Author Topic: Smoking  (Read 2466 times)

goatpebble

Smoking
« on: May 07, 2008, 10:42:38 pm »
I have been so good, even when sitting in a typical Italian cafe, when my best mate was stressed out (we are both ex smokers, and cyclists) we both decided not to smoke.

He wanted to smoke, and so did I. We both had huge decisions to make about our lives, and despite the stress, we did not do it!

It was something we felt proud of.

But I returned to the UK, and on my own again, I started. My friend did the same thing, back home in Germany.

We are mailing each other all the time, because we are so weak! It is worse because his first language is not German, so he is thinking so hard about his studies.

Help!

Re: Smoking
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2008, 11:43:50 pm »
I found the sudden realisation that I had CHD whilst being rushed to the hospital in an Ambulance at the age of 42 for emergency heart surgery a great incentive to quit smoking.

Re: Smoking
« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2008, 11:16:13 am »
Don't be too hard on yourself. Don't be too soft either. Pack the fags in again and give it another go. Don't give up trying to give up!
Those wonderful norks are never far from my thoughts, oh yeah!

bobajobrob

Re: Smoking
« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2008, 06:20:58 pm »
I'm planning to give up in two weeks' time when I start LEJoG. I gave up in 2005 for 8 months so I know I can do it. I started again when I was smoking those other kind of cigarettes and got hooked back on the tobacco.

Don't give up trying to give up!

Quite.

Re: Smoking
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2008, 07:01:58 pm »
I'm not a quitter!

(Except I am. 2 years in a couple of weeks...)
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Smoking
« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2008, 08:13:32 pm »
GP: don't beat yourself up about being "weak" - you'll just discourage yourself further.

Think about why you started again - what situations was it that caused you to need the cigarette?  What places?  What emotional states? 

Most of the addiction with smoking, really, is in the mental habit stuff rather than in the physical addiction (you get past the worst of that in a few days, and all of it within a couple of weeks).  But if you have associations between a cigarette and feeling calm, or feeling social, or having a good time - then when something triggers that association, you'll get the craving.

So when you've worked out what triggers, for *you*, the desire to smoke, think about ways that you can either avoid those situations, or (better) work out other ways of dealing with them.  (The trouble with avoidance is that you probably can't avoid these things forever!)  If smoking calms you, think about what else you find calming - can you make that more accessible?  That sort of thing.  If you have trouble thinking of alternatives, you can always ask on here :)

Good luck!  Don't give up giving up.  :)

alan

Re: Smoking
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2008, 09:03:24 pm »
Don't give up trying to give up!

I would endorse that advice.My succesfull attempt at giving up was not my first attempt.
Keep on keeping on :thumbsup:

Re: Smoking
« Reply #7 on: May 22, 2008, 12:39:35 pm »
You can do it. Took me several years and many attempts.
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

urban_biker

  • " . . .we all ended up here and like lads in the back of a Nova we sort of egged each other on...."
  • Known in the real world as Dave
Re: Smoking
« Reply #8 on: May 22, 2008, 12:43:36 pm »
You can do it. Took me several years and many attempts.

Exactly the same here. I think I gave up about 3 or 4 times before it stuck. On at least two of those occasions I stopped for 6 months only to re-start due to work stresses etc.

Write it off, put it down to experience and give up again when you feel ready.

This time I seem to have managed to go for about 5 years without a smoke - so looking good so far ;)
Owner of a languishing Langster

Re: Smoking
« Reply #9 on: May 22, 2008, 12:45:36 pm »
Good luck and keep trying, as the others have said.

I first quit two and a half years ago - now. after four or five attempts, I have stopped for 3 months, and I look upon the others as practice runs.

Persistence is the key, and don't get demoralised  :)

Charlotte

  • Dissolute libertine
  • Here's to ol' D.H. Lawrence...
    • charlottebarnes.co.uk
Re: Smoking
« Reply #10 on: May 22, 2008, 12:52:29 pm »
You're a man of undoubted style and good taste, Goaty.  What about finding a way to make smoking so horrendously unfashionable that you couldn't possibly do it any more?

Perhaps have a few ciggies whilst wearing an outfit like this:



:D
Commercial, Editorial and PR Photographer - www.charlottebarnes.co.uk

Pedaldog

  • M' back!
  • Head Banger.
Re: Smoking
« Reply #11 on: May 22, 2008, 02:12:51 pm »
As many people will know, I survive on a diet of Caffeine and Nicotine.
I "Quit" smoking a few times a week and have managed one spell of about 12 weeks recently!
I will have another go. It doesn't matter how many times you stop as, at least while you're not smoking, you're Not Smoking.

Torslanda

  • Professional Gobshite
  • Just a tart for retro kit . . .
    • John's Bikes
Re: Smoking
« Reply #12 on: May 22, 2008, 04:47:57 pm »
Despite redundancy, children and other minor factors I have managed to abstain for 10 weeks now. That's not to say I couldn't have - especially last thursday when I left the office - but, for now, we're staying away .

J
VELOMANCER

Well that's the more blunt way of putting it but as usual he's dead right.

Jezza

Re: Smoking
« Reply #13 on: May 22, 2008, 08:49:30 pm »
I started again in SE Asia recently after 3 years as a non-smoker. God knows why.

S'pose I'll have to give up again soon.

Re: Smoking
« Reply #14 on: May 22, 2008, 09:06:29 pm »
Stopping smoking is a process.

It's over six years since I last smoked (a 25 year long, latterly 2-pack a day habit) but the process began at least three years before that, and goes on to this day.

Sadly, once you've been a smoker, you will always be, at best an ex-smoker - so you always need to be on your guard.

FWIW - my FIL quit smoking in 1974 and still has occasional pangs.

For as long as I want to not smoke more than I want to smoke, I'll not smoke.

Re: Smoking
« Reply #15 on: May 22, 2008, 09:19:20 pm »
+1 to ChrisS' comments above.

The "I'm now a non-smoker." mantra is just denial. Accept that you're an "ex-smoker" and get on with dealing with it.

It gets easier, but it's how you deal with the tricky situations (that will crop up every now and then for the rest of your life) that will keep you an "ex-smoker".
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Smoking
« Reply #16 on: May 23, 2008, 02:32:56 pm »
I started again in SE Asia recently after 3 years as a non-smoker. God knows why.

S'pose I'll have to give up again soon.

To keep the beasties away ? I get bitten loads more on holiday compared to when I used to smoke.
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

Re: Smoking
« Reply #17 on: May 23, 2008, 05:13:02 pm »
I think it's cheaper to buy an anti midge spray :D

As to non smoking I gave up  unexpectedly due to a ruddy awful cold. Much as I liked my pipe and a had a stock of my favourite baccy, after two weeks I said to myself "well I haven't smoked for two weeks I might as well continue" I was non to confident but it has now lasted for about 6 years.

And interestingly I have no desire to smoke again.
"100% PURE FREAKING AWESOME"