Author Topic: Reader's bodges  (Read 67416 times)

fuzzy (retd.) AAGE

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Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #50 on: May 18, 2009, 02:31:35 pm »
Gear cable snappage? Small nut, washer and bolt combination to clamp around the stub of cable adjacent to the mech to set the mech on a sprocket/ chainring that makes finishing the ride doable.
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Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #51 on: May 19, 2009, 11:18:15 am »
Extreme sport mtb dude?
Tie a bit of innertube across the stanchions of your fork above the wheel.
Keeps a bit of the mud off. :thumbsup:

To clarify, this should be between the fork crown and the arch, not between the stantions.

As per the commercial version, pictured here.
Life is too important to be taken seriously.

Zoidburg

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #52 on: May 23, 2009, 09:22:12 pm »

3. Drill two 2mm holes. Note that aluminum is soft, and aluminum tubes are thin, so it won't take many turns of a hand drill...

Neither pretty nor clever, but surely better than getting rid of the frame? My engineer friends weren't that impressed, though.

 :o

Blimey

I wouldn't ever drill into an Al frame.
I did see a MTB the other day that had a rack fitted, it was an Italian coke can thin XC race job, which has the exact same ally plate drop outs as my Saracen

The chap had drilled and tapped the big drop out plate to hold a rack, seemed to be OK-ish

I think :-\

border-rider

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #53 on: May 23, 2009, 09:24:35 pm »
I'd be less worried about  dropout plate, as long as the hole is nice and smooth

I drilled the Al crown of the carbon forks on my Pomp in 2003 without too many qualms. I'd not drill tubing tho'

Zoidburg

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #54 on: May 23, 2009, 10:59:03 pm »
I'd be less worried about  dropout plate, as long as the hole is nice and smooth

I drilled the Al crown of the carbon forks on my Pomp in 2003 without too many qualms. I'd not drill tubing tho'
I wouldn't either

A tube is strong because its a tube with out ragged holes near points of stress.

robbo6

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #55 on: May 26, 2009, 07:42:04 am »
Ever-loosening cranks can be fixed by inserting strips of thickish paper between the bottom bracket axle square faces and the crank. Cut or tear them to the width of the flats and have a slight overlap at the front to stop them slipping back as you push the cranks on. Best done when creaking starts before the crank socket distorts.

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #56 on: May 26, 2009, 07:52:07 am »
Gear cable snappage? Small nut, washer and bolt combination to clamp around the stub of cable adjacent to the mech to set the mech on a sprocket/ chainring that makes finishing the ride doable.

Just use the lower limit screw and turn it until the mech alignes the chain with the ring/sprocket of choice.

Mr Larrington

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Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #57 on: May 27, 2009, 11:27:46 am »
Ever-loosening cranks can be fixed by inserting strips of thickish paper between the bottom bracket axle square faces and the crank. Cut or tear them to the width of the flats and have a slight overlap at the front to stop them slipping back as you push the cranks on. Best done when creaking starts before the crank socket distorts.

An American couple were attempting something similar on their tandem on PBP.  The fact that no-one present knew the French term for "aluminium foil" probably didn't help...
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Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #58 on: May 27, 2009, 11:52:47 am »
Ever-loosening cranks can be fixed by inserting strips of thickish paper between the bottom bracket axle square faces and the crank. Cut or tear them to the width of the flats and have a slight overlap at the front to stop them slipping back as you push the cranks on. Best done when creaking starts before the crank socket distorts.

An American couple were attempting something similar on their tandem on PBP.  The fact that no-one present knew the French term for "aluminium foil" probably didn't help...

"Stella Artois", surely?
Life is too important to be taken seriously.

Raph

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #59 on: October 16, 2009, 10:57:49 am »
To be able to use a bar bag, the front light had to go elsewhere, so i put it on the front mudguard. Even a light light (as opposed to a heavy light...) eventually cracked the mudguard when vibrating over bumps, and when I got the solidlights I knew the mudguard wouldn't last half a mile with that on the end, so this is the bodge:



Two picture frame hangers, rivetted to the mudguard with washers both sides, then chopped down mudguard stays bolted on with the usual mudguard eyebolts.

It's sturdy enough to hold a brick, so probably just about strong enough for the solidlights.

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #60 on: October 16, 2009, 02:02:02 pm »
To be able to use a bar bag, the front light had to go elsewhere, so i put it on the front mudguard. Even a light light (as opposed to a heavy light...) eventually cracked the mudguard when vibrating over bumps, and when I got the solidlights I knew the mudguard wouldn't last half a mile with that on the end, so this is the bodge:
I did that some years ago with a lightweight dynamo lamp, except I used an old mudguard bridge to attach the stays in the conventional manner.  I'd seen it on French touring and cummuting machines many times and consider it a very neat way of attaching the lamp.  The only problem is that the lamp is in exactly the right place to get all the spray back from the leading edge of the mudguard, and so needs cleaning often.

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #61 on: October 16, 2009, 05:16:54 pm »
My light bracket:



The active ingredients are a long M5 bolt, an expanding wedge bar end, and a 1" to 1 1/8" stem adaptor sleeve.  And electrical tape, of course.

Raph

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #62 on: October 16, 2009, 09:35:19 pm »
To be able to use a bar bag, the front light had to go elsewhere, so i put it on the front mudguard. Even a light light (as opposed to a heavy light...) eventually cracked the mudguard when vibrating over bumps, and when I got the solidlights I knew the mudguard wouldn't last half a mile with that on the end, so this is the bodge:
I did that some years ago with a lightweight dynamo lamp, except I used an old mudguard bridge to attach the stays in the conventional manner.  I'd seen it on French touring and cummuting machines many times and consider it a very neat way of attaching the lamp.

By "conventional manner" do you mean attaching them at the bottom near the dropouts? I'm sure it's just as good but I had those unused low-rider bosses just begging for the job.

Quote
The only problem is that the lamp is in exactly the right place to get all the spray back from the leading edge of the mudguard, and so needs cleaning often.

I thought that at first but in practice it's not a problem. I suppose if I do a lot of muddy stuff I might change my mind about that!

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #63 on: October 17, 2009, 02:27:56 pm »
By "conventional manner" do you mean attaching them at the bottom near the dropouts? I'm sure it's just as good but I had those unused low-rider bosses just begging for the job.
No, I too used the low rider bosses.  As a you say - ideal, simple, and quite elegant.  By conventional manner I meant that the additional stays attach to a mudguard fitting (a fitting removed from old mudguards, one where the stays attach to the mudguard) in the conventional manner.  The mudguard fitting was simply attached to the mudguard by a single bolt through the mudguard, which also served as the fixing bolt for a simple and low profile lamp bracket.

Zoidburg

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #64 on: October 17, 2009, 05:17:04 pm »
I went down the expanding bar end plug route as well, I used it with just a short off cut of piece bar and it is now bolted to an old computer mount, the off set kind that sits the computer over the middle of the stem clamp. My old vista now lives ban in the middle of the bars and leaves room for the back up light.

Raph

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #65 on: October 18, 2009, 12:25:01 pm »
Quote
The mudguard fitting was simply attached to the mudguard by a single bolt through the mudguard, which also served as the fixing bolt for a simple and low profile lamp bracket.

Excellent - bypasses the malarky I had to deal with to drill a block to fit the light mount to... see pics. It's ended up very solid but rather heath robinson all the same. Now you've mentioned that I might re-do it some time if I find the right kind of mudguard bridge...

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #66 on: October 20, 2009, 07:42:35 pm »
A rather crude bodge, I'm afraid - the rear mudguard on my Brompton broke. For the last year, at least (I forget) it has been held together by a wire coathanger, cunningly wound around the mudguard stays & crimped in place, & some reflective gaffa tape.

Mrs Bs road bike has a dynamo headlight (brake bolt mounted), fitted with a plug compatible with the battery pack from the good old Smart twin headlights. With a 6W bulb, it's not a bad light. My old Roberts had the same arrangement. The light fitted nicely under my Carradice bar bag, lighting up the road nicely without dazzling me. The Smart lights go on our mountain bikes.
"A woman on a bicycle has all the world before her where to choose; she can go where she will, no man hindering." The Type-Writer Girl, 1897

TheLurker

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Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #67 on: November 24, 2009, 09:10:18 am »
A pretty obvious one this; an oil can for hard to reach places.

 1x Pump action bottle. The Body Shop lemon foot spray bottle is a handy size.
 1x Diffuser top & straw from a can of GT85

Swap existing diffuser on pump action bottle with diffuser from can GT85. Put oil in pump action bottle*. Use.

*Probably a good idea to clean it out first tho' eh?
Τα πιο όμορφα ταξίδια γίνονται με τις δικές μας δυνάμεις - Φίλοι του Ποδήλατου

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #68 on: February 27, 2010, 05:44:26 pm »
I use a 12" steel rule to measure chain wear, and have previously judged by eye the extra 1/16" at which the chain should be replaced. I was considering buying  a longer ruler, but I already have more than one steel rule, so made a small modification using the other steel rules and a(n already blunt) stanley knife.

I'm surprised it took me so long to think of this (blindingly obvious) solution!

clarion

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Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #69 on: May 28, 2010, 01:58:26 pm »
This is actually a bodge:


[/quote]

The Shimano 600 Arabesque groupset seems to have only been produced with band-on levers.  And it's mighty purty.  But my bike, though 1980, has some custom features ahead of its time (vertical dropouts; brazed on lever bosses etc).  So I took the levers off their band, and used the curved spacer from my ole Shim Light Action levers.  The spacers are a bit haphazard, and I have to admit the RH lever does unscrew a bit with use, meaning it won't always hold the tension*, but oldskool riders will be used to giving the latch a tweak now and again.

Looks fine, tho, dunnit? :D


* Yes, of course it's friction!  Why would I want to use anything else? ;)
Getting there...

border-rider

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #70 on: May 28, 2010, 02:00:18 pm »
The 600 Arabesques would fit directly onto a lever boss that was designed for old-skool Campag levers.  I used them thusly on my Merlin, c1983

clarion

  • Tyke
Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #71 on: May 28, 2010, 02:12:03 pm »
The spacing wasn't quite right for mine (the screw wouldn't tighten far enough), so I had to root around for a suitable sprung washer.
Getting there...

What a Cracker!
« Reply #72 on: August 03, 2011, 08:42:39 pm »


Had a job removing a casstte lockring the normal way - using a large adjustable spanner and chain whip. The chain whip actually broke. So this was solution number 2, after the chain whip was repaired. Anchor the wheel in corner of garage door with an old chain nailed to the post. Get an extra piece of pipe onto the adjustable and with less strain on the chain whip I was able to put far more power into the right hand with the extension. Worked first time. What a cracker!

eck

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Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #73 on: August 03, 2011, 10:04:58 pm »
 :thumbsup:
Nice gloves btw.  :-*
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Fixedwheelnut

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Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #74 on: August 11, 2011, 09:54:26 pm »
Whilst on a short Tour of Belgium Mick's freewheel packed up and lost drive so to keep him going I used a cargo strap and threaded it through the inner sprocket to the spokes.
 This allowed him to use it as a sort of fixedwheel and ride 10 miles to a bike shop 'Henys' in Poperinge where they fitted a new wheel for him  :thumbsup:
"Don't stop pedalling"