Author Topic: Chain Tension  (Read 4445 times)

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Chain Tension
« Reply #25 on: January 29, 2018, 08:02:46 pm »
A brand new chain is lubricated with grease. The grease tends to get pushed aside on the first ride, so the chain 'stretches' on the first ride and then the length is much more stable after that.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Re: Chain Tension
« Reply #26 on: January 29, 2018, 08:08:07 pm »
If you over-tighten a chain it will stretch quicker.   

Re: Chain Tension
« Reply #27 on: January 29, 2018, 10:22:32 pm »
Thanks for that LittleWheelsandBig, hopefully it will settle now then.
Ian I set the chain so that it doesn't bind at all, so maybe a bit slack to start.
Boots an Spurs

Manotea

  • Where there is doubt...
Re: Chain Tension
« Reply #28 on: January 29, 2018, 10:39:24 pm »
But not too slack...  impressive, eh?



Yes, that bike sure needs a clean!

zigzag

  • unfuckwithable
Re: Chain Tension
« Reply #29 on: January 29, 2018, 11:21:56 pm »
But not too slack...  impressive, eh?

it is indeed!

in my (similar) case the weakest link was rear axle which got bent beyond repair; i had to get a new wheelset. slack chains can make a lot of damage to fixed/ss bikes!

JonB

  • Granny Ring ... Yes Please!
Re: Chain Tension
« Reply #30 on: January 31, 2018, 02:12:02 pm »
My chain (KMC 1/8") can go slack within a 100km especially if it's a hilly ride, I've re-tensioned during a ride on a number of occasions. I do think there's something in Ian's point above about the more you tighten it then it will 'stretch' quicker and so I've started to leave a bit more slack in it but nothing that's noticeable through the pedals. I used to think there might be some movement at the drop outs but then ruled this out as it would likely throw the wheel off centre. It's also worth noting just how little the wheel has to be moved to get the chain tight, the other side of that - it doesn't take a lot of wear to create slack.

How's the Dolan? Any pics?

Re: Chain Tension
« Reply #31 on: January 31, 2018, 03:59:17 pm »
I've always had terrible trouble maintaining tension on my Bob Jackson. This has been the case with good quality normal axle nuts and a Phil Wood bolted hub. With both I have had to have them tighter than I am comfortable with, and once I have broken a bolt on the Phil. And that is even with ensuring that the surfaces are clean and free of grease. That was a high spec bolt chosen after getting advice on here.

Re: Chain Tension
« Reply #32 on: January 31, 2018, 04:47:04 pm »
JonB
Dolan all good so far, impressed with power transfer (not that I produce any power) but what I'm able seems to drive me forward. First Aluminium Fixed Frame I've ever owned. My other thing is a 1970 531 Holdsworth, so a little compliant.
I've read all the post's and maybe being a tad anal re chain tension. But having read and seen some of the comments re chain coming off is scary.
Boots an Spurs

Re: Chain Tension
« Reply #33 on: February 08, 2018, 08:19:31 pm »
A small chainring and sprocket combination exacerbates the problem because chain tension is higher and it's all more fussy about slack spots than bigger cogs.  I had chains going slack in dry conditions within 100 miles on 39 x 14 (old MTB frame, so 26" wheels) but I rarely need to touch the 52 x 20 on my roadified track bike.  If you can cope with a few extra ounces, big-big is the way to go; it's much smoother and more pleasant to ride, unless you really like the more immediate feel of a small-small transmission.
Never tell me the odds.

Re: Chain Tension
« Reply #34 on: February 09, 2018, 07:18:53 am »
I think the drivetrain is the most important part on a fixed gear and it's simply not worth skimping on the pennies.
EAI sprockets, Sugino75 chainrings and HKK or DID chains. It'll be round and strong.

Re: Chain Tension
« Reply #35 on: February 09, 2018, 01:00:12 pm »

Dolan all good so far, impressed with power transfer (not that I produce any power) but what I'm able seems to drive me forward. First Aluminium Fixed Frame I've ever owned. My other thing is a 1970 531 Holdsworth, so a little compliant.


I have found mine very perky for what is a pretty cheap frame.   I was worried it would be a little harsh over the longer distances but it was comfortable on the 600 I did in September.   Mine is getting on for 2 years old and a bit beaten up from commuting and Winter miles so I'm going to get another one in the Spring for audax and weekend use.   It will more than likely be my choice for next year's PBP.

On the chain tension I use a surly tugnut on the drive side and retension the chain once a week as part of my usual weekend once over.   I will put a new chain on every few months and I use Izumi tracks which you can get for about 15 quid.   I'm not particularly great at keeping the bike clean so some items wear out quicker than they would if I had a little more time.

Re: Chain Tension
« Reply #36 on: February 12, 2018, 02:28:54 pm »
It will more than likely be my choice for next year's PBP.

Worked fine for me on the last one:
“That slope may look insignificant, but it's going to be my destiny" - Fitzcarraldo

zigzag

  • unfuckwithable
Re: Chain Tension
« Reply #37 on: February 12, 2018, 07:26:10 pm »
If you can cope with a few extra ounces, big-big is the way to go; it's much smoother and more pleasant to ride, unless you really like the more immediate feel of a small-small transmission.

i agree and was planning to replace my current drivetrain (once it wears out) with a combination that removes the faff of shortening new chain, basically plug&play.

Jonah

  • Audax Club Hackney
Re: Chain Tension
« Reply #38 on: February 12, 2018, 08:52:27 pm »
I think the drivetrain is the most important part on a fixed gear and it's simply not worth skimping on the pennies.
EAI sprockets, Sugino75 chainrings and HKK or DID chains. It'll be round and strong.

EAI cogs strip the threads on Phil cogs