Author Topic: Confessions of a tool junkie  (Read 5247 times)

Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #150 on: June 18, 2019, 03:17:35 pm »
I still find mine really useful as a big FO screwdriver to shift recalcitrant screws.  You really can get loads of torque with one and there are not many screws that refuse to budge.  Just don't do it with the spiral extended though.

ElyDave

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Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #151 on: June 18, 2019, 03:39:12 pm »


I don't need it. I don't need it. I don't need it. I don't need it. I don't need it.

https://www.planetx.co.uk/i/q/TOJOOMT/jobsworth-outdoor-multi-tool
You're right. You don't.
The more you make use of the hammer and the axe, the less your wire cutters will cut wire.

That axe is good enough for cheese and that's about all, I wouldn't worry
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Cudzoziemiec

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Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #152 on: June 18, 2019, 03:44:55 pm »
It does look like the type of gadget that does lots of things not quite well enough. In fact it screams to be made in a camo version.
An ungovernable laughter, a joyous agitation which makes the summer stretching before you seem like an unrolling canvas on which you might draw those first rude pure strokes that are free. (Capote)

Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #153 on: June 19, 2019, 10:05:23 am »
<snip>

That axe is good enough for cheese and that's about all, I wouldn't worry

I suspect that cheese is what the pivot for the pliers/cutters is fashioned from.

robgul

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Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #154 on: June 19, 2019, 11:01:40 am »
I still find mine really useful as a big FO screwdriver to shift recalcitrant screws.  You really can get loads of torque with one and there are not many screws that refuse to budge.  Just don't do it with the spiral extended though.

Yep - I've got the full-size Yankee and smaller one about 10" long - both still in frequent use although I have some newish battery tools too.  The advent of Pozidriv screws has made a big difference to screwing with the Yankee spiral ... and the smaller one has a couple of bits like an old-style Rawlplug tool (the fluted ones that had a holder that you hit with a hammer) that you can drill into plasterboard/soft material.

Latest purchases are a cheapie table saw from Aldi and a Bosch cordless glue-pen/gun .... and a cordless sabre-saw.

.... and one of these is a recent acquisition - pure indulgence but creates a neater crimp than just pliers.   [I believe that you can get a similar tool that stamps initials into the cable end crimp!!]

Rob

Mr Larrington

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Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #155 on: June 19, 2019, 11:27:37 am »
Lt. Col. Larrington (retd.) has a spiral screwkidiser wrought from finest Chinesium which is still functional after 45 of your Earth years.  I hope to inherit it, along with his Rolex.  But the grandfather clock can go for firewood.
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T42

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Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #156 on: June 19, 2019, 02:48:31 pm »
Latest purchases are a cheapie table saw from Aldi and a Bosch cordless glue-pen/gun .... and a cordless sabre-saw.

Rob

MrsT is fond of intoning that cheap stuff is more expensive in the long run, but my credo is that if you buy cheaper stuff you can get more - and you're not so worried about breaking it, come to that.  In any case it's 90% Chinesium these days.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

robgul

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Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #157 on: June 19, 2019, 04:30:34 pm »
Latest purchases are a cheapie table saw from Aldi and a Bosch cordless glue-pen/gun .... and a cordless sabre-saw.

Rob

MrsT is fond of intoning that cheap stuff is more expensive in the long run, but my credo is that if you buy cheaper stuff you can get more - and you're not so worried about breaking it, come to that.  In any case it's 90% Chinesium these days.

Although it's Aldi the machine is a rebadged version of the same saw sold by Screwfix at twice the price.   Agree in principle on "cheap is expensive" but my usage is pretty minimal and not mission critical for woodworking stuff ... cycle tools are another matter, virtually all Park Tool in my workshop.

Rob

Kim

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Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #158 on: June 19, 2019, 04:34:42 pm »
My take on that is that it's fine to buy cheap if you're not sure it's going to get a lot of use, but to always replace a broken / worn out tool with a good quality one.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #159 on: June 20, 2019, 08:15:22 am »
When I recently bought  drill, I deliberately bought the cheapest I could find; £15 from Argos. The only reason I bought it was that I didn't want to have to wait till Thursday evenings when I can use one at Bike Kitchen or borrow friends', with the inevitable carting of stuff to be drilled or drill. I figure if it lasts ten drillings that'll be a several of years for me and if I do find I end up using it regularly, I can buy something from Black & Decker or even Bosch.
An ungovernable laughter, a joyous agitation which makes the summer stretching before you seem like an unrolling canvas on which you might draw those first rude pure strokes that are free. (Capote)

JennyB

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Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #160 on: June 20, 2019, 09:13:09 am »
When I recently bought  drill, I deliberately bought the cheapest I could find; £15 from Argos. The only reason I bought it was that I didn't want to have to wait till Thursday evenings when I can use one at Bike Kitchen or borrow friends', with the inevitable carting of stuff to be drilled or drill. I figure if it lasts ten drillings that'll be a several of years for me and if I do find I end up using it regularly, I can buy something from Black & Decker or even Bosch.


I read somewhere that the average home DIY drill is used (presumably meaning switched on and under load) for a total of only ten hours.
Jennifer - walker of hills



Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #161 on: June 20, 2019, 11:00:40 am »
probably ten minutes, not ten hours!

Kim

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Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #162 on: June 20, 2019, 12:19:07 pm »
About one set of shelves worth, surely?
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

T42

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Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #163 on: June 20, 2019, 01:12:11 pm »
Latest purchases are a cheapie table saw from Aldi and a Bosch cordless glue-pen/gun .... and a cordless sabre-saw.

Rob

MrsT is fond of intoning that cheap stuff is more expensive in the long run, but my credo is that if you buy cheaper stuff you can get more - and you're not so worried about breaking it, come to that.  In any case it's 90% Chinesium these days.

Although it's Aldi the machine is a rebadged version of the same saw sold by Screwfix at twice the price.   Agree in principle on "cheap is expensive" but my usage is pretty minimal and not mission critical for woodworking stuff ... cycle tools are another matter, virtually all Park Tool in my workshop.

Rob

Trouble is that given the ebb'n'flood manner in which Aldi/Lidl replenish stock you're only likely to see them once or twice a year. The quality, probably at Screwfix too, is likely to be less than consistent.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #164 on: Today at 09:20:28 am »
Finally got to try the Makita Red belt sander on Saturday. Its a beast! Sanded down the garden table top in about 15 minutes, highly recommended as long as you don't need variable speed. Did the legs and the grooves between the slats with a Lidl sending attachment for an angle grinder. That worked well also but the quality of the hook and loop disk for attaching the pads to wasnt up to much. Plastic and melted when used continuously, mind you at £3.00 for the disk and six sanding disks I cant complain, did the job. 3/4 of a tin of Danish Oil and the table doesn't look 20 years old any-more.
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.