Author Topic: School run insanity  (Read 2102 times)

School run insanity
« on: February 15, 2019, 12:24:34 pm »
Had a day off work yesterday so did the school run. As leaving neighbour was de icing car, they're boy is my my eldest monkeys class. There are a family 10 doors up who were also driving.

Got to school after chasing the kids who were hyper because of the fog. Walk past the parked idling cars including my neighbor. This is my first issue that only a handful of people don't drive and many of the drivers live nearer then us. Not only is there the eco aspect the kids enjoy it.

At collection I sadly had to drive as going straight to swimming and the youngest can't manage a day at school, a swimming lesson and probably 3 miles cycling yet. This is the only day we drive one way.

Had to drive past another school and the driving was insane including one car that mounted the pavement to squeeze past traffic.

It really does drive me mad.

Re: School run insanity
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2019, 12:56:41 pm »
< removes gender-stereo typing image after fair complaint>

Re: School run insanity
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2019, 01:07:05 pm »
Had to drive past another school and the driving was insane including one car that mounted the pavement to squeeze past traffic.

That's amateur compared to the Olympic Park:
https://twitter.com/hackneycyclist/status/861979663874371584

(That's a *pavement* the black BMW is whizzing down!)

Re: School run insanity
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2019, 01:38:59 pm »
One of the schools had to put up fence posts to stop people parking on the path, like fully on path and being prepared to do it when people were walking on it.

There must be something wrong that people don't even think they're doing anything wrong. Maybe new car smell is actually some mind altering drug.

Re: School run insanity
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2019, 01:55:17 pm »
My daughter's school (just inside the South Circular in London, so quite urban and well connected by public transport) occasionally gets one of the parent governors and some of the children to hold up signs at the parents that double (sometimes triple) park and often block the drives of residents. This type of shaming seems to work on some of them, others are simply immune to it.

The council also send parking enforcement officers round every few weeks. The 5 minute grace period is still given but only to safely parked cars. Those that are double/triple parked, parked too close to a junction (outside of a marked bay) or blocking someone's drive are given tickets straight away. Despite being warned about this by the school it still catches a few people out.

What also helped was the school pointing out to the parents that less than 400m away are a couple of CPZ (Controlled Parking Zones) that is only in effect from 9.30am, so there is free parking for drop-off times (unfortunately the parking restrictions run until 4.30pm so there's no free parking timed for collection). The nearest free parking is over a mile away (beyond the catchment area of the school, although that doesn't account for people moving further away) and it doesn't cross any of their minds to actually pay for parking, easily done by the minute with various apps, in a designated parking spot.

I'd say only 10% of parents drive their kids to/from school, a few do it because they live a couple of miles away and some do it because they continue on to work in their car, but the majority are just dropping off and driving less than a mile back home. Even though it's only a single form entry primary (i.e. ~210 children) it's still a noticeable number of cars when they park like fuckwits.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: School run insanity
« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2019, 02:00:53 pm »

Women, huh! Thank goodness no men drive, and when they do they do so only in exemplary fashion.  ::-)

Fair point, I've taken it down but you've quoted it

Re: School run insanity
« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2019, 02:02:03 pm »
My daughter's school (just inside the South Circular in London, so quite urban and well connected by public transport)

The good news is that the school is 100 yards inside the ULEZ extension that'll come into force in October 2021, so it'll cost drivers of all but recent cars £12.50 a day to drive close to the school.

I think that's going to have a useful big effect, I can't wait for it.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: School run insanity
« Reply #7 on: February 15, 2019, 02:16:40 pm »
The good news is that the school is 100 yards inside the ULEZ extension that'll come into force in October 2021, so it'll cost drivers of all but recent cars £12.50 a day to drive close to the school.

Recent *diesel* cars. My 2006 petrol car is compliant. And the cut off for diesel is 2016, so by 2021 that'll be a lot of compliant diesels, including everyone buying* brand new Audi Wankpanzers.

(* well, renting, it's not like they're going to pay it off)

The answer to a lot of these problems is School Streets, where non-residents' cars are banned in the 45 minutes before and after school. It has a measurable effect on those making short journeys by car.

Re: School run insanity
« Reply #8 on: February 15, 2019, 02:22:16 pm »

Women, huh! Thank goodness no men drive, and when they do they do so only in exemplary fashion.  ::-)

Fair point, I've taken it down but you've quoted it

Have taken my quote down too. Props for taking it down  :thumbsup:
R10000 x 2   RRtY x 7    SR x 7    E = 128

Re: School run insanity
« Reply #9 on: February 15, 2019, 02:49:57 pm »
Recent *diesel* cars. My 2006 petrol car is compliant.

Well, yes, my 2001 petrol car is compliant.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: School run insanity
« Reply #10 on: February 15, 2019, 03:24:37 pm »
Same old story today, dozens of cars, and despite the mild weather, engines still running. I don't want to breathe it either.

(double annoyance as the pool was closed because the lifeguard is sick so I got to the breathe it for nothing, and I'll have to trudge back there this evening)
!nataS pihsroW

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: School run insanity
« Reply #11 on: February 15, 2019, 04:53:00 pm »
Same old story today, dozens of cars, and despite the mild weather, engines still running. I don't want to breathe it either.

That's the thing that *REALLY* pisses me off, people sitting with their engines running, some modern cars auto shut off and restart, but people still seem to do it.

How many of the same parents would then complain about the idea of cycle infrastructure to make it easier to get to school ?

Oh and same thing with people idling at level crossings...

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: School run insanity
« Reply #12 on: February 15, 2019, 09:45:14 pm »
I am impressed by the three kids who walk to my village school.  2 miles of country disused railway path each way. :thumbsup: I have wondered if parents have ever had a letter from head-teacher expressing concern...

Ben T

  • What you saying, then?
Unless you put on overalls, boots, and a helmet with a high tech pre fitted lamp - and you dig coal - nope, you don't know me.

Re: School run insanity
« Reply #14 on: February 15, 2019, 10:48:59 pm »
A few Glasgow primary schools to trial car-free zones

Sadly I can see this failing. People will use any excuse to justify their need to drive to the school gate to drop the kids off. And it trumps everyone else need obv.

Re: School run insanity
« Reply #15 on: February 18, 2019, 09:05:49 am »
I live round the corner from a reception & primary school. The school entrance is on the inside of a loooong radius corner that encircles most of the grounds. The road outside becomes a car park twice daily and if you're tyring to navigate around it, there is literally no way of seeing if your way is clear. I'm not around Mon-Thu to experience it, but on a Friday afternoon I am often treated to the cacophony of idling engines and beeping horns.

The lasting negative effect I see is that the pavements around my area are covered in oily blotches where cars (whose seals are all shot from daily 5 min journeys, no doubt) have been sat waiting for their precious darlings.

There is obviously a toxic element of car culture that means people will use them, despite it being a net inconvenience (justifying the cost, perhaps?), instead of walking/cycling. However, I know of some mitigating circumstances due to other bureaucratic failings that must shoulder some of the blame: Some friends who live around the corner have their kids at the school above, they had go through several appeals to get their kids placed at this school,  which is all of 700m from their house, as they were not in the catchment zone for it. By the council's plans, they would have had to take their kids 3 miles away, the other side of the town centre which probably would have meant them buying a second car and driving them there and back.


ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: School run insanity
« Reply #16 on: February 18, 2019, 09:35:55 am »
I think there's sometimes the paradox of choice (in that it's not really a choice). That said, there's only one state school (whatever they call comprehensive schools these days) in the town I live, but they took care to site it on the edge of town rather than the centre to ensure the maximal travel time for the maximal number of people. It's also sited on a fast, moderately busy road with poor sight lines, the sort that seems to encourage every fourth driver to speed (I wouldn't cycle on it, and unless you're in possession of the perceived immortality of youth, you don't linger while crossing). I don't think there are any bus routes up there, unless there's a special school service.

That said, it's not a huge town and I'm sure all the cars sitting outside aren't from outliers, nor really is there any excuse for leaving the engines running for what must be 10-15 minutes.
!nataS pihsroW

Re: School run insanity
« Reply #17 on: April 06, 2019, 01:11:11 am »
When I was at school you only got a free bus pass IF you lived more than three miles radius from the school (which only took about 40-45minutes to walk).
The problem is not that the kids don't want to walk BUT the parents.
"Oh no I'm not wasting over an hour walking them to school and back when I could be sat on my Fat lazy arse watching telly."

Re: School run insanity
« Reply #18 on: April 06, 2019, 06:33:55 am »
Is that many of them? From what I can see, many of them are juggling several school runs and getting to work.

CrinklyLion

  • The one with devious, cake-pushing ways....
Re: School run insanity
« Reply #19 on: April 06, 2019, 09:17:54 am »
When I was at school you only got a free bus pass IF you lived more than three miles radius from the school

Still the case for the SmallestCub's comp and the EldestCub's post-16 college.  In the case of the former I think you get transport IF you live outside the 3 mile radius AND you are in catchment (which includes a couple of villages the kids get bussed in from) and in the case of the latter, which pulls kids from all over town, I think it is a combination of living outside the 3 mile radius and means-testing - we would qualify but he prefers to cycle.

Re: School run insanity
« Reply #20 on: April 06, 2019, 09:48:03 am »
The 3 mile rule gets bent anyway...my daughters' school pulls in kids from all the nice villages around south Swindon, despite rough Swindon schools being much closer to the villages (2 miles vs 7 miles for their house).  It's how it keeps its results up, and the council still provides school buses.
Never tell me the odds.

PaulF

  • "World's Scariest Barman"
  • It's only impossible if you stop to think about it
Re: School run insanity
« Reply #21 on: April 06, 2019, 09:58:08 am »
I think the flexibility of the rule may depend on an assessment of the safety of the route? All the kids from/my village get a bus to the local academy which is only 1.5 miles away. But the route is either down a road with no footpath or a path through woods and across a field. Neither of which are lit.

fboab

  • It's a fecking serious business, riding a bike
Re: School run insanity
« Reply #22 on: April 06, 2019, 10:16:29 pm »
I do think the "why don't they just walk /cycle" ignores the fact that most children driven to school are driven there by parents who are then driving to work.
I certainly wouldn't have had time to cycle or walk my children to school and then get to work on time.
Both parents work - if they are still in the same house - so that they can afford the two cars they need, to get to the jobs they have to have, to pay for the cars and house.
TSS is not Total Sex Score, Chris!

CrinklyLion

  • The one with devious, cake-pushing ways....
Re: School run insanity
« Reply #23 on: April 07, 2019, 10:19:21 am »
The 3 mile rule gets bent anyway...my daughters' school pulls in kids from all the nice villages around south Swindon, despite rough Swindon schools being much closer to the villages (2 miles vs 7 miles for their house).  It's how it keeps its results up, and the council still provides school buses.

But if those villages are in your daughter's school's catchment area then that isn't bending the 3 milke rule at all - they'd be in catchment, and live more than 3 miles from the school, so qualify for funded transport to school.

For example, my eldest didn't get a place in his preferred (non-faith) school because we are out of catchment, although live about a mile and a half away.  Kids who live in villages 5 or 7 miles away do get a place despite the fact that they drive past a different secondary school (the one where the Cub ended up) to get to it - although the ones that live in a different village further out of town get bussed either 7 miles to the Cub's school or to my old school, which is about 8 miles in the opposite direction...

The fact that catchment areas have all sorts of historical nonsenses in them is a separate issue :)

Riggers

  • Mine's a pipe, er… pint!
Re: School run insanity
« Reply #24 on: April 09, 2019, 08:36:49 am »
We have three schools on our road, and now the schools have broken up for Easter, the absence of cars is always remarkable. Not only on ours but obviously all other roads in proximity.

That said, them cars that are on the road feel justified in driving faster, due to the lack of traffic. Twats.
Certainly never seen cycling south of Sussex