Author Topic: Juniors beginning to make their own way  (Read 1926 times)

Feanor

  • It's mostly downhill from here.
Juniors beginning to make their own way
« on: May 07, 2017, 08:00:10 pm »
So Junior #1 is just completing year 2 in Medical School in Edinburgh.

The last 2 weeks, he's had placements:
1 week shadowing a nurse, and the second week in an A+E ambulance.

He's described the second week as "Seen some shit", and I don't doubt it.
The weekends on ambulance crew are a bit of a zoo.

Oscar's dad

  • Cheers!
Re: Juniors beginning to make their own way
« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2017, 11:21:26 am »
The son of one of our MEMWNS riders is a medical student and he came out with us a couple of Wednesdays ago. He too said hospital placements were something of an eye opener. I like seeing young people getting to grips with the real world!

Re: Juniors beginning to make their own way
« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2017, 09:31:50 pm »
The son of one of our MEMWNS riders is a medical student and he came out with us a couple of Wednesdays ago. He too said hospital placements were something of an eye opener. I like seeing young people getting to grips with the real world!

Did he wear a helmet?  I only ask if his experience in hospital placement has affected his perception on risk.

I recall an oncologist nurse who smoked because of the stress of his role even though he knew the risks.

Ruthie

  • Her Majester
Re: Juniors beginning to make their own way
« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2017, 09:43:39 pm »
Surprised he didn't see much shit the first week. Nurses clean up wheelbarrow loads of the stuff.
Milk please, no sugar.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Juniors beginning to make their own way
« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2017, 10:11:15 pm »
Shit is benign compared with blood, guts and violence IMO.

Oscar's dad

  • Cheers!
Re: Juniors beginning to make their own way
« Reply #5 on: May 09, 2017, 06:23:26 am »
The son of one of our MEMWNS riders is a medical student and he came out with us a couple of Wednesdays ago. He too said hospital placements were something of an eye opener. I like seeing young people getting to grips with the real world!

Did he wear a helmet?  I only ask if his experience in hospital placement has affected his perception on risk.

I recall an oncologist nurse who smoked because of the stress of his role even though he knew the risks.

He was wearing a Magic Hat as does his dad. Not sure if their motivation for doing so. 

Eccentrica Gallumbits

  • Rock 'n' roll and brew, rock 'n' roll and brew...
Re: Juniors beginning to make their own way
« Reply #6 on: May 09, 2017, 08:35:13 am »
Surprised he didn't see much shit the first week. Nurses clean up wheelbarrow loads of the stuff.
Nurses clean it up before the doctors get there.
My feminist marxist dialectic brings all the boys to the yard.


clarion

  • Tyke
Re: Juniors beginning to make their own way
« Reply #7 on: May 09, 2017, 10:19:04 am »
I recall an oncologist nurse who smoked because of the stress of his role even though he knew the risks.
I used to see the asthma consultant in Derby - a brilliant man called H. Morrow Brown, who revolutionised asthma care via the use of desensitisation - who smoked like a chimney, even while seeing asthmatics in his consulting room! :o
Getting there...

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: Juniors beginning to make their own way
« Reply #8 on: May 09, 2017, 11:07:47 am »
Smoking is perfectly ordinary medic behaviour, surely?  At least amongst the older generations for whom smoking was normal.  Stressful work that's not particularly conducive to giving up, innit.  See also: Alcohol.

Goes with every other example of an expert in $foo maintenance being sloppy in the maintenance of their own $foo.


(Obviously there's no shortage of counter-examples, but they aren't as memorable.)
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Cudzoziemiec

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Re: Juniors beginning to make their own way
« Reply #9 on: May 09, 2017, 08:02:33 pm »
My grandfather was a surgeon. Qualified around 1930. He didn't smoke at that time but found the aroma of tobacco from his colleagues in their staff room (or whatever the term is) so alluring he decided to take it up. For some reason, he chose a pipe rather than cigarettes, and found it took so long to get the thing lighted and going properly that by the time he was just getting into a smoke, he'd be called away to a consultation or whatever; so he never actually did become a smoker.
An ungovernable laughter, a joyous agitation which makes the summer stretching before you seem like an unrolling canvas on which you might draw those first rude pure strokes that are free. (Capote)

Ruthie

  • Her Majester
Re: Juniors beginning to make their own way
« Reply #10 on: May 09, 2017, 08:06:19 pm »
Smoking is perfectly ordinary medic behaviour, surely?  At least amongst the older generations for whom smoking was normal.  Stressful work that's not particularly conducive to giving up, innit.  See also: Alcohol.

Goes with every other example of an expert in $foo maintenance being sloppy in the maintenance of their own $foo.


(Obviously there's no shortage of counter-examples, but they aren't as memorable.)

Not so much now.  Not since they removed the staff smoking room from the operating theatre suite.  A few die-hards, obviously.
Milk please, no sugar.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Juniors beginning to make their own way
« Reply #11 on: May 10, 2017, 04:18:22 pm »
My (then) five-year-old brother once saw an Eminent Paediatrician privately at his home.

As Paediatrician put down his pipe, brother asked "If you're such a good doctor, why do you smoke?"

I don't think this chap ever forgave my brother...