Author Topic: Cambrian Series Permanents  (Read 53982 times)

CrazyEnglishTriathlete

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Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #500 on: April 07, 2016, 08:35:15 pm »
Barclays ATM in Llanwrtyd is on the main square, as you'll hardly be warmed up by them.  Tregaron has a Spar and Y Talbot on the way back - they used to do a great cawl.  Lampeter has a greasy spoon on the right hand side, if you don't stop for long in Tregaron as its only 45 minutes onwards - does proper tea with extra hot water and all day breakfasts.  New Quay has a big choice of cafes - if you haven't had a big feed in Lampeter - its only 90 minutes between the two  (Memories of the 3B a couple of weeks ago)  :thumbsup:
Eddington Numbers 123 (imperial), 168 (metric) 516 (furlongs)  110 (nautical miles)

Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #501 on: April 24, 2016, 08:04:41 pm »
May I heartily recommend the 2D, which I rode this weekend.  I started from Builth and it is a quick run to LLanwrtyd down the main road and at that time there is no traffic issue.  From Llanwrtyd all the way to Tregaron is on lovely roads - an absolute pleasure on a nice day.  The run down through Llandewi Brefi to Lampeter is pleasant and fast, but after that the ride gets tough, with very wearing terrain to New Quay.  The hills are not nasty, but few of them have brake free descents to pay you back.  I found it a bit fiddly cutting the corner, just out of New Quay,  to get back on the road to Tregaron, so study that section carefully.  I had a puncture on that section, but luckily I knew there was a bike shop in 'no mans land' en route to Tregaron and they lent me a track pump to get up to full pressure.

From Tregaron, it is the Elenydd route to Rhayader, via Cwm Ystwyth.  For some reason (probably rushing due to work/kids etc etc), I was totally not paying attention when I prepared my routesheet and I let Google Maps route me over the rough track to Claerwen reservoir and the Elan Valley.  I knew it was not right, but being stubborn, pressed on.  I finally bottled it about 1 or 2 km from where I later found out the track would have got better again (curses), as it was pretty cold and getting late and I thought a pringled wheel could mean a 999 call.  On returning to the main road and the Cwm Ystwyth way, I had put about 18km on the route and a biggish climb, so I had to put the hammer down to get over to Rhayader, as the clock was ticking.  Luckily, I made it in time, despite my puncture repair going leaky again and requiring 2 or 3 more stops to get some pressure. 

Without the puncture and the silliness, I guess it would have been about a 11 1/2 hour ride for me.  The control places would suit all tastes.  I went round on my sandwiches and a packet of Jaffa cakes, but cafes, chippies and the like abound.

All in all, I would say that this is one of the best 200 routes I have come across.
Lakes Audaxes on again in May 2019 (200km and 300km with hall accomodation).  Also an October running of The Tour of Rheged from S Lakes.

Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #502 on: April 24, 2016, 10:18:14 pm »
Chapeau on finishing with a fairy visit and a bonus 18 kms. I think that sometimes we only finish rides as theres not really a plan b.

Your report sounds very similar to my Barcud Coch 200 perm last year. After a navigation error sending me up a gravel track and over an additional hill I gave up on any hope of finishing in time and took time to take photos and enjoy the day. then oddly appeared to have enough time so plodded on and finished with about 5 minutes to spare.

It was a day of ups and downs in more ways than one.

CrazyEnglishTriathlete

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Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #503 on: April 29, 2016, 07:26:35 am »
Entry number 100 for the season reached.  Thank you all for supporting these rides and keeping them alive.

Looks like the 4F rather than the 8A for me this weekend as the weather forecast for the second half of the long weekend is interesting....

...I've heard that the Inuit have 37 different words for snow so I presume that Welsh have a similar number for liquid precipitation.
Eddington Numbers 123 (imperial), 168 (metric) 516 (furlongs)  110 (nautical miles)

Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #504 on: April 29, 2016, 07:35:08 am »
Entry number 100 for the season reached.  Thank you all for supporting these rides and keeping them alive.

Looks like the 4F rather than the 8A for me this weekend as the weather forecast for the second half of the long weekend is interesting....

...I've heard that the Inuit have 37 different words for snow so I presume that Welsh have a similar number for liquid precipitation.

Good luck Colin on your ride; liquid precipitation here this morning was snow so Inuit words still OK !!
....after the `tarte de pommes`, and  fortified by a couple of shots of limoncellos,  I flew up the Col de Bavella whilst thunderstorms rolled around the peaks above

mattc

  • n.b. have grown beard since photo taken
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Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #505 on: April 29, 2016, 08:44:02 am »
Entry number 100 for the season reached.  Thank you all for supporting these rides and keeping them alive.

Looks like the 4F rather than the 8A for me this weekend as the weather forecast for the second half of the long weekend is interesting....

...I've heard that the Inuit have 37 different words for snow so I presume that Welsh have a similar number for liquid precipitation.
100 entries eh. Any update on validations? <hint hint! I'm itching to get on the Cambrian Scoreboard! >

Have a good ride. I'm doing an Anglo-Welsh 600, which clearly has no place on this thread, but I suspect we'll be getting Sunday's weather. An 8-pointer sounds a little too much given the typical april weather!
Has never ridden RAAM
---------
No.11  Because of the great host of those who dislike the least appearance of "swank " when they travel the roads and lanes. - From Kuklos' 39 Articles

CrazyEnglishTriathlete

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Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #506 on: May 02, 2016, 05:46:58 pm »
Many years ago, shortly after taking on the Cambrian Series rides, I was asked to design the Welsh equivalent of the ‘Maniac Grimpeur’, a 1000km event in the North Pennines and Lake District with as much climbing as possible.  I admitted failure at the 1000km event but came up with an 800km event as a rough figure of eight centred on Llanidloes.  It’s been on my list to do for some time, but Mrs CET isn’t keen on me spending two nights in a row on my own, for the good reason that I might fall asleep and crash in the middle of nowhere.

This May Bank holiday things seemed to be coming together.  Oliver, who is planning to do all the Cambrian series and I both had time available.  But the week beforehand was very cold and I was under a lot of pressure at work, and the weather forecast was poor for the second half of the long weekend, so we agreed on the bottom half of the 8A, which is the Cambrian 4F (Aberdare – Hay-on-Wye – Knighton – Llanidloes – Devils Bridge – Builth Wells – Aberaeron – Llandeilo – Aberdare).

My doubts about the weather and the event meant I booked a hotel late, Aberdare was full, so I ended up in the Castle Hotel in Merthyr.   I met Oliver at the Butcher’s Arms in Ponsticill, after we’d both done a short ride from our respective accommodation.  Then we were straight into fantastic mountain scenery, along the road that cuts through the Brecon Beacons to Talybont, which exceeded our expectations, and had a really steep testing climb before a hair-raising descent.  The sun was out and it was just great.

Oliver had a problem with the mount for his saddlepack so we stopped in Hay for some cable ties.  Then we headed along the roller-coaster to Knighton through Newchurch and Gladestry.  We found a tiny little tea shop for a much needed lunch.  It felt like we were on holiday.  But whilst we ate the rain started.  We climbed up Bailey Hill in light rain, a hill that goes on forever after a steep start.  Near the top I stopped to put on my rain jacket and we hurtled down the other side.  Spectacular riding.

Every rider has their strengths.  Oliver is better than I am up steep hills.  And correspondingly I’m better on long drags into the wind, which was also the case for the next six miles towards Llanbister.  But it was hard work.  The stage continued with a wonderful set of lanes through Bwlchysarnau to Llandiloes, with no major hills, just constant undulations, and a nagging headwind.  We could see the highest hills to the west, the dome of Punlumon marked by lying snow.  Everywhere lambs gambolled about, untroubled by the strong northwesterly wind that impeded our progress.  We dropped into Llanidloes for some much needed food.  We were behind where I’d hoped to be, with the wind and spending a bit longer at controls, and I had my first nervous moment about finishing in time.

The shortest route from Llanidloes to Devils Bridge starts up the Hafren valley on little lanes and then cuts across to the A44 mountain roads and avoid the main road to Llangurig.  When I’d researched the route I’d been interrupted by a phone call and I had a funny five minutes checking that we were heading in the right direction on Oliver’s Garmin.  Confirmed that we were on the right route we went through the most outstanding bit of road of the whole day, the sun shining through bare trees and lighting up the glistening moss that covered every spare bit of ground up a grindingly steep hill, before coming out on open moors and brain-frying descents. 

It was so much better than the bleak A44 that we now had to face.  I put my head down into the strong wind and drove the gears to the welcome summit.  I was cold and tired and hungry and knew that it would take longer for me to eat that Oliver, so I checked that it was OK to go ahead on the descent.  I’d been eating and riding well, and I felt that my head and stomach were in a good place, the only worry was the time.  We still had 240km to go and would probably only have 16 hours left.  That seems like plenty, but with the Elan Valley and then the Devil’s Staircase (at night) to do, it felt quite daunting.  I also had memories of a very tough night on the Cambrian 3B a month before, cold and hallucinating.

When I got to the Hafod at Devil’s Bridge it suddenly all hit me.  We all have an inner resilience, and life’s events eat at that resilience.  That tough project at work had already eaten into mine, as had the previous ride.  Now, after two hilly stages into the wind, I suddenly found that resilience was all used up.  My head started to spin.  I struggled to eat my cawl.  Oliver was keen to continue, but I knew I needed to eat, so he set off.  I didn’t feel any better.  I just couldn’t face riding through the night, knowing that I’d only be able to take a half-hour catnap.  I didn’t have enough in my sleep bank.  It had been very cold on the descent to Devil’s Bridge.  All these things ran through my head. 

There is a line between audacity and foolishness and my judgment was that to continue was to cross that line.  There is no fun suffering from hypothermia by the side of a road in the middle of nowhere.  So I asked the Hafod if they had any accommodation.  They didn’t but they called the George Borrow at Ponterwyd, which was three miles down the road.  Feeling happier, I rolled along to the George Borrow and went to check in, only to find that room had gone to an internet booking, so I was sent to the Druid Inn in Goginan, a further five miles towards Aberystwyth.  The first two miles was a drag up hill and I began to feel particularly rough.  Then there was a long descent, which I knew I would have to climb the next day.  But John Howell of the Druid Inn was the perfect host.  He knew his beer and they had a good chef, whose cod, chips and roasted tomatoes were the perfect recovery meal.

I slept really well (I was asleep just after 9pm) and, after a good breakfast, started off at 8.30am heading back up the A44 in light rain.  I followed main roads all the way back, stopping in Builth Wells for a second breakfast.  My legs were going well, despite the headwinds, but I had no regrets about stopping the night before.  When you I’m really tired its not safe to continue and my speed drops (the legs work but the brain stops giving them instructions).  I did have thoughts of retracing the road from Merthyr to Talybont but found myself on the main Brecon road, so I stopped in Brecon to top up my water bottle.   The drag up to the Storey Arms went on forever, traffic heading for something in Cardiff going past constantly and the wind blowing heavy drizzle into my face, but I was back to Merthyr in good time, for a quick shower, and a drive to spend the rest of my bank holiday with my family.

Oliver had a satnav issue, so the 4F remains uncompleted, like an unclimbed mountain, tempting those who are bold enough to give it a go.  In warmer weather, I’d make more speed and a catnap by the side of the road would be less daunting, so another attempt this summer or next seems on the cards.
Eddington Numbers 123 (imperial), 168 (metric) 516 (furlongs)  110 (nautical miles)

Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #507 on: May 02, 2016, 06:49:24 pm »
Great write up Colin, and wise decision---can fully relate to the inner resilience bit being eaten away by other life events !! ALL the Cambrian rides are tough and having `other things on your plate` can knock resolve. Hoping ride 1H though end this weeks after one failed attempt
....after the `tarte de pommes`, and  fortified by a couple of shots of limoncellos,  I flew up the Col de Bavella whilst thunderstorms rolled around the peaks above

iddu

  • Are we there yet?
Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #508 on: May 02, 2016, 06:59:55 pm »
Many years ago, shortly after taking on the Cambrian Series rides,...

You loon  ;D

Just missed you then, relatively speaking, we were in Ponterwyd about 21:30.
I'd offer you some moral support - but I have questionable morals.

Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #509 on: May 06, 2016, 07:12:27 pm »
Finally got around to riding Cambrian 1H !! After an abortive attempt in December when drizzle turned to heavy rain and then a Sunday lunch stop... today was the nominated day.

Warm hazy sunshine from the off, fragrant bluebells lining the banks as I sped down Beggars bush en route to Knighton and an ATM control.

20160509_161202 by jamesld8, on Flickr


And then  nice steady gradients on A roads along to Penybont

P5060037 by jamesld8, on Flickr

 allowed me to keep a good average speed up so I pushed on without a coffee stop at Severn Arms and  into the lanes section leading to  Hundred House. Immediately on crossing the River Ithon there was an  abrupt change of road and gradient as the narrow lane led steeply up to the crossing over Llandegley Rocks and I descended carefully avoiding potholes and cars as I headed down to Hundred house.

The main course on the  menu was about to come, Glascwm Pitch an average 13% over 700m with kicks to 20%. But as is the nature of many  Radnor lanes there was a bit of `cyclist softening up` as the lane kicked up and down with several steep little climbs before arriving at the cattle grid and foot of Glascwm Pitch. A cuckoo called just as I reached the climb...

P5060039 by jamesld8, on Flickr

doesn`t look too bad does it ? just wait until you try and ride it then !!

A beautiful valley section followed the descent, leading along a stream and woods full of bluebells, the air full of bird song.  Bryngwyn and its ancient squat stone built church  was eventually reached and there followed a steep fast descent down to Rhosgoch passing the golf club on the long climb up to Clyro Hill. Checking my Garmin I reckoned that there was over 300m descent down to Hay on Wye ---all of which would need to be regained after  a lunch stop  ::-)

A BLT roll, coke, large coffee and cake restored my energy for the climb back out of the Wye Valley en route to Painscastle (aptly named for anyone daring ride roads in this area) but the lane chosen (by rwgps) turned out to be a total pleasure to ride as it steadily rose at an agreeable gradient through woodlands before crossing Begwns Common and  a fast  descent to Painscastle.

In December I`d taken the reverse route but the horrifically steep climb of 15-20% from Cregrina had made me modify my route to reverse the Ireland Moor climb (favouring instead Glascwm Pitch). Ireland Moor was glorious, warm, light breeze , views, albeit hazy, across to Brecon beacons and the hills of Elan Valley.

The route up onto Ireland Moor:

P5060040 by jamesld8, on Flickr

and the wonderful descent (ascent in December` attempt)

P5060041 by jamesld8, on Flickr

A few more nasty sharp kicks in the lanes back on way to Hundred House and then steady A road climbs all the way back to New Radnor and the start; a superb and very hard route covering a whole variety of roads and climbs and packing in 2300m climbing for AAA  :thumbsup:

https://www.strava.com/activities/567358599

A few notes too : Radnor Arms in New Radnor is currently closed. Pub in Hundred House didn`t look very open although there was a sign advertising food. In Hay on Wye the sandwich shop (down alley way opposite the car park / bus stop) does very good value food. Prince and Pugh, top High St Knighton does food (and hardware too !!) 
....after the `tarte de pommes`, and  fortified by a couple of shots of limoncellos,  I flew up the Col de Bavella whilst thunderstorms rolled around the peaks above

CrazyEnglishTriathlete

  • Miles eaten don't satisfy hunger
  • 3x Brimstone ancien 3x Pendle/Tan Hill DNF
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Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #510 on: May 07, 2016, 10:50:56 am »
Love the photos.  Want to be back in Wales and I was only there a week ago for the abortive 4F.  Meanwhile, I got to looking at the statistics for Cambrian Series rides over the years - here are the percentages for successful rides at each distance. 

Now - these are unreliable statistics because I don't know (in most cases) the difference between a DNF or a DNS (although I am certain that there are a few old unused brevets mouldering away - I will still honour them  :))  And also there are some entries this year that the riders haven't got around to yet. 

100s - 46.5%
200s - 59.8%
300s - 33.3%
400s - 13.3%!!!
600s and above - 29.4%

So there you have it - a suggestion that the 400 distance is harder than the 600.  I think for the Cambrian Series that is possibly the case as, unless you a strong rider going well, there is virtually no time for sleep, and that's hard over 27 hours.  With the 1H completed, it is the following rides that are still waiting a first completion since I took the series on: 

100s C1G, C1J, C1K (these are the new ones)
300s C3D
400s C4E, C4F, C4G
600s C6B (I've just had a couple of entries for this one)
Eddington Numbers 123 (imperial), 168 (metric) 516 (furlongs)  110 (nautical miles)

mattc

  • n.b. have grown beard since photo taken
    • Didcot Audaxes
Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #511 on: May 07, 2016, 10:59:14 am »
Excellent news - I am an above average rider in the 200 category  :smug: By 40%!
Has never ridden RAAM
---------
No.11  Because of the great host of those who dislike the least appearance of "swank " when they travel the roads and lanes. - From Kuklos' 39 Articles

Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #512 on: May 07, 2016, 11:00:04 am »
 I`ve several `mouldering away` --- 1C, 1E, 2A, 2J, 3C, 4F, 6A  !!!

Card for 1H completed went in post this morning for hopeful validation  :thumbsup:
....after the `tarte de pommes`, and  fortified by a couple of shots of limoncellos,  I flew up the Col de Bavella whilst thunderstorms rolled around the peaks above

Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #513 on: May 21, 2016, 07:54:23 am »
Quickly validated for 2.25 `climbies`, Thanks Colin for prompt service  :thumbsup:
....after the `tarte de pommes`, and  fortified by a couple of shots of limoncellos,  I flew up the Col de Bavella whilst thunderstorms rolled around the peaks above

Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #514 on: June 01, 2016, 09:06:05 pm »
I realise that this is only slightly related to the Cambrian Series but the people watching this thread probably know more about unsupported bike riding in Wales than anyone.

I have a pair of free weekends in September and I was thinking about picking the best one for a DIY from St Davids to London - I've always wanted to go to St Davids for some reason.

Planning is at the early stages but I would take the train(s) to Haverfordwest on Friday afternoon then get an early start in the morning - breakfast in St Davids then cycle via Fishguard, Llandeilo, Trecastle, Brecon, Crickhowell, Chepstow and back onto familiar roads near Oxford, home for Sunday night.

In England I'd think nothing of hopping on my bike and heading East but I've not cycled in Wales - are there any bail out options in case of mechanicals I can't fix? Is stuff generally shut on Sundays? Any particular items required due to local climate? Is night riding in September unwise? (I think I'd probably get to Brecon as it was going dark on Sat evening - maybe a bit further if I'm riding hard - but sleeping there is an option.)

I've taken a look at a few Audax routes for ideas, but any suggestions for alternative ways to go or routes to crib would be extremely welcome. I wish there were some linear perms in the Cambrian Series!

Thank you for any advice.

Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #515 on: June 02, 2016, 06:50:31 am »
Section of "Llandeilo, Trecastle, Brecon, Crickhowell, Chepstow " you can get some good pointers to best route from looking at BC / BCM Audaxes and comments about A40 (avoid as much as possible in `peak` times and have a look at this also https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=97727.0

In terms bail out options for section around Llandeilo / Trecastle you could get the train back from Llandovery; BUT it`s not very frequent at all , it`s the Heart of Wales line (Craven Arms - Swansea route  a handful trains a day).

Sundays most places would be similar to rural England, particularly once you get to Brecon and east thereof.

Weatherwise, depends on which end of September ! The route you plan doesn`t go particularly high, you`re not crossing any open exposed moors at 1000ft , but you may find you get a good strong SW / W tailwind to boost you along (to which may be added significant precipitation). I`d compare potential weather as to being similar to that you could expect up on Cotswolds at same time of year ie if you headed out of Oxford to Stow / Chipping Norton and the northern side of Cotswolds.

St Davids is lovely, very compact and perhaps for completion you should head down to one of the bays to dip your wheels in the Atlantic  ;D
....after the `tarte de pommes`, and  fortified by a couple of shots of limoncellos,  I flew up the Col de Bavella whilst thunderstorms rolled around the peaks above

Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #516 on: June 02, 2016, 07:10:46 am »
Thank you! Very helpful to know and the other thread is also useful. Should have known the question would have come up before.  :facepalm:

Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #517 on: June 02, 2016, 08:20:08 am »
you`ll find though my rwgps link is not coming up as I had a clearout of routes but PM if you want repeat
....after the `tarte de pommes`, and  fortified by a couple of shots of limoncellos,  I flew up the Col de Bavella whilst thunderstorms rolled around the peaks above

CrazyEnglishTriathlete

  • Miles eaten don't satisfy hunger
  • 3x Brimstone ancien 3x Pendle/Tan Hill DNF
    • CET Ride Reports and Blogs
Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #518 on: June 02, 2016, 09:26:18 am »
The hardest part to avoid the A40 is west of Carmarthen.  There is a good cycle patch from the B4296 junction into Carmarthen but west of that any A40 avoidance does make it very hilly (and perfect Cambrian Series territory where the controls are picked to make hills unavoidable). 

E of Carmarthen I really enjoy the B4300 (S of the river) and continue through Ffairfach, veer left in Bethlehem do a mile S on the A4069 and then ride up through Twynllanan to Trecastle - its a long drag up but not steep and the views of the Black Mountains across the open moors are great.  A short stint back on the A40 and then you can again use the south side of a river valley for the B4558 through Talybont.  If it's late then get back on the A40 at Crickhowell and into Abergavenny - there's a petrol station on the R as you enter the town that stays open late. 

From there retracing the BC route through Usk (B4598 and then B4235) to Chepstow gets you to the Severn Bridge
Eddington Numbers 123 (imperial), 168 (metric) 516 (furlongs)  110 (nautical miles)

mattc

  • n.b. have grown beard since photo taken
    • Didcot Audaxes
Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #519 on: June 02, 2016, 10:31:26 am »
Not a problem if he comes from Fishguard (as per the 2C wot I rode in April).
breakfast in St Davids then cycle via Fishguard, Llandeilo, Trecastle, Brecon, Crickhowell, Chepstow and back onto familiar roads near Oxford, home for Sunday night.


Although that section IS rather hilly, as you suggest!

See https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=79290.msg2010666;topicseen#msg2010666. Just a short bit of A40 to tackle.

Has never ridden RAAM
---------
No.11  Because of the great host of those who dislike the least appearance of "swank " when they travel the roads and lanes. - From Kuklos' 39 Articles

Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #520 on: June 03, 2016, 03:59:09 pm »
Thanks everyone!  :thumbsup:

This is what I have so far (with no diligence applied to the English section of the route yet): https://ridewithgps.com/routes/14171055

Havorfordwest-StDavids-Usk looks like about as much climbing as The Shark (10k feet) so pretty confident I can do that in one day and stop there for some sleep before an easier second leg back to London.

On the 2c route Fishguard-Maenclochog... is the B4313 preferable to the route through Cwm Gwaun? Both seem to have similar climbing.

Any suggestions to chop out more of the A40 without adding ridiculous climbing / miles very welcome!

mattc

  • n.b. have grown beard since photo taken
    • Didcot Audaxes
Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #521 on: June 03, 2016, 04:26:33 pm »
I used the B4313 and it was fine. Hilly but quiet and beautiful!

Further along that road, I turned left* to go through Meidrim, which cuts out another big chunk of A40. I was navigating from road-atlas-fragment and memory - no GPS! - and didn't have any problems.

* At this bridge here:
https://www.google.com/maps/@51.8757404,-4.5868882,3a,30y,161.26h,84.88t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1seqbwqT9r6gotvTzQN0-i-g!2e0!7i13312!8i6656
sp "Meidrim" [if you speak Audax :) ]
Has never ridden RAAM
---------
No.11  Because of the great host of those who dislike the least appearance of "swank " when they travel the roads and lanes. - From Kuklos' 39 Articles

Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #522 on: June 03, 2016, 06:12:44 pm »
I would take a left at 106km, go through Bancyfelin, it takes you off the A40, when you rejoin it on the other side of the village you go on a cyclepath that runs alongside the dual carriageway.
Also, unless you actually want to go through the village of Llangadog I would take a right at 146.8km, stay on that road and you'll rejoin your route at 152.6km, it cuts a big corner off and it also cuts about a third off the climb into Bethlehem itself.
Just another note, Excellent food at 129.3km, a little pricey but really, really good quality, turn into the car park and cycle round the back to the courtyard
Also a good cafe at 176.8km, Glanusk service station, this more of your truckstop type cafe.
"Nothing compares to the simple pleasure of a bike ride." - John F. Kennedy

Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #523 on: June 04, 2016, 07:01:48 am »
Thanks! Food stops noted and highly appreciated  :thumbsup:

Now updated with a mix of roads from the Severn Across and Windsor-Chester-Windsor to get back to London.

https://ridewithgps.com/routes/14397051

It would be fairly easy to extend this to a 600 by routing along the Northern half of the Severn Across. Could also be a nice option for anyone who wants to ride too and from the 8A  ;D

CrazyEnglishTriathlete

  • Miles eaten don't satisfy hunger
  • 3x Brimstone ancien 3x Pendle/Tan Hill DNF
    • CET Ride Reports and Blogs
Re: Cambrian Series Permanents
« Reply #524 on: August 06, 2016, 06:06:23 am »
Have recently been on holiday in West Wales with the family and (amazingly) resisted the temptation of the Cambrian 1E.  However, on several rides did discover some stunning sections of road.  Piecing them together, I came up with this as a 100km route.

https://goo.gl/maps/nt2EsfctSZv

If there is interest then I might think about a Cambrian 1L  Newport (Pembs) - Narberth - Llanboidy - Newcastle Emlyn - Crymych - Newport (Pembs) 1600m ascent (but with 400m ascent in the first 10km)
Eddington Numbers 123 (imperial), 168 (metric) 516 (furlongs)  110 (nautical miles)