Author Topic: Lezyne GPS  (Read 5375 times)

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Lezyne GPS
« Reply #25 on: November 26, 2016, 10:01:58 am »
I wouldn't be too interested in buying a wicker basket that rapidly deteriorates in the rain.

Over a decade ago, I was repeatedly passed during the Elenith 300 by a bloke riding a ladies hybrid with wicker baskets front and back. It opened my eyes as to what might be good equipment choices. Something that dies after a shower of rain is wall-art; not useful, practical equipment.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Phil W

Re: Lezyne GPS
« Reply #26 on: November 26, 2016, 07:34:37 pm »
Doesn't have to be slaved to a smartphone. Only if you want the live updates and SMS notifications etc, when using the GPS.

frankly frankie

  • I kid you not
    • Fuchsiaphile
Re: Lezyne GPS
« Reply #27 on: November 26, 2016, 07:36:13 pm »
Something that dies after a shower of rain is wall-art; not useful, practical equipment.

Like a map  :demon:

I saw the Garmin range (EDGE only!) in my LBS yesterday and was disappointed at the size of the 810 – bigger that the 500, but the map mock-up just looked so tiny to be unusable!

Really - GPS map displays and paper maps - they are such different things that they should have different names - each is better or worse than the other in some situations, but it's difficult at first for anyone who loves paper maps (and most of us do) to wean themselves onto a pokey little 2x1 screen display - never mind it is more accurate, more detailed, and covers more terrain than the paper equivalent, weighs less, is more compact, is waterproof, and in many cases is easily updateable.
It's not dark yet but it's getting there.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Lezyne GPS
« Reply #28 on: November 26, 2016, 07:49:22 pm »
A GPS receiver isn't really supposed to be a substitute for a paper map, it's more like a substitute for a compass.  It helps you work out where you are and/or shows you which way to go.  Yes, with a mapping-capable model you can program routes on it directly in extremis, but you wouldn't normally use it that way.  It can also act as a more advanced form of bike computer, recording where you've been and how fast you were going when you got there.

A larger-screened, faster-CPUed tablet device with appropriate mapping software compares favourably to paper maps in most respects, at least for touring (where it saves volume and helpfully doubles as an internet access device, ebook reader, etc. etc.).  I wouldn't carry one on an audax, and you probably still want the Garmin to keep an eye on things as you're riding along, especially if it's pish.

Paper maps are cheap, the batteries don't run out, and they have large displays.  They're susceptible to wind, water, repeated folding, and don't work in the dark or tell you where you are without additional hardware.  Updates are expensive.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...