Author Topic: Reader's bodges  (Read 67318 times)

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #75 on: August 12, 2011, 09:55:01 pm »
Those old battery lights (pre-LED) had large lenses that made excellent wine glasses when bus shelter touring.



LEE

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #76 on: September 06, 2011, 05:30:20 pm »
Bagman support using 3 cable ties.

Stops saddlebag saggage for almost no cost or weight penalty.


IanDG

  • The p*** artist formerly known as 'Windy'
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Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #77 on: September 06, 2011, 05:32:48 pm »
Whilst on a short Tour of Belgium Mick's freewheel packed up and lost drive so to keep him going I used a cargo strap and threaded it through the inner sprocket to the spokes.
 This allowed him to use it as a sort of fixedwheel and ride 10 miles to a bike shop 'Henys' in Poperinge where they fitted a new wheel for him  :thumbsup:

.

Just because you're a fixed wheel nut, doesn't mean everyone else wants to be one!

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #78 on: September 10, 2011, 05:59:35 pm »
Since I got the folding pedal on my Borm, I've been mildy concerned about the way it can go over centre and hit against the frame when it's all folded.  I mentioned it to MFWHTBAB how it needed some padding, and he said "What you need is a length of cable sleeve split lengthways and a couple of zipties.

What a stroke of luck that we'd just pulled a length of pyro cable off the wall in preparation for some plastering.


DSCN2522 by Panticle, on Flickr


DSCN2518 by Panticle, on Flickr

Concept by MFWHTBAB, realisation by me.

(yes, if I'd been patient I'd have flaked all the old paint off, but I figure it'll come off eventually)
If I had a baby elephant, it could help me wash the car. If I had a car.

See my recycled crafts at www.wastenotwantit.co.uk

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #79 on: September 10, 2011, 07:03:19 pm »
Dismantled an unused Klickfix maptrap, a little of trimming with a Stanley knife to fit the back of a Legend HCx (a rather bruised and battered spare back plate, courtesy of Kim )

Drilled right through the Klickfix with a 1/8" dia drill, then counterbored the "top" with a 5mm.

UNC4-40 x 5/8" long socket head screws through and into the threaded hole in the Garmin back, and a 5g packet of sugru to fill the gaps and repair the damage in the back plate.



The Klickfix bracket is really secure on the stem, and mounts the screen an inch or so higher (every little helps - my eyes are getting no younger).  Doesn't tend to mess up the sticky band on the Garmin Legend like the predecessor RAM mount did.


dasmoth

  • Techno-optimist
Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #80 on: October 09, 2011, 12:30:03 pm »
I'm not proud of this one, but it did get me home when I was running out of options.

Due to a somewhat convoluted set of circumstances, I found myself in the middle on nowhere with a flat tyre, both spare tubes already used, and no usable puncture repair kit.  I did, however, have a Park Tools self adhesive tyre boot.  As a very last resort, I tried wrapping this firmly around the inner tube, slipping it back into the tyre, and pumping gently.  To my astonishment, I couldn't hear a hiss, so kept pumping until the bike was rideable.  Even more amazingly, I then rode it like this for about 50km back to event HQ, with no further drama except a slight judder from the rear wheel at high speeds.

I note that this morning the tyre is flat, so this is very definitely just a get-you-home solution.  But it does seem to work as a last resort!

Me, I'll be super-careful to make sure I don't pick up an old puncture kit with a dried-out tube of adhesive in future.  But I'll be sticking with my policy of carrying a Park boot on longer rides, too...
Half term's when the traffic becomes mysteriously less bad for a week.

Mr Arch

  • Maker of things! Married to Arch!
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Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #81 on: October 23, 2011, 11:55:39 am »
Not sure if this is a bodge or not.
How to get six speeds from a Sturmey Archer X-RD3 three speed hub and still use 1/8" chain.

Remove the single sprocket and the plastic dust cover from the drive end.  Replace with a 16t and 18t dished sprocket so as to have the widest gap between the teeth.  The spring clip should still fit.  On mine the 16t is a 3/32" and the 18t is a 1/8" so that might make a difference.
Fit a rear mech designed to clamp in the horizontal drop outs.
Set the high screw limit to align with the 16t.  Ignore the 18t low screw as it won't have the reach as a stop.
Use a friction shifter but ensure the limit on the end of the shifter is on the low gear side.  This is what stops you shifting the chain into the spokes.
Connect a cable and adjust so that when the lever is on the stops the 18t is selected and when the selector is moved off the stop the 16t is selected.
Instant wide range hub ratio splitter.


I did have more photos but can't find them now.

dullcommuter

  • Jon Chambers
Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #82 on: September 16, 2012, 06:24:05 pm »


Two in one:
  • Cat-eye with broken bracket attached to rear reflector bracket with various odds and ends found in shed.  When found to be too wobby reinforced with a bent spoke
  • Rear mudguard similarly attached via cunning use of bent piece of rusty metal of unknown origin
(Not visible: original seat post rusted into place.  After many hours trying to cut it out, just hammered the remains it down inside, bought new seatpost and chopped the end off until it was short enough not to hit the old one)

AndyK

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #83 on: September 16, 2012, 07:11:10 pm »
Halfords red reflective tape turns a GoPro case into a very good rear reflector, with the added benefit of highlighting the camera's presence to drivers.


Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #84 on: May 17, 2013, 10:15:52 am »
Not mine, but this one made me smile the other day. I saw in in the bike shed after work. I presume it's a larger capacity battery bodge for a light intended for use with small replaceable batteries. If I ever see the owner I'll ask for details. Looks like the archetypal academic's bike and bodge:





ETA: The two speedo's perform different roles - one is a speedo, the other is for cadence!

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #85 on: May 17, 2013, 02:12:01 pm »
I wouldn't ride that anywhere that is a bit sensitive for the anti-terrorist lads!
Welding, fabrication and light engineering available to forum members.

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #86 on: July 08, 2013, 10:08:15 pm »
Can we have non-bike bodges? Yesterday evening, I watched MFWHTBAB panel beat a flashing kit to replace the one missing from the second hand Velux window I got for free last year, using copper from some old cut up immersion tanks.

It's times like that, among many others, that I know why I love him so much....
If I had a baby elephant, it could help me wash the car. If I had a car.

See my recycled crafts at www.wastenotwantit.co.uk

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #87 on: October 13, 2013, 11:42:53 am »
Don't use your low-rider bosses?  With a bit of aluminium tubing as a spacer (B&Q), a few washers and a long M5 bolt, you can put any standard dynamo headlamp on there.  It's a very rigid connection and won't fatigue like those useless steel fork crown brackets...at least, if your fork fatigues you'll have more to worry about that which way your front light is pointing  :o
such a good bodge that a well known touring specialist in Harrogate now sells something similar for about eight quid. Should have saved the cash
are we nearly there yet?

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #88 on: August 20, 2014, 12:14:22 am »
Bodged a repair on the cracked rear SKS mudguard on my Thorn.

LBS did not have any replacement narrow guards in stock so glued and clamped a 6 inch piece of old mudguard over the bit that was cracked with some epoxy glue from the pound shop.

It dried surprisingly quickly and is holding up so far.




fuzzy (retd.) AAGE

  • SWMBO's Toy Boy.
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Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #89 on: December 09, 2014, 09:09:33 pm »
Not bike related but, as hinted elsewhere-

We got our ride on mower back from its service today complete with a new flashing orange beacon onna pole to keep the elf 'n safety Nazis at bay.

The pole is a foot too tall for the mower to be stored in the 'garage' so I have had to fettle a folding pole bodge- remove 3 of the 4 bolts at the bottom of the pole (vertical bracket fixing pole to chassis), loosening the 4th slightly. Transform  forward bolt hole into a slot with a bit of hacksawage then replace forward bolt with a bolt and wing nut. Feed all the excess in the power cable from the switch end to the pole mount end and the pole now pivots backwards. I am in the process of bodging a tether to stop it pivoting too far back. When in use, the pole is pivoted forward and secured by tightening the wing nut.

Photo's will follow in The Appropriate Thread









It now fits in the 'garage'.
Quote from: tatanab
The mark of a true cyclist - prepared to try anything on offer

If it ain't bad for you it ain't worth doing

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #90 on: December 09, 2014, 09:14:59 pm »
The Bins For Jane thread is that way --->
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
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Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #91 on: December 10, 2014, 01:32:08 am »
It's only that way if you if you turn the thread through ninety degrees.  Which would be an √¶xcellent bodge in itself.
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #92 on: December 10, 2014, 09:17:10 am »
Bagman support using 3 cable ties.

Stops saddlebag saggage for almost no cost or weight penalty.


It surprises me that Carradice do not add a bar across the width, not only to prevent saggage, but to make the support more rack-like for when the bag is not a attached.  Would then allow say a small dry pack or other odds and sods to be carried.

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #93 on: February 03, 2015, 04:14:39 pm »
More an economical bodge-enabler than a bodge - DW40 on eBay is IMO even better than WD40, at a fraction of the price. Decant onto an empty Granger's Proofer bottle for precision spraying.

fuzzy (retd.) AAGE

  • SWMBO's Toy Boy.
  • Apprentice Leathery Old Git
    • The Secret Cyclist blog
Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #94 on: April 19, 2015, 08:59:40 pm »
Because of one of these-



due to failure of one of these-



I took some of these-



and did this-



to facilitate this-



which led to this-



How long till the little darlings restructure it I wonder?
Quote from: tatanab
The mark of a true cyclist - prepared to try anything on offer

If it ain't bad for you it ain't worth doing

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
  • Custard Wallah
    • Mr Larrington's Automatic Diary
Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #95 on: April 20, 2015, 09:52:52 am »
They have non-illuminated posts, both concrete and wooden, at the end of the cul-de-sac leading to Fort Larrington.  It is opposite a primary school.  I do not think there is a single one which has not at some time been killed utterly to DETH by a Yummy Mummy in an Audi 4x4.
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #96 on: October 05, 2016, 08:09:00 pm »
Made a new fixing eye for my Cyo with Sugru.



Seems to be holding.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #97 on: October 05, 2016, 08:15:43 pm »
Made a new fixing eye for my Cyo with Sugru.

Ooh, I'll be interested to hear how well that lasts.  I've got a Cyo with the same problem.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #98 on: October 06, 2016, 01:19:32 pm »
Ooh, I'll be interested to hear how well that lasts.  I've got a Cyo with the same problem.

Three months so far, although I haven't ridden that bike much- maybe averaging twice a week. Let's see if it makes it through the winter when I'll be using it every day.

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #99 on: October 10, 2016, 03:19:06 pm »
I've had a really annoying Cateye blinky for about a year, a TD-LD560. It came out of the bargain bin in the LBS and it's supposed to come on automatically when it gets dark, it has a light and movement sensor in it (so- presumably- it goes off when you park your bike in the shed). You can disable this function by holding down the on/off button according to the manual.

As soon as I put batteries in it the thing started blinking and no matter what sequence of pushing/ holding down the on/off button I tried it remained on forever. I never got around to returning it.

Today I took it to work to have a look at it. I extracted the PCB and noticed there were copious flux residues all over it (not surprising it wasn't cleaned but it wasn't very appealing). I chucked it into a beaker, sloshed in some isopropanol and a bit of deionized water and buzzed it in the ultrasonic bath for an hour (I thought of firing up the semi-aqueous cleaner but didn't, not because it was overkill but because I'd have to fill up the wash tank). Gave it a nice rinse in deionized water, stuck it in an oven at 80C for 30 mins.

And now it works. I can turn the damn thing on, cycle through the blinky phases, and then turn it off.

Don't know whether it was a case of using some crappy solder paste/ other flux or whether there was some other conductive contaminants on the board.

Easily the most satisfying job I've done all year, if not in my entire life.