Author Topic: Marmalade  (Read 30938 times)

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Marmalade
« on: September 30, 2008, 11:40:05 pm »
No "Food & Drink" board is complete without its Marmalade thread.

I've just jarred 11lb of best Seville Orange marmalade. Absolutely marvellous stuff. I've used old "Bonne Maman" jars because I think they are the easiest to scrape out. I'm also interested to see how many of the lids' "vacuum buttons" my marmalade will suck down. Last time we made some, the success rate was pretty high.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Marmalade
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2008, 11:44:08 pm »
Marmalade.

Marvellous.


If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Marmalade
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2008, 11:53:18 pm »
I've used Bonne Maman jars when jam making; their wide tops make filling without spilling easier.
I've not done marmalade; partner no likey...

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Marmalade
« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2008, 12:12:42 am »
If you made some, I'd take it off your hands.

I wouldn't charge much.
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

Re: Marmalade
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2008, 03:18:40 pm »
I use to make my own marmalade and add some crystallized ginger  :P :P

Re: Marmalade
« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2008, 08:51:50 pm »
No "Food & Drink" board is complete without its Marmalade thread.

I've just jarred 11lb of best Seville Orange marmalade. Absolutely marvellous stuff. I've used old "Bonne Maman" jars because I think they are the easiest to scrape out. I'm also interested to see how many of the lids' "vacuum buttons" my marmalade will suck down. Last time we made some, the success rate was pretty high.

Do you have a recipe for it?

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Marmalade
« Reply #6 on: October 05, 2008, 01:19:30 pm »
Marmalade.

Marvellous.



And all because we didn't know what to do with these strange fruits! Or so I've heard, but can't find a reference to it now, that when seville oranges were introduced to Britain, people found them too bitter to eat raw and didn't think to peel them before cooking.
A cup of tea is the perfect bridge between real life and cake.

fruitcake

  • some kind of fruitcake
    • Bailey
Re: Marmalade
« Reply #7 on: October 05, 2008, 08:41:43 pm »
Lemon marmalade makes a nice change every now and then.

Re: Marmalade
« Reply #8 on: October 05, 2008, 08:48:52 pm »
Lemon marmalade makes a nice change every now and then.

With added whisky  ;D

Re: Marmalade
« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2008, 08:57:09 pm »
It's Jam, but with Oranges, Lemons or Limes.

What's not to like?

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Marmalade
« Reply #10 on: October 06, 2008, 02:47:04 pm »
It's Jam, but with Oranges, Lemons or Limes.

What's not to like?

Partner dislikes its bitterness.

clarion

  • Tyke
Re: Marmalade
« Reply #11 on: October 06, 2008, 03:09:06 pm »
I wish I liked marmalade... :(
Getting there...

Re: Marmalade
« Reply #12 on: October 06, 2008, 03:33:27 pm »
I love the stuff especially Oxford Marmalade.
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

bikenerd

Re: Marmalade
« Reply #13 on: October 06, 2008, 03:36:14 pm »
I love marmalade, the darker, the bitterer the better.
When undertaking a walking tour of Seville, we were told by the guide that the locals have never eaten Seville oranges and they sell them all to "the crazy English".
Seville's a great city, btw.  Hopefully they've completed the Metro by now.

Re: Marmalade
« Reply #14 on: October 06, 2008, 04:04:08 pm »
I wonder wtf they grew them in the first place then before we invented marmalade ?
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

bikenerd

Re: Marmalade
« Reply #15 on: October 06, 2008, 04:25:26 pm »
I wonder wtf they grew them in the first place then before we invented marmalade ?

Ornamental trees, supposedly.  The blossom is very pretty.

clarion

  • Tyke
Re: Marmalade
« Reply #16 on: October 06, 2008, 04:27:35 pm »
Are you suggesting that Orange Blossom Special? ;D
Getting there...

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Marmalade
« Reply #17 on: October 07, 2008, 06:26:25 pm »
Wowbagger's Brother's Vintage Shropshire Marmalade

3lbs Seville Oranges
2 lemons
6lbs sugar
up to 4 pints water (no more!)

Wash the fruit and boil until tender in about half the water.

Cut in half and slice the peel, returning the fruit to the already boiled water.

Add the sugar, make up with the rest of the water and boil until setting point is reached (in my experience this is several hours). Skim out the pips, which will rise to the surface.

Wait at least 20 minutes before jarring into hot jars with good lids. You may wish to use greaseproof paper circles on the top of the marmalade.

Remember - Seville oranges are only available for a short time in January. They freeze well for use throughout the year.

I prefer to use the "Bonne Maman" type of jar as they are easier to fill, and empty. If you use the original lids and screw them on tight when the marmalade is still hot enough, they can vacuum-seal.

I usually make the jars hot by giving them a standard wash in the dishwasher.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Marmalade
« Reply #18 on: December 14, 2008, 11:15:52 pm »
Yesterday I made another 11 pots. It's wonderful. Again, I used "Bonne Maman" jars and 10/11 are now vacuum sealed. The 11th, once cooled had a wee dram of a'bunadh (60.2% abv) added to it. That's my special pot, that is.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: Marmalade
« Reply #19 on: December 14, 2008, 11:53:07 pm »
Partner dislikes its bitterness.

That's precisely what I do like about it. The bitterer the betterer. Most jams are far too sweet for my taste.

Wowbagger, you've inspired me - I shall make it my mission to seek out a source of Seville oranges and make a big batch of Vintage ShropshireKent Marmalade over the Christmas hols.

d.

nicknack

  • Hornblower
Re: Marmalade
« Reply #20 on: December 14, 2008, 11:54:26 pm »
You'll probably have to wait till Jan for the oranges though.

<>edit> I see Wowb beat me to it. I've still got one batch left from last year in the freezer and I'm down to the last jar, so I may have to do some in the hols too.
There's no vibrations, but wait.

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: Marmalade
« Reply #21 on: December 14, 2008, 11:55:13 pm »
6lbs sugar

Does this have to be jam sugar or will any kind do?

Quote
Remember - Seville oranges are only available for a short time in January.

Oh yeah, was forgetting that... will have to postpone marmalade-making mission.

d.

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Marmalade
« Reply #22 on: December 14, 2008, 11:58:09 pm »
Ordinary granulated sugar is fine.

Two years ago we got a "job lot" of Seville oranges in Southend market one snowy January morning when there was nobody about and the stall holder wanted to pack up and go home. 30lb oranges for £10. We've still got some left in the freezer, but not enough to last through to 2010. I will buy some more next month.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: Marmalade
« Reply #23 on: December 15, 2008, 12:53:01 am »
I reckon I should be able to get Seville oranges at Borough Market, which is near work - but not 30lb for a tenner!

Another thing that's good to make in Jan/Feb is preserved lemons, using the fantastic thick-skinned Sicilian lemons that are available then. Just get a load of lemons (must be unwaxed!), juice half of them, cut the rest into quarters but not all the way through (so the quarters are still joined at the stem) and pack them with coarse sea salt. Make a bed of salt in the bottom of a sterilised jar then pack in the lemons, with more salt to fill in the gaps between them. When you can't get any more lemons in, top up the jar with the lemon juice - make sure there are no air pockets - put the lid on the jar it and store it somewhere cool and dark for a few weeks.

Once they've matured, you can use the peel finely diced in Middle Eastern cooking. You need only a small amount to impart a heady lemon flavour, so one jar goes a long way. Particularly good with chicken - I recommend them in a chicken tagine with almonds and olives.

d.

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Marmalade
« Reply #24 on: September 02, 2009, 10:49:34 am »
Another batch is simmering away now. I'll soon start to take the pips out.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.