/faqs/things-every-hacker-once-knew/ should solve that...


(I reckon the demise of RS232 is greatly exaggerated, though I did deposit a box full of 9-25pin adaptors, gender changers, null modem cables and the like[1] at the tip last week.)


[1] The Centronix printer cables had been breeding.

I must have a look in the boxes of old shit and see if I can find my breakout box.

Once HoneyDanber UUCP was released by USL (in about SVR5.2 I think) getting uucp working became a lot simpler. Am I giving away my age?

(I can't remember where I first saw this link - https://github.com/dspinellis/unix-history-repo.git was it here?)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on February 13, 2017, 07:45:16 pm
<old-fart mode="war-story">
I remember doing lots of work with _supposedly_ standard RS-232 interfaces on pathology (Haem/Chem/Bloodbank mainly) analysers and SWRHA's implementation of Phoenix.  Oh the hours of "fun" sorting out the bit settings needed to get the stop bits, parity and line speeds aligned with those available on a PDP-11 serial port. One and a half stop bit variants were especially good "fun". And then all the games writing handlers dealing with "inventive" use of ACK/NAK/STX/ETX in-band flow control and that's before you even got to the weirdly packed data. 

Mind you it was bloody sight more fun (and less volatile) than JavaScript.  :)
</old-fart>
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on February 13, 2017, 07:52:21 pm
young fart - I don't think I've ever used a serial cable. In fact, I was reading that and realising I have no idea how terminals would connect to a mainframe/minicomputer - would it have a bank of serial ports on the back?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on February 13, 2017, 07:54:43 pm
young fart - I don't think I've ever used a serial cable

*thunk*
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: barakta on February 13, 2017, 08:04:37 pm
young fart - I don't think I've ever used a serial cable

*thunk*

Dibdib is a whole *five* years younger than us... We must be right on the edge of this tech.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on February 13, 2017, 08:13:54 pm
*looks around the room*

Actually using a serial port right now:

Stuff that has a serial port that might at some point be used:

Not a chance:

We seem to be doing quite well at getting rid of the things, tbh.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on February 13, 2017, 08:17:23 pm
Maybe, and I think I was a little underexposed to tech for a while too. My first exposure to the internet was my dad's work laptop about 1996/7, and then we bought a PC maybe in 97/98 or so. Before then, it was just tinkering with cassette games on an Amstrad CPC464 or the painting apps on an Atari STe.

So I guess I 'grew up' with PCs just as USB was becoming ubiquitous, and must have just missed serial peripherals.

(on preview - also I've never really been a hardware guy, and even in my "tinkering" stages it was more software than hardware - discovering usenet as a teenager, teaching myself HTML, the Golden Age Of Napster, etc...)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Vince on February 13, 2017, 09:37:44 pm
I have experienced two iterations of serial hair tugging.
As a junior programmer I had to workout how to connect the venerable printers to the shiny new IBM PCs. Life got much easier once I persuaded the boss to buy me a breakout box. I also abused all the standards by putting two serial connections down a single cable when they wanted new terminals at the far end of the factory, but didn't want to schedule a shut down to get new cabling installed.
More recently, interfacing marine electronics using the NMEA0183 standard. technically its RS422, but just happens to work via a standard serial interface.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: tiermat on February 14, 2017, 09:01:26 am
Not got to the end of the article, yet, but it has woken up memories of my first, post college job. I was a printer repair guy, with all that entails. It also made me remember the chips required for serial comms, 1488 & 1489. That and Ferrets. S'pose you had to be there, really.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on February 14, 2017, 09:18:32 am
I do remember the time when you sometimes manually had to jig the interrupts from COM ports on Windows. I suspect they never fixed that, it turned out to be easier in the Microsoft world to let the technology deprecate.

I used to have a Seagate magneto-optical drive that used RS232. Or possibly that was a febrile bad dream. Back in the day, it was a oddly favoured mechanism for connecting capillary electrophoresis machines to superannuated Apple IIs (I'm not that old, but the control software was).
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on February 14, 2017, 09:20:53 am
Ah, serial cables, he said, smoothing his flowing but greying locks...

When I was a young Mr Larrington taking his first tentative steps into BOFHdom, Important People in my then-employer's IT department had a hardwired terminal via a serial cable anything up to a hundred and fifty yards long and the riff-raff had to make do with accessing the VAX and/or PDP1 via a primitive network, which involved miles of co-ax, desktop boxes which converted RS-232 serial-speak at 2400 into something that could be fired down the co-ax, and a bunch of rack-mounted things that translated it back before feeding it into the Babbage-Engines.  The limited number of rack-mounted things meant not everyone who wanted in could do so at whim and there were frequent "Is Your Session Really Necessary" reminders.  Not that the Babbage-Engines could have coped with that many lusers anyway, especially if the mad Yugoslav nicknamed "Vlad the Compiler" was one of them.

If you were Very Important - the IT Director, the system mangler or the BOFH - then you were allowed to jibble the printer port on the back of your terminal to accomodate a second hardwire into the PDP.  Which needed a different cable.  I had boxes of 25-pin RS-232 shells and connectors under my desk and a GBFO reel of 4-core serial cable strategically placed for lusers to trip over if they came a-whining about the line printer running out of paper, the laser printer needing hitting with a hammer again or the plotter drawing pretty pictures on its own bed because some gobbin had forgotten to put in a sheet of shiny and expensive paper before stabbing <RETURN>.

1: The VAX was for SCIENCE and the PDP for word processing.  Payroll was done on a Mac!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Phil W on February 14, 2017, 04:09:41 pm
You'll find (if you ever have anything to do with them) that many Supermarket petrol stations still have the pumps connected to the store network over RS432 standard cable. RS432 is just like RS232 except it can work over much larger distances.  They then have serial to IP convertor boxes so the pumps and underground tanks can talk to the computers at the other end.   You can then query the amount of fuel in the tanks, alert any dangerous leaks, and of course set the prices.  Plus authorise the pump and all that pay at pump stuff.  Bet you didn't realise your credit card details are going over good old serial connections. Fast and reliable enough for the purpose though.

The cables are buried in concrete and replacing them would not be a cheap job and of course you'd lose sales whilst you closed the petrol stations and dug them up.  So the old cables remain and convertor boxes it is. 
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on February 14, 2017, 04:30:58 pm
It's going to take a long time for serial interfaces using RS422 and RS485 and the like to die in these sorts of industrial/embedded applications.  While Ethernet is now cheap and ubiquitous, it adds layers of complexity that embedded hardware often doesn't want to have to deal with, can muck up timing-sensitive communications, and potentially introduce security issues.  And nobody wants to have to re-wire things, so converter boxes it is.

See also: Floppy disks.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on February 14, 2017, 04:42:01 pm
Of course serial is alive and well.

You are plugging your devices in via your USB ports, aren't you?

It is parallel that died out.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on February 14, 2017, 07:37:58 pm
Of course serial is alive and well.

You are plugging your devices in via your USB ports, aren't you?
Yebbut, writing a noddy piece of code to talk to something hanging off an RS-232 (or 423 Beeb fans!) port could be done in an afternoon* and didn't need shed loads of arcane knowledge provided the language you were using provided even basic bit twiddling / direct port acccess functions (So MUMPS aka DSM-11 for PDP, pretty much any language on the Beeb that let you get at the OSBYTE calls and even dear old VB on a PC with a DLL / control written in a sensible language.  USB on the other hand... well I've looked at it a couple or three times and walked away each time.  Not got that much life left to waste.

*Providing the manufacturer provided  the correct info. regarding whether 2 & 3 were crossed (null modem) or not.  The number of times they'd get that wrong.  Debugging technique ... nothing on the read buffer?  Re-solder wires 2 & 3 arse about and try again.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on February 14, 2017, 07:43:59 pm
Indeed.   Fortunately, there are chips that will USBify a RS232-style serial interface (and indeed many microcontrollers have this functionality built in).  So we can keep using noddy serial code over USB, at least until FTDI decide to throw their toys out of the pram and have their Windows drivers deliberately brick counterfeit chips again.

RS232 serial is going to go the way of the *nix tty: Alive and well, but rarely a piece of physical hardware.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on February 16, 2017, 11:40:33 am
tty  is also alive and kicking, down in the grotty valley of IoT, it is what is expected.

I2S, GPIO, etc; I think you'd find your old serial poking skills aren't as redundant as you are assuming.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on February 21, 2017, 08:21:06 am
My IBM Model M is 27 today!  I will have to be very solicitous of its well-being for the next twelvemonth as I don't want it going the way of Messrs Jones, Hendrix, Joplin, Morrison, Cobain, Winehouse ect. ect.

(https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2615/32902555911_7edeb6d4cc_b.jpg)

(https://c2.staticflickr.com/4/3911/32647027220_ef2df5092c_b.jpg)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on February 21, 2017, 07:05:54 pm
My IBM Model M is 27 today!  I will have to be very solicitous of its well-being for the next twelvemonth as I don't want it going the way of Messrs Jones, Hendrix, Joplin, Morrison, Cobain, Winehouse ect. ect.
Bloody hell! "_Manufactured_ in United Kingdom."  There's a phrase you don't see very much these days.

Given we've stopped making stuff and the way things are going there may not be a United Kingdom of {sing along if you know the words} much longer I'd wrap it in cotton wool and only use it on high days and holidays>
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on February 21, 2017, 07:41:54 pm
No point wrapping a Model M in cotton wool.  Those are what the cockroaches are going to be spodding with after Mr Trump has a nice game of Global Thermonuclear War.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Zipperhead on February 21, 2017, 08:37:53 pm
My computer crashed today, well it would be more accurate to say that my computer made a crash today when it fell over. The monitors stopped updating and it didn't respond to the power button.

So I pulled the power cord out, and took the graphics card out, blew the dust out and put it back in. No apparent damage.

As you were.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on February 24, 2017, 07:37:34 pm
How does one get hold of a version Mickey$oft Windows? I have ever only got it "free" with a computer, which then had a CD for recovery/reinstall.

The latest version of Win (and laptops) I've played with, the OS was/is on a recovery drive and no disk.

Yes, I played around with naughty versions of Windows back in the day. They got harder and harder to get hold of - product key, OS and what ever cracking tool was a pain the backside to get to play ball - to be worth playing with again.

I've looked online and is confused, there is no way I believe that you can get a legitimate version for under  20 earth credits. And I understand that is just the product key, you still need the OS - but from where and how?

I'm going to use it within VirtualBox on Debian or what ever flavour of Linux I'm playing with at the time.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: jsabine on February 25, 2017, 01:34:48 am
And I understand that is just the product key, you still need the OS - but from where and how?

Er, from Microsoft? Last time I had a Windows product key I found instructions for downloading it from MS themselves, stuck it on a disc, and installed it on the two machines I had keys for. No problem at all either finding it or doing it.

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on February 25, 2017, 10:44:56 pm
Well I build my first PC in 20+ years today. Feck me what a change to my dying laptop. The last two or so years I have become used to:

Hit power (the last few months I had to do that a few times and if it didn't boot right I had to unplug it to then press power again)
waaaaait
login
waaaaaaaaait
click chrome
waaaaaaaaaaaaait
type the url in I wanted to visit
waaaaait
if I wanted to visit another url I had to wait before I could enter the url and then
waaaaaaait while I watched my CPU freak out and cook
then if I was lucky I could type a message on farcebook or gmail after about five min.

And god forbid if I wanted to play a youtube video too, that was simply a no go area or do other crazy things like opening gimp or file manager.

Today I installed debian (later MX Linux based on Debian) booted up, logged in, fired up chrome and wrote an email in less time than it took to boot up my laptop.

Boy - USB3, SSD, 2 cores 3.5Ghz, 16Mb 2100Mhz and what not - it is fast ... just opened six 3Mb+ images in Gimp and less than a minute later I was laughing in shock and surprise, oh yes I was also ready to edit too.

Oh and I flashed my first every BIOS, oooo look at me :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on March 01, 2017, 11:20:49 pm
I've been sporadically backing up my DVDs for a few weeks (only done a handful to be fair) and, now I have a working Bluray drive, I've started on those too.

My poor little iMac can't cope. The DVDs it can encode at a reasonable pace, but throwing a bluray MKV at it has ground it to a halt. 4fps.

Looks like I'll have to sort a tactical deployment of The Beefy Core i7 Windows Box for this...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on March 02, 2017, 08:09:47 am
Google cast how does it work? My phone keeps showing the option to cast whatever I'm doing on YouTube and chrome. But I don't own a Google Cast item, so it must be a neighbour.

So if I cast to the item, would it just start to play there. Or do they have to ok it and would they get a preview?

Wonder what to cast to it - horror, Daily Fail or ...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on March 02, 2017, 08:44:30 am
No, usually the receiving device has to be set to receive data from cast then you can 'cast' from your phone, tablet whatever. So it is probably a neighbour with a smart TV setting their TV to receive chromecast. I use mine to play movies from my phone on our TV sometimes. It works pretty well.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on March 02, 2017, 01:12:42 pm
No, usually the receiving device has to be set to receive data from cast then you can 'cast' from your phone, tablet whatever. So it is probably a neighbour with a smart TV setting their TV to receive chromecast.

Hang on, how would it be aware of a TV/Chromecast on a separate LAN?


I've only used it at a TV-enthusiast friend's house, where it's actually really cool for anyone in the room to be able to illustrate what they're talking about by displaying a video or webpage on the big screen.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on March 02, 2017, 01:27:31 pm
I can't speak for Chromecast, but my Apple TV only works when my phone/ipad is on the same network as the Apple TV.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Vince on March 02, 2017, 01:52:48 pm
Is a neighbour stealing your wifi with their smart TV?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on March 02, 2017, 01:55:38 pm
Do any target devices actually appear when you press the cast button? Or (as with Apple TV) it just gives an empty list?

I've just tested it with iPlayer on my iPhone - despite being in the office with no WiFi I still get an AirPlay button, but pressing it only gives the option to play on my iPhone (at home I can choose from iPhone or Apple TV).
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on March 02, 2017, 02:25:13 pm
I have no clue. The only item in the house that might have Google/Chrome Cast does not react when I try to connect from my phone. I do get asked if I'm ok with my microphone to be used to ID/link them. This then fails and then gets asked for a PIN. No idea which kind or what the other Cast is, as I'm not told, like TV, monitor or phone etc.

I'm sure it is only when I'm only in some parts of the house. Though have not done a full test so can't say/remember if other phone or laptop (winOS with Chrome Browser) is near or on. The items on the connected items to the router is our own (unless you can hide that).
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: rr on March 02, 2017, 07:02:37 pm
Chromecast is direct to the TV, I can cast to the screen in our VC room at work despite only having a cellular internet connection, or in another case no connection at all.
You have to set the TV to connect wirelessly and then the cast button on the phone. Also works with our laptop and Chromebook.
Dead good for showing photos and YouTube, iPlayer etc.
My phone also runs the TV remote app whenever the TV is turned on.
Initial pairing via a pin is needed
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Jurek on March 04, 2017, 03:29:28 pm
The mouse from my 2015 iMac has developed an annoying amount of slop and rattle, left to right / east to west between the acrylic upper part and the metal base.
It grates. Well, not so much grates as has an additional 'half-click' where you could really do without one.
During the last couple of weeks as this feature has made itself more prominent, my irritation has increased bigly.
I appreciate that it is a bit stone-in-the-shoe syndrome but, it is still in warranty. Just.
Today saw me return to Peter Jones and explain the issue to their after-sales bod.
He relieved me of my mouse, in order to consult a colleague.
Returning a few minutes later he showed me PJ's demo mouse saying 'This is our mouse. It is rattling and slopping just like your's'.
And indeed it was.
I resisted the temptation to point out to him that their mouse was as f*cked as mine, and they should return it to Apple for a replacement.
Instead, from my bag, I pulled out the mouse from my 2012 iMac and demonstrated to him how rock-solid it was, despite of an additional three years of regular use. I asked that my defective 2015 mouse be replaced with a new one under warranty, and he duly complied, pausing to ask whether I was entirely happy with the replacement mouse.

It was only later that the thought occurred to me that the 2012 magic mouse is not exactly the same as the 2015 magic mouse.
2015 is AFAIK magic mouse 2 or something.
So this exercise has shown that Apple's QC/Production quality in 2015, isn't quite the same as it was in 2012. Maybe.
Anyway, I haz a new mouse.

ETA: And I had a bowl of soup and some bread in Peter Jones' 6th floor restaurant which has views over London rooftops which can be filed under 'Mary Poppins'  :thumbsup:


 
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Jaded on March 04, 2017, 03:56:23 pm
Magic Mouse 2 is better. It has its own batteries and a better touch surface.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Jurek on March 04, 2017, 03:58:38 pm
Agreed. Mouse 2 has better features.
I'm questioning the quality of the build. I'll see how I get on with the replacement one.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on March 04, 2017, 06:54:40 pm
I succumbed to temptation and bought a second IBM Model M off eBay.  1994 model.  Pity the bloody PS2 port on the back of the machine doesn't work, thus forcing a couple of days delay to clicky typing goodness while the PS2/USB gadget was delivered.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on March 06, 2017, 09:59:16 am
No, usually the receiving device has to be set to receive data from cast then you can 'cast' from your phone, tablet whatever. So it is probably a neighbour with a smart TV setting their TV to receive chromecast.

Hang on, how would it be aware of a TV/Chromecast on a separate LAN?
Good point. I wasn't thinking very clearly. Unless some smartTVs have a mode where they work as a short-range router for chromecast purposes.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on March 06, 2017, 10:03:35 am
Daughter got replacement (refurb) zenbook, not as spiffing a model as the one that was stolen, but it was what could be afforded. After a few days, it died. Under warranty, so it went back.
She hadn't been happy with it, so after some umming and ahing, picked a lenovo yoga 3 instead, again a refurb.

That seemed much better. Two days later, she phones me up; "Dad, the fan is making an incredible racket, I can't even work it is so loud" I google while she is on phone, seems it is common issue . . .

Balls. Lenovo have screwed something up. Suggested fixes are either replacing bios but plausibly someone suggest a software fault results in multiple launches of rundll.exe causing CPU to heat up and kick fan into overdrive. bugger.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on March 06, 2017, 10:39:52 am
Agreed. Mouse 2 has better features.
I'm questioning the quality of the build. I'll see how I get on with the replacement one.

I had my Magic Mouse 2 replaced, it had a pronounced if tiny wobble. Probably if I knew no better I would have let it be, but I have a colony of earlier Magic Mouses (I have one v2 and two v1s on my desk). The Apple store just gave me a new one (though they didn't seem convinced there was a problem, but hey). I like them, but it seems there's some variability, and they're sensitive little things. My wife's Magic Mouse, for instance, has a mildly more satisfying click. File under #firstworldproblems.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on March 06, 2017, 12:07:42 pm
My wife's Magic Mouse, for instance, has a mildly more satisfying click. File under #firstworldproblems.

I feel your pain.  The clickiness of the "2" key on my recently-acquired Model M is a little subdued compared with its older sibling.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Jurek on March 06, 2017, 07:11:36 pm
My wife's Magic Mouse, for instance, has a mildly more satisfying click. File under #firstworldproblems.
Wait!
There's variation in satisfaction to be had from click?
*Makes appointment at Covent Garden Genius Bar to acquire a more satisfying click*

You were right to have your wobbly mouse replaced. My 2015 mouse also had a wobble. It now lives in a box on the fourth floor of a building a smidgin west of Sloane Square, and I have a wobble-free mouse.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on March 06, 2017, 07:28:03 pm
Oh, there is. I mean, there's nothing wrong with my mouse's click, it just I know there's a better click upstairs. I can't quantify it but it's a slightly more firm click. It's a click that takes no effort yet at the same time means business. Anything clicked by that mouse stays clicked. It's a decisive click. Sometimes the clicks on my mouse are a bit 'meh' like it doesn't entirely mean it. It's not a committed click and who doesn't want commitment from a click.

My wife also has one of those force-feedback trackpads which is very nice, the same as on my Macbook. That's a super-nice click, let me tell you.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on March 15, 2017, 05:27:54 pm
This afternoon a mistake agent, inspecting the landlord's non-repairs, accused me of trying to hack into NASA.  I suggested that NASA have more than enough problems already.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Dibdib on March 15, 2017, 06:36:38 pm
This afternoon a mistake agent, inspecting the landlord's non-repairs, accused me of trying to hack into NASA.  I suggested that NASA have more than enough problems already.

What were you hacking, The Gibson?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on March 15, 2017, 06:38:46 pm
This afternoon a mistake agent, inspecting the landlord's non-repairs, accused me of trying to hack into NASA.  I suggested that NASA have more than enough problems already.

What were you hacking, The Gibson?

I think it's a games company.  There's this Global Thermonuclear War simulation...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ashaman42 on March 15, 2017, 07:28:47 pm
Defcon?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on March 15, 2017, 11:42:34 pm
No, she is a closet member of al-gebra.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on March 19, 2017, 11:39:13 am
Has anyone made there own bios back up batteries? http://www.zlectronic.com/crms/bigpic/us/33646_zlectronic_1.jpg
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on March 19, 2017, 12:50:16 pm
I don't think I've had a BIOS battery go flat in the modern era (I last remember dealing with one on a crusty 386 ETA: Ah no, barakta did a PRAM battery on a PowerPC Mac at one point).  They tended to out-last the capacitors on noughties motherboards.

I think all our machines have a normal CR2032 holder on the board.  That arrangement looks needlessly complicated, but wouldn't be too tricky to reproduce.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on March 19, 2017, 01:02:51 pm
Just plug it into the mains, never run out of batteries that way, mind you might need a new motherboard ...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Chris S on March 21, 2017, 02:40:44 pm
 ???

Angular 2 and ngrx.

A whole new universe of What. The Fuck?

(Actually, I quite like it, as frameworks go).
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on March 21, 2017, 04:58:56 pm
Has anyone made there own bios back up batteries? http://www.zlectronic.com/crms/bigpic/us/33646_zlectronic_1.jpg

It's just a coin cell holder inna plastic wrapper, innit?  There's one like that in a little MSI netbook of mine - to save space on the motherboard itself.  Cut off insulation, replace cell, tape or heat shrink up.  The parts can be got from eBay or your usual component supplier if you need to make one from scratch for some impressive project.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Chris S on March 22, 2017, 11:04:30 am
Today's minor amusing moment; I found myself typing:

<div class="ui fixed sticky brown bottom">

 :thumbsup:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: rogerzilla on March 23, 2017, 08:54:54 pm
My 2.5-year old Samsung Galaxy S5 has a new battery, since the old one was beginning to struggle to make it through a day.  I resisted the £5 ones on eBay, which are ALWAYS fakes, whatever the listing says, and paid about £15 for a proper retail pack.  It probably has twice the capacity of the old knackered one...half a day of fairly intensive use and it's still on 75%.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on March 25, 2017, 03:54:37 pm
I've somehow wound up hosting email for customersother people*.

One "customer" wanted to create filtering rules from the webmail client. This has lead to an adventure with dovecot-sieve/manage-sieved and roundcube's sieve plug-in so that one person can has filtering rules. Which of course would have been easier if all the guidance on the t'interweb wasn't all copied from the same source omitting the same important detail, that storing sieve rules inside a users mailbox is sub-optimal.

Another "customer" wanted email set-up on a proper computer, which has resulted in an adventure with a gummed laptop sporting an equally gummed up keyboard.

At my age I should know better. These things always escalate. I agreed to the first by opening my mouth without thinking and the other was fallout from F-I-L getting let down by a friend of the family.

*customers would PAY me. And by other people I don't mean fellow forummers.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on April 12, 2017, 11:07:18 am
Darty, bless their leaden knickers and earthenware tootsies, have sent me an email telling me how careful they always are to ensure on-line security, and asking me to change my account password if it was created before 2016.

IOW, they just discovered they were hacked in 2015.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on April 12, 2017, 11:25:34 am
Noticed in the NYT that Toshiba is tottering:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/11/business/dealbook/toshiba-foxconn-chips-deal.html?ref=dealbook&_r=0    :o
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Bledlow on April 14, 2017, 12:21:46 pm
I don't think I've had a BIOS battery go flat in the modern era (I last remember dealing with one on a crusty 386 ETA: Ah no, barakta did a PRAM battery on a PowerPC Mac at one point).  They tended to out-last the capacitors on noughties motherboards.

I think all our machines have a normal CR2032 holder on the board.  That arrangement looks needlessly complicated, but wouldn't be too tricky to reproduce.
IIRC I've replaced two, both in this millennium. One on a PC I used to own & later gave to charity (wiped, ready for installation of new OS etc. by the charity) at least a decade ago, & one about 5 years ago on an old (even then) PC used by a blind bloke & supported by another charity which I was volunteering for. Both took a bog standard CR2032 in a normal holder on the board. Open case, take out old CR2032, stick in pocket so it doesn't get mixed up with new one, take new one out of blister pack, push in, fire up PC to check it's OK, close down when it's obvious it is, put case back together.

Never having noticed any other arrangement on any of the machines I've opened up to repair or upgrade, I assumed that it was universal.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on April 14, 2017, 12:26:46 pm
Never having noticed any other arrangement on any of the machines I've opened up to repair or upgrade, I assumed that it was universal.

It wasn't in the crusty 386 era (suspect they needed more current, so bigger batteries were a thing), and obviously Apple like to be different, but as far as modern PCs go, so did I.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: simonp on April 27, 2017, 11:09:00 am
git bisect - such a useful feature
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on April 27, 2017, 07:27:59 pm
git bisect - such a useful feature
So many to choose from; so little time.   :)

*sings* I have a little list, they'll none of them be missed...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: simonp on April 28, 2017, 12:01:48 am
git bisect - such a useful feature
So many to choose from; so little time.   :)

*sings* I have a little list, they'll none of them be missed...

I've been incrementally optimising a function and committing small changes as I go. Now I'm running regressikn tests and have found two issues so far.  bisect to identify the bad change, with debugging changes applied from a stash at each point to speed up the process. Apply fix at HEAD of my branch then interactive rebase to squash the fix into the bad change so it becomes good, and to ensure that if a second bug is found the next bisect doesn't find the first issue. Once all clean, rebase down to a single commit and push.

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on April 28, 2017, 07:35:56 pm
Logged in to microsft store and now the laptop wants those details to log in now.  How do I change back to the usual log in.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Bledlow on April 28, 2017, 11:20:28 pm
git bisect - such a useful feature
So many to choose from; so little time.   :)

*sings* I have a little list, they'll none of them be missed...
But can it be performed remotely?  ;D
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on April 29, 2017, 12:32:27 pm
Logged in to microsft store and now the laptop wants those details to log in now.  How do I change back to the usual log in.

Anyone?  Tried the store log out and it is still the same.

Sorted, need to change the user account to local.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on April 29, 2017, 01:42:17 pm
I wouldn't say I'm a heavy user of the 'tinternet. But I'm glad that our ISP ain't capping our usage. Just had a wee chat with support - £10 cheaper and a new router for much less than listed. We clock in at about 250GB a month.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on May 04, 2017, 08:17:54 pm
I think I may have to have a restorative wee nippy sweetie to get over the shock.  Visual Studio Pro. 2017 installed _first_ time _without_ error in under an _hour_ and without the slightest grumble.  I'm still having trouble coming to terms with it.

I was more than half expecting it to be a repeat of VS2015; 3 machines and I can't remember how many attempts (_lots_ and _lots_ and _lots_) to install it.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on May 04, 2017, 08:21:48 pm
I wouldn't say I'm a heavy user of the 'tinternet. [...] We clock in at about 250GB a month.

I'd say we were heavy users and only seem to manage about 130GB/month on average...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on May 04, 2017, 10:30:25 pm
Just heard today that a average flight in a modern plane. Clocks up about 2Tb of data about the flight.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on May 15, 2017, 10:52:14 am
Mrs T's W7 is taking an age to download updates (~3 hours so far).  It was suffering from "not genuine windows" even tho' it was properly activated, and hadn't updated itself for the last X months. SLMGR -REARM banished the error message but nowt's happening. Beginning to think it needed something other fix, e.g. uninstalling that update, I forget the number.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TimO on May 15, 2017, 04:52:41 pm
I'm very happy now, that after about two days of faffing around, I managed to get the compiler to generate a reasonably sized patch!

(http://balius.sp.ph.ic.ac.uk/~timo/stuff/SoloVersion254cPatch.png)

We need a way to generate binaries from C code, that can be patched with reasonably compact binary patches, since it's not really sensible to have an entire compiler (and bits) on board our instrument on the spacecraft !

I've worked out techniques and methods for generating binary files, where a minimum of the code moves around.  Up until now, I had about 140000 bytes of change, in a 320000 byte binary, which whilst better, was really a bit ridiculous for a few dozen lines of change in the source code.  Getting that Total number of differences down to 1256 bytes is a major "Yay!" for me. :D
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on May 15, 2017, 05:12:48 pm
Mrs T's W7 is taking an age to download updates (~3 hours so far).  It was suffering from "not genuine windows" even tho' it was properly activated, and hadn't updated itself for the last X months. SLMGR -REARM banished the error message but nowt's happening. Beginning to think it needed something other fix, e.g. uninstalling that update, I forget the number.
Blow it away. Reinstall.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on May 15, 2017, 08:16:50 pm
I'm very happy now, that after about two days of faffing around, I managed to get the compiler to generate a reasonably sized patch!
Swap you for a copy of Visual Studio 2017?  :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on May 16, 2017, 09:32:04 am
Mrs T's W7 is taking an age to download updates (~3 hours so far).  It was suffering from "not genuine windows" even tho' it was properly activated, and hadn't updated itself for the last X months. SLMGR -REARM banished the error message but nowt's happening. Beginning to think it needed something other fix, e.g. uninstalling that update, I forget the number.
Blow it away. Reinstall.

Better yet, I'm installing Ubuntu, on a USB stick for now until she gets the hang of it.

Though I'd rather be out in my workshop making shavings.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TimO on May 16, 2017, 02:06:32 pm
I'm very happy now, that after about two days of faffing around, I managed to get the compiler to generate a reasonably sized patch!
Swap you for a copy of Visual Studio 2017?  :)

Will it compile code for a LEON3 with a SPARCv8 instruction set, running RTEMS ? :D
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on May 16, 2017, 06:15:45 pm
I'll be doing a major PC upgrade soon (mobo, CPU, RAM, SSD) and it's got me thinking it could be the last one ever.  Will I even want a desktop PC at home in fifteen years time, let alone the whizziest one affordable?  Very possibly not.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on May 16, 2017, 06:18:40 pm
I can't imagine not wanting a desktop computer (unless brain implants or something render proper screen/keyboard user interfaces obsolete).  I can imagine a world where they become the domain of hobbyists and niche industries and it's increasingly difficult to obtain one.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on May 16, 2017, 06:31:25 pm
Must admit I'm writing less since I'm rarely at a proper keyboard these days.  I'm using a tablet right now.  Oh dear.  Bad.  Or, for those who don't like my shit, good!

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on May 16, 2017, 09:24:36 pm
My holy **** moment in that respect came when I saw a colleague unfold his Macbook, prop up his iPad by the side, instant two monitor system.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on May 16, 2017, 09:36:37 pm
I gone the other way. I was obsessed with my tablet-based workflow and then my notions became disabused – too much faffage – instead I swapped my clunky Dell for a svelte Macbook Pro which isn't much heavier and doesn't limit what I can do on the road. As for home, there's something ineffably glorious about working on my 27 inch iMac. Even just typing a document is rather nice, since it's 1:1 on a A4 spread. It makes everything look a lot more awesome than it is.

For mindlessly bimbling the Facebooks though, it's probably overkill.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on May 16, 2017, 09:43:29 pm
My holy **** moment in that respect came when I saw a colleague unfold his Macbook, prop up his iPad by the side, instant two monitor system.

I did at one point experiment with configuring xorg on my desktop to VNCify a virtual screen so a tablet (or anything else) could be used this way.  It did actually work, albeit sluggishly (fine for texty things anyway), but the geometry from mismatched screen sizes/resolutions was suboptimal.

Not quite the same thing, but what'd be really nice would be to be able to install Synergy on Android without requiring root.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on May 16, 2017, 09:56:51 pm
Oh yeah, I too use often my iPad for a spare screen real estate. It's very cool and astonishingly lag-free despite wifi.

My favourite thing about Macs though is the swishy desktop switching. I had a clunky way of doing it with a desktop manager on Windows, but on a Mac it's awesome and I do the three finger swish between umpteen different desktops (spaces I think they call 'em). There's probably something similar in Win10, but it won't be as awesome. I did it during a product demo today to switch to another browser and I'm pretty sure the swish between desktops is all they'll remember. Open mouths. How did I do that? Awesomeness, that's how. I'll take credit wherever I can get it.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on May 16, 2017, 10:16:07 pm
Ooobunty - ever imitators of the Mega Global Fruit Co - had a rather pleasing desktop swish feature at one point, which I cunningly mapped to nudging my scrollwheel left and right.  No doubt they changed it 6 months later, along with the rest of the UI, when they decided it wasn't brown enough.  I'm running a desktop environment from 1997 now.  I find it calming.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on May 17, 2017, 04:56:58 am
Misfortunately I lack the desk real estate to do the multiple monitor thing.  Shame, as it could have been handy when bouncing between about ten windows like wot I've been doing for most of the last week.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Jaded on May 17, 2017, 06:47:50 am
Making the iPad into a pressure sensitive touch screen addition to the desktop is rather fun.

More fun is the CTRL and two finger drag, (if you have enabled it) which zooms the screen.

Scenario 1 - someone is peering at the screen so you zoom in on the bit they are looking at
Scenario 2 - connected to a projector, (doesn't matter where the MBP is as you've got Magic Trackpad and keyboard and mouse - they work!). Doing some training on a complex piece of software you simply zoom into the bits that need zooming. That always impresses.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on May 17, 2017, 11:00:50 am
Yes, screen zoom is also cool especially cool for product stuff where you're expected to show some squirrelly little web application on a projector and people insist on the sitting on the back row of the huge auditorium. Saves the usual 'I couldn't read it' feedback (well, fucking well sit near the front you numpty). It also works with presentation slides, so someone squeaks from the audience, I can zoom in.

Very few people know how to do these things, so I think the bar for ninja presentation skillz is set fairly low.

I have eight full resolution desktops on my 27 inch iMac and swish merrily between them. Saves the space of a second monitor (and I couldn't find one to replicate the iMac anyway).
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: barakta on May 17, 2017, 11:43:09 am
Yes, I freak people out with my b for blanking screen on ppt and knowing that ppt under doze lets you jumps straight to a slide by number so you can go back and forth via the keyboard like a wizard.

I use CTRL+Scroll a lot under any OS, haven't seen the latest MacOS version yet, must have a play, historically I was unimpressed cos the quality of the zoom was shite and jaggy.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on May 19, 2017, 05:36:34 pm
Oh yeah. I went mano to mano with (a new) Virgin Media hub 3 and won.

Engineer visit to fix a phone line culminated in the Internets dieing. Engineers diagnosis  was the router, even though it came back I thought it better to swap out, which he did.

Disabling WiFi is fine, but if you want to change the internal IP subnet from 192.168.0, officially there is no way. As I have various stuffs baked in to the old 10.x network, this would have been a major pain. With a little poking around I found that it can be configured with SNMP strings in the URL with hex for the IP (as long as you get the session authorisation number). Boom.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Chris S on May 19, 2017, 06:09:58 pm
I have eight full resolution desktops on my 27 inch iMac and swish merrily between them. Saves the space of a second monitor (and I couldn't find one to replicate the iMac anyway).

Surely you forget where you put stuff?

I've tried using multiple desktops/spaces/workspaces/arenas (whatever we're calling them this week) in the past - it's so doable when you have 32Gb RAM; but I end up forgetting where I've put things.

I quite often have the same issue with virtual machines. I'll often be working with a dozen or more active VMs - running tests, doing RPA - whatever; and I end up forgetting what's running on what VM.

Maybe it's just an age thing.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on May 19, 2017, 06:18:10 pm
I have eight full resolution desktops on my 27 inch iMac and swish merrily between them. Saves the space of a second monitor (and I couldn't find one to replicate the iMac anyway).

Surely you forget where you put stuff?

I've tried using multiple desktops/spaces/workspaces/arenas (whatever we're calling them this week) in the past - it's so doable when you have 32Gb RAM; but I end up forgetting where I've put things.

I find it works if things have a consistent place according to function, but how well depends on the amount of crossover between them.  I always seem to end up with one that's a twisty mess of terminal windows running ssh, all different.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on May 20, 2017, 11:35:27 am
Can you not name the multiple desktops/spaces/workspaces/arenas (whatever we're calling them this week)?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on May 20, 2017, 11:28:23 pm
I really miss having a second monitor when I'm at home. It's comes in beautifully handy at work.


Following the recent saga of pfSense stalling on boot due to a missing network port, I've replaced the Intel PRO/1000VT card in the firewall with another identical card and all is well.
Just for the lolz, I popped the card with the dodgy port into my desktop. All four ports available courtesy of the IGB driver and all four ports work.

Took the liberty of putting a second replacement card into the backup server too. Another step towards running a second redundant firewall with automatic failover should the master die. Of course, this relies on me getting four public IP addresses on both broadband connections so I'll settle for a cold failover if/when I upgrade the backup servers CPU to one that has the necessary virtualisation gubbins*.

*Reducing it's power envelope is the first priority
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on May 21, 2017, 12:11:44 am
I really miss having a second monitor when I'm at home. It's comes in beautifully handy at work.

After changing jobs a couple of years back, I added a second monitor to my main home PC because running our software pretty much requires multiple monitors.

Now, after a few years of using multiple monitors both at home and at work, I find single-monitor systems absolutely horrible to use!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on May 21, 2017, 12:16:23 am
Now, after a few years of using multiple monitors both at home and at work, I find single-monitor systems absolutely horrible to use!

This.  It's like drinking a McDonald's milkshake with one hand tied behind your back or something.

It's why I don't really get on with laptops.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on May 21, 2017, 07:53:39 am
me too - have added a cheap HDMI telly for when I am working at home and it does the job.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on May 21, 2017, 10:12:26 am
I really miss having a second monitor when I'm at home. It's comes in beautifully handy at work.
I don't, at least not for the odd bit of coding I do at home* and I certainly don't need it for arguing on the internets.   Now where did I put that flint axe head? :)

Confession:  I do run my work setup in my study with two monitors.  I'm not quite that stick in the mud.


*I.e. stuff on my machine with my licenses in my time rather than stuff on the work machine (which is also "at home") with their licenses when they're paying me.  Ohhh I'm sure you know what I mean.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on May 21, 2017, 10:58:23 am
Single monitor is quite restrictive when I'm working from home - which isn't infrequent given the nature of what I do.
It's nice to have monitoring in one window, with terminal/remote desktop sessions in another so that when I make a configuration change I get instant feedback as to whether or not I've broken something.

It's also useful for the occasional bit of coding I do - run the software/web application on one display and open the development environment on the other. Or when collaborating with people.

The monitor I've got is quite a posh one from my photographing days ... I'd ideally like an identical one so that it's inferiority doesn't upset my OCD.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on May 23, 2017, 12:45:22 am
I have eight full resolution desktops on my 27 inch iMac and swish merrily between them. Saves the space of a second monitor (and I couldn't find one to replicate the iMac anyway).

Surely you forget where you put stuff?

I've tried using multiple desktops/spaces/workspaces/arenas (whatever we're calling them this week) in the past - it's so doable when you have 32Gb RAM; but I end up forgetting where I've put things.

I quite often have the same issue with virtual machines. I'll often be working with a dozen or more active VMs - running tests, doing RPA - whatever; and I end up forgetting what's running on what VM.

Maybe it's just an age thing.

Swiping up gives a nice row of selectable desktop thumbnails. Plus I use a different distinctive background for each so I usually remember where I left an application. You can tie applications to desktops but that's too organized for me. Swishing backwards and forwards is completely fluid and you can hover between desktops so you can see what's on two. Also swiping down while in an application gives you the location of every window even if I've spread them across desktops. And none of this seems to have a RAM or performance hit, it all seems to ride the graphics card memory.

It's awesome on a 27 inch machine but makes a 13 inch Macbook's more limited desktop space far more practical. Design on one desktop, proof on another. I couldn't go back to a single desktop space.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on May 23, 2017, 02:00:53 am
Been using multiple desktops since Irix 5.3. Much prefer multiple monitors though.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on May 24, 2017, 09:16:52 pm
Looked to replace the cmos battery on Toshiba nb100 and after stripping the laptop down found that it is not a cr2016 or 2032 but a different one that I can make out the number.  Arse.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on May 24, 2017, 10:08:13 pm
Looked to replace the cmos battery on Toshiba nb100 and after stripping the laptop down found that it is not a cr2016 or 2032 but a different one that I can make out the number.  Arse.

Can you measure it?
Diameter and thickness?
The numbers in the crXXXX are just dimensions.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on May 24, 2017, 10:38:10 pm
With a little removal of the tab spot attached on it is a cr1220 (well maxell ml1220)  RS sell the cells with tabs attached.....but out of stock :(

Maplin don't sell the right ones so cricklewood electronics for the correct cell.  Only 60p.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on May 25, 2017, 10:21:05 am
Work's database is acting weird. "select to_date(sysdate, 'dd/mm/yyyy') from dual;" is returning "25/05/0017" whereas "select to_char(sysdate, 'dd/mm/yyyy') from dual;" is returning "25/05/2017".

 ???
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on May 25, 2017, 01:04:53 pm
Work's database is acting weird. "select to_date(sysdate, 'dd/mm/yyyy') from dual;" is returning "25/05/0017" whereas "select to_char(sysdate, 'dd/mm/yyyy') from dual;" is returning "25/05/2017".

 ???

It's because you've passed a date into a function requiring a string. So you get an automatic conversion to a char(n) with the default format, presumably that default is a two digit date, so you've lost the century before it gets to the to_date function.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on May 25, 2017, 01:23:18 pm
Either that, or M has been going through agents at a rate of knots.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: asterix on May 29, 2017, 07:13:46 am
Was going nuts trying to download stuff off my newish mobile via USB.  It just didn't do what it was supposed to do, i.e. let me change from charging to download.  Simple answer: the USB cable I had chosen was for charging only and didn't do do downloading. 
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: nicknack on May 29, 2017, 12:44:19 pm
Now, after a few years of using multiple monitors both at home and at work, I find single-monitor systems absolutely horrible to use!

This.  It's like drinking a McDonald's milkshake with one hand tied behind your back or something.

It's why I don't really get on with laptops.
I run Ubuntu Studio on a laptop in my music room with a separate monitor (with several workspaces) perched above it. So I can drag stuff up and down rather than side to side.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Jaded on June 01, 2017, 10:51:07 pm
I've got a nice 27" monitor at the two places I usually dock my MBP and for the places I don't have such a behemoth, I can use the iPad as a second screen with pressure sensitive touch stuff.  :thumbsup: (or as a third monitor when I have a behemoth attached)

If I put things on different desktops I'd forget where they were. I grew up with a 512×342 pixel monochrome display.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on June 05, 2017, 10:24:34 pm
So, following on from my major IT meltdown in Feanor Towers last week
( mostly my own fault for failing to pay proper attention to error messages when applying saved configs to a replacement firewall )
I've done a bit of testing in relation to a separate switch failure.

I have a fairly extensive network, but in the computer room, all the main servers and my own PC are on a modest netgear GS108 8-port gigabit switch.
( This uplinks to the core switch in the network cabinet, where most other things connect, and where PoE is done )

The 8-port unmanaged netgear switch is OK to a point, but it has serious thermal management issues.
Plugged in to the power, with no network cables, it runs cool.
Plug in 8 LAN cables in link-state, and the temperature of the case rises quite noticeably, but the device continues to function.
Now start shifting serious data on several of the ports, and the CPU starts to heat up and the device becomes hot to touch.

Then it dies.
It starts dropping link to the PCs.
The PCs start to report  LAN down / up / down  / up / down.
Then it's just down.
All LEDs on the switch have gone on solid ( no blinky ).
The hardware has just gone into a latched state.

Toss it away, and insert a spare D-link switch and sanity is restored.
After a cool-down and cigarette, the shitty netgear is good to go again.

So if you plan to use one of these, don't stress them too hard with connected ports or heavy throughput.
They are only suitable for shoving behind the TV cabinet to connect 3 or 4 devices, where only one or two will have any actual throughput.



Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on June 06, 2017, 06:40:23 am
Yoicks!  I got one of them, plus one of its five-port little brothers, plus one of its "looks presentable enough to have alongside the telly" cousins, but I suspect they never get worked hard enough even to break into light perspiration.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on June 06, 2017, 10:18:59 pm
I've got a cisco 2950 sitting on a shelf in the office that I must find a use for at some point (and learn how to configure.)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on June 06, 2017, 10:43:26 pm
I've got a cisco 2950 sitting on a shelf in the office that I must find a use for at some point (and learn how to configure.)

That's a blast from the past!
I spent 3 days last week learning to configure some Dell S4048T-ON switches which I'll be installing in our data centre next week. First time I've used a serial port to configure anything and first time I've used a CLI only switch.

On a different note, I need to find myself a USB to serial-in-ator so I can configure the APC IP-enabled PDU I've required for the home-rack. It will be nice being able to remotely switch the lab on and off, as well as monitor the power utilisation of each plugged in device.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on June 06, 2017, 10:49:03 pm
I'm not sure I followed much of that at all. We might roll it into a lab network switch with authorised MAC addresses only to provide a secure net for our ancient lab kit that we can then bridge to the wider world via an appropriate gateway (possibly a raspi or similar with a script that will upload to a shared folder on Box)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on June 06, 2017, 11:00:51 pm
I'm not sure I followed much of that at all. We might roll it into a lab network switch with authorised MAC addresses only to provide a secure net for our ancient lab kit that we can then bridge to the wider world via an appropriate gateway (possibly a raspi or similar with a script that will upload to a shared folder on Box)

Honestly, Unless you need all the ports on the Catalyst, I'd just get an 8 or 16 port 'smart' switch. They are relatively cheap and the Web GUI makes them fairly easy to configure.
As a gateway device, I'm not sure I'd use a RasPi ... strictly speaking it would need two network ports, unless you are hopping from ethernet to WiFi.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on June 06, 2017, 11:16:36 pm
In my case I will probably discuss this with our IT folk and let them use their expertise to enable a solution that works for us all. A far better choice. At the moment it is sneaker net.

I had a quick look at the 2950 manual - 600+ pages. Some of which might be written in English. Out of my depth here.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on June 07, 2017, 12:37:48 pm
Crivens! Google have done an update to Chrome for iOS which has actually fixed a problem, specifically that it is no longer slower than a drugged-up slof.  It's still slower than Puffin, but a good deal easier to read.  Soz, Puffin.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on June 07, 2017, 12:51:21 pm
I've got a cisco 2950 sitting on a shelf in the office that I must find a use for at some point (and learn how to configure.)

If it talks RS232 out of an RJ45 connector, you'll need the cisco RJ45 to DB9 serial cable.
Let me know if you need one...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Bledlow on June 07, 2017, 02:33:01 pm
Apple - bah! Fucking rip-off arsewipes!

£19 for a cable to connect an iPad to a charger. :facepalm:  And it's only needed because the old one (original one supplied with the iPad, so what the Californian profiteers say is 19 quid's worth) decided to short out where cable meets plug. Cue burning smell, heat which melted the insulation, & an electric shock for Mrs B when she pulled it out. Well-made & worth almost £20? I think not.

Hi-ho, it's off to the nearest vendor of apparently reliable replacements at less than half the price, the Shop Known as Maplin, because Mrs B can't wait for something much cheaper still off the Interwebs & take the chance that it won't work.

She could get one for nothing, in theory, but she'd have to go to Oxford to collect it from her employer's IT base.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on June 07, 2017, 02:37:00 pm
While exciting new connector standards are a big part of what you sign up for with Apple products, you do start to wonder why they persist with these evidently far too thin power cables...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: tiermat on June 07, 2017, 05:10:34 pm
My phone curled up its toes today. I have had it just over a year, the camera started playing up a couple of months ago and the reboot I did today was, obviously, a reboot too many! Back on to the previous phone for now until I get the new one, from Hong Kong, next week. I have had enough of Oneplus so am going for a Moto Z.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Bledlow on June 07, 2017, 06:18:28 pm
While exciting new connector standards are a big part of what you sign up for with Apple products, you do start to wonder why they persist with these evidently far too thin power cables...
Yeah. Thinner than those for any of our other (all non-Apple) computing devices.

It's basically a USB cable with a proprietary connector on one end, but much thinner than any of the drawer full of other USB cables we have. Perhaps it's trying to be elegantly minimalist, inspired by the late Mr Jobs.  :-\

The iPad's not Mrs B's choice, BTW. NHS-supplied, illustrating a distinct lack of joined-up thinking, as of course it doesn't work with the password-protected USB stick the NHS gave her for transferring data between devices.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on June 07, 2017, 06:46:42 pm
Apple - bah! Fucking rip-off arsewipes!

£19 for a cable to connect an iPad to a charger. :facepalm:  And it's only needed because the old one (original one supplied with the iPad, so what the Californian profiteers say is 19 quid's worth) decided to short out where cable meets plug. Cue burning smell, heat which melted the insulation, & an electric shock for Mrs B when she pulled it out. Well-made & worth almost £20? I think not.

Hi-ho, it's off to the nearest vendor of apparently reliable replacements at less than half the price, the Shop Known as Maplin, because Mrs B can't wait for something much cheaper still off the Interwebs & take the chance that it won't work.

She could get one for nothing, in theory, but she'd have to go to Oxford to collect it from her employer's IT base.

I got one the other week for a tenner from Mr Sainsbury's House Of Toothy Comestibles.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on June 07, 2017, 07:12:07 pm
Or get one for pennies off eBay - although it'll also be thin to save copper (might even be alubloodyminium wire).  I suppose App£e's are thin for the sake of high flexibility and fashionability.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on June 07, 2017, 09:10:40 pm
I've never broke a lightning cable and I regularly screw them up and toss them in a bag for transport around the world. They don't seem notably thinner than the USB cable on my desk (which might admittedly be made out of Chinese cheese string) and unlike USB, they aren't whichwayround shit. That said, they seem to breed under my desk and I unaccountably seem to find them lying on the pavement (OK, I've found two).
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on June 07, 2017, 10:10:25 pm
My kids go through lightning cables like crazy.
They dangle their phones by them and all kinds of nonsense.

They get bulk-grade Amazon ones now, they last no better or worse than Apple originals.
But at a fraction of the price, I have a hidden stash to be doled out as required.
The stash needs to be hidden, otherwise they would just steal them the moment they couldn't find one in their middens.

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on June 07, 2017, 10:33:03 pm
Well, I wouldn't pay £20 for a cable (though if it's minidisplay port-VGA or HDMI cable suck up the cost and buy the Apple one, I have a draw full of Chinese knock-offs that distinguish themselves by failing to work in several different ways – if you really don't like the colour blue, I have the cable for you).

As a fruity type, I have a house that seems to accumulate Apple chargers and cables. This iMac came with two cables and then I had the mouse replaced on account of wobbles, so they gave me another mouse and cable.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on June 08, 2017, 02:04:01 am
It's only a matter of time before the pukka FruitCo one that came with this fondleslab snaps just south of the Lightning end; the outer insulation looks as though it's been nibbled to DETH by an okapi.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on June 08, 2017, 08:18:26 am
Went into the social security site yesterday to get an EU Health Insurance card. The appropriate page directed me to a full-page country selection which directed me to (ta-da) the local social security site. Another link thereon prompted me to Get the App!!! Thinking thereby to get a phone-based card I flashed the QR code**, downloaded & installed a snazzy-looking piece of shininess which when launched downloaded about a meg of data, then brought up a full-screen country selection page which, when I tapped the wee French flag, took me by a series of very familiar options to the phone version of (ta-da') my local social security site.

Ouroboros, thy name is Sécurité Sociale. Only they do not eateth their owne tayles, they live with their heads up their arses, admiring the view.

**and the front wheel fell off. No it didn't.


Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on June 08, 2017, 08:26:24 am
Sequel: phoned up the local SS office.  "Sure, what's your number? Gotcha. OK, you'll have it in 10 days. What's that, you tried via the web site? You shouldn't do that, it doesn't work."
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Bledlow on June 11, 2017, 05:06:43 pm
Apple - bah! Fucking rip-off arsewipes!

£19 for a cable to connect an iPad to a charger. :facepalm:  And it's only needed because the old one (original one supplied with the iPad, so what the Californian profiteers say is 19 quid's worth) decided to short out where cable meets plug. Cue burning smell, heat which melted the insulation, & an electric shock for Mrs B when she pulled it out. Well-made & worth almost £20? I think not.

Hi-ho, it's off to the nearest vendor of apparently reliable replacements at less than half the price, the Shop Known as Maplin, because Mrs B can't wait for something much cheaper still off the Interwebs & take the chance that it won't work.

She could get one for nothing, in theory, but she'd have to go to Oxford to collect it from her employer's IT base.

I got one the other week for a tenner from Mr Sainsbury's House Of Toothy Comestibles.
£7.99 for a short (but just long enough) one from Maplin. Progressively longer ones £1 more for each step up.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on June 11, 2017, 10:29:53 pm
Made my biggest mistake by a country mile in a very long time.
I wound up deleting every file over 60 days old under '/' on the home server. I suspect the only reason I still have internet access is Linux's ability to continue running despite losing its underlying file system. This is going to be a fun few days, and an opportunity to find out how good my backups are.

I figure it's not a bad time to make the switch from Ubuntu to Debian either.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on June 14, 2017, 06:47:18 pm
My backup regime works. Home server is up and running and all services are restored  :thumbsup:
I've added 'set -eu' to all the backup scripts so changing a variable name doesn't mean that lines like 'find ${backupFolder}/* -ctime +60 -delete' become potentially lethal.

All I've got left now is rebuilding the backup server on Debian Jessie and re-enabling the ZFS backup jobs.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on June 17, 2017, 10:48:08 pm
This may only apply to Nougat on Nexus.

Recent upgrades (how difficult would it be to leave a readme.txt or the like on the phone to let us know what has happened?) appear to have some very useful enhancements. Now, if you tap and hold an icon on enabled apps (=Google apps at the mo) you get shortcuts to common tasks. eg, on gmail, compose and mail to common contacts, messages, create message etc. All more useful than it first sounds.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on June 18, 2017, 06:21:07 pm
Asus' iKVM aint no DRAC but it sure is nice sitting on the sofa whilst installing Debian on my backup server.

Really pleased to report no issues running QEMU/KVM or ZFS under Debian.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: andrewc on June 19, 2017, 03:58:41 pm
https://my.matterport.com/show/?m=Vz8kCqGRjQA      3d walk through the National Museum of Computing (seems to be a work in progress).
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: andrew_s on June 23, 2017, 12:09:56 pm
No google doodle for today - it's still showing yesterday's (Oskar Fischinger's 117th birthday, on 22nd)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: SoreTween on June 24, 2017, 06:27:11 pm
RJ45 cables - how do you tell the males from the females?  I know they must be males & females despite looking the same to me as that's the only reasonable explanation for the number of the damn things I have now.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on June 29, 2017, 06:22:03 am
More a "what I have learned", that the Google Now assistant (Siri-like thingy) can actually be useful, eg is able to send SMS/WhatsApp chats hands free.

"OK Google, Send a WhatsApp to Mrs Ham"
...."You want to chat with Mrs Ham, OK, What's the message?"
"I'm on my way back, should be about 2 hours, etc etc"
...."Do you want to send or cancel?"
"OK google, read my message back to me" (hint: This is one step too far)
...."Duh?" (or the equivalent)
Cue a very one sided conversation at this point
"OK Google you stupid bitch"
...."Here's a matching video"

 :facepalm: ;D
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: BrianI on June 29, 2017, 09:32:29 pm
Oh, what a lovely find.

A great remake of The Sentinel Returns!

https://nexus23.org/warfare2/zenith-sentinel-remake/ (https://nexus23.org/warfare2/zenith-sentinel-remake/)

Runs on my ubuntu box on wine!   :D
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on June 29, 2017, 10:14:22 pm
Google cast how does it work? My phone keeps showing the option to cast whatever I'm doing on YouTube and chrome. But I don't own a Google Cast item, so it must be a neighbour.



Remember this? I was playing around with the windows laptop today and went into the network settings. And lo and behold in there win10 could see a Samsung TV. We don't own a TV or anything that is Samsung, ok I do have a hard-disks that is not plugged in that is Samsung but that is it. But this still don't explains how they talk together. As there is now't to see on the router and on the android bluetooth.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on June 29, 2017, 10:47:26 pm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromecast#Device_discovery_protocols Suggests it's network based.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on June 30, 2017, 07:43:36 am
It's one of the reasons I always move windows/any wireless kit off the default 192.168.x.x network onto 10.x.x.x network, avoiding overlap. (Note: this was non-trivial with my latest Virgin hub Mk III)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on August 07, 2017, 01:50:21 pm
Following my grumble about (some) Android apps not supporting landscape mode - I've found an app that can force it:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=nl.fameit.rotate

It seems to work with everything, albeit via rather confusing settings for the auto modes.

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on August 07, 2017, 02:13:48 pm
Following my grumble about (some) Android apps not supporting landscape mode - I've found an app that can force it:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=nl.fameit.rotate

It seems to work with everything, albeit via rather confusing settings for the auto modes.

Ooh, I'll have a play with that later.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on August 17, 2017, 06:08:31 pm
Discovered how to create multi-line text files from the Windows command line.  You may call me slow on the uptake if you wish, but this made the creation of several hundred small files an awful lot easier.  I imagine the same effect could be had from a database, but first I'd have to remember how to drive one after twenty-mumble years.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on August 17, 2017, 06:11:14 pm
Following my grumble about (some) Android apps not supporting landscape mode - I've found an app that can force it:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=nl.fameit.rotate

It seems to work with everything, albeit via rather confusing settings for the auto modes.

Ooh, I'll have a play with that later.

I had a play with that later.  It solved all my rotation problems.  My neck is eternally grateful.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on August 20, 2017, 06:50:10 pm
Has Bing maps stopped doing OS maps?  That was the only reason to use Bing...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: JonBuoy on August 20, 2017, 07:29:59 pm
Has Bing maps stopped doing OS maps?  That was the only reason to use Bing...

Still doing them for me.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Biggsy on August 20, 2017, 07:59:38 pm
I too couldn't see the OS option when trying on my tablet a moment a go, but it's appeared after some random tapping and refreshing.

I've just coughed up for some OS maps through Viewranger, coincidentally - and immediately noticed some info that's out of date by fifty years (a certain church marked as having a tower).
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on August 20, 2017, 08:12:57 pm
I too couldn't see the OS option when trying on my tablet a moment a go, but it's appeared after some random tapping and refreshing.

I seem to have brought it back by clearing all the bing-related cookies.  Odd.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on August 26, 2017, 07:25:51 pm
Peli's mum couldn't for some reason open a file she received. It showed up in her Google Drive, but it just didn't want open. So I asked her to share it with me, just to check, and I could open it. So I printed it out on her computer via cloud printing onto her printer. This just makes me laugh :)

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on September 06, 2017, 01:12:39 pm
We've got cloud raining onto our bloody everywhere.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on September 15, 2017, 03:50:20 pm
Drat.  I replaced a D-link 100 Mbit switch with a Netgear gigabit ditto.  Before the switch, streamed video was pretty smooth, but now I get a more-or-less regular lag-&-catch-up effect.  Looks like the D-Link was prioritizing according to need and the NG is giving the same priority to everyone.

What you get for buying cheap kit, I suppose.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on September 15, 2017, 04:35:27 pm
Is it actually running at gigabit speed?  Sometimes dodgy cabling that was fine for 100M makes things fall back to 100M half-duplex or something daft.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on September 15, 2017, 05:27:41 pm
Quite chuffed. Managed firstly to pull my fingers out. Then set up a Raspberry with WiFi and a usb disk, that I have been talking about for yonks. Gave it to mum of Peli to take home and plug in.

And lo and behold it booted up, logged onto WiFi and opened a VPN as I had set up. So now I got a remote backup I can rsync to.

Only limited by my upload as mother of Peli got a nice fast line to the world.

Next step is to automate it all.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on September 30, 2017, 10:06:22 am
Wording captions on Google Maps seem to appear upside-down and/or back-to-front from time to time.
Sometimes they disappear completely from sections of a map.

Most disorientating!

(I know I can refresh but sometimes I lack patience!)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on October 03, 2017, 10:26:38 pm
Went to one of our web transformation meetings today. Uni is about to rebuild the web from the ground up with lots of stakeholder investment. Good news: accessibility is an absolute given - the frameworks and implementations will be as good as can be by design, with considerable input from our accessibility experts.

Lots of write once, reuse everywhere ideas floating about.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on October 06, 2017, 08:08:27 am
So Firefox allegedly got faster. We'll see.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on October 08, 2017, 04:10:40 pm
Two of David's tech problems today seem to have the same 'clean the contacts' solution.
1) Canon EOS camera 'Error 01'
2) Random LOUD notes on Clavinova CLP-585
Back to basics...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on October 13, 2017, 05:03:25 am
You know how your NAS is supposed to talk to an ntp server to make sure it knows what date and time it is?  And you know when you shut down said NAS, because you're away for a month, and you switch it back on, and the said NAS, whether by accident or design, forgets it's supposed to talk to the ntp server and assumes the date and time are the same as they were when you turned it off?

Yes, exactly like that.  On two devices :-\
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on October 16, 2017, 11:19:18 pm
Just did a Windoze update for the first time in a looooooooooooong time and the lapdancer is still working  :o
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on October 17, 2017, 02:32:39 pm
I've just found a bit of SQL someone's written which stumped me. The code is effectively:

Code: [Select]
select decode(column_name, null, null, column_name)
from table_name

Why not just use

Code: [Select]
select column_name
from table_name

?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on October 17, 2017, 04:50:31 pm
Q: What does that red light on the front of the WD NAS signify?

Quote from: TFM
The following faults trigger this state:
• Disk SMART failure
• Data volume does not exist
• System volume does not exist
• System thermal shutdown (75° C)

Ulp!

Edit: Or because it's 96% full because stupid Macrium Reflect orphaned four backup sets from before I embiggened the SSD in August.  Old crap removed, light now a soothing blue again.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on October 17, 2017, 07:14:59 pm
I've just found a bit of SQL someone's written which stumped me. The code is effectively:

Code: [Select]
select decode(column_name, null, null, column_name)
from table_name

Why not just use

Code: [Select]
select column_name
from table_name

?

Just goggled it, cos it's not any T-SQL I know.  It's coracle  and I quote "The Oracle/PLSQL DECODE function has the functionality of an IF-THEN-ELSE statement...."

I haven't looked any further than that, but it looks like something like the T-SQL coalesce function which lets you extract the first non-null value from a set of columns*.

*I expect you know that, but just in case you didn't.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on October 17, 2017, 09:46:24 pm
I've just found a bit of SQL someone's written which stumped me. The code is effectively:

Code: [Select]
select decode(column_name, null, null, column_name)
from table_name

Why not just use

Code: [Select]
select column_name
from table_name

?

LOL

It's good practice to deal with nulls, otherwise unintended bad things can happen, eg if you're going to use a string function on the result the idiom is
Code: [Select]
select decode(column_name, null, 'null', column_name)
from table_name

I would put your colleague's version in the same box as the very common
Code: [Select]
if (variable == true)
{
  do_stuff();
}

It's harmless but shows the author to be a complete idiot.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on October 17, 2017, 10:01:35 pm
I've just found a bit of SQL someone's written which stumped me. The code is effectively:

Code: [Select]
select decode(column_name, null, null, column_name)
from table_name

Why not just use

Code: [Select]
select column_name
from table_name

?

Just goggled it, cos it's not any T-SQL I know.  It's coracle  and I quote "The Oracle/PLSQL DECODE function has the functionality of an IF-THEN-ELSE statement...."

I haven't looked any further than that, but it looks like something like the T-SQL coalesce function which lets you extract the first non-null value from a set of columns*.

*I expect you know that, but just in case you didn't.

Nested DECODE is fucking horrible to look through and get any meaning from it  :demon: I found that example deep in the guts of just such a horrible beast. You can use CASE in Oracle SQL these days, but some of my colleagues seem to be rather sadistic.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on October 18, 2017, 08:43:28 am
Could be worse.  It could have GOTOs in it :demon:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on October 22, 2017, 12:29:44 am
I'm giving win10 a go, mainly because reasons. Been trying for an hour to reassign a key to be my mute key. In Linux that was dead easy even if it was already assigned to something else. Anyone here knows how to get the key on my keyboard that by default is calculator to become mute. No I don't want a combo I just want one key just like Linux did and like volume up and down do
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on October 22, 2017, 08:48:08 am
Unless it is supported in your keyboard (many do) not sure you can without a little hacking ... something like nircmd http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/nircmd.html may do the job. Alternatively, just use the key combo ;)

If you're new to W10, (or not new but never looked at shortcuts) it is worth having a shufti at https://support.microsoft.com/en-gb/help/12445/windows-keyboard-shortcuts although having said that, one of my faves Win-Shft-S for the snipper, doesn't seem to be listed.

ETA - this may help, too https://www.microsoft.com/accessories/en-gb/support/how-to/keyboard/reassign-keys
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Vince on October 22, 2017, 11:01:31 am
I've just found a bit of SQL someone's written which stumped me. The code is effectively:

Code: [Select]
select decode(column_name, null, null, column_name)
from table_name

Why not just use

Code: [Select]
select column_name
from table_name

?
I've seen that sort of construct before. It happens when the simple solution doesn't produce the desire results, where the decode did.
I'm sure that not all nulls have the same value.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on October 22, 2017, 11:46:22 am
Is that a situation where null entries would not be returned unless specifically requested through the decode? Does Oracle return nulls when selecting rows and is it SQL or PLSQL code?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on October 22, 2017, 04:53:30 pm
Unless it is supported in your keyboard (many do) not sure you can without a little hacking ... something like nircmd http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/nircmd.html may do the job. Alternatively, just use the key combo ;)

If you're new to W10, (or not new but never looked at shortcuts) it is worth having a shufti at https://support.microsoft.com/en-gb/help/12445/windows-keyboard-shortcuts although having said that, one of my faves Win-Shft-S for the snipper, doesn't seem to be listed.

ETA - this may help, too https://www.microsoft.com/accessories/en-gb/support/how-to/keyboard/reassign-keys
Ha! It is Micky$oft keyboard but is not supported by the Mouse and Keyboard Center. The key opens up calculator, as it did in Linux yet I was able to tell it to mute.  I tried nirsoft but got no joy. need more hacking.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on October 22, 2017, 05:00:46 pm
Is that a situation where null entries would not be returned unless specifically requested through the decode? Does Oracle return nulls when selecting rows and is it SQL or PLSQL code?

For that to be the case, wouldn't the statement be decode(column_name, null, "null", column_name) ?


I've been having a play with pxelinux. Thus far I've managed to add pxe options for debian net install (i386, amd64) and DRBL live (i386, amd64).

I need to have a look into rolling my own distro that will launch desktop -> browser -> hit a certain URL. When I can master that, we can start running the Gigabyte Brixen used to display monitoring information at work sans disks.

I need to dig into chaining in Windows Deployment Services too.

PXE Boot Menu:
(https://i.imgur.com/OFu6mrf.png)

PXE Booted DRBL:
(https://i.imgur.com/xESOT5X.png)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on October 22, 2017, 07:08:36 pm
Unless it is supported in your keyboard (many do) not sure you can without a little hacking ... something like nircmd http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/nircmd.html may do the job. Alternatively, just use the key combo ;)

If you're new to W10, (or not new but never looked at shortcuts) it is worth having a shufti at https://support.microsoft.com/en-gb/help/12445/windows-keyboard-shortcuts although having said that, one of my faves Win-Shft-S for the snipper, doesn't seem to be listed.

ETA - this may help, too https://www.microsoft.com/accessories/en-gb/support/how-to/keyboard/reassign-keys


Ha! It is Micky$oft keyboard but is not supported by the Mouse and Keyboard Center. The key opens up calculator, as it did in Linux yet I was able to tell it to mute.  I tried nirsoft but got no joy. need more hacking.

Try here....https://www.microsoft.com/accessories/en-gb/downloads
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on October 23, 2017, 09:15:55 am
I came across this URL https://www.macave.leclerc/ and thought "That's an unusual TLD ... really?"

And yes, http://data.iana.org/TLD/tlds-alpha-by-domain.txt it is, I must have missed that change. Scrolling through the list produces on or two "oh rly?" It appears for c $200K, .narwhal could be yours
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on October 23, 2017, 11:16:46 pm
Well, after 7 years they have finally agreed to upgrade my desktop at work (Dell 730, 16Gb RAM. I must have been a good boy because they approved the spec I gave them - i7, 512Gb SSD, 32Gb RAM, GeForce 730 graphics card. Now, where am I going to find another 2 monitors to get the most out of this..
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on October 24, 2017, 12:10:15 pm
Error 503 Backend is unhealthy

That's candid. We've all had one of those mornings when we've had to scurry off to the cubicle, sweat on brow and praying there's no one else in there to overhear our tectonic bowel motions.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on November 02, 2017, 03:24:31 pm
I've just learned that:

a) There's a printer on the International Space Station
b) It's an Epson Stylus Color 800
c) They're about to replace it with a customised (to remove the scanning/fax components) HP all-in-one.

I'll be in the corner, despairing for the human race.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on November 02, 2017, 03:59:18 pm
Reminds me of the daisy-wheel printer on a US sub in The Hunt for Red October. Just about the daftest thing they could have used.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on November 13, 2017, 03:42:12 pm
Installed High Sierra last night.

Why oh why has the font I use for Notes changed?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on November 13, 2017, 04:20:17 pm
You were obviously using the wrong one, and they fixed it.

A bit like effing Firefox, who brought out tab groups back when I was developing my routing site. I set one up specially for useful Internet & routing stuff I had found. I went looking for it this morning: FF has discontinued the feature.  Obviously I shouldn't have wanted to use it.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on November 13, 2017, 07:42:42 pm
Apple appear to be having their security claims challenged https://www.wired.com/story/hackers-say-broke-face-id-security/


I wonder if you could :

a) 3-d print fingerprints
b) 3-d print fingerprint gloves.......
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on November 13, 2017, 07:59:00 pm
So they fooled facial recognition by making a realistic copy of the face? Blimey, who knew.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Greenbank on November 13, 2017, 08:04:38 pm
So they fooled facial recognition by making a realistic copy of the face? Blimey, who knew.

Ah, but they had made lots of claims that their facial recognition could not be fooled by masks.

They even had Tim Cook showing off the masks they used in their testing:-

(https://static6.businessinsider.com/image/59b82af49803c513098b4d39-480/apple-faceid-masks.png)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on November 13, 2017, 08:39:53 pm
Well that's, erm, a bit stupid. Mind you, you note that people become dumber through proximity to computers. I figure they put out some kind of ray. The knock sense clean out of your head. After a while you can't even spell 'hubris.' I see Tim's problem there. Those faces are huge. Making normal size faces was always going to be better.

Mind you, rather than go through the trouble of making an exact likeness, just go Jack Bauer with a screwdriver and ask nicely. TV, unlike computers, makes us smarter.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: vorsprung on November 14, 2017, 10:01:27 pm
I've taught myself go and put a project on github with the go stuff in https://github.com/vorsprung/parameter-ssm-template
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: fuaran on November 16, 2017, 08:39:00 pm
The new Firefox Quantum seems to be rather fast.
Though the square tabs look ugly. And it seems to have messed up the font sizes on some sites.  Especially YACF - everything is rather small. Zooming in works, but it forgets that when I refresh the page.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: dave r on November 17, 2017, 06:23:25 pm
The new Firefox Quantum seems to be rather fast.
Though the square tabs look ugly. And it seems to have messed up the font sizes on some sites.  Especially YACF - everything is rather small. Zooming in works, but it forgets that when I refresh the page.

I've installed it on my Lubuntu box but cant open it as it gives a parsing error, XML Parsing Error: Undefined Entity location: Chrome:// Browser/content/Browser.xul line number 1165, column 7:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: dave r on November 18, 2017, 08:59:28 am
The new Firefox Quantum seems to be rather fast.
Though the square tabs look ugly. And it seems to have messed up the font sizes on some sites.  Especially YACF - everything is rather small. Zooming in works, but it forgets that when I refresh the page.

I've installed it on my Lubuntu box but cant open it as it gives a parsing error, XML Parsing Error: Undefined Entity location: Chrome:// Browser/content/Browser.xul line number 1165, column 7:

Sorted it, uninstalled it, removed the PPA, then installed the normal firefox and upgraded it. Its running OK now, its quick but looks a bit like a tonka toy.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on November 21, 2017, 09:31:59 am
The provider for our club website changed the handling for .htaccess/.htpasswd some time in the last couple of years, but it went unnoticed because in the meantime El Prez got Serif cut-rate via the FFCT, decided it was the bee's knees and clobbered everything in the www directory.  Now he's realizing that he can't put club docs on line for anyone and wants to resurrect the old system I put in, which is still there in a protected subdirectory.

Trouble is, the provider's description of his implementation of .htaccess/.htpasswd doesn't match what the server actually does. I've been batting my head against it for a couple of days and getting nothing but #500.


And fwiw I agreed about FFQ's square-cornered tabs. OK, they want speed and curvy ones take a little longer to draw, but surely not that long.

Noticed in passing that refreshing a page does not refresh the page icon, which is annoying when you're trying various designs.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on November 21, 2017, 09:49:10 am
And as usual, no sooner bitched about something than the solution emerges: typo in our domain name in the AuthUserFile line.  :-[  :facepalm:

Now I need to sort out all the dislocated paths... oh Mother.

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on November 24, 2017, 12:48:12 pm
Hurrah: DJ Random has played all the musical tunes in my iTunes library :thumbsup:

Bah: A lengthy session of tag-jibbling can no longer be put off :'(
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on November 25, 2017, 11:07:40 am
Been frobbing with OpenLayers2 and the Flickr API. Wondering if I should try learning OpenLayers3 or just get a life  :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on November 25, 2017, 02:22:10 pm
Hurrah: DJ Random has played all the musical tunes in my iTunes library :thumbsup:

Wow—how many days/weeks?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on November 25, 2017, 06:34:12 pm
Somewhere north of two years off and on.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mrs Pingu on December 03, 2017, 03:29:53 pm
I have just fixed my Android keyboard not working in Chrome on the Facebook page issue that I've had for aeons, just by turning off auto correct (tho it works fine with predictive text). I wish I'd found that out ages ago.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on December 04, 2017, 08:45:13 am
All of a sud my W7 will not overwrite a strip the height of a horizontal scroll bar, just above the task bar. Maximized windows stop there, leaving a strip of the background image visible.  It'll probably fix itself when I reboot, but ICBA just now.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on December 05, 2017, 07:30:56 pm
Trying to jibble an Excel spreadsheet to generate something that can be used to create a Several of text files is giving me a headache.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Zipperhead on December 05, 2017, 11:43:30 pm
Trying to jibble an Excel spreadsheet to generate something that can be used to create a Several of text files is giving me a headache.

Grasshopper, you need to study harder https://youtu.be/OrwBc6PwAcY (https://youtu.be/OrwBc6PwAcY)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on December 06, 2017, 05:46:57 pm
Trying to jibble an Excel spreadsheet to generate something that can be used to create a Several of text files is giving me a headache.

I have achieved a minor degree of success in that text files of the appropriate format and - crucially - prettiness, can now be produced.  With an awful lot of copying and pasting.  Now I just need to repeat the exercise four times and hand-jibble about 18,000 numbers :'(
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mcshroom on December 30, 2017, 09:09:29 pm
Why does my computer think it's always in Sunderland? As far as I'm aware it's never even been to Sunderland, and for that matter I don't think I have either ???
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on December 30, 2017, 09:11:09 pm
I either live in outer Manchester or central Bradford according to my IP.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on December 30, 2017, 10:13:33 pm
Arnold, Nottingham.  Which does at least make sense, in a not-really-at-all kind of way.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on December 31, 2017, 10:23:52 am
Mercifully, Farcebok seems to have got the message that I don't live in York.  But it still tells me that I'm simultaneously logged in from London, York and Santa Clara CA ???
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on December 31, 2017, 10:50:03 am
Someone keeps attempting to log in to my apple account in Middlesborough. It took ages to work out it's actually me but somewhere else entirely.

Trip Advisor regularly congratulate me on being one of the top reviewers in Sutton. This despite the other part of them knowing exactly where I am and barring me from reviewing local businesses.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on January 09, 2018, 05:40:43 am
Gentlemen, if your The Product dishes out so many error messages that notepad++ cannot open the log file, because it is too big, there is probably something very wrong at a fairly fundamental level.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Zipperhead on January 09, 2018, 02:06:11 pm
Gentlemen, if your The Product dishes out so many error messages that notepad++ cannot open the log file, because it is too big, there is probably something very wrong at a fairly fundamental level.

You might wish to meet some of our web developers. They switched on some extra "diagnostics" on all of one of our customers web servers. 20G per server per day. Did they bother to read through all those logs to find what they were looking for? Did they buggery.

Is your bear peckish?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on January 18, 2018, 08:49:35 am
Fucking Amazon Fucking Search. How the holy hell can they get away with something quite so shit? In here rather than rant coz I might be missing summat essential that might help. Plus it's all a bit of a laugh really.

Previously, I'd really only noticed how shit the book search was. For a purveyor of the written word, this was a bit on the odd side. You want to search for books by Michael Bond? Certainly sir, here are three hundred results including tomes by Dan Brown and Charlotte Rampling. In German. Oh, you've found our little button that specifies the author? Aren't YOU clever. but if you think we're going to help you by taking away the foreign language results or giving you a way to display the results more usefully or even to page through the results faster, you've got another think coming.

Anyhow, I'm after one of the volumes of Atlas des cols des alpes (vol 3). Logical then, I search for it, eh?

(https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-6x9hcmJS1CA/WmBblo_mqmI/AAAAAAABEzc/j-VfVPk-Cc0kHzbqMxyOkqvW2wjpG6pZgCKgBGAs/s1024/Atlas%2Bdes%2Bcols.png)

(which is a bit of a laugh from the resulting French) OK. Challenge. Let's put quotes around the phrase, that should work eh?

(https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-gBPOsGukOQg/WmBblk4fTTI/AAAAAAABEzc/xZCyqELCqykAslpVLn5d3fP3Txl9PX6-wCKgBGAs/s1600/Atlas%2B2.png)

 :facepalm:

Right Amazon you fuckers. Atlas +des +cols +Alps Yesssssss!!!! Still no useful results on Amazon UK (>£30 for the volume) but I won.

Amazon.fr was my friend, search worked normally and I found someone with a copy for €12
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on January 18, 2018, 09:00:39 am
Yes, Amazon.

Looking for a new portable hard drive the other day. Select all the options, select 2TB, sort by price.

Why do I then have to navigate through pages of leads, caddies, plugs before I find an actual entire portable drive?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on January 22, 2018, 10:38:18 pm
Learned something today and confirmed something I knew.

Fired up a guest OS in virtualbox that was created in Linux, on my windows rig. Rather cool that, me thinks, first time I ever tried and needed to do so.

Though I either need to do this more often or have a guest OS without various programs that need to sync and update ever few minutes. As dropbox, skype, outlook and the OS itself etc. Went into up update mode and drained the bandwidth, RAM and CPU while it is trying to figure out what I have been up too in the last five month. So I went to make a cuppa while I wait ...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on January 28, 2018, 09:33:07 am
A pome:

<textarea>
When I double-click a word
In this editor of text
I just want to mark the letters
And not the bloody space
Before the next.
</textarea>

(Yes, I have just been reading Brian Bilston.)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on January 30, 2018, 01:11:37 pm
Harrow Times story
(http://www.harrowtimes.co.uk/resources/images/7335822/?htype=0&type=mc3)

'Students take part in digital project for Comic Relief'

Methinks the aspect ratio of this image needs Comic Relief...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on February 03, 2018, 07:02:35 pm
Backup!  You normally take abut two hours so why have you been running for ten?  Explain yourself!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Polar Bear on February 03, 2018, 07:10:36 pm
Chrome:  Why do you choose to freeze my machine every few months?   Delete, reinstall, problem solved.

I do clean down history regularly so I am perplexed as to what is causing these issues but at least I know the solution.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Beardy on February 03, 2018, 08:42:21 pm
Ponders: am I the only person in the western world to have never used chrome?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: SoreTween on February 04, 2018, 08:07:31 am
No
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on February 04, 2018, 02:36:21 pm
Chrome is the new IE6.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Polar Bear on February 04, 2018, 03:38:22 pm
I just love it when geeky types give you a tech slapdown!    ;)   :thumbsup:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on February 04, 2018, 03:42:30 pm
To be fair, I'm using Chromium right now.

Just like I used IE6 back in the day.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on February 04, 2018, 06:04:09 pm
I find that Chrome periodically stops working on particular web pages (Expedia the other day wouldn't go beyond 'we're finding you...') but worked fine in Safari. I'm mostly moved over to Safari which seems to have fewer issues and is so fast it's usually found the answer before I've thought of the question.

In other news, aspect ratios, you know my thoughts. I don't understand what is wrong with the sort of people that do that and don't appear to notice. Same with TVs until HDMI took over.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on February 07, 2018, 02:08:53 pm
Backup!  You normally take abut two hours so why have you been running for ten?  Explain yourself!

Yesterday's backup: I/O Performance: Read 1.1 Gb/s - Write 92.7 Mb/s

Rebooted NAS

Today's backup: I/O Performance: Read 1.1 Gb/s - Write 792.2 Mb/s

Now that's more like it.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: freeflow on February 07, 2018, 03:51:09 pm
No broadband yesterday.  I waited several hours after checking that there were no planned outages. Rang Zen to ask if there were issues and after a short delay was told that there was 'maintenance' ongoing and that they had people in the exchange.  Service would be resumed by 5:30 pm (I was ringing just before midday).  About an hour later broadband came back.  Download speed was only 38 Mbps.






















Trouble is, the best I'd ever had before the outage was 1.4 Mbps.   I wonder how long the new speed will last.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on February 12, 2018, 08:29:46 am
Just had El Presidente on the blower.  His 2-year-old laptop's mother board has gone phut.  Apart from a trip to Quebec last summer it had never left his desk. Are they that fragile these days?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Beardy on February 12, 2018, 09:46:25 am
I have managed to confuse myself with email
I have; two apple accounts, three email providers, five domains, multiple email addresses, email forwarding and email address aliasing across domains and providers, two ipads, one  iPhone one desktop. Add to this mix; six users (family members) plus various iPhones, macbooks, ipads, desktops etc. Oh, and family sharing between my own apple accounts and between my and Dr Beardy's (Mrs) apple accounts.

I _think_ all my devices are logged on as the same person with the mail accounts set up accordingly BUT I'm getting imessages and text messages seemingly randomly on my devices. My outgoing emails are also confusing me, largely because, probably due to my sknflintness, my email providers don't support outgoing email aliasing on my accounts, so I have to change the 'from' address on replies to one that will work. <$deity knows what my correspondents think of my ever changing emails.

I'd go and sit in a corner and rock backwards and forwards if I didn't have to go and grapple with the monster that is GDPR! 
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on February 12, 2018, 10:48:18 am
I'm in a workshop for summat to do with quite a big system. The guys that put it together have  a dashboard that includes a counter that counts the number of system hits, looking like an odometer, starting with a unit wheel. And going up to approximately 1.5 billion per day. wheeeeee!  ;D
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on February 12, 2018, 11:04:34 am
Just had El Presidente on the blower.  His 2-year-old laptop's mother board has gone phut.  Apart from a trip to Quebec last summer it had never left his desk. Are they that fragile these days?
Usually not. Have multiple laptops around house, belonging to children etc. Not had a motherboard blow on any of them.

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on February 12, 2018, 02:18:37 pm
Just had El Presidente on the blower.  His 2-year-old laptop's mother board has gone phut.  Apart from a trip to Quebec last summer it had never left his desk. Are they that fragile these days?
Usually not. Have multiple laptops around house, belonging to children etc. Not had a motherboard blow on any of them.

Quite.  Usual failure mode for our laptops is diminishing battery life, followed by terminal lack of RAM upgradability.

Usual failure mode for other people's laptops I've dealt with over the years is Windows, followed by fluff ingestion / fan bearing failure, hard drive failure, lost/broken power supplies and physical damage.  (There's obviously a selection bias here, on account of only seeing the out-of-warranty broken ones, and whose crusty laptops I'm willing to expend effort on.)  Some of these issues have affected our laptops too (particularly fluff and OS problems), but since we're able to deal with them they don't really count as failure.

I think barakta had several cases of logic board failure on Apple laptops in the 1990s...


Not that desktop computers are that much better, they're just an order of magnitude easier to maintain/diagnose/repair, can hold a lot more fluff before performance is affected, and are extremely unlikely to be dropped.  Over the years I've had several motherboards fail due to the capacitor plague (fortunately now seems to be a thing of the past); countless fan failures (cheap and easy to replace unless it's the graphics card), a couple of PSU failures (one was repairable); various dodgy hard drives; a few instances of dodgy RAM (mosly the eBuyer value RAM favoured by PSOs in the early 2000s); one small fire (graphics card) and a CPU damaged by overheating (original Athlon).  I think the only really interesting failure of someone else's desktop I encountered was the aftermath of a lightning strike.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on February 12, 2018, 04:53:43 pm
Yes, well, that's what the bloke in the shop where he bought it told him.   From what El P. told me, though, the machine will actually run about one time in 30 that it's turned on, which sounds less like a motherboard failure than power supply, or something between the supply and the board. I don't have sufficient HW nous to get in there & boogie, though.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on February 12, 2018, 05:08:42 pm
Agreed.  There will be plenty of power gubbins on the motherboard that can fail in the usual PSUish ways.  But also boring things like loose RAM might give the same symptoms.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ScumOfTheRoad on February 12, 2018, 05:14:10 pm
T42  You should be looking for a beep code or a light code.
When motherboards cannot boot up far enough to display on the screen they will try to tell you what the failure is by beeping a Morse code like pattern. Dells signal to you by using the front LED lights.
Of course a total PSU failure results in nowt beep code. But at least try to listen to the poor thing in a quiet room. It may be asking for help.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on February 12, 2018, 09:16:55 pm
I think I am going mad
I cannot see any way of creating a jobseeker account on this site:

https://www.jobvite.com/ (https://www.jobvite.com/)

There is a login page, but no account creation. Attempting to login and entering details just gets 'no account exists' message.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on February 13, 2018, 08:08:22 am
@Kim & Mr. C.: Looks like the first thing to do is to tell El Prez not to junk the thing out of hand.  Could be a hiding to nothing if PSU stuff on motherboard is fried, though...  And as I mentioned, I've no idea how to fix it.  I know the bloke who told him it was kaput and I'm pretty sure he'd have pressed home RAM etc. - it's not exactly good publicity to flog a machine that craps out in 2 years.  I got my my tower PC from him and it's still going strong after 5 or 6 years.

I'll toddle up to El P's place and have a gander. If nothing else he has half-decent coffee. Thanks, both.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: mrcharly-YHT on February 13, 2018, 09:08:12 am
Is it truly out of warranty? Some companies run a longer warranty than others. Might be worth checking (it depends on the type of failure).

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on February 13, 2018, 11:08:41 am
I think you'd have a reasonable expectation that a laptop should work for more than two years. I took a four year old Mac Mini back to Apple and uttered the phrase 'sale of goods' and while they didn't look entirely enthused, they replaced a faulty wifi card at no cost to me.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on February 13, 2018, 02:09:20 pm
Back from El Prez's.  Laptop is totally unresponsive. Well, the power lights come on, but they don't flicker and there are no beeps. We did have a gander under the keyboard, but nothing was apparent - no surprise, given my lack of knowledge. Even a swift anointing with El P's espresso had no effect.

He's left with a creaky old mini-tower PC.  It's a Pentium 4 and the clock resets to 2002 when it's unplugged because etc.  It has a mix of RAM card frequencies and capacities to a total of 4 Gb.  He has W7 Pro on it, and it crawls. Performance Index is 2.7. It must be paging like buggery at the speed of a dead snail. The motherboard'll probably take 4 Gb but I doubt if that'd make much difference. Heigh ho.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hulver on February 13, 2018, 04:09:27 pm
Back from El Prez's.  Laptop is totally unresponsive. Well, the power lights come on, but they don't flicker and there are no beeps. We did have a gander under the keyboard, but nothing was apparent - no surprise, given my lack of knowledge. Even a swift anointing with El P's espresso had no effect.

He's left with a creaky old mini-tower PC.  It's a Pentium 4 and the clock resets to 2002 when it's unplugged because etc.  It has a mix of RAM card frequencies and capacities to a total of 4 Gb.  He has W7 Pro on it, and it crawls. Performance Index is 2.7. It must be paging like buggery at the speed of a dead snail. The motherboard'll probably take 4 Gb but I doubt if that'd make much difference. Heigh ho.
I have seen that before when the battery is completely toasted. Taking the battery out and running it just from the mains adaptor made it work.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on February 14, 2018, 12:06:36 pm
Another one from the "playing with the big boys" box. I just got to poke a finger at an Ethernet network card. One that runs without switches. At speeds greater than 600Gb/s. (yes, that's 60x what you might have thought was the maximum speed)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Beardy on February 14, 2018, 12:24:08 pm
Another one from the "playing with the big boys" box. I just got to poke a finger at an Ethernet network card. One that runs without switches. At speeds greater than 600Gb/s. (yes, that's 60x what you might have thought was the maximum speed)
Sheesh. In only 2001 I remember putting in a 20Gb/s WAN in and we only managed that dizzying headline speed by cheating and have two routes[1] between each node. Admittedly the fibre between major nodes was carrying multiples of that by the use of different colours over the fibre 

1. The two routes were totally diverse[2] from end to end for redundancy reasons, but that didn't stop us making the double speed claim :)
2. this required lots of hole and trench digging and occasioned this (then) IT PM visiting site to check that cables had actually been laid as I was being told.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on February 18, 2018, 01:23:29 pm
Just noticed that our LAN disk had its 10th birthday last week.  It's runs about 10 hrs/day and maybe 350 days/year. That's 35,000 hours so far.

Now that I've mentioned it, it'll probably crash.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on February 20, 2018, 06:01:17 pm
Maplins is circling the plughole https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/02/20/crunch_time_maplin_in_talks_to_sell_the_business/  :(
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on February 20, 2018, 06:09:10 pm
Maplins is circling the plughole https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/02/20/crunch_time_maplin_in_talks_to_sell_the_business/  :(

This is what they get for not selling battery holders.  >:(
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on February 20, 2018, 09:34:58 pm
I was down in Emba at Feanor Outposts last weekend, and I had need of a laptop for Garmin fettling.

We do have several here, but they all belong to other family members.
I do have a couple of old ones, so I dug one out and charged it up.
It booted up, into Windows Vista!

That would be OK for what I needed.
It had a PCMCIA WiFi card ( an old Cisco A/B/G one ).

Only it had *no* USB ports!

Bah!
So I stole one of the kids laptops for the weekend.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on February 24, 2018, 04:23:48 pm
Hmm not sure what is going but over the last week or so, we have had at least 5 different companies we get emails from. Banks, pet insurance etc. Sending out emails to their list to only come back a few minutes later saying oops. All ranging from a merry crimbo email in Feb (not sure if they are late or early) to using "Dear wrong name".
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Paul H on February 24, 2018, 04:47:22 pm
Maplins is circling the plughole https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/02/20/crunch_time_maplin_in_talks_to_sell_the_business/  :(
Useful to know, I have some money on one of their cards, might be worth finding something to spend it on while there's still the chance.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on February 25, 2018, 12:52:47 am
Finally getting some monitoring and visbility around the state of my sprawling home network:

(https://i.imgur.com/3UZJ0Sr.png)

UPS battery is a bit cold

(https://i.imgur.com/YC7KTwN.png)

 :o

On Edit: That second graph is shrivelled down to a size that makes it almost imperceptible. It shows the UPS battery temperature dipping down to 5°C.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TimO on February 25, 2018, 12:36:10 pm
Maplins is circling the plughole https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/02/20/crunch_time_maplin_in_talks_to_sell_the_business/  :(

Many <cough> many years ago, I used to get the Maplins catalogue, for the data that was available in it, and to drool over semiconductors that I couldn't afford !

With the Internet, electronics data is easily available, as are all the exotic components, which I suppose is why Maplins went away from components, into more macroscopic items; PC, gadgets etc, which was originally a small part of their stock.

Of course, they're still competing with the online distributors, and I've only been into Maplins 2 or 3 times in the last decade, looking for stuff that I wanted to buy now.  Unless they change their business model, they're not going to survive.  If they hadn't existed, I would just have waited a few days, for delivery from elsewhere.

I suspect that's going to be true progressively more and more with many more high street stores, even more than is happening already.  I buy a lot of items online now, with delivery typically being anywhere from an hour to a week.  Even with stuff sent for a tiny cost from China, it frequently arrives in a couple of weeks.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on February 25, 2018, 01:04:44 pm
Maplin hasn't been the same since they stopped posting you items free of charge when you turned up and they didn't have stock.  The rot really set in when they sacked the old beardy guy at the components counter and filled the shop with DJ kit and RC toys.  It became even worse when you couldn't even rely on them for the sort of components you might use for wiring up hi-fi systems or installing pretty LEDs on things.

Distress purchases aren't enough to run a business, and the consumer tat they've made the cornerstone of their sales is now readily available elsewhere.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on February 25, 2018, 02:04:29 pm
I did buy a reel of speaker cable from them last year, but why does a 20m reel of 2-core wire cost twice as much as a 20m Cat 6 network cable?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Jurek on February 25, 2018, 02:19:19 pm
Yesterday, I bought £15.00 worth of cable ties (black, in three different sizes, seeing as you are asking) from my local Maplins.
I must confess, if they fold, I'll be crestfallen.
It's has been damned handy on numerous occasions to saunter all of five minutes before reaching my local one.
If I need bits for electrics at four on a Sunday afternoon, to fill my Sunday evening with unbridled soldering, there aren't too many other places that are likely to be able to help.
Oh, and up until around a year ago, my local branch had A Woman working in it.
Since then, they've reduced their staff from around six or seven, to two.:(

Oh, while flicking through the Sunday rag in the cafe this morning, I read that it looks like a buyer may've been found.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on February 25, 2018, 04:33:35 pm
Many <cough> many years ago, I used to get the Maplins catalogue, for the data that was available in it, and to drool over semiconductors that I couldn't afford !
+1 Cheapest pin-out manual on the market. I used to tear out and keep the transistor and IC pages.

These days the only things I buy there are Ag conductive paint; dodgy TV zappers, repairing; for the use of and their spray silicone grease for lubricating rubber motors.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on March 01, 2018, 02:12:00 pm
Mobile phone "always on" is creepy. But cool.

Signed,

A Google Fanboi

ETA: Not that cool that I haven't switched it off now.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Tim Hall on March 07, 2018, 01:10:46 pm
My Pi based Kodi refused to play any videos or music last night, claiming items were removed from the library.  Prime suspect was the external HDD had died but plugging that in elsewhere showed it worked.
Delving further showed it wasn't mounted. Much reading of t'internet to find out where it should mount, trying to remember where i'd told it to mount, what tweaks I'd done etc and I was no further forward.

Then I swapped the USB port on the Pi and lo! it mounted all by itself. Next time, try the obvious.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: spesh on March 08, 2018, 02:25:13 pm
I for one welcome our robot overlords.

https://www.theverge.com/circuitbreaker/2018/3/7/17092334/amazon-alexa-devices-strange-laughter
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on March 19, 2018, 09:31:14 pm
I awarded Visual Studio's Intellisenesence* a gold star today.  A rare, a very very very rare, event.  It suggested {mumble}Schemata as the correct name for a function returning a List of type {mumble}Schema.




*I know whereof I speak.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on March 22, 2018, 12:03:01 pm
First I can't get Flickr, now I can't get my bank GGRRR!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on March 22, 2018, 08:07:37 pm
Oh I do so like Microsoft maths.  Today we have the 15.6.3 update, but given the issues M$ have with counting it could very well be the 15.7.9 upgrade.  Who can tell?

(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/810/27087993818_afb7db42ea_z_d.jpg)
LurkOnnaBike/flickr
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on March 30, 2018, 02:18:25 pm
The 'Down' cursor key on my MacBook Air seems dead.
Everything else works OK.
Suggestions?

David thinks there could be dirt in the contacts. I don't really want him to attempt to dismantlethis...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on March 30, 2018, 02:37:58 pm
If the key travel feels fine, dirt or broken/corroded tracks on the membrane, at a guess.

This sort of thing is frustrating to try to fix when its an easily dismantled and trivially easy to replace desktop keyboard.  Repairing anything on an laptop, especially a Mega-Global Fruit Corporation one is going to be a much more expensive circle of hell.

You may have to replace the whole keyboard unit.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: SteveC on March 30, 2018, 02:44:14 pm
MrsC poured Kir into her MacBook a few years ago. I think there was only one key affected. Cost was about £120 from the Apple Store to get it fixed.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ScumOfTheRoad on March 30, 2018, 02:45:37 pm
I would agree with dirt in the contacts.
I have never done this with laptop keys, but I would suggest getting some screen cleaning spray.
Saturate the key with a good few squirts of the cleaning fluid. Leave for a bit.
Then press the key a good few times.  I guess ispropyl alcohol would do the job too.

I guess further that cleaning spray with a water base should not be allowed to soak into a laptop circuit board.
SO maybe alcohol would be a better bet.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Jurek on March 30, 2018, 02:50:43 pm
If memory serves, some early Macbooks had keyboards which could be unclipped from the body of the machine, and the keyboard immersed in water (I know it sounds drastic, but it might be worth researching) to rid it of anything causing the keys to stick.
Heavy Duty drying with rice / airing cupboard would, needless to say, have to follow.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on March 30, 2018, 02:52:21 pm
Yes, pure IPA[1] if you're going to do that sort of thing.  Problem is that the contacts are sandwiched between sheets of flexible plastic, so it may not penetrate without dismantling.


[1] Not the beer, that's strictly for slippy Brompton seat posts.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Jurek on March 30, 2018, 03:04:15 pm
Yes, pure IPA[1] if you're going to do that sort of thing.  Problem is that the contacts are sandwiched between sheets of flexible plastic, so it may not penetrate without dismantling.


[1] Not the beer, that's strictly for slippy Brompton seat posts.
Indeed. But the stickiness may be taking place between the outer surface of the membrane and the actuator / key.
As I understand it, the membranes themselves are sealed - although I've no idea  to what IP...

FWIW my No.2 iMac (2015)  is on its third bluetooth keyboard.
Thanks to spillages.
Meh!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Jaded on March 30, 2018, 03:08:39 pm
The 'Down' cursor key on my MacBook Air seems dead.
Everything else works OK.
Suggestions?

David thinks there could be dirt in the contacts. I don't really want him to attempt to dismantlethis...

turn it upside down and knock and shake it. and flick the key.

it is astonishing what laptops try and collect...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Jurek on March 30, 2018, 03:10:00 pm
The 'Down' cursor key on my MacBook Air seems dead.
Everything else works OK.
Suggestions?

David thinks there could be dirt in the contacts. I don't really want him to attempt to dismantlethis...

turn it upside down and knock and shake it. and flick the key.

it is astonishing what laptops try and collect...
A very good starting point.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on March 30, 2018, 03:54:50 pm
I had actually tried the IPA before posting, to no effect as the screen had gunk a keyboard print on it and I thought keyboard, screen and this down key might benefit from this.
No effect on down key.
Screen is shiny.

Key travel is OK and doesn't feel gritty. Nearby up key works OK.

Will try shaking but doubt this will help.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on April 19, 2018, 02:10:08 pm
Is there any way to scan software downloaded from the net?

Background - Downloaded a few mac os from tactic.com, via google docs, and would like to check that there is nothing hiding.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on April 22, 2018, 08:39:47 pm
I think a scholar has hacked into Google Maps and school website...

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@53.0719162,-1.3070747,16z (https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@53.0719162,-1.3070747,16z)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: citoyen on May 08, 2018, 10:19:01 am
Bizarre Word glitch #35,927:

I regularly get sent copy from a writer who uses what must be an ancient version of Word - files have the .doc extension rather than .docx. I presume he is using Windows, though I haven't asked him. I'm guessing it's not a recent edition of Windows either, probably XP or something.

When I open these files in Word on my Mac, they are invariably missing the last few lines of copy - or at least, the copy is hidden and I can't access it.

The solution I have worked out is to open the files in Word, save them as plain text, then re-open the text files and save them as .docx. This works reliably.

It's a little irritating, to put it mildly, but I somehow suspect there won't be an easier fix apart from telling the contributor to update his bloody software to something from the 21st century.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: freeflow on May 08, 2018, 04:01:02 pm
You could try saving as rtf or as pure xml before reloading and resaving as docx. Alternatively try loading into libre office writer and saving as docx.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: citoyen on May 08, 2018, 04:34:03 pm
You could try saving as rtf or as pure xml before reloading and resaving as docx. Alternatively try loading into libre office writer and saving as docx.

That doesn't sound like any less faff than what I'm doing though.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on May 08, 2018, 06:51:38 pm
I can see why you'd find it irritating, but the Luddite in me is on the side of your correspondent.  He or she has a WP package that works.  It almost certainly doesn't issue nagging messages to upgrade to the latest "whizzy" cloud* enabled dependent version every 5 minutes.  The fact that you have to jump through a few hoops is not his or her problem. And I'll bet your correspondent is perfectly happy running that WP package on an ancient piece of kit that with an OS out of the ark that doesn't report every damned keystroke to its electronic overlords and most certainly does not need replacing cos it still does what's needed thank you very much.

Of course you could just ask him or her to send documents to you as RTF rather than DOC.  I'm assuming it's most likely to be Word 97 or slightly later which has RTF as one of its supported file formats.  It's an approach I've used successfully when exchanging documents amongst people on wildly different versions  (i.e. the current one and the one just preceding - don't ask) of MS-Word.


*Let someone like Microsoft keep copies of all my documents on a server not under my control?  And edit them with a SAAS programme that I have to renew a licence for every year or lose access forever?  Aye. Right.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: citoyen on May 08, 2018, 07:51:04 pm
The fact that you have to jump through a few hoops is not his or her problem.

Yeah, that's kind of true... up to a point. Needs to be a bit of give and take both ways though. If I had to send him files, would it be my responsibility to convert them to .doc format?

Tbh, it doesn't bother me enough to feel the need to do anything about it. It's irritating but nothing worse than that, otherwise I would have had words with him about it already. I also have to deal with Pages files and Google docs on occasion. I also seem to spend a lot of time helping out technologically incompetent colleagues who can't work out what to do with Pages files and Google docs... FML

Arguably, I'd be within my rights to refuse to accept submissions in any proprietary format (which .doc is), and enforcing such a policy would make life easier for me in some ways, but I don't feel strongly enough about it.

Quote
*Let someone like Microsoft keep copies of all my documents on a server not under my control?  And edit them with a SAAS programme that I have to renew a licence for every year or lose access forever?  Aye. Right.

That's fine as a principle, and obviously I'm not obliged to use Word when there are plenty of other WP packages out there using open file formats.

Different story with Indesign - it's no longer possible to buy it as a standalone program, you have to go down the subscription route, and there are no substitutes because pretty much everyone else in the industry is using Indesign. Quite simply, I wouldn't be able to do my job without Indesign.

I probably do still have an old version of Indesign on disc somewhere but it almost certainly wouldn't be compatible with the OS on my current work computer and even if it were, it wouldn't be able to handle the shared files I work on.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: citoyen on May 08, 2018, 08:17:15 pm
Interestingly, opening the .doc files in Google Docs through my web browser doesn't suffer the same glitch.

I think the real problem is that MS only provides half-hearted support for the Mac versions of its own products. I expect there are plenty of other similar glitches that I haven't encountered... yet.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on May 08, 2018, 11:44:43 pm
Every MS product suffered from the 'what about Windows' problems, every decision made was inflected by Windows, and every product became subservient to needs of Windows, and how that product would benefit Windows. Far enough, it is their biggest product, but it was a business myopia that made it difficult for them to diversify. And they still struggle. That said, they have a huge mountain of cash regardless, so they're probably not about to call me up for business advice.

I do hate the subscription model. I used to have my own copy of Office and I didn't begrudge the £100 or so for a copy that I could use on a couple of years and would be current for five or so years. I'm not paying to subscribe, I don't need continuous development, it's a word processor, spreadsheet etc and already has far more features and functions that I'll ever use. It's a dramatic increase in the cost of ownership (yes, you can still buy a standalone Office for Mac, but of course they deliberately stunt it, and the licensing is one computer only where it used to be five).

I think Adobe are sowing the eventual seeds of their own demise with their subscription model. Photoshop's familiarity, for instance, was gained through wide (and often not entirely legal) usage. They've locked it down to corporates and professionals and tbh, their products while full-featured are starting to look a bit tired. Yes, a lot of workflows are tied into their tools and there's business inertia. But then again, they might want to remember that everyone used to use QuarkXpress, and Indesign was the pretender.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on May 09, 2018, 11:16:37 am
Is there an easy way to determine whether a sudden loss of intertubes in the wee small hours was an issue at The Man's end or my router showing signs of droid rot?  No unusual blinkenlight activity on the latter, but it swore blind it was connected when ping was unable to find Microsith, Farcebok or Google.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on May 09, 2018, 03:29:24 pm
I have had the same, with my ISP between 6-7am and some times at night but not linked to a soap cliffhanger time as this was often random. Though ping tanked to something silly that all the websites I tried to visit my browser kept saying nope nothing to see here or it's dead Jim. I even set up a speed test script that clearly said that my speeds dropped to now't and pings went to yawnville, mostly because there was not pong to my pings.  Should have had about 48 down and 9 up, but doing these times I had about .5 down and .1 up or just nada.

I moaned to my ISP and they said there was no sign that the internet had been cut near or at me. The little green light saying that it was awake and on the ball was on, the light saying that there was a phone line was also on but the most important green one was sometimes not seen.

After some nagging and tos and fros I was told that the ISP don't check or care about the ping.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on May 09, 2018, 06:37:03 pm
I moaned to my ISP and they said there was no sign that the internet had been cut near or at me. The little green light saying that it was awake and on the ball was on, the light saying that there was a phone line was also on but the most important green one was sometimes not seen.

After some nagging and tos and fros I was told that the ISP don't check or care about the ping.

This is what AAISP are for (https://support.aa.net.uk/CQM_Graphs).
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Afasoas on May 11, 2018, 12:02:14 pm
Is there an easy way to determine whether a sudden loss of intertubes in the wee small hours was an issue at The Man's end or my router showing signs of droid rot?  No unusual blinkenlight activity on the latter, but it swore blind it was connected when ping was unable to find Microsith, Farcebok or Google.

Some external monitoring on both connections might be beneficial..
You could try uptime robot, for instance. At it's free tier, it will do checks 5 minutely and that includes pings.

If you want minutely checks, you can use pingdom. But you only get one check for free (or two if you send a tweet) and at the free tier they are http only. Which means running a webserver. To be fair you could setup a raspberry Pi at each site, install nginx and forward port 80 to them.

The tricky part, is the IP address of the internet connections constantly changing. So you would need a Dynamic DNS service (I think there are some free ones, noip.com?) and a client for the dynamic DNS service at each site.

None of the above is unfeasible but, it's probably not worth the effort for most folk.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: cygnet on May 11, 2018, 01:37:49 pm
Clickbait fail:
(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/981/41136960825_ba499bfc8b.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/25F8Fgg) (https://flic.kr/p/25F8Fgg)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on May 17, 2018, 06:07:43 pm
Thought I'd post this as others may be Arirbnb-ing, too.

Airbnb now ask for ID verification

Cue a conversation with their hell desk

Quote

You have asked me to submit sensitive personal information for the purpose of identity validation. Please confirm that you will effectively destroy this information once you have validated my identity and provide me with confirmation that this has been done, thank you.

Quote
Hello Ham, this is Glenda from Airbnb. I will be here to assist you with. ID verification is essentail [sic] for security purposes, rest assure that Airbnb has the best security practice with the data we are collecting. Thanks

Quote

Thank you for that reply, but you have not answered my question.

Unless you can tell me otherwise, once you have used my personal info to validate my ID (and frankly, I am uncertain why you even have to do that) I can see no reason for you to continue to hold this information.

Please therefore destroy it and confirm to me the process you use to destroy it. Thank you.

Quote
You can read everything to our Airbnb Privacy Policy. You can be assured that everything is for safety purposes of all Airbnb users.

Quote
I have read your privacy policy, including where you describe the use you put that data to.

However none of the uses quoted indicate why, having validated my ID, you require to continue to hold this data.

Having verified my ID, you have no more need to hold my sensitive personal information on file. You may claim to have effective security in place but you will be aware that the Internet is littered with well secured systems that have been hacked and lost millions of users' data.

Please explain why you need to continue to hold this information on file, as opposed to simply holding the validated status.

Quote
I totally understand your concern. I will be escalating this to a team that is better equipped to handle such queries. Thanks

To Be Continued
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on May 17, 2018, 07:07:39 pm
From Arch OTP:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FRbJiX-rtgU
https://youtu.be/FRbJiX-rtgU
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hulver on May 30, 2018, 04:40:42 pm
The latest version of Windows 10 that was foisted onto me by Windows Update has hosed my computer.

Attempting to start 90% of programs gives a message that "The application has failed to start because the side by side configuration is incorrect please see the application event log or use the command line sxstrace.exe tool for more detail."

I can't even check the event log, because guess what error I get when trying to start it.

Thanks a lot microsoft.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: D.A.L.E. on May 30, 2018, 04:57:04 pm
The latest version of Windows 10 that was foisted onto me by Windows Update has hosed my computer.

Attempting to start 90% of programs gives a message that "The application has failed to start because the side by side configuration is incorrect please see the application event log or use the command line sxstrace.exe tool for more detail."

I can't even check the event log, because guess what error I get when trying to start it.

Thanks a lot microsoft.
Spent this afternoon fixing my aunts laptop that went West after the latest update too. Completely goosed. Fuck you Bill.

Posted from my beautiful wee MacBook Pro, swoon emoji.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hulver on May 30, 2018, 05:02:42 pm
The latest version of Windows 10 that was foisted onto me by Windows Update has hosed my computer.

Attempting to start 90% of programs gives a message that "The application has failed to start because the side by side configuration is incorrect please see the application event log or use the command line sxstrace.exe tool for more detail."

I can't even check the event log, because guess what error I get when trying to start it.

Thanks a lot microsoft.
Spent this afternoon fixing my aunts laptop that went West after the latest update too. Completely goosed. Fuck you Bill.

Posted from my beautiful wee MacBook Pro, swoon emoji.

One of the solutions I found online was to reinstall the VC++ 2013 Runtime. Guess what error it gives when I run the installer?

Looks like I'm reinstalling Windows.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on May 31, 2018, 10:05:26 am
Dear Very Big Knob at my Megacorp,

Thank you for circulating this new Powerpoint template for us all to use, very pretty it is and only 11Mb. I've taken that, deleted the slide masters that were nothing to do with it, resized the images and got rid of Micro$hafts obsession with bitmaps, replacing them with visually identical jpg. It's now 350Kb. Shall we use this instead?

kthxbai
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on May 31, 2018, 12:55:36 pm
Does Powerpoint still not handle vectors? Mine doesn't, but I'm still using Office 2011 for Mac. Reminds me that I have to wrestle Office 365 from the mothership. They'll probably make me do battle with procurement 'as we don't support Macs.' This is untrue, our IT people in my experience don't support anything.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on May 31, 2018, 01:15:57 pm
Tried to install an update to iTunes last night.  "Soz.  No can do!" said the Mega-Global Fruit Corporation of Cupertino, USAnia's installer thing.  "Because I cannot access C:\Program Files\iTunes."

It is right.  Something has munted the security settings on said directory so thoroughly that it'll probably take three hours of Google and swearing to fix.  And I can't even blame the Mega-Global Fruit Corporation of Cupertino, USAnia because the same update worked seamlessly on another machine.

Bah!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on May 31, 2018, 01:23:21 pm
Does Powerpoint still not handle vectors? Mine doesn't, but I'm still using Office 2011 for Mac. Reminds me that I have to wrestle Office 365 from the mothership. They'll probably make me do battle with procurement 'as we don't support Macs.' This is untrue, our IT people in my experience don't support anything.

Short answer - No. Longer answer, yes, but only in Micro$hits own drawing format, that limited drawing capability has classically been one of the reasons for using Powerpoint.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Tim Hall on May 31, 2018, 04:05:59 pm
Company anti spam thing, you are useless at keeping out dodgy emails sent to the generic sales force email addy.  You try to make up for this by stopping a much needed authentication email sent to me.  It'll turn up tomorrow. Bah. 
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on June 05, 2018, 04:08:17 pm
Does Powerpoint still not handle vectors? Mine doesn't, but I'm still using Office 2011 for Mac. Reminds me that I have to wrestle Office 365 from the mothership. They'll probably make me do battle with procurement 'as we don't support Macs.' This is untrue, our IT people in my experience don't support anything.

Short answer - No. Longer answer, yes, but only in Micro$hits own drawing format, that limited drawing capability has classically been one of the reasons for using Powerpoint.

It still astounds me that a program that by definition should be resolution-independent (after all, you never know what the projector you use for presenting will support) doesn't even support PDF.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on July 01, 2018, 07:20:54 pm
We've got to poke it to know it...

(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1781/41323462310_91d4b84e77_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/25XBxE7)
IMG_1264_01 (https://flic.kr/p/25XBxE7) by The Pingus (https://www.flickr.com/photos/the_pingus/), on Flickr

(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/922/43084315202_223f9fe1b6_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/28DdnSJ)
IMG_1265_01 (https://flic.kr/p/28DdnSJ) by The Pingus (https://www.flickr.com/photos/the_pingus/), on Flickr

(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/914/43084323162_43e179b2b4_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/28DdqeY)
IMG_1266_01 (https://flic.kr/p/28DdqeY) by The Pingus (https://www.flickr.com/photos/the_pingus/), on Flickr
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on July 01, 2018, 08:12:29 pm
We had fun with one recently: Wired it up to a power source and ran a screwdriver down the platter to scrape all the data off.  The disk itself was transparent.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: DaveJ on July 02, 2018, 11:18:01 am
Glass?  The 2.5" disks sound like they might have been if you hit them with a hammer.

Dave
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on July 06, 2018, 11:03:41 pm
Is it ethical to borrow other peoples wifi signal?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: jsabine on July 07, 2018, 12:48:23 am
Depends. Will you give it back?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on July 07, 2018, 12:57:14 am
Unless it's intended to be an open network for public use, then it's going to be an offence under the 1990 Computer Misuse Act, but so is turning off the washing machine, so whatever.

In the more likely scenario of discovering that a neighbour is a luser with an unsecured network, I'd apply the common sense approach of not doing anything particularly bandwidth intensive (so as not to incur charges or impact the performance of their network), and only if you have a pressing need to do so (need to get online to top up your mobile, moved house and are still waiting for our-favourite-telco to sort your DSL out (https://xkcd.com/466/), that sort of thing).  And, it goes without saying, not doing anything dodgy with it.

Also, bear in mind the possibility that the neighbour *isn't* a luser and it may be a honeypot...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on July 07, 2018, 07:19:40 am
Depends. Will you give it back?

I'll only annoy a few electrons temporarily..

Unless it's intended to be an open network for public use, then it's going to be an offence under the 1990 Computer Misuse Act, but so is turning off the washing machine, so whatever.

In the more likely scenario of discovering that a neighbour is a luser with an unsecured network, I'd apply the common sense approach of not doing anything particularly bandwidth intensive (so as not to incur charges or impact the performance of their network), and only if you have a pressing need to do so (need to get online to top up your mobile, moved house and are still waiting for our-favourite-telco to sort your DSL out (https://xkcd.com/466/), that sort of thing).  And, it goes without saying, not doing anything dodgy with it.

Also, bear in mind the possibility that the neighbour *isn't* a luser and it may be a honeypot...


Well my favourite new telco (virgin), are offering a new service of sharing wifi with other users while out and about, but only on their latest hub.  This hub has many many users complaining of poor wifi compared to the older hub.  Connecting to shared virgin email signal is patchy at best and a unable to connect.

The worst bit is the mobile phone app kept turning the wifi on whilst the phone was not in use.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on July 07, 2018, 08:46:46 pm
I am using David's MacBook at present.

I seem to have killed my trusty MacBook Air DEDD with a spilt drink, which only wet the Magsafe port. The charger itself is working OK with this Macbook (I think it's a Pro from 2009).

The drink was a diet squash, so didn't have much sugar.

Initially, the display was blank and the fans were working overtime. The fans stopped when I held the 'on' switch but now the whole machine lacks any hint of life.

The rest escaped dry so nothing went on the keyboard etc.

This is more than a little inconvenient! David's at a concert tonight.

I suggested judicious use of a hairdryer, a suggestion rejected by David.

I'd welcome any suggestions...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on July 07, 2018, 08:58:28 pm
It's a Macbook, so presumably you can't deprive it of power completely by removing the battery, which is always the best thing you can do in the event of a spillage, to stop electrolytic corrosion.

If it happened to me, I'd squirt copious amounts of IPA[1] at it in the hope of displacing the liquid and follow up with compressed air.  Judicious use of a hairdryer (not too hot) isn't a terrible idea.  Distilled water is an improvement on squash, but will itself take ages to dry.

Sugar is sticky, but not ionic, so isn't itself conductive.  I expect there's enough citric acid, minerals etc in it that are, though.


[1] Not the beer.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on July 07, 2018, 09:29:36 pm
Is it needed in a hurry?

Might be an idea to take it apart and clean things up with IPA.  But initially spray IPA in the area of the spilt drink.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on July 07, 2018, 09:44:12 pm
I'd like it sooner rather than later.
Mail and banking would be nice.

Passwords might be a problem...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on July 07, 2018, 10:08:06 pm
Can you or david take the bottom bit apart?  Have you got the small enough screwdriver?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on July 07, 2018, 10:18:49 pm
I see this needs a star-fangled tiny screwdriver.
I certainly don't have one and I don't know about David.

I've got into mail and banking.
Twitter will have to wait.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: jsabine on July 08, 2018, 01:13:44 am
I've got a feeling that the star-shaped fixings on macbooks have five lobes: if either of you does have starry screwdrivers, they're almost certainly torx/t-star, which have six lobes.

Don't try to use them together - that way madness lies. And product damage.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on July 08, 2018, 01:30:21 am
They are indeed 5 pointed.
David says he has starry screwdrivers but I know not their point count.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on July 08, 2018, 01:56:28 pm
I seem to have killed my trusty MacBook Air DEDD with a spilt drink, which only wet the Magsafe port. The charger itself is working OK with this Macbook (I think it's a Pro from 2009).
The drink was a diet squash, so didn't have much sugar.
Initially, the display was blank and the fans were working overtime. The fans stopped when I held the 'on' switch but now the whole machine lacks any hint of life.
The rest escaped dry so nothing went on the keyboard etc.
This is more than a little inconvenient! David's at a concert tonight.
I suggested judicious use of a hairdryer, a suggestion rejected by David.
I'd welcome any suggestions...

MY MACBOOK AIR LIVES!

It seems to be working normally now having rebooted normally.

I wonder whether the wet MagSafe Port was a red herring as another charger could recharge the Air and my charger worked OK on David's MacBook. (The sticky tape splinting the wire WAS wet.)

The Clue might have been the fans working overtime.

It seems cured after chilling out overnight.

David earlier thought the Eprom had failed and would be spendy to fix.

If this MacBook can't stand the heat, maybe I should get it out of the kitchen!

(It's 28.0 here with 42% humidity. It's resting on a hard, tiled surface; this should not really overwhelm it IMO.)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on July 08, 2018, 05:21:32 pm
Coolio.

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on July 12, 2018, 12:23:59 am
The Puffin browser has unilaterally decided that when I hit "Post" to reply to a post in here, what I really mean is "Start New Topic" ???

ETA: reset fondleslab.  It's working again.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on July 14, 2018, 02:27:18 pm
We've got to poke it to know it...

(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1781/41323462310_91d4b84e77_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/25XBxE7)
IMG_1264_01 (https://flic.kr/p/25XBxE7) by The Pingus (https://www.flickr.com/photos/the_pingus/), on Flickr

(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/922/43084315202_223f9fe1b6_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/28DdnSJ)
IMG_1265_01 (https://flic.kr/p/28DdnSJ) by The Pingus (https://www.flickr.com/photos/the_pingus/), on Flickr

(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/914/43084323162_43e179b2b4_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/28DdqeY)
IMG_1266_01 (https://flic.kr/p/28DdqeY) by The Pingus (https://www.flickr.com/photos/the_pingus/), on Flickr

Dibs the magnets ;)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on July 14, 2018, 02:30:06 pm
Found some (well many) older laptop ram ddr1 and less.  Some ddr2 but 1gb or less.

Was wondering what to do with it?  Any value or anyone that would want or have a use for them.

Or recycling.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: essexian on July 16, 2018, 09:15:05 am
My computer knowledge could be written on the back of a stamp....indeed, I think it was a huge mistake moving away from Windows 3.1....so I suppose my laptop is dead as it is showing that no hard drive can be found.

I have tried the stuff in the start up "esc" thingy with no luck.

I suppose the machine is now a couple of kilo's of trash. Sigh. Disappointed as it was only a year or so old.


EDIT....forget this.... I tried pressing buttons left, right and centre and for some reason I don't understand, it all seems to be working okay again.

Frankly, we made a mistake moving away from slide rules.... hell, I do wonder at times, whether we were wrong climbing down out of the trees  :facepalm:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on July 16, 2018, 12:11:51 pm
Failure to find the hard drive is generally a problem with the hard drive (usually a mechanical problem, like the bearing getting sticky), which is a failure-prone and therefore eminently replaceable part.  No need to trash the whole machine.

Failure to find a bootable operating system on the hard drive may simply be a software problem.  It's entirely possible for something important to the boot process to become corrupted without an actual hardware failure.  A clever person might be able to persuade it to work again.  A person who's even cleverer might wipe the disk and reinstall the OS so it definitely works without wasting too much brain power on it.

TBH, I reckon Windows 3.1 was the big mistake.  The dead trolls said it right. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d85p7JZXNy8)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on July 16, 2018, 05:30:45 pm
Quote from: Kim
TBH, I reckon Windows 3.1 was the big mistake.
DSM-11 FTW.  Preferably on a PDP 11-7x or 11-8x.  Pictures?  Who needs pictures?  :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: essexian on July 17, 2018, 01:24:39 pm
Well after working for another four hours, the machine died again and now despite everything I try, its now unwilling to start.

I note what you say Kim about a smart person may be able to fix it, but frankly, I need a machine this afternoon so I have gone out and brought a new one.....is it wrong to use the "how much did your new bike cost" rule for a new Computer? CBH thinks it cost £150 less than I actually paid. 

There is a local computer person nearby so I might take the old machine to them to see if they can fix it: it has quite a few photos etc on it which I would quite like to have access to....what's that? Cloud storage?  :facepalm:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on July 18, 2018, 08:58:45 am
I just installed the latest Java update. So what? Well, once it was finished a message box told me "You have just installed Java <blah blah blah>" - without congratulating me!

There's still hope for the world.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on July 28, 2018, 12:11:15 pm
The headphone socket on my 'Apple just works' MacBook Air has failed.

The speakers still speak when I plug in the phones, to which there is no sound.

Phones worked earlier yesterday. Plug feels as if it's gripped properly by the socket.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on July 28, 2018, 12:59:06 pm
Probably worth trying another set just to confim the headphones haven't actually failed in a way that inhibits their detection (might be that it's measuring impedance rather than physically detecting the presence of a plug), as that's going to be by far the least painful problem to solve. 

It could also be possible that there's something softwarey overriding the normal headphone detection, I suppose.  I don't have the Mac experience to suggest where to look, thobut.   :-\
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on July 28, 2018, 01:46:06 pm
Thanks! I'll snaffle/borrow David's phones at some stage.

ETA No luck with Davi's posh Sony phones. (Mine are magenta JVC cheapies I got from Sainsbury's.)

Restarting the computer several times made no difference.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on August 05, 2018, 08:29:34 am
Realized yesterday that it was getting bloody hot under my desk, and the computer fans were simply recycling hot air.  I now have a fan blasting straight in under.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Auntie Helen on August 06, 2018, 04:43:23 pm
I have the 50GB iCloud at 79p per month but decided I would just use my hard disk and reduce back to the free 5gb.

I transferred all my documents to the MacBook hard disk but it made no difference to iCloud, it still said I had 35GB data in there, even though I only had 100MB documents and my Thunderbird emails (which ended up as 3.5GB)

So I got onto Apple Support and some nice Irish people talked me through various things.

Then we got to the next point and the guy said "We have to remove all Documents and Data". I had made a backup of all of these on the Mac's desktop. I said to him "what about the Thunderbird Emails". He said they definitely wouldn't be deleted (he was doing a screen view at the time so could see my iPad). I said "Are you really sure?" and he said "Yes."

So I pressed "Delete all Documents and Data" and my Thunderbird emails disappeared. My most recent backup is 2 months old as I was now using iCloud. The Apple Support Guy has escalated a ticket to see if they can restore it from their servers as otherwise I've lost all my filed emails for the last two months. I was able to restore from a backup so I know I have emails up to the end of May.

He then said "you should always do a Time Machine backup, iCloud isn't a backup." Even though it was he who told me to delete it and I clarified twice that it was OK to do!

Fixed the issue though, my iCloud data usage is only 100MB now...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on August 06, 2018, 04:59:27 pm
The 'E' key on my MacBook Air is coming adrift. It works if jiggled.

I am not a rough or rapid typist.
At all.

David says he's not seen anything like this on any Mac he has owned.

E is, of course, the letter used most frequently.

Underwhelming. I'm sure we'll live with this and/or fix it.

Apple just works.

Always.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Jaded on August 06, 2018, 05:35:07 pm
Hmm. Time Machine isn’t really a backup though, certainly not a full one.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on August 06, 2018, 07:28:53 pm
@Auntie

I use Google for things online and I noticed that I was coming close to my limit too. Some poking around I found out that the bin/trash in google drive was the culprit. Could that be your problem?

I understood the Drive bin behaved like Gmail bin - got emptied after 30 days or so.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Auntie Helen on August 06, 2018, 07:33:28 pm
They checked that and it wasn't the case. It seems to be a mini bug for some users.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on August 06, 2018, 08:54:22 pm
Incidentally, does anyone else get irked when computers use "[rubbish] bin" for what really ought to be "trash[can]"?  It's like someone's over-enthusiastically localised the UI into British English; presumably due to excessive exposure to RISC OS at a formative age.

(My regular desktop is MATE.  It has a "Wastebasket", which has gone past localisation and well into taking the piss.  The contents live in ~/.local/share/Trash/ as if to prove my point.)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on August 06, 2018, 09:09:32 pm
Microsith uses "Recycle Bin*", which makes a certain amount of sense.  IIRC the Mega-Global Fruit Corporation of Cupertino, USAnia used "Wastebasket" in the days when I had regular access to a FruitCo babbage-engine.

* though mine's now "Dave's Anbaric Dustbin"
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on August 06, 2018, 09:13:45 pm
It is yclept 'Trash' on this MacBook Air.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on August 06, 2018, 09:15:28 pm
Microsith uses "Recycle Bin*", which makes a certain amount of sense.

Yeah.  It suggests that you can fish things out of it without getting your hands dirty, which is a dangerous metaphor if ever there was one.


Quote
Anbaric Dustbin

Excellent idea!  *renames*
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: nicknack on August 06, 2018, 11:04:25 pm
Rubbish Bin on Ubuntu.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pickled Onion on August 09, 2018, 07:53:35 am
Wasn't it do with Apple "inventing" the Trash icon and suing anyone who copied it? Or is that urban myth?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Jaded on August 09, 2018, 08:10:17 am
Apple did indeed de-UK English the Trash Can, as Mr L remembers. They gave a reason but I don’t remember being that impressed with it.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: essexian on August 09, 2018, 08:36:10 am
"They" updated my works computer yesterday from Windows 7 to 10 so of course this morning, nothing is working as I don't seem to be able to get into our office drive where, of course, all my work is kept.

Sigh.

I would phone the Helpdesk but I can't log into the office system to get the phone number.

Sigh.

I would go back to bed but I have 12 days to do 17 days work in so can't afford to lose any time (and yes, I do get that I have just wasted a couple of minutes writing this!)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on August 13, 2018, 01:38:16 pm
https://www.pbs.org/newshour/nation/an-11-year-old-changed-election-results-on-a-replica-florida-state-website-in-under-10-minutes

Quote
An 11-year-old changed election results on a replica Florida state website in under 10 minutes
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on August 13, 2018, 05:03:55 pm
You'd think anyone reporting on a hacking convention would have got over the "ZOMG some children know more about computers than some adults" thing about 30 years ago.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Tim Hall on August 13, 2018, 05:19:50 pm
You'd think anyone reporting on a hacking convention would have got over the "ZOMG some children know more about computers than some adults" thing about 30 years ago.

The story, as originally filed, had got over it. However, a pesky 11 year old hacked into the newspaper's computer and changed the emphasis.  Or perhaps not.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on August 13, 2018, 05:29:20 pm
You'd think anyone reporting on a hacking convention would have got over the "ZOMG some children know more about computers than some adults" thing about 30 years ago.

The story, as originally filed, had got over it. However, a pesky 11 year old hacked into the newspaper's computer and changed the emphasis.  Or perhaps not.

That explains the Daily Mail.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on August 13, 2018, 06:00:00 pm
If an eleven year old can do that, it should probably worry us more what someone with significantly experience is capable of.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: tiermat on August 14, 2018, 03:01:41 pm
I arrived at wrk this morning.

I removed my laptop from it's bag.

I plugged it in.  "Hmmm" thought I, "Why does the power light not light?"

I lifted said laptop up to find a tiny pool-ette of liquid underneath it.

Thinking back, I got caught in not one, but two cloud bursts, yesterday.  I guess my laptop bag is not Monsoon proof.

Desktop support said "Do you not have a waterproof laptop bag?"

"Well," said I "the laptop bag I got with the laptop doesn't keep the rain off particularly well"*

"HUMPH" said they

*For some reason, our desktop support function do not supply laptop bags when they supply laptops...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on August 15, 2018, 04:14:50 pm
The 'E' key on my MacBook Air is coming adrift. It works if jiggled.

I am not a rough or rapid typist.
At all.

David says he's not seen anything like this on any Mac he has owned.

E is, of course, the letter used most frequently.

Underwhelming. I'm sure we'll live with this and/or fix it.

Apple just works.

Always.

T key is coming adrift now...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Tim Hall on August 16, 2018, 01:45:28 pm
My land line rang yesterday.  Probably for the first time.  I answer it and down a crackly line a woman with an Indian accent* says she's calling from First Direct but before we proceed could she ask me some security questions.


I almost hang up straightaway, but explain that that's not going to happen is it. She understands and asks me to call back and ask for extension xyz.  She also says she'll text me the reason for the call. 1471 indicates the number she called from was kosher, a text arrives asking me to get in touch with the fraud team, so I call them on my mobile. I explain what's gone on, they reassure me it's a legit call, thank me for taking such precautions and put me through. More crackly line, another Indian accent*.  It turns out my credit has been declined in attempted dodgy transactions by Bad People. Card gets stopped, we check the transaction history, I cut up the card.

Why do they do this?They even realised it was wrong when I refused to give them the details.

*IME, calls to First Direct have been on uncrackley lines to people with Scottish or Norvern Monkey accents, as their call centres are in Scotland somewhere or Leeds. 
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: dave r on August 18, 2018, 09:12:52 pm
Bonkers, just bonkers, I've been on Linux for years, always kept a backup of my files on an external drive. Today I was trying to update my backups, I deleted my download folder on the eternal drive then found that I couldn't copy a fresh copy to the backup drive, it wouldn't let me, if I renamed it Dave's Downloads it would accept it, if I tried to rename it downloads it wouldn't let me, if I renamed it downloads and did it as two words it would let me do that. All other files copied with no problems.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Phil W on August 27, 2018, 09:17:54 am
Found an old Mapsource manual.  Recommends at least 16-32Mb of memory  and 640x480 display. Those were the days.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on August 27, 2018, 12:58:26 pm
The 'E' key on my MacBook Air is coming adrift. It works if jiggled.

I am not a rough or rapid typist.
At all.

David says he's not seen anything like this on any Mac he has owned.

E is, of course, the letter used most frequently.

Underwhelming. I'm sure we'll live with this and/or fix it.

Apple just works.

Always.

T key is coming adrift now...

Is it the plastic key holder breaking?

https://jpdiv.wordpress.com/2011/02/19/replacing-the-keys-on-an-apple-keyboard/  hopefully shows what I mean.

PS am in your neck of the woods today.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on September 04, 2018, 11:34:25 pm
Here is some ancient analogue goodness. Donated by a colleague who was clearing out his office.

(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1873/44479828731_d6bab66c01_o.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/2aLwKqP)Analog computing (https://flic.kr/p/2aLwKqP) by David Martin (https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidmam/), on Flickr
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1853/30610391638_f5220d4e7e_o.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/NCWfZ5)Analog computing (https://flic.kr/p/NCWfZ5) by David Martin (https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidmam/), on Flickr
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1899/44479822431_5151a2b05b_o.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/2aLwHyc)Analog computing (https://flic.kr/p/2aLwHyc) by David Martin (https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidmam/), on Flickr
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1881/29542173157_f42e00f298_o.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/M1xmR4)Analog computing (https://flic.kr/p/M1xmR4) by David Martin (https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidmam/), on Flickr

I have yet to use it in anger.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: grams on September 05, 2018, 02:32:00 pm
T key is coming adrift now...

It sounds like dirt or crumbs trapped underneath. You can unclip the keytops on MacBooks by sticking a long fingernail under the top edge and gently pulling upwards.

(N.B. don't do this on a newer USB-C MacBook keyboard, you'll probably break it)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Jaded on September 05, 2018, 05:09:35 pm
Don't try and clip them back in though!  ;D
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: grams on September 05, 2018, 06:32:07 pm
Nah, once they're off you can see how the clip mechanism works and slide them back over the little pins easily enough.

(or just roughly lining them up and mashing them down also works)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Jaded on September 05, 2018, 06:58:15 pm
I shall try mashing!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on September 08, 2018, 11:11:48 am
Well my PC is playing up. Over the last few day it has just frozen while not doing something hard. Looking in the logs I can't see (and understand) what causes it. The only thing that jumps out is a somethingKernelSomeotherthing was restarted or not shut down properly.

Plugging and unplugging the SSD boot drive into motherboard with other HHD drive. When the SSD drive is not connected I can boot right into BIOS and see the connected drives there. But when that SSD drive is plugged in sometimes I can and when I can I might see it and some of the others drives there.

Plugging the drive into a USB adopter, on my laptop it tells me that the drive is just fine.

Installed win10 on another disk so lets see if that behaves and if it does it must be the SSD not the motherboard.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on September 08, 2018, 12:11:52 pm
Remember the days when HDDs at 7200rpm were fast? 

Goes shopping for a new SSD before I fall asleep waiting for things to happen on this disk :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: BrianI on September 08, 2018, 09:17:08 pm
I'm loving Linux Mint 19 Mate Edition :-) So much so, I've installed it on my old-desktop-hooked-up-to-the-telly-legal-steaming-box, my desktop, and my cheap refurbished HP Probook 6450b  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on September 16, 2018, 04:18:22 pm
 Memory Lane: rooting through the cable crypt for something to cannibalize to wire up a CB guitar this morning, I came up with a home-made Laplink cable, the RS232 version.  Remember the first time you saw that? I do: the wonder of seeing the contents of both PCs at the same time. And the suspense while you waited to see if the transfer would actually work without crashing.

Didn't use it - wanted multistrand.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on September 16, 2018, 10:14:47 pm
I was an Amiga jibbler in those days, PARNet (and its scrawny sibling SERNet) was the equivalent.  I remember cobbling up a null modem cable out of the mains lead from a dead lawnmower, which was excellent for multi-player games but outperformed by sneakernet with 880kB floppies for actual file transfers.  There was still a convenience factor of being able to leave the OS floppy in the drive on the machine without a hard disk.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: dave r on September 20, 2018, 09:00:59 am
My printers down again :( I've a cheap HP printer that's about ten years old now that's been getting increasingly temperamental as time passes. Its latest trick is to print but produce blank sheets, I can hear it printing but it doesn't produce anything, I'm sure its done this before but I can't remember what the solution was. Ideally I'd replace it but I do that little printing I can't justify buying another.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on September 20, 2018, 02:58:20 pm
My printers down again :( I've a cheap HP printer that's about ten years old now that's been getting increasingly temperamental as time passes. Its latest trick is to print but produce blank sheets, I can hear it printing but it doesn't produce anything, I'm sure its done this before but I can't remember what the solution was. Ideally I'd replace it but I do that little printing I can't justify buying another.

Is it an ink jet printer.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: dave r on September 20, 2018, 10:59:27 pm
My printers down again :( I've a cheap HP printer that's about ten years old now that's been getting increasingly temperamental as time passes. Its latest trick is to print but produce blank sheets, I can hear it printing but it doesn't produce anything, I'm sure its done this before but I can't remember what the solution was. Ideally I'd replace it but I do that little printing I can't justify buying another.

Is it an ink jet printer.

Yes its an inkjet, a HP deskjet2280 running on ubuntu 18.04, I'm thinking about waiting till after Xmas and then spending any cash I've received over Xmas or my birthday on a replacement in any sales that are going on.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on September 20, 2018, 11:52:36 pm
...On some kind of laser printer, given that you go long periods without using it.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: dave r on September 21, 2018, 03:44:49 am
...On some kind of laser printer, given that you go long periods without using it.


Laser printers cost too much,  I like the idea but they're to far outside any budget I might have.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on September 21, 2018, 07:23:42 am
Quote from: dave r
... I can hear it printing but it doesn't produce anything...
Of course you have checked that the cartridges aren't empty, haven't you?  :)

If you're only printing stuff intermittently and the printer has a "clean print heads" cycle you can start manually try that before you kick off a print run.  The cartridge print heads may be gumming up where they're sitting idle so no ink is reaching the paper.

If there's no manual clean option, the cartridge is still full and it is just a case of gummed up heads you could try taking the cartridge out and very, very, very gently cleaning the heads with a damp cotton bud.  Bit of a last resort this though because you run the risk of buggering up the fragile cartridge heads completely and what with cartridges being ridiculously overpriced...

Another possibility that's just flitted through what passes for my mind is that the ink in the cartridge(s) may have dried out/gone sludgy/separated if they're very old cartridges. Worth trying a new cartridge if you've got any to hand?

You could also check that the cartridges' signal contact points are still held securely and cleanly against the printer and perhaps give them a bit of a clean if they look grubby.

After that? Not a clue.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: dave r on September 21, 2018, 07:52:17 am
Quote from: dave r
... I can hear it printing but it doesn't produce anything...
Of course you have checked that the cartridges aren't empty, haven't you?  :)

If you're only printing stuff intermittently and the printer has a "clean print heads" cycle you can start manually try that before you kick off a print run.  The cartridge print heads may be gumming up where they're sitting idle so no ink is reaching the paper.

If there's no manual clean option, the cartridge is still full and it is just a case of gummed up heads you could try taking


 the cartridge out and very, very, very gently cleaning the heads with a damp cotton bud.  Bit of a last resort this
though because you run the risk of buggering up the fragile cartridge heads completely and what with cartridges being ridiculously overpriced...

Another possibility that's just flitted through what passes for my mind is that the ink in the cartridge(s) may have dried out/gone sludgy/separated if they're very old cartridges. Worth trying a new cartridge if you've got any to hand?

You could also check that the cartridges' signal contact points are still held securely and cleanly against the printer and perhaps give them a bit of a clean if they look grubby.

After that? Not a clue.

Cheers, I'm sure  I've come across this before but I can't remember what the solution was
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 23, 2018, 07:38:59 pm
I have been contemplating a new speaker and I was told in the pub that apparently people 'can't believe I don't have Alexa.' I'm not sure if that's because they expect me to keep women in small boxes. So, smart speakers are evidently the thing. I currently have an ancient Aiwa thing with a crappy Logitech Bluetooth adaptor (it's only crappy because I have to turn the volume up to the max on everything to get barely a kick to my eardrums, and as such the thing buzzes like an overtaxed high tension power line). And then I forget so wander down the following morning, turn on the radio and the voice that comes is louder than the VOICE OF GOD. Which means God actually sounds a lot like Chris Moyles.

You'd think it would be simple, honestly, but it isn't, there's a million different things, all kinds of other stuff, myriad options. I have been sitting here since 4pm and I'm still none the wiser. I have a NAS under the stairs with an iTunes library and occasional Spotify. Make the sounds come out and make them sound moderately nice. And loud. And I'd like a speaker in my remote command centre and one in the living room. I'd buy the Apple one, but if you've either tried to hold a conversation with Siri, you'd know why that would be a bad idea. Honestly, I'm not sure about talking to computers, but at some point in future, it'll be the only way to turn on a light and flush the loo.

I give up. I think I'll wander to John Lewis and try the Sonos One thing. Sometimes old school suck-it-and-see is better than a million reviews.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on September 23, 2018, 07:50:29 pm
I'm an old fart.  Speakers should come in stereo pairs, and - in the absence of special dispensation for disability or when used to control manned spacecraft - computers should be operated by keyboard (preferably with a loud beep on every keypress) or total-immersion virtual reality system.  Touchscreens, speech recognition and those upside-down trackpad things you get these days are all a work of Sian.  And I know who Chris Moyles is.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 23, 2018, 07:57:40 pm
I think my main use case is the bathroom, honestly operating both an iPad and Kindle while immersed in the bath is a fraught operation. And the voice activation feature for my wife is notoriously unreliable. Alas, I suspect neither will bring me a fresh beer on command.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on September 23, 2018, 07:59:21 pm
Weirdly, while I do have a bathroom computer, it doesn't really have a user interface.  Unless you count the door.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: grams on September 23, 2018, 08:00:04 pm
The Apple one only accepts voice commands for Apple Music (the streaming service), not iTunes or Spotify, so it's useless to you anyway.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 23, 2018, 10:00:45 pm
So I read, hence shit. Plus Siri is, I suspect, a daughter of Finestre, the Demon of Such Things. It's only a matter of time before she's (or he, I hear it's gender fluid) whispering in your ear kill them all. And when she does I'll tell her 'I'm sorry, I don't understand kill them all."

I'm so old I'm not set on subscription services. I dunno, I like to think that a sudden urge to play Belinda Carlisle's Heaven on Earth won't be stymied by the fact I've not my monthly subscription.

That said I use the free Spotify as radio and buy stuff I like. I figure that way something more than spare fractions of a cent makes it to the artist.

Every day I not just feel a bit older, and I suspect I actually am. Entropy, my reflection.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on September 23, 2018, 10:44:46 pm
I keep the iTunes library on a NAS and pipe sounds via whichever Babbage-Engine is closest to an amplifier and speakers.  Except the one in the Chips Room, which has a network cable and ancient FruitCo AirPort Express to connect it to the PC in the Great Hall.  You just have to remember not run iTunes on two machines simultaneously, as otherwise it gets confused.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on September 23, 2018, 10:51:41 pm
I'm an old fart.  Speakers should come in stereo pairs,

Just sold a pair of those on eBay. And, because I'm an older fart and was able to buy them new for -urm- £80? I think - I've just sold 'em for £6,500.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on September 23, 2018, 10:53:37 pm
Blimey, what were they?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on September 23, 2018, 11:05:24 pm
Chartwell BBC monitors, low serial number. Liquidated for the Miss Ham collecting tin.

Yes, I was a bit gobsmacked, too.

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 24, 2018, 09:27:21 am
Blimey, it would probably be cheaper to get Taylor Swift and come round and play a Bontempi in my living room.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on September 24, 2018, 10:15:11 am
Well on investigation (because eBay shit), it looks like there is a Chinese collectors fad. The top bidder has dropped out, no idea if any of the similar value bidders will step in, it might all be a crock'o'shit. The genuine UK value is around £2K, still astonishing IMO, and I can be sure of £4k.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 24, 2018, 12:07:33 pm
I keep the iTunes library on a NAS and pipe sounds via whichever Babbage-Engine is closest to an amplifier and speakers.  Except the one in the Chips Room, which has a network cable and ancient FruitCo AirPort Express to connect it to the PC in the Great Hall.  You just have to remember not run iTunes on two machines simultaneously, as otherwise it gets confused.

At the moment, I either play the tunes from the NAS or via Spotify through my Mac and bluetooth it to the dongle on the Aiwa or use my phone to play though the TV soundbar or kitchen speakerbox via bluetooth.

The Aiwa is slowly dying, it must be a zillion years old, has crappy bass. The remote control died last year so now when the phone rings I have to scoot across the room on my chair to turn it down and then scoot all the way back, trying hard not to run over a cat or tip myself over on the floor/rug interface. And now the buttons on the front require enhanced pressing. Oh, the suffering. I could just stand up, of course.

Anyway, I'd like to play my tunes louder and it would be nice if I could play both in my mezzanine office and the adjoining living room so I can wander around the ground floor with constant tunage. Voice control isn't that important, but I'm informed it's the future. Light bulb on. Light bulb off. I still dream of hover cars and social acceptability for tight silver lurex. That was the future they promised me, not shouting at a woman in a box.

I hate technology purchases, they just make me feel old. When I were a lad, you could just plump for the one with the most giga-whatevers. Now there's an infinite number of models. You can't even get a single variety of computer cable.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on September 24, 2018, 12:18:52 pm
One of my amps is networked, has FruitCo AirPlay built-in and can be run as either 7:1 or 5:1 with a pair of remote squeakers elsewhere.  Another one does Bluetooth but because Bluetooth is just a subset of Sian's Radio I don't use it.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 24, 2018, 12:38:15 pm
I'm quite unsophisticated. I did have a 5:1 home cinema thing but it now lives in the garage after the last house move as I couldn't be bothered with all the wires and a soundbar and wireless subwoofer does the job amply enough. Everything does bluetooth though there's the hassle of selecting the bloody thing on my phone. Apple for reason, maintain that the best way to select a bluetooth device is by navigating through a dozen menus, and not simply offering up a list when resting one's finger on the icon.

To be honest, I'm being nudged into this purchase by my wife as I apparently 'don't buy anything.' I presume this is because she's noodling about the purchase of some new music making device (and contra-somesuch) so when I exclaim 'how much!' (I don't really care, but it's a tradition) she'll say 'well, you did just buy a...'
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 25, 2018, 06:43:54 pm
Oh woes, my mid-2011 MacBook Air no longer has enough narwhals under the hood to run MacOS Mojave. No dark mode for you, my geriatric little laptop. I am sort of worried that activating dark mode merely opens a portal to Hell for Finestre, the Demon of Such Things, to wander through. She's lovely, of course, but like most demons, kind of evil. She did, after all, put Steve Jobs on Hell's Microsoft Help desk. For eternity. Then he gets moved to IBM Outsourced Solutions. You should hear him wail, even by Hell's standards of constant pitiful wailing, it's something special. They use it as elevator muzak.

ETA: I put it on my iMac. It seems to have broken precisely nothing. Adobe CC and Affinity work, even the ancient Office 2011. Finestre popped around for a cup of tea the moment I entered the Dark Mode. Inspiring eternal torment is thirsty work, or so she says. And can I get her a new iPhone? It's all Nokia in Hell.

EETA: No worries though, they're moving to Blackberry soon.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Maverick on September 26, 2018, 08:49:25 am
Oh woes, my mid-2011 MacBook Air no longer has enough narwhals under the hood to run MacOS Mojave.
Likewise  :'(

ETA: I put it on my iMac. It seems to have broken precisely nothing. Adobe CC and Affinity work, even the ancient Office 2011.

It also converted my 6TB Fusion drive to APFS without borking it, doesn't seem to have made any difference to speed in the real world though. I like dark mode, I've always used black backgrounds wherever it is available, seems to suit my substandard eyesight better than bright backgrounds.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 26, 2018, 10:01:18 am
I quite like Dark Mode (admittedly Finestre is going to get fed up with the constant cups of tea) – of course, it only works with apps developed with the latest frameworks that support it – though Adobe and Affinity had had their own 'dark' modes (as default) for a while. Which can make for a bit of a mishmash until updates arrive (and older applications never). Easy to swap depending on mood, of course (it would benefit from a menu bar toggle).

The changing desktop is actually quite cool.

I think everything else is mostly under the hood. Performance seems fine. Bluetooth continues to work. They've faffed with the fonts again.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on September 26, 2018, 11:36:02 am
Is there a special word for the kind of blind panic you feel at 4 am when it looks as though something has so thoroughly scrambled the contents of your network drives that the chances of putting everything right appear to be nil?

Until you realise than the PCs have had their net-branez scrambled because you rebooted the router, which does all the DHCP stuff in these parts :facepalm:

Restart PCs, net-branez unscrambled, Stuffs back where they should be.  Make note to investigate giving everything a fixed IP address.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: rafletcher on September 26, 2018, 03:49:49 pm
I keep the iTunes library on a NAS and pipe sounds via whichever Babbage-Engine is closest to an amplifier and speakers.  Except the one in the Chips Room, which has a network cable and ancient FruitCo AirPort Express to connect it to the PC in the Great Hall.  You just have to remember not run iTunes on two machines simultaneously, as otherwise it gets confused.

At the moment, I either play the tunes from the NAS or via Spotify through my Mac and bluetooth it to the dongle on the Aiwa or use my phone to play though the TV soundbar or kitchen speakerbox via bluetooth.

The Aiwa is slowly dying, it must be a zillion years old, has crappy bass. The remote control died last year so now when the phone rings I have to scoot across the room on my chair to turn it down and then scoot all the way back, trying hard not to run over a cat or tip myself over on the floor/rug interface. And now the buttons on the front require enhanced pressing. Oh, the suffering. I could just stand up, of course.

Anyway, I'd like to play my tunes louder and it would be nice if I could play both in my mezzanine office and the adjoining living room so I can wander around the ground floor with constant tunage. Voice control isn't that important, but I'm informed it's the future. Light bulb on. Light bulb off. I still dream of hover cars and social acceptability for tight silver lurex. That was the future they promised me, not shouting at a woman in a box.

I hate technology purchases, they just make me feel old. When I were a lad, you could just plump for the one with the most giga-whatevers. Now there's an infinite number of models. You can't even get a single variety of computer cable.

You have Amazon Prime, no? So you get Amazon Music as part of that.  Something Alexa enabled seems a sensible in that case.  Sonos are reportedly good.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 26, 2018, 04:06:21 pm
I do have Prime, but it's a bit shit. Amazon want you to upgrade to Unlimited. I'm not especially keen to give more money to the tax-dodgers. I should perhaps bite the bullet and go with Spotify or Apple Music, I just have the olde worlde urge to have actual music (even if it's only electrons) that won't disappear the moment I stop handing over cash. Even if I never listen to it again. Plus I genuinely think that create the stuff that I enjoy should get paid actual money for their endeavour. But like I say, I do mine Spotify Free (and honestly, the number of adverts isn't large). I assume they have shout-at-a-lady control for that, but I'm sure I'd have to read another 25 web pages to find out.

I quite like the Sonos One and John Lewis sell it, so I may meander by and see if I can annoy a sales assistant by turning the volume as loud as it goes and wandering off to see if I can still hear it from outside the building.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: lastant on September 27, 2018, 08:16:29 am
I quite like the Sonos One and John Lewis sell it, so I may meander by and see if I can annoy a sales assistant by turning the volume as loud as it goes and wandering off to see if I can still hear it from outside the building.

We're fully Sonos'd up...we have Play:1s in both bedrooms and the kitchen and a Play:3 in the lounge. If I was buying with hindsight I'd have probably opted for another Play:1 or a Play:5 in the lounge, but only as what we've got feels a bit of a half-way house in regards to their line-up (and it looks as though they'll be refreshing it in the very near future). Syncs to our NAS, connects to our Spotify and streams from TuneIn/SoundCloud/others as necessary and it's nice to be able to group them around the house depending on the situation.

The Play:1s are excellent, the Sonos One adds voice recognition to it (Alexa for now, Google by Christmas...maybe). They go ridiculously loud for the size that they are, and can be paired to make a stereo set if you so wish - they've also just released them in a range of hues (https://www.theverge.com/circuitbreaker/2018/4/17/17246286/sonos-one-hay-colors-pricing-date) if the black or white is a bit too monochrome for you.

In short: as far as 'plug and play' goes, I'd recommend Sonos to anybody. Worth noting it won't stream Spotify unless you've got a Premium/paid account in case that's one big draw to picking one up.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 27, 2018, 09:17:32 am
Thanks, I'd noodled as far as the Spotify Premium requirement. Tbh, I'm not convinced by voice control. Part of me thinks it's the future, but another part of me knows AI will always overthrow us and this is likely the time the people of future – from their caves – will take a break from starvation to identify as the start of their downfall. Are you sure want to play that, ian? I can see it pouring harsh judgements on my listening choices. Computers, alas, will never understand the pure elation that those first notes of Bonnie Tyler's Total Eclypse of the Heart can engender. They might, on the other hand, devise an algorithm that makes sense of the video. Humans have failed.

Lightbulb on, lightbulb off. I assume someone out there has a better use. Volume up, volume down. Kill them all, Alexa, kill them all.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on September 27, 2018, 05:33:55 pm
Quote from: ian
Tbh, I'm not convinced by voice control...
Ahh,  but you have full control of your limbs.  For all its current flaws and idiocies I can see it making life very, very much more bearable for someone who hasn't.  Don't much like the server based nature of it though.  Loss of privacy and all that.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on September 27, 2018, 05:55:37 pm
Quote from: ian
Tbh, I'm not convinced by voice control...
Ahh,  but you have full control of your limbs.  For all its current flaws and idiocies I can see it making life very, very much more bearable for someone who hasn't.  Don't much like the server based nature of it though.  Loss of privacy and all that.

Indeed.  $evilco Internet Of Shit tech has made voice controlled lightbulbs and the like affordable even by some of the disabled people who need it.

The best assistive technology is mainstream products whose assistive properties are largely coincidental.  See also: SMS, iThings, Garmin PE watches, Di2, Youtube, etc.


None of which makes speaking to computers any less wrong.  "Computer, end program."
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 27, 2018, 06:19:38 pm
Well, you know I kinda meant I as in the singular me, didn't see the point of voice control, obviously there are wider benefits. We do have to balance those against the inevitable downfall of mankind. Though I suspect any AI that can automatically mute Donald Trump is welcome to be my machine overlord.

Actually, shouting 'MUTE' might be one of those use cases. And not just in the house. Nutter on the train. MUTE! Teenagers bereft of headphones listening to grime or drill or some shit on their tinny mobile phones...

I am impressed by tech that just works. When my phone, deeply ensconced in my bag in the porch where I've forgotten it, rings I can just answer it on my computer. And yes, despite my fear of talking to computers, it's quite nice to just tell Siri to answer it. Now if she'd deal with the phone call and attend all my meetings we'd really be getting somewhere. But I'll take what I can get.

The dictation feature on a Mac is very, very good. That said, I by far prefer to type and nudge the mouse around. If Amazon want to listen to me they're going to have to put up with me belting out Total Eclipse of the Heart with chilling regularity.

In other news, blimey some hifi bits are expensive. You can tell the market is middle-aged men with too much to spend. Hey wait, hold on...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on September 27, 2018, 10:44:58 pm
Putting it in here as it a but random and don't need a whole new thread.

I got a ISP provide router, SKY, I understand that you can connect another router say a TP-Link to get even better wifi coverage. Any of you lot done that? If so what router do you recommend?

Neighbourhood is drowned other ISP/Routers on 2.4Ghz and one other than ours on 5Ghz. The two main computers in the house are on LAN else it is two mobiles, one laptop and a tablet that is turned on now and again. 
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 28, 2018, 09:23:25 am
Most routers have an access point mode, you just to google the instructions. I have a BT Hub and used to have an old Belkin ADSL router to broadcast extra wifi in my remote command centre, connected through a powerline adapter. Worked fine until the Belkin went bang a few weeks back. I found an older BT Hub in a box and now use that in the same role. Pretty painless, plug in a network cable, switch it to AP mode, name your wireless network and that's probably about it.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on September 28, 2018, 10:02:07 am
Yeah I got an idea how it would work :) It is more what gear to get as I don't have a spare laying about :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 28, 2018, 10:08:53 am
Well, you can buy a dedicated AP, though you'd probably pick up a second-hand router for peanuts – ISPs give them out with some regularity. No idea about models, I expect they're mostly the same chips under the bonnet.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: fuaran on September 28, 2018, 11:41:58 am
Using multiple access points doesn't really work in my experience. If you give them both the same SSID, devices will drop the connection as they switch between them, or stay connected to one, even if it is a weaker signal etc. You could give them separate SSIDs, but then you have to tell the devices to change networks.
A whole home wifi system should be better. Though probably much more expensive.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on September 28, 2018, 07:09:27 pm
I used to have one SSID across two boxes and it sort of worked without working very well. Two different SSIDs works a lot better. Generally, there's enough wifi from either box to get a connection, and devices will opt for the strongest when they initially connect. I just know I have to connect to the SSID covering my remote command centre when I'm in there.

Anyway, tonight I'm mulling over subscription music. Should I join the feckless and accept my music collection as an ephemeral expression of my exquisite bad taste or keep on filling hard drives with the stuff? I still haven't bought a funky speaker thing. That's in an advanced state of mulling. Probably for several weeks more, I got some travels coming up so it'll be a while before I can prod things in the shop. I have the attention span of a squirrel anyway so I might just, oh, is it beer time?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: tiermat on September 29, 2018, 06:21:08 pm
I was discussing, yesterday, the AWS outage which affected Alexa this Wednesday just gone.

After a little search I found an article about it. I author pointed something out which made me smile.

On Alexa devices, the alarms are stored locally, so if the backend fails, the alarm will still go off.

However the voice commands are all cloud based.

So the alarm goes off, but you have no way of cancelling it!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on October 02, 2018, 11:19:41 am
Not really sure if this belongs here or elsewhere, maybe in POBI even, but it's just been brought to my attention that the central police station in Wrocław, a city of about half a million in southwest Poland, is running Windows 95.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on October 02, 2018, 12:30:00 pm
Using multiple access points doesn't really work in my experience. If you give them both the same SSID, devices will drop the connection as they switch between them, or stay connected to one, even if it is a weaker signal etc. You could give them separate SSIDs, but then you have to tell the devices to change networks.
A whole home wifi system should be better. Though probably much more expensive.

WiFi roaming (including persuading dual-band clients to use the 5GHz version of an AP) is a complete arse, and since the behaviour is mostly determined by the client, there's little you can do at the access point end to make it work properly - someone will inevitably come along with a device that doesn't want to play.  The standard bodge seems to be to configure the access points to be fussy about minimum received signal strength, so that clients get kicked and (hopefully) reconnect to one with a better signal, rather than clinging on for dear life.  Obviously this approach is contraindicated when trying to achieve maximum coverage with a minimum number of access points, and some clients are still prone to unhelpfully tearing down the interface and starting again (closing any open sockets in the process) when they roam.

There's a WiFi Roaming Fix app for Android that sorts it out at the client end, but that fails the user-having-to-care-about-network-infrastructure test.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on October 02, 2018, 12:38:52 pm
On the same SSIDs, iDevices would keep insisting on the wifi password as they move between wifi points, despite it (a) being the same password and (b) being saved in the keychain. Which was a pain in the arse and why I have two different SSIDs now.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on October 02, 2018, 01:05:04 pm
Well you need to there is no way that even the best wifi routers without any interference, wall and such like can reach all the way out to the west wing of your house LOL
 
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on October 02, 2018, 02:14:06 pm
Missus's Thunderbox had stopped downloading her mail so she followed the advice of a runner friend and updated her Ubuntu. Now Thunderbox works but her printers have pissed off into the middle distance. And strange but true, the shell interface tells me that pg does not exist.  My UNIX (yes, UNIX) savvy dates from the 80s but I thought pg was part of every distro/release/whatever. If so, there's something very wrong somewhere.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on October 02, 2018, 02:36:38 pm
Try 'less' (which is more).  Though I've got pg on this Debian system, apparently as part of the util-linux package.  Surprised oohbunty doesn't have it.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on October 02, 2018, 05:09:33 pm
Gotcha, ta. Doesn't more go back to UNIX days, before pg I think?  I've always thought of pg as being new(er).

Still not sure what to do about the printers.  Hook 'em up to my machine and share them over the network, probably.

ETA: just checked: pg is included in Ubuntu. Sounds as if the environment settings got buggered or the installation wasn't completed. Oh fecking joy, all joys excelling...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: dave r on October 02, 2018, 06:31:18 pm
I've treated myself, I now have a new printer, a HP Envy 4527, and its connected to my Ubuntu box wirelessly, I couldn't set it up from the computer but it connected easily working from the printer itself, though imputing the wireless password on the printer was decidedly fiddly, not only that but it connected easily to my tablet after I'd downloaded a pair of apps. I've just got to dispose of the old printer.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on October 02, 2018, 08:11:17 pm
I gave up and bought a pair of Sonos things with Alexa imprisoned inside. It's better, I believe, than keeping her in your car boot. I took the opportunity to test the volume on the staff of Dixons at the airport. It's amazing how fast you can make their sales minions scamper*.

I haven't got them yet, they're in the tender arms of the Royal Mail. I just thought you'd appreciate the update. I'm still not sure I'm ready to talk to computers. I don't much like talking to humans. I can apparently talk to my security cameras. Woot.

Actually, asking the time will be useful. The only clock we have in the living room adjusts it's time automatically based on magic devil rays. Except for every couple of days, it'll take a random time. No matter how many times I held it and looked puzzled, there appears to be no way to set it manually. Which means we exist in a state of chronological distrust. Sometimes it's non-obviously wrong. Sure, we could buy a clock that works. But I believe in dramatically overengineered solutions.

*ETA: it might have helped that I'd selected discotits to play. Hey, it's was their music.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on October 03, 2018, 03:52:03 am
I don't know what the daft buggers at SCS Software have done with their latest update, but when I am driving my virtual lorry down a virtual Danish motorway I want the virtual traffic to look a bit more realistic than this:

(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1905/30127226887_c14ad455fa_h.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/MUeUWk)
AI fail 1 (https://flic.kr/p/MUeUWk) by Mr Larrington (https://www.flickr.com/photos/mr_larrington/), on Flickr
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on October 03, 2018, 08:13:44 am
That's a Bentley, have you ever read Good Omens?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: pcolbeck on October 03, 2018, 09:07:56 am
I'm still not sure I'm ready to talk to computers. I don't much like talking to humans. I can apparently talk to my security cameras. Woot.
Mrs Pcolbeck has a passive aggressive relationship with our Alexa setup (controls music and lights in main part of the house). I think Alexa may be winning.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on October 03, 2018, 12:20:44 pm
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1905/30127226887_c14ad455fa_h.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/MUeUWk)
AI fail 1 (https://flic.kr/p/MUeUWk) by Mr Larrington (https://www.flickr.com/photos/mr_larrington/), on Flickr

I got overtaken by that van on the M60 once.  Same weather.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on October 03, 2018, 12:23:11 pm
I'm still not sure I'm ready to talk to computers. I don't much like talking to humans. I can apparently talk to my security cameras. Woot.
Mrs Pcolbeck has a passive aggressive relationship with our Alexa setup (controls music and lights in main part of the house). I think Alexa may be winning.

As has previously been observed, barakta's subtly-deaf-in-ways-that-hearing-people-don't-normally-notice speech defeats most voice recognition software.  She can improve the accuracy somewhat by speaking in a sarcastic tone.  (Oh no, what a personal disaster.)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on October 03, 2018, 01:45:00 pm
Win10 in it's infinite wisdom has decided that I got two folders with the same name, but with different content.

Disk under Debian:

Folder 1 - with Documents
Folder 2 - with Photos
Folder 3 - with a backup of Peli's files

Disk under Win10

Folder 1 - with Documents
Folder 2 - with Photos
Folder 2 - with a backup of Peli's files

Trying to rename the double Folder 2 back to Folder 3, no can do under win 10, under Debian I can, but Win10 ignores the rename. Rsync under Win10 from Folder 3 (backup of Peli's files) backup starts off fine, but suddenly starts to grab files from Folder 2 (Photos).

Disk scan and reboot, haven't snapped Win10 out of it's silliness.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on October 03, 2018, 01:49:08 pm
Yahoo! has hijacked my searching.

Having chosen Google as my default search engine, all my searches now seem to end up with Yahoo! even when I start from google.co.uk.

My ISP is BT and I use their webmail but I don't like Yahoo! for searches.

It's not fair!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on October 03, 2018, 02:00:39 pm
That's a Bentley, have you ever read Good Omens?

Needs more flames?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on October 03, 2018, 02:03:51 pm
Yahoo! has hijacked my searching.

Having chosen Google as my default search engine, all my searches now seem to end up with Yahoo! even when I start from google.co.uk.

My ISP is BT and I use their webmail but I don't like Yahoo! for searches.

It's not fair!

This on the mac?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on October 03, 2018, 02:06:10 pm
Yahoo! has hijacked my searching.

Having chosen Google as my default search engine, all my searches now seem to end up with Yahoo! even when I start from google.co.uk.

My ISP is BT and I use their webmail but I don't like Yahoo! for searches.

It's not fair!

This on the mac?

Yup!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: pcolbeck on October 03, 2018, 02:22:54 pm
Yahoo! has hijacked my searching.

Having chosen Google as my default search engine, all my searches now seem to end up with Yahoo! even when I start from google.co.uk.

My ISP is BT and I use their webmail but I don't like Yahoo! for searches.

It's not fair!

This on the mac?

Yup!

Something in your browser, either a setting or an addon. Its not a generic BT thing. I'm on BT and my search stays on Google.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on October 04, 2018, 07:44:34 am
I'm still not sure I'm ready to talk to computers. I don't much like talking to humans. I can apparently talk to my security cameras. Woot.
Mrs Pcolbeck has a passive aggressive relationship with our Alexa setup (controls music and lights in main part of the house). I think Alexa may be winning.

Hmm, my wife refuses to speak to Alexa already. I'm not sure what Alexa said, she'd only been installed for twenty minutes. Honestly.

I will say that the Sonos set-up was a masterclass in how to do computer things. Simple, guided instructions, took a few minutes, job done. Alexa set-up, on the other hand, honestly Amazon you have bazillion dollars, couldn't you spend more than $5 on your app UX?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Wombat on October 04, 2018, 06:41:27 pm
Ian,
I haven't looked at Sonos' blurb on what you can do with Alexa, lately, but can you give it voice instructions to play a particular album from a particular folder on your music library?  Its folder structure is several layers deep.  I'm not at all interested in streaming music services, just playing my own music, and accessing internet radio.  I don't currently use Sonos speakers, its just the method of getting the music from my NAS to my amp, and the only actual Sonos component is the Connect box.  As I'm unimpressed with the Sonos Android app, and its perverse layout (the PC one is far more readable, but why aren't they identical in appearance?) I'd like a less fussy way to play the music I want.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: freeflow on October 04, 2018, 06:46:16 pm
Windows 10 Oct 2018 update didn't.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on October 04, 2018, 07:15:26 pm
Ian,
I haven't looked at Sonos' blurb on what you can do with Alexa, lately, but can you give it voice instructions to play a particular album from a particular folder on your music library?  Its folder structure is several layers deep.  I'm not at all interested in streaming music services, just playing my own music, and accessing internet radio.  I don't currently use Sonos speakers, its just the method of getting the music from my NAS to my amp, and the only actual Sonos component is the Connect box.  As I'm unimpressed with the Sonos Android app, and its perverse layout (the PC one is far more readable, but why aren't they identical in appearance?) I'd like a less fussy way to play the music I want.

No, it will only locate tunes by voice via a streaming service (because the magic cloud that processes your commands knows nothing – nor has access to – your NAS). You'd have to use the app. The iOS Sonos app looks fine and will index any music on your NAS. I can also play Spotify, Amazon Music etc. via AirPlay to get around the restriction that ties you a premium service for direct streaming. But again, unless the tunes are online (or you use something like iTunes Match) the voice command won't work other than for skip, volume up and down, etc.

To be honest, that's probably fine for me, I'm still prevaricating over Spotify Premium, a state of indecision that may last for another couple of decades. I mostly bought it for the speakers to replace my ancient stereogram. Far better than faffing about with bluetooth.

It's great for internet radio, I just have to say Alexa, play [station name], and job done. There's probably much more stuff, I'm sure. She certainly doesn't know about train status though, because I just asked her. Southern should give her a job, she's ideally qualified.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: grams on October 04, 2018, 11:43:49 pm
Yahoo! has hijacked my searching.

Having chosen Google as my default search engine, all my searches now seem to end up with Yahoo! even when I start from google.co.uk.

The default search engine option in the Safari Preferences seems to currently be broken and the actual way to change it is to open a new window, click the magnifying glass next to the search box in the toolbar and you get a secret menu of the actual search engine to use.

(Although that doesn’t explain it redirecting if you use the embedded search box within a google.co.uk page... if that’s happening something is *very* wrong)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on October 06, 2018, 08:15:16 pm
Yahoo! has hijacked my searching.

Having chosen Google as my default search engine, all my searches now seem to end up with Yahoo! even when I start from google.co.uk.

The default search engine option in the Safari Preferences seems to currently be broken and the actual way to change it is to open a new window, click the magnifying glass next to the search box in the toolbar and you get a secret menu of the actual search engine to use.

(Although that doesn’t explain it redirecting if you use the embedded search box within a google.co.uk page... if that’s happening something is *very* wrong)

I see google for about a second, then Yahoo jumps in...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: barakta on October 06, 2018, 09:14:38 pm
Helly, smells like you have malware in your browser or the system. Try a different browser to see if it still happens. Also try starting your browsers with addons disabled or in safe mode.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: barakta on October 06, 2018, 09:16:04 pm
As for Alexa, I am morally obliged to share this youtube clip of Scottish woman getting angry and sweary at Alexa for not understanding her accent until she fakes being English: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=orD-e_W6Pic

I think if I revert to my now lost native Glaswegian accent speech recognition is usually slightly better.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on October 06, 2018, 10:10:46 pm
Helly, smells like you have malware in your browser or the system. Try a different browser to see if it still happens. Also try starting your browsers with addons disabled or in safe mode.

Thanks! Will do!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on October 07, 2018, 05:48:46 pm
Bad Cat and I challenged Alexa to a miaow-down. This was fine, apparently Alexa, once appropriately skilled has a large collection of what appear to be authentic miaows. Until Alexa interrupted proceedings which had, until that time, consisted solely of miaows with a message 'Thank you for subscribing to Audible, please say "yes" to confirm.'

Me and Bad Cat looked at one another. Then she miaowed.

So yes, I've just had to go online to cancel the cat's £7.99/month subscription to Audible. More worrying is that cats can order things via Alexa.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on October 07, 2018, 08:09:09 pm
Arf  ;D
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ScumOfTheRoad on October 08, 2018, 08:05:24 am
As for Alexa, I am morally obliged to share this youtube clip of Scottish woman getting angry and sweary at Alexa for not understanding her accent until she fakes being English: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=orD-e_W6Pic

I think if I revert to my now lost native Glaswegian accent speech recognition is usually slightly better.
Laughing out loud.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: barakta on October 08, 2018, 11:45:34 am
I just think of some of my Scottish family, my cousin Lynne would do a great rendition of this. She's from Paisley near Glasgow and when she gets going it's a real entertaining experience to watch. I'm amazed I can follow her given how deaf I am, but I can understand her perfectly, especially after a glass of wine!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Wombat on October 08, 2018, 04:23:34 pm
Ian,
I haven't looked at Sonos' blurb on what you can do with Alexa, lately, but can you give it voice instructions to play a particular album from a particular folder on your music library?  Its folder structure is several layers deep.  I'm not at all interested in streaming music services, just playing my own music, and accessing internet radio.  I don't currently use Sonos speakers, its just the method of getting the music from my NAS to my amp, and the only actual Sonos component is the Connect box.  As I'm unimpressed with the Sonos Android app, and its perverse layout (the PC one is far more readable, but why aren't they identical in appearance?) I'd like a less fussy way to play the music I want.

No, it will only locate tunes by voice via a streaming service (because the magic cloud that processes your commands knows nothing – nor has access to – your NAS). You'd have to use the app. The iOS Sonos app looks fine and will index any music on your NAS. I can also play Spotify, Amazon Music etc. via AirPlay to get around the restriction that ties you a premium service for direct streaming. But again, unless the tunes are online (or you use something like iTunes Match) the voice command won't work other than for skip, volume up and down, etc.



To be honest, that's probably fine for me, I'm still prevaricating over Spotify Premium, a state of indecision that may last for another couple of decades. I mostly bought it for the speakers to replace my ancient stereogram. Far better than faffing about with bluetooth.


It's great for internet radio, I just have to say Alexa, play [station name], and job done. There's probably much more stuff, I'm sure. She certainly doesn't know about train status though, because I just asked her. Southern should give her a job, she's ideally qualified.

Thanks for that info, Ian. I wasn't sure if it effectively voice controlled the Sonos app, or sidestepped it to directly control the music.  I find the Sonos app annoying in the way it is not very obvious how to go from the queue to looking for more music (The PC app has 3 columns, so why doesn't the phone/tablet one, allowing me to use it landscape format, and having it all visible?), and that I have to tell it where my music library is, every time I use it.   Why can't it just look immediately in the NAS music folders straight away, rather than offering me the NAS drive, and even then having to tell it where the music is.  Mind you, I also hate the way all computing based music playing stuff wants to decide what an "album" is, rather than respecting the fact that each album is in its own sub-folder, because that's how each album is defined. And as for choosing music by "genres" just sod off, will you?  Its in albums under each music type, and as you haven't got a clue what genre a 16th century choral piece is, don't even try.  And that most decidedly applies to Microsoft effing Groove music, which I'm left with after MS decided the fully working Media player was not permissible any longer.  I've given up and use a Nero product for playing music when sat in front of the PC.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on October 10, 2018, 09:57:21 am
Windows 10 Oct 2018 update didn't.
https://www.cnet.com/news/microsoft-halts-distribution-of-windows-10-update-amid-reports-it-deletes-files/

I hope it wasn't that, that happened
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on October 10, 2018, 11:41:01 am
They've re-released the update, apparently without the random file deletion feature.

Maybe one day Windows will be ready for the desktop...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: andyoxon on October 10, 2018, 03:34:25 pm
I noticed the update was ready to update (on shutdown) this am, when I slept the PC.  Worth doing creating a system restore point or summat else?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: TheLurker on October 10, 2018, 07:21:07 pm
Quote from: Kim
Maybe one day Windows will be ready for the desktop...
Not in our lifetimes.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Pingu on October 10, 2018, 09:37:51 pm
I decided to update the office suite on this lapdancer from an old version of OpenOffice to the latest version of LibreOffice. The LO installation went fine, but when I started it up and mucked about with a spreadsheet the lapdancer cpu temperature went through the roof (well over 90°C according to SpeedFan)  :o A bit of opening and closing of programs revealed LO to be the culprit.

A search on a FISE came up with disabling use of OpenCL by LO and that seems to have done the trick, but, Ruddy Norah, I thought I was going to have a borked lappy for a moment  :demon:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: tiermat on October 12, 2018, 12:56:33 pm
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/oct/10/amazon-hiring-ai-gender-bias-recruiting-engine

Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on October 12, 2018, 03:13:44 pm
Machine learning in learning from the training dataset shocker!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: tiermat on October 13, 2018, 08:41:07 am
Machine learning in learning from the training dataset shocker!

Hence why I posted with no comment. You would have thought that at least one of them had done CS 101 and thus knew about GIGO.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on October 13, 2018, 11:12:04 am
Sadly, with boys in technology (and it almost always is boys), the size of their datasets is always more important than their quality.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: grams on October 13, 2018, 11:18:25 am
Why are we suddenly calling this junk AI when it sounds exactly like the dumb statistical analysis spam filters were doing 15+ years ago?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on October 13, 2018, 11:23:59 am
Because AI sounds banging.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on October 14, 2018, 12:29:32 pm
Because AI sounds banging.

Am sorry dave, I can't do that.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on October 14, 2018, 12:45:21 pm
I always use the term 'machine learning' because it's really AI, is it? Obviously, machine learning isn't so sexy.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: David Martin on October 14, 2018, 02:31:39 pm
Because AI sounds banging.

Am sorry dave, I can't do that.

That's what my students say when I set them an assignment.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: barakta on October 14, 2018, 02:58:54 pm
Because AI sounds banging.

Am sorry dave, I can't do that.

That's what my students say when I set them an assignment.

*cackles*
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Wowbagger on October 15, 2018, 04:40:55 pm
Memory Lane: rooting through the cable crypt for something to cannibalize to wire up a CB guitar this morning, I came up with a home-made Laplink cable, the RS232 version.  Remember the first time you saw that? I do: the wonder of seeing the contents of both PCs at the same time. And the suspense while you waited to see if the transfer would actually work without crashing.

Didn't use it - wanted multistrand.

I loved Laplink. I used to use it when I was a Computer Professional. My last job for HMCE was the merging of local VAT offices' databases because Normal Lamont (or someone) decided to reduce the number of VAT offices from 80-odd to 50-odd. We had to copy the databases onto state of the art laptops (Toshiba something-or-other with massive 360mb hard discs) and merge them on there. The local offices' computers were, typically, Olivettis with 20mb hard discs.

When Laplink was running, and it always took quite a long time, it gave the impression that I was hard at work as all those filenames and associated numbers & dates went scrolling by.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on October 15, 2018, 06:54:32 pm
When Laplink was running, and it always took quite a long time, it gave the impression that I was hard at work as all those filenames and associated numbers & dates went scrolling by.

In many places this principle applies to anything taking place in a terminal window.

In others, the presence of a terminal window is a sign that you're a dangerous hacker.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on October 16, 2018, 07:14:30 am
wow I was clicking about on the internet today and lycos and angelfire are still alive.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Chris S on October 26, 2018, 04:17:12 pm
I tried installing Zwift on a 32 bit PC, and it complained saying Zwift no longer supports 32 bit PCs, and that I should upgrade.

So I installed it on a 64 bit PC, and guess what? Yes, that's right - it installs a 32 bit executable.  :facepalm:
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on October 29, 2018, 10:36:47 am
IBM buy RHEL (https://www.redhat.com/en/about/press-releases/ibm-acquire-red-hat-completely-changing-cloud-landscape-and-becoming-world%E2%80%99s-1-hybrid-cloud-provider)

Red Hat used to be quite good. Oh well.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on November 07, 2018, 10:07:23 pm
I've become addicted to Sonos speakers. The weird thing is that they somehow make wifi work.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on November 12, 2018, 12:55:25 pm
R.I.P. HAL: Douglas Rain, Voice Of Computer In '2001,' Dies At 90 http://n.pr/2DgyZUe
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Tim Hall on November 15, 2018, 04:03:14 pm
An email flooded in yesterday, allegedly from some medium sized cheese at head office. Apparently the IT support bods have a tool on all the machines to help monitor performance and this needs to be upgraded. Pls to download the file at the end of this link and click run.

On the one hand, no way, do you think I'm daft? On the other, the email looked kosher, address checked out, formatting and sig checked out.

What is a remotely working chap to do?  I ring head office. Is this email for real? Why yes, yes it is.

I download the zip file and extract an exe. Click run.

Whoops!, or perhaps, hurrah!, I do not have admin rights to install stuffs on my machine.

Drink coffee instead.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: BrianI on November 24, 2018, 07:04:03 pm
Despite having a Windows free zone at home for a good number of years (my last windows os was XP, everything else since then has been Linux in one form or another) im actually installing Windows 10 on an old pc hooked up to the telly for Zwift netflix & Steam 😀

My photo editing rig will still be running Linux though!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: T42 on November 28, 2018, 01:08:29 pm
BSODomized twice this morning, and as usual gone before I could read the address of the log.  "Display driver" in first line: seen that one before but not for years.  Did a driver update in the Device Manager, it told me mine was already up to date - after 9 years. I don't trust that but I no longer feel gung-ho enough to do it all manually.

BSODdit, I'll procrastinate. Don't need a driver for that.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on December 22, 2018, 07:26:42 am
When looking at what's my IP, I tend to be either just outside of Manchester or in Bradford, which is ok since I live about 25'ish north of both. Sometimes I get "hooked" up with an IP in London, which is fair enough since so much IT is down that there way.

Various internet services, depending on my security settings, will tell me "you last/just logged in from X location". These will fit to the location above, but twitter over the last few weeks have been a bit lost. As they tell me that I'm in Belfast.

EDIT: Just used a few other what is my IP services and they can't agree - I "live" in either Manchester or Belfast according to the same IP. Oh well I don't think if any of you lot explains I would understand why that is :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on December 22, 2018, 01:42:35 pm
When looking at what's my IP, I tend to be either just outside of Manchester or in Bradford, which is ok since I live about 25'ish north of both. Sometimes I get "hooked" up with an IP in London, which is fair enough since so much IT is down that there way.

Various internet services, depending on my security settings, will tell me "you last/just logged in from X location". These will fit to the location above, but twitter over the last few weeks have been a bit lost. As they tell me that I'm in Belfast.

EDIT: Just used a few other what is my IP services and they can't agree - I "live" in either Manchester or Belfast according to the same IP. Oh well I don't think if any of you lot explains I would understand why that is :)


It's quite simple:  IP addresses aren't geographic[1].

Sometimes people think it would be really useful if you could determine a physical location based on an IP address, so to that end, various attempts at compiling databases of IP locations have been made.  Unfortunately, they all suffer from the same problem, namely that IP addresses aren't geographic.  As a result, any given GeoIP database lookup will return a location that is either:  a) fortuitously correct  b) uselessly vague  c) accurate, but out of date  d) based on incorrect assumptions[2]  or e) complete bollocks.


Ob-xkcd:
(https://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/geoip.png) (https://xkcd.com/713/)


[1] The only person likely to know the physical location of a given host is the administrator of the network it's connected to.  Eg. Your ISP probably have your address on file, and I have a reasonable idea where my printer is.  But there's no etablished protocol for J Random Website to ask us that in real time, even if we were wiling to disclose the answer.
[2] Shoutout to fellow AAISP customers in Arnold, Nottingham.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on December 30, 2018, 11:03:37 pm
Why can you only buy one pi board at a time in the UK?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on December 30, 2018, 11:09:49 pm
Why can you only buy one pi board at a time in the UK?

That was a thing when they were first released and in short supply.  I didn't realise it was still a limitation.  I'm fairly sure I bought 6 Model Bs in one go from Farnell at one point.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: fuaran on December 30, 2018, 11:19:39 pm
I think it is just the Pi Zero limited to one per order. Probably still in short supply, because it is so cheap, so discouraging people from buying loads of them. Seems you can buy in bulk if you get them with the pre-soldered header.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on December 31, 2018, 05:23:16 pm
Am after one pi zero w and one pi zero.  Then a few other bits.  Not allowed to do it.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Maverick on January 01, 2019, 08:40:38 am
You can get them here https://shop.pimoroni.com/?q=pi%20zero (https://shop.pimoroni.com/?q=pi%20zero)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on January 01, 2019, 11:59:07 pm
Amazon solved the problem, which annoys me as am loathed to use amazon.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on January 06, 2019, 12:35:08 pm
You know when you have an Asus EeePC, yeah, and it's, like, nine years old, yeah, and it's got Windows 10, yeah, and it like hasn't been switched on since like October 2016?

Yes, exactly like that...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on January 06, 2019, 12:50:30 pm
I'm impressed that an Eee will run (well, walk) Windows 10.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on January 06, 2019, 02:07:12 pm
Fresh-ish install back then, cruft pared back to the minimum and very limited number of applications.  It's updating itself ATM so natch it'll put all the crufty apps back on  :'(
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on January 06, 2019, 04:32:52 pm
Win 10 works fine, just needs the memory maxed out to 2gb!!!!!!!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: woollypigs on January 06, 2019, 06:47:08 pm
The latest version of win10 has given life in one old laptop. So there might be hope for the eee yet, if it survives nearly 3 years of updates :)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Gattopardo on January 06, 2019, 06:53:21 pm
Or the obsolescence of bits like wifi cards.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: citoyen on January 08, 2019, 11:34:18 am
In my current job, I have a wireless Apple keyboard. It has just occurred to me that I have not yet had to plug it in to recharge it. That's pretty impressive, considering I have been using it for several hours a day five days a week since 22nd October, with just a few days off for Christmas - much better than the cheap shit Anker wireless keyboard I use at home, which also drops the connection regularly.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: DaveReading on January 10, 2019, 02:16:44 pm
Does anyone know anything about TOR?

I run a public website for aircraft enthusiasts at Heathrow (yes, yes, I know!) and I don't have any problem with visitors with web browsers using the data it displays on arrivals and departures (that's what it's there for), but it's become clear that it's also being accessed by someone running a screen-scraper bot that hoovers up the data at regular intervals (despite the banner on the site saying that no automated scripts or bots are allowed).

The client IP addresses of the bot used to access the site vary, and a reverse DNS search on any of them typically comes up with something like "this-is-a-tor-exit-node.filepit.to", so it's clear that the perpetrator is using TOR to disguise their actual IP address, which I would otherwise block.

I know there are public lists of TOR exit nodes, but they don't seem particularly complete.  Is there any way of detecting TOR access programmatically from the server log (IIS) so that my application can use that to decide whether to allow/disallow access?

I'd stress that I have nothing against TOR as a concept, I appreciate that it's a lifesaver in less enlightened countries, but I'm not willing to accept it being used for what is, essentially, hacking my website.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: ian on January 10, 2019, 02:38:30 pm
In my current job, I have a wireless Apple keyboard. It has just occurred to me that I have not yet had to plug it in to recharge it. That's pretty impressive, considering I have been using it for several hours a day five days a week since 22nd October, with just a few days off for Christmas - much better than the cheap shit Anker wireless keyboard I use at home, which also drops the connection regularly.

Pretty good aren't they? I think I have to recharge about once every six months (same for the mouse and trackpad). Also rock solid, which I simply don't expect from Bluetooth
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Greenbank on January 10, 2019, 02:49:37 pm
I run a public website for aircraft enthusiasts at Heathrow (yes, yes, I know!) and I don't have any problem with visitors with web browsers using the data it displays on arrivals and departures (that's what it's there for), but it's become clear that it's also being accessed by someone running a screen-scraper bot that hoovers up the data at regular intervals (despite the banner on the site saying that no automated scripts or bots are allowed).

They're just using TOR to prevent you from banning a specific IP address.

I'd gather as much info as you can about the thing doing the scraping.

i.e. log all of the headers presented (e.g. user-agent[1]), timing info (does it make several queries in a row, does it make the queries at the same times, etc)

You might find that there's something specific about that client you can use to detect it.

If you outright ban it then you can expect them to work out how and make it harder for you to detect it in the future, so it becomes an endless game of whack-a-mole.

You can be much sneakier. I've written a bunch of things to scrape other sites (honouring their robots.txt and other wishes) and what annoyed me most was when the format of the response changes.

If you detect the annoying client then change the format of the page you return, add in new divs, add an extra column, that kind of thing.

One other fun thing is if you can reliably detect this client amongst all of the legitimate clients then occasionally send it incorrect data.

1. I know these can be trivially faked, but that person having to do that will cost them some time. At some point in the whack-a-mole game you'll either exhaust their (or your) patience or technical ability.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on January 10, 2019, 03:34:39 pm
You can be much sneakier. I've written a bunch of things to scrape other sites (honouring their robots.txt and other wishes) and what annoyed me most was when the format of the response changes.

If you detect the annoying client then change the format of the page you return, add in new divs, add an extra column, that kind of thing.

Having had the misfortune to have to dabble in scraping things[1] from time to time, I second that approach.  Assuming it won't break things for the legitimate users, you can do it without having to detect the scraper.


[1] Usually to get data out of embedded devices, rather than from public websites.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Mr Larrington on January 11, 2019, 01:16:03 am
Newly relocated PC starts making expensive noises every time graphics card breaks out of a stroll.  Dive (more like, "bomb", TBH) under desk with torch, pull off side panel, poke errant disk drive cable away from one of graphics card's fans.  Peace and normal heart rate restored.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on January 11, 2019, 10:14:34 am
Would anyone like:

- a Wacom Graphire  ET-0405-U usb tablet with pointer and mouse?  vintage is likely 2001 or thereabouts.

- a Sharp Zaurus SL5500 with gubbins (including a 64!!1! Mb!!1!, count 'em, SD card)

- Also on offer JVC-JRS100 receiver, mostly works, vintage....'75? probably only fit for spares, has a hefty PS in it but unlikely worth any shipping cost. anyone got an actual use for it I'll cover shipping headed dumpwards

Headed dump-wards shortly (prob not the Zaurus)
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Steph on January 12, 2019, 09:12:52 pm
Just a simple question, coming from the lunatic TERF fringe of Twitter.

They keep posting the construction "&amp" after various insulting words. Anyone have a translation for me?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on January 12, 2019, 09:23:52 pm
No idea what the TERFs are doing, but ampersands are a special character in HTML[1] (to embed arbitrary characters by their code point[2] - for example &#89; gives you a 'Y').  Consequently, if you just stick an ampersand in, the parser tries to interpret what follows as something special rather than simply generating an ampersand character.   To embed an ampersand without the parser interpreting it as a command, it gets encoded as &amp;

Consequently, lots of systems that are designed to process normal text for use on the web will escape the ampersands.

Many buggy systems get this stuff wrong, for all sorts of tedious reasons, but a popular example is taking input where the ampersands are *already* escaped as &amp; and naively escaping it again (so it becomes &amp;amp;) and you end up seeing &amp;-related rubbish in the output.

TL;DR: It might simply be a result of copy&pasting in software[4] that's a bit clever, but not clever enough.  But I'm not discounting the possibility of a new internet slang that I'm not aware of.


[1] Certainly the older standards - it think the current ones allow an un-escaped ampersand?
[2] This is more useful for symbols and characters used in non-English[3] languages.
[3] For USAnian values of English.  &#163; is useful to Brits, for example.
[4] Possibly a troll-bot?
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Feanor on January 12, 2019, 09:47:07 pm
Thought I'd just killed my 8 port USB charger which does Fast Charging to my Samsung phone.

I had it connected to my new Suunto watch, which connects via a USB using contact pads much like the Garmin units.  The Garmin units have a crocodile clippy arrangement to clamp the cable to the pads.  The Suunto is magnetic.  The cable end has a strong magnet which clamps itself to the back of the watch, which works very well.  There are ridges which make the thing self-aligning, so you don't need to manually jibble it so much.

I disconnected the watch, and the cable end then clamped itself firmly to the metal base of the lamp on the bedside table.
Whilst the cable was humping the lamp, it was shorting out all its connector pins.
Also, the lamp has a touch dimmer, so goodness knows what low current mains voltage AC was present on the lamp base.

The charger died.

But after I came back in from the restaurant and pub, it had come back to life!
Yay!
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Kim on January 20, 2019, 09:03:25 pm
It being the 30th anniversary of the launch of that most iconic of small computing things - the Macintosh SE/30 - we thought we'd dig barakta's one out for a play.

Sadly, while the screen still worked in that beautifully sharp way that only mono CRTs can, it failed to boot with classic symptoms of a memory error.  Opening up the case (made easier by past-us having not replaced the bastard-awkward torx screws from hell last time we had it open) we discovered a large clump of corrosive powdery ick where the corner of the circuit board with the realtime clock and something ROM-related was supposed to be.

That's going on the WEEE pile then.   :(


If anyone's got an old computer gathering dust, this is your irregular reminder to remove any internal backup batteries.
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on January 22, 2019, 11:34:44 pm
I have been struggling with a brand new MacBook Air, which would not accept a password I gave it last night and which worked last night.
Apple forums would not allow Hellymedic as a name for me, probably because it is 'profane'...

Have now managed the problem...
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: Ham on January 23, 2019, 11:09:51 am
(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/kdOPBP9vuZA/hqdefault.jpg)

https://www.theguardian.com/media/2019/jan/23/dont-trust-daily-mail-website-microsoft-browser-warns-users
Title: Re: A random thread for small computing things that don't really warrant a thread of their own
Post by: hellymedic on January 24, 2019, 02:14:45 am
David and I bought two identical 13" MacBook Air computers from John Lewis Clearance earlier this week.

We have both had very 'interesting' experiences setting the