Author Topic: Tubeless for Dummies  (Read 87717 times)

zigzag

  • unfuckwithable
Re: Tubeless for Dummies
« Reply #925 on: March 24, 2019, 03:50:33 pm »
had a slow deflation today from a piece of wire. the hole could not seal with the wire in it as the sealant cannot attach itself to smooth/slippery foreign objects. removed the wire with a door key*, pumped up the tyre (with the puncture at the bottom) and all was well.

* will need to include a pointy tool or a small knife into my saddle bag for the future.


jiberjaber

  • ... Fancy Pants \o/ ...
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Re: Tubeless for Dummies
« Reply #926 on: March 24, 2019, 05:46:27 pm »
Which worms have you found best?

Sorry missed this, Maxalami ones. 2 sizes, I have often cut down the larger as well as use the smaller.
Regards,

Joergen

Re: Tubeless for Dummies
« Reply #927 on: March 30, 2019, 10:34:49 pm »
Today I tried to fit a pair of tyres - same type and size- to a pair  of factory prepped rims - same type and size. Rear first, tyre on, then a blast from the Joe Blow booster, and the tyre seats nicely and stays well inflated for several hours. Front, tried three times, no joy, just wouldn’t seat. CO2 blast did it, but deflated in minutes. Tried another tyre (same type & size) same result. Eventually replaced the factory tape, and bingo. What a pain.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

CSX

Tubeless for Dummies
« Reply #928 on: March 31, 2019, 09:36:42 pm »
CO2 blast did it

I heard that it’s better not to use CO2 canisters with tubeless, because it ruins the sealant.

Re: Tubeless for Dummies
« Reply #929 on: April 01, 2019, 12:02:51 pm »
CO2 blast did it

I heard that it’s better not to use CO2 canisters with tubeless, because it ruins the sealant.

Yes, I know. This was just the preliminary seating of the bead - I like to check how things are going before getting messy with sealant.

As for the CO2 thing, as far as I can tell it's not exposure to high concentrations of CO2 that are the problem, but that the inevitable thermal shock of the cooling expanded CO2  can cause polymerisation of the sealant. Recommendation is, if using CO2, to set the wheel with the valve at the top, and leave time for sealant to flow down to the bottom, so keeping the cold CO2 away from the liquid sealant.

In my case CO2 is a last resort, hence my checking / replacing the taping, so I can manage with just the air-shot pump when it comes to seating the tyre with sealant in.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

bludger

  • Randonneur and bargain hunter
Re: Tubeless for Dummies
« Reply #930 on: April 01, 2019, 10:23:18 pm »
Been a few weeks since I did my fishing wire, tubeless repair kit and shoegoo bodge of the tyre back together, and it's held up fine with tubes.

I'm going to try running it tubeless again this week, we'll see how it goes.

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Re: Tubeless for Dummies
« Reply #931 on: April 03, 2019, 07:42:34 pm »
Evening all. I've just been looking at my rear Hutchinson Fusion 5 and found at least a dozen cuts in the 1-5mm range. I've definitely had three punctures which sealed, albeit after fairly significant sealant loss and goodness knows how many others that I never noticed.

My question is, is there a point at which you consider your tyres to have been compromised by so many nicks and cuts that it is time to swap it out? Do you just keep running it, provided it holds pressure?


vorsprung

  • Opposites Attract
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Re: Tubeless for Dummies
« Reply #932 on: April 03, 2019, 08:26:07 pm »
Evening all. I've just been looking at my rear Hutchinson Fusion 5 and found at least a dozen cuts in the 1-5mm range. I've definitely had three punctures which sealed, albeit after fairly significant sealant loss and goodness knows how many others that I never noticed.

My question is, is there a point at which you consider your tyres to have been compromised by so many nicks and cuts that it is time to swap it out? Do you just keep running it, provided it holds pressure?

It depends.  Let's consider normal tubed clinchers first.  If they are Schwalbe Marathon sort-of-tyres then look for obvious big cuts but ignore the small stuff.  If they are Ultragatorskins then they only start to be a problem when the casing is so worn that the carcass is visible. On lighter, faster tyres like Michelin Pro I try and replace them if I count more than 4 nicks.  So there is a lot of variabilities depending on the type of tyre

On tubeless, if I have a tyre that is already quite durable like a Schwalbe S1 (now rebranded as a G1 speed)  I am happy riding about with huge holes.  Nicks - like on the tubed versions are not an issue.  On the lighter tubeless tyres, I seem to be able to get away with waiting for major wear like the carcass becoming visible.  But that is on the ultralight Schwalbe Ones, not with a medium weight tyre

So I'd say that the rule of thumb is that nicks do not matter.  I suppose if you have a tyre with a nick and you meet the wrong piece of glass then your chance of a massive, unsealable hole is slightly higher.  But the type of small holes that nicks more typically allow to happen aren't a problem if you have sealant
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bludger

  • Randonneur and bargain hunter
Re: Tubeless for Dummies
« Reply #933 on: April 03, 2019, 11:40:41 pm »
Evening all. I've just been looking at my rear Hutchinson Fusion 5 and found at least a dozen cuts in the 1-5mm range. I've definitely had three punctures which sealed, albeit after fairly significant sealant loss and goodness knows how many others that I never noticed.

My question is, is there a point at which you consider your tyres to have been compromised by so many nicks and cuts that it is time to swap it out? Do you just keep running it, provided it holds pressure?

I would keep running it but you can give yourself some peace of mind by using some tubeless repair patches on the inside. It's a bit of a job to unmount, clean, patch, re-seat and seal them but they do the job. https://www.planetx.co.uk/i/q/TOBARKL/barbieri-large-tubeless-repair-kit £6
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bludger

  • Randonneur and bargain hunter
Re: Tubeless for Dummies
« Reply #934 on: April 08, 2019, 02:43:41 pm »
Just mounted mine using an extra 2 layers of rim tape per wheel. Sealed up marvelous. OKO magic milk hi fibre sealant, panaracer gravel king sk tyres. Think the jobs a goodun
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Pedal Castro

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Re: Tubeless for Dummies
« Reply #935 on: April 08, 2019, 03:04:43 pm »
I finally got around to installing tubeless tyres onto my tubeless rims but couldn't seat them with a trackpump and couldn't find any CO2 cartridges in the garage. Rather than put the other tyres back on I put latex tubes inside and added sealant, so far so good, 13 mile hilly TT,  200km DIY and a 140km cyclo on Flanders cobbles all well inside expected times. I may leave them as they are now as a long term experiment.

bludger

  • Randonneur and bargain hunter
Re: Tubeless for Dummies
« Reply #936 on: April 08, 2019, 03:18:57 pm »
I think the airshot is the way to go. Though my secret weapon is to mount the tyre with a tube in first, and then take the tube out so that half the tyre is already mounted making the job much easier.

This is the one I use https://www.alpinetrek.co.uk/birzman-pump-up-tubeless-tire-pump-12l-220-psi-15-bar/?aid=7dcbad55a2d2bf24ffb81694d3167947&pid=10004&gclid=Cj0KCQjw4qvlBRDiARIsAHme6ovgbg2cWKMEcJ4PBqB-phfP0PTWSlzz_lajF-Q3tRUpP6uV9dDt0WMaArHLEALw_wcB&wt_mc=uk.pla.google_uk.775755312.44713492950.185511308766
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Re: Tubeless for Dummies
« Reply #937 on: April 08, 2019, 04:01:57 pm »
I second the airshot, got one (https://www.bike24.com/p2205538.html) and it has made fitting tyres a much more enjoyable experience.
“That slope may look insignificant, but it's going to be my destiny" - Fitzcarraldo

zigzag

  • unfuckwithable
Re: Tubeless for Dummies
« Reply #938 on: April 08, 2019, 05:40:40 pm »
so far i've managed to inflate and seat the tyres with the track pump every time (valve core needs to be removed). i had a pair of wheels where the deflated tyre bead would move towards the centre well - in that case i pressed my finger over the valve after pumping the tyre up and quickly screwed the core in, not letting all of the air out. no problem so far.

Re: Tubeless for Dummies
« Reply #939 on: April 09, 2019, 12:37:09 pm »
Does anyone clean out of dried sealant regularly or just leave to get all gooey and weblike?

I've had horizons on for 18 months now and just top it up. No problems but I was wondering if anyone else has a regular clean out and tyre inspect.


jiberjaber

  • ... Fancy Pants \o/ ...
  • ACME S&M^2
Re: Tubeless for Dummies
« Reply #940 on: April 09, 2019, 03:28:21 pm »
Does anyone clean out of dried sealant regularly or just leave to get all gooey and weblike?

I've had horizons on for 18 months now and just top it up. No problems but I was wondering if anyone else has a regular clean out and tyre inspect.

Only if I am patching internally... else it just stays in there as added puncture proofing :)

I'd be happy to be getting 18 months out of my tyres  :thumbsup:
Regards,

Joergen

Re: Tubeless for Dummies
« Reply #941 on: April 09, 2019, 05:37:42 pm »
Good point! I've been really happy with them. I've tried other tubeless tyres and the rear lasts three months if I'm lucky before failing.

bludger

  • Randonneur and bargain hunter
Re: Tubeless for Dummies
« Reply #942 on: April 11, 2019, 09:03:32 pm »
Rear tyre came unstuck from the rim 70 km into a ride today which was very annoying. Front wheel is fine. I think the one on the rear needs more rim tape to resist stresses of weight so I'm going to make do with an inner tube until I get home.
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fd3

Re: Tubeless for Dummies
« Reply #943 on: April 20, 2019, 11:21:08 am »
Fitted Hutchinson Override 38s on Kinlin XR22Ts yesterday (Stans valves and Doc Blue).  Used an innertube overnight to get them to fit, but then went straight for inflation - no soapy water or removing the valve core - fit fine with just a track pump.  Held pressure overnight, will try them on a ride tomorrow - but so far super easy.