Author Topic: Grammar that makes you cringe  (Read 352241 times)

Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5250 on: March 27, 2019, 11:12:19 am »
An actor, or a witness in court, might give a credible performance.  A footballer might give a creditable performance.  Sportsball pundits, get your shit outsorted.

But if a footballer can give an incredible performance, surely they must be able to give a credible one.

Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5251 on: March 27, 2019, 11:15:19 am »
Today I have "non-US dollar based partners," which I've rendered as written. Seems quite simple in comparison (and sadly devoid of chemical pun potential).

But is that partners who use non-US dollars, or partners who use US dollars although they're not based in the USA, or something entirely different?

Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5252 on: March 27, 2019, 11:19:40 am »
Is a complicated psychological condition associated with intricate arrangements of buildings a complex complex complex complex?

Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5253 on: March 27, 2019, 11:38:49 am »
An actor, or a witness in court, might give a credible performance.  A footballer might give a creditable performance.  Sportsball pundits, get your shit outsorted.

But if a footballer can give an incredible performance, surely they must be able to give a credible one.

That is only a reasonable assumption if the use of the word "incredible" is correct in that context, which it isn't, however frequently we say it.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5254 on: March 27, 2019, 11:39:24 am »
An actor, or a witness in court, might give a credible performance.  A footballer might give a creditable performance.  Sportsball pundits, get your shit outsorted.

But if a footballer can give an incredible performance, surely they must be able to give a credible one.
Reminds me of when I first came across the Polish word for incredible. "The bloke who organises these charity events is niesamowity." So what does that mean? Nie, obviously, is a negative prefix, so I looked up samowity in a Polish-English dictionary. Not there. No such word. Turns out Polish, quite sensibly, uses different words for "credible=believable" and "incredible=amazing."

Today I have "non-US dollar based partners," which I've rendered as written. Seems quite simple in comparison (and sadly devoid of chemical pun potential).

But is that partners who use non-US dollars, or partners who use US dollars although they're not based in the USA, or something entirely different?
Partners who use any currency other the US dollar. As opposed to non-US dollar-based partners, I suppose. You'd think lawyers would speak more clearly.
An ungovernable laughter, a joyous agitation which makes the summer stretching before you seem like an unrolling canvas on which you might draw those first rude pure strokes that are free. (Capote)

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5255 on: March 27, 2019, 11:40:25 am »
Does getting your shit outsorted mean getting it sorted by a third party contracted for the specific task?
An ungovernable laughter, a joyous agitation which makes the summer stretching before you seem like an unrolling canvas on which you might draw those first rude pure strokes that are free. (Capote)

Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5256 on: March 27, 2019, 12:03:58 pm »
I just didn't want to end a sentence with a preposition.  It seems that this is the type of thread up with which people will not put that.  :facepalm:

mattc

  • n.b. have grown beard since photo taken
    • Didcot Audaxes
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5257 on: March 27, 2019, 12:23:20 pm »
Does getting your shit outsorted mean getting it sorted by a third party contracted for the specific task?
That's quite a useful term!

I have a lot of stuff that I need outsorting ...

(NO, IE spellchecker, do NOT underline "outsorting" - BAD IE!)
Has never ridden RAAM
---------
No.11  Because of the great host of those who dislike the least appearance of "swank " when they travel the roads and lanes. - From Kuklos' 39 Articles

Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5258 on: March 27, 2019, 12:26:55 pm »
Yay, I've helped to coin a new phrase.

I'm never sure whether people who use 'to coin a phrase' to introduce a time-worn cliché are using it ironically, or are just ignorant of what it really means...

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5259 on: March 27, 2019, 12:45:41 pm »
I just didn't want to end a sentence with a preposition.  It seems that this is the type of thread up with which people will not put that.  :facepalm:

That would be the kind of thing up with which I would not put...

T42

  • Gaulois réfractaire
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5260 on: March 27, 2019, 01:57:44 pm »
Isn't the preposition "rule" one of those spurious 19th-century dictates? I'd look it up in Fowler but it's two feet out of reach.
Où sont les merguez d'antan ?

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5261 on: March 27, 2019, 02:10:41 pm »
I just didn't want to end a sentence with a preposition.  It seems that this is the type of thread up with which people will not put that.  :facepalm:

What are you talking about? ;)

Isn't the preposition "rule" one of those spurious 19th-century dictates? I'd look it up in Fowler but it's two feet out of reach.

Yes - belongs in the bin along with split infinitives, another pseudo-Latin affectation.

rr

Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5262 on: March 27, 2019, 10:52:38 pm »
Job advert for principle engineer.
Government chief whip?

Sent from my moto x4 using Tapatalk


Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5263 on: March 28, 2019, 12:18:16 am »
I just didn't want to end a sentence with a preposition.  It seems that this is the type of thread up with which people will not put that.  :facepalm:

What are you talking about? ;)

Isn't the preposition "rule" one of those spurious 19th-century dictates? I'd look it up in Fowler but it's two feet out of reach.

Yes - belongs in the bin along with split infinitives, another pseudo-Latin affectation.
I'm slightly puzzled by the Pseudo-latin reference. Split infinitives seem to be popular in the American dialects of our language. UK dialects, particularly the RP varieties (which many in the UK view as an affectation) have a different tradition. I don't know of any split inifinitives in Black Country, though I'm not a native speaker.
In contrast, Latin lacks (lacked, if you prefer, though it seems to be the Lingua Franca  :demon: in the Vatican) splittable infinitives. Are there any European languages that share this oddment of English (with a suspicion that some of the pidgin English dialects may not have it)?

T42

  • Gaulois réfractaire
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5264 on: March 28, 2019, 08:04:34 am »
German, with zu. I suspect that the anti-splitting edict might have been imported with George rev. 1 or Albert of the hyperconstrictive britches.
Où sont les merguez d'antan ?

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5265 on: March 28, 2019, 11:38:16 am »
In contrast, Latin lacks (lacked, if you prefer, though it seems to be the Lingua Franca  :demon: in the Vatican) splittable infinitives. Are there any European languages that share this oddment of English (with a suspicion that some of the pidgin English dialects may not have it)?

That's the point - as I understand it, the rule about not splitting infinitives in English was laid down by scholars who felt that English should emulate Latin. And I think the same is true of the rule about not ending sentences with prepositions.

But English, as you rightly say, is not Latin.

German takes precisely the opposite approach - actively encouraging the shunting of prepositions to the end of the sentence, even if they are tacked on to the front of compound verbs in the infinitive.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5266 on: March 29, 2019, 03:25:31 pm »
I'm not sure whether to call this grammar or vocabulary (and it's definitely not a cringe), but if you were truing a wheel would you say you were making it "more truthful"? I'd say I was making it "truer" but yesterday someone who was talking to me while I did a rim swap used the "more truthful" phrase.
An ungovernable laughter, a joyous agitation which makes the summer stretching before you seem like an unrolling canvas on which you might draw those first rude pure strokes that are free. (Capote)

T42

  • Gaulois réfractaire
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5267 on: March 29, 2019, 04:39:32 pm »
A thing can either be true or not true, so I'd say closer to true rather than either; but if I had to choose I'd say truer, since truthful means honest and I don't see wheels having the capacity to tell lies.
Où sont les merguez d'antan ?

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5268 on: March 29, 2019, 05:20:10 pm »
I don't see wheels having the capacity to tell lies.

Unless there's diesel about...
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5269 on: March 29, 2019, 06:37:18 pm »
Yeah, my thinking also was that truth is not the same as being true.
An ungovernable laughter, a joyous agitation which makes the summer stretching before you seem like an unrolling canvas on which you might draw those first rude pure strokes that are free. (Capote)

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5270 on: March 29, 2019, 07:07:32 pm »
Quote
Bristol’s streets will be safer for cyclists when the government relaxes the laws on electrically-powered e-bikes.
As opposed to, say, steam-powered e-bikes.
https://www.bristol247.com/opinion/your-say/bristol-streets-will-be-safer-for-cyclists-when-government-relaxes-laws-on-e-bikes/
An ungovernable laughter, a joyous agitation which makes the summer stretching before you seem like an unrolling canvas on which you might draw those first rude pure strokes that are free. (Capote)

mattc

  • n.b. have grown beard since photo taken
    • Didcot Audaxes
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5271 on: April 01, 2019, 12:13:01 pm »
What's wrong with
"closer to true" in this context?

Or truer for informal usage.

(as a wheel is never perfectly true, scientifically speaking :)  )

I certainly agree that truthful is the wrong word in this context - I would suggest that the speaker was just making a linguistic joke.
Has never ridden RAAM
---------
No.11  Because of the great host of those who dislike the least appearance of "swank " when they travel the roads and lanes. - From Kuklos' 39 Articles

fboab

  • It's a fecking serious business, riding a bike
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5272 on: April 02, 2019, 10:54:53 am »
Spelling, Grammar, whatever, it's wrong-er than a wrong thing in Wrongton.

Quote
I have attached just one very simple ingredients list to give you a very small idea of what is available from ****'s 64 contracted principles ranges.

TSS is not Total Sex Score, Chris!

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5273 on: April 02, 2019, 02:47:02 pm »
I reckon that one fails on excessive verbal gymnastics, rather than any specific technical offence.  It really needs a management buzzword early on in the sentence as a warning of what's to come.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5274 on: April 04, 2019, 02:04:45 pm »
I'm giving pun of the day award to whoever it was that wrote this (about Mark Francois) in the Graudnia:
Quote
Last night, after a narrow Commons vote to delay Brexit, he briefly graduated from corporal to deity: “Forgive them father, for they know not what they do”.
An ungovernable laughter, a joyous agitation which makes the summer stretching before you seem like an unrolling canvas on which you might draw those first rude pure strokes that are free. (Capote)