Author Topic: Grammar that makes you cringe  (Read 352913 times)

fboab

  • It's a fecking serious business, riding a bike
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5275 on: April 05, 2019, 03:53:27 pm »
HM Gov. The wrong your[sic] in a Brexit Webinar.


IT IS THE END TIMES
TSS is not Total Sex Score, Chris!

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5276 on: April 05, 2019, 04:31:21 pm »
HM Gov. The wrong your[sic] in a Brexit Webinar.


IT IS THE END TIMES
Not eu're?
An ungovernable laughter, a joyous agitation which makes the summer stretching before you seem like an unrolling canvas on which you might draw those first rude pure strokes that are free. (Capote)

Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5277 on: April 05, 2019, 11:31:48 pm »

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5278 on: April 06, 2019, 12:50:19 pm »
Eu were...
An ungovernable laughter, a joyous agitation which makes the summer stretching before you seem like an unrolling canvas on which you might draw those first rude pure strokes that are free. (Capote)

T42

  • Gaulois réfractaire
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5279 on: April 06, 2019, 12:59:09 pm »
"Dr. Johanna Rhodes, an infectious disease expert at Imperial College London. "We are driving this with the use of antifungicides on crops," she said of drug-resistant germs."

Wie bitte?

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/06/health/drug-resistant-candida-auris.html
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
  • Custard Wallah
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Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5280 on: April 08, 2019, 06:13:31 pm »
HM Gov. The wrong your[sic] in a Brexit Webinar.


IT IS THE END TIMES

We knew that just from the use of the foul term "Webinar".
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

fboab

  • It's a fecking serious business, riding a bike
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5281 on: April 08, 2019, 06:27:04 pm »
HM Gov. The wrong your[sic] in a Brexit Webinar.


IT IS THE END TIMES

We knew that just from the use of the foul term "Webinar".
We knew that from the foul term "Brexit"
TSS is not Total Sex Score, Chris!

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
  • Custard Wallah
    • Mr Larrington's Automatic Diary
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5282 on: April 08, 2019, 06:34:14 pm »
That too.
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5283 on: April 15, 2019, 11:26:19 am »
English is one of the weirdest languages in the world!
Some of the comments are even weirder.
An ungovernable laughter, a joyous agitation which makes the summer stretching before you seem like an unrolling canvas on which you might draw those first rude pure strokes that are free. (Capote)

Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5284 on: April 17, 2019, 12:15:54 pm »
https://corplinguistics.wordpress.com/2013/06/21/the-weirdest-languages/

And the weirdest, by their methods, is 'Chalcatongo Mixtec' spoken by around 6,000 people in Oaxaca, Mexico. And to get to that point it is
- tonal, which marks it as slightly weird (very approx 40% of languages)
- verb-initial (very approx 8%)
- Yes/no question sentences are not distinguished from statements either by word order, use of a 'question participle' somewhere in the sentence, change of intonation, or, indeed anything (1 out of the 954 languages in the study). 'I am the only person on this forum unable to my head round this'.
- Something odd with 'proniminal subjects' combining the, eg, Spanish/Italian method (subject markers modifying the verb), and the, eg, English/German method ('he','it', 'they'), but in the latter the pronoun does not appear in the same position as the full noun phrase would appear (again Chalcatongo Mixtec is the only one).

Whereas Basque, a language isolate, is 10th least weird. Weird.

Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5285 on: April 24, 2019, 08:14:58 am »
from a public "blotter" posting of law enforcement activity:

"5000 S Regal, officers responding for a reported domestic violence incident between a father and 7 year old, who argued over eating vegetables and a cell phone. -CS"

that's how the tooth marks appear on cell phones, it seems

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5286 on: April 24, 2019, 01:15:58 pm »
That's silly.  Cell phones are obviously a fruit.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
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Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5287 on: April 24, 2019, 01:46:10 pm »
Only iPhones, shirley?
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5288 on: April 24, 2019, 04:30:05 pm »
And Blackberrys?

JJ

Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5289 on: April 24, 2019, 04:44:56 pm »
This one was on the BBC News website.  I'll paraphrase because the context is distracting:  Her and her husband took their children somewhere.
I expected better.  Thankfully it's been fixed now.

Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5290 on: April 25, 2019, 09:20:03 pm »
I know that moaning about misplaced apostrophes is old hat, but I did particular cringe recently when I saw a form where the bloke had also completed his wife's details, giving her the title Mr's

Not what the paperwork concerned, but they were in the process of getting divorced.  Good grounds I'd say.

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5291 on: April 25, 2019, 09:30:15 pm »
giving her the title Mr's

That's not the etymology, is it?

*googles*

Thank fuck.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5292 on: May 02, 2019, 03:10:55 pm »
Elsewhere someone has posted a photo of a railway timetable from 1952. On the front cover, to indicate that it was given to passengers without charge, is the word "gratuitous". I love the way words shift in meaning.  :thumbsup:

<We apologise the lack of grammar and cringe in this post. Normal service will be resumed shortly.>
An ungovernable laughter, a joyous agitation which makes the summer stretching before you seem like an unrolling canvas on which you might draw those first rude pure strokes that are free. (Capote)

Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5293 on: May 02, 2019, 05:52:22 pm »
Elsewhere someone has posted a photo of a railway timetable from 1952. On the front cover, to indicate that it was given to passengers without charge, is the word "gratuitous". I love the way words shift in meaning.  :thumbsup:

My wife certainly feels that the timetable information I pass on to her for any given rail journey is gratuitous.

(In fairness, since I discovered Realtime Trains, she's got a point.)

T42

  • Gaulois réfractaire
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5294 on: May 03, 2019, 08:27:03 am »
giving her the title Mr's

That's not the etymology, is it?

*googles*

Thank fuck.

Etymologically you could say that it's a contracted mistress, if you wanted to invite strangulation.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

T42

  • Gaulois réfractaire
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5295 on: May 03, 2019, 08:32:42 am »
Elsewhere someone has posted a photo of a railway timetable from 1952. On the front cover, to indicate that it was given to passengers without charge, is the word "gratuitous". I love the way words shift in meaning.  :thumbsup:

<We apologise the lack of grammar and cringe in this post. Normal service will be resumed shortly.>

Yeah. Derive* derives from the French word for drift.

*   which my fingers this morning want to type as Dervie, which sounds like a station on the Glasgow-Stranraer line**.
** Tut, two whiches in the same sentence. One more and we can do Macbeth.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

T42

  • Gaulois réfractaire
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5296 on: May 08, 2019, 11:00:39 am »
Creeping vernacular, Batmanperson! Latter-day definitions requested for:

DM: Graun headline: Creepy men slide into women's DMs all the time, but they can be shut down.  Doc Martens? Drogerie Markt?  Diuretic Marmalade???

Crombie: Friend of missus's used it to refer to an old copy of a book, and when queried replied "but everyone uses it" without elaborating. The only crombie I know of takes a capital and is a coat.  Can someone please explain?

Ta.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5297 on: May 08, 2019, 11:18:42 am »
DM: Graun headline: Creepy men slide into women's DMs all the time, but they can be shut down.  Doc Martens? Drogerie Markt?  Diuretic Marmalade???

Direct messages (ie private communication on social media channels)

Quote
Crombie: Friend of missus's used it to refer to an old copy of a book, and when queried replied "but everyone uses it" without elaborating. The only crombie I know of takes a capital and is a coat.  Can someone please explain?

A synonym for hesh.  ;)

I believe it comes from Abercrombie & Fitch - a clothing brand that is popular among today's youth.

Salvatore

  • Джон Спунър
    • Pics
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5298 on: May 08, 2019, 12:53:53 pm »
The OED says it's from
Quote
J. & J. Crombie Ltd., a Scottish firm of cloth-makers
Quote
et avec John, excellent lecteur de road-book, on s'en est sortis sans erreur

T42

  • Gaulois réfractaire
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #5299 on: May 08, 2019, 01:01:30 pm »
Ta, but she spoke of the old copy of the book as being her "crombie".  Had it been a copy of the Times and she lived under a bridge I could understand the vestimentary reference, but I gather she doesn't. Could a crombie also mean a vademecum or a staff to be relied on, like Bradshaw's or the OS 1-inch series?
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.