Author Topic: New York, New York...  (Read 3066 times)

New York, New York...
« on: August 17, 2017, 12:23:51 pm »
I'm treating myself to a week in NYC 14th Oct to 21st Oct , staying at The Jane Hotel http://www.thejanenyc.com/ in the West Village.

I'm planning to spend a couple of days just hitting the major museums & galleries, and will be trying to arrange evening concerts at the NY Phil & Carnegie Hall & perhaps some sleazy jazz clubs..

What else would you regard as essential to do here, other than just walk or ride around (hotel does bikes) ?
Not fast & rarely furious

tweeting occasional in(s)anities as andrewxclark

robgul

  • HoECC & Cycle:End-to-End webmaster, S Warwickshire Bike Shop in Wellesbourne
  • . . cyclist, Cytech accredited, manages an LBS
    • Cycle:End-to-End
Re: New York, New York...
« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2017, 03:51:35 pm »
Staten Island ferry - free - and the classic view of Manhattan (and not too far from Liberty either).

Get the DK "Top Ten" guide book - has everything you need to see listed.

NYC is EVERYTHING you have seen on the films and more . . .

Rob

PS: Carnegie Hall I found to be disappointing - go to Radio City for an amazing auditorium

Re: New York, New York...
« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2017, 04:42:36 pm »
We visited in 2008, and had a hotel pretty close to the Empire State Building. The highlight of the trip for me was going out for a walk early in the morning when I couldn't sleep - I think it was about 6am, might have been 5:30, and it was fascinating.

CrinklyLion

  • The one with devious, cake-pushing ways....
Re: New York, New York...
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2017, 05:01:58 pm »
The SmallestCub learnt to skate on the rink in Central Park....

We were staying with friends in NJ, a commuter train away from NY, and I discovered I couldn't face the the NY subway without adult supervision (or an anxiety attack) so we didn't go into town much.  However we did go exploring Hoboken and I thoroughly recommend that!

Riggers

  • Mine's a pipe, er… pint!
Re: New York, New York...
« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2017, 05:05:25 pm »
I've never been to New York, but it looks to me like you're staying at The Grand Budapest Hotel!!
Certainly never seen cycling south of Sussex

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: New York, New York...
« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2017, 05:23:14 pm »
Walk around, the quiltwork of neighbourhoods is unique. NYC is my home from home, I've been back-and-forth since the mid-90s (and in the mid-90s, there were still plenty of neighbourhoods in Manhattan you didn't want to visit, now it's pretty much all very safe). The Bronx back then? Fuggeddaboudit. It's a big city, you won't see it all, but it has a character and vibe that isn't represented anywhere else. It's America yet it isn't.

Cycling is a lot better these days, but unless you're familiar with the stop-start nature of NYC and city cycling in general it can be a bit daunting. There are a growing number of cycle lanes, but don't expect not to share them with the occasional errant taxi. Marvel at the delivery boys on their clunky (occasional electric) bikes and their total ignorance of traffic direction, signals, and the weather. Getting absolutely anything delivered isn't as exciting in the era of Deliveroo and Uber Eats, but back in the late 90s, it was a serious novelty. The delis and bodegas are a NYC institution in and of themselves. The remixed whoop-whoop of sirens is one of the best soundtracks (provided it's not a NYPD cruiser behind you, in which case, sorry officer I didn't realise it was one way.*)

You can ride and walk up the Hudson (well, the riverside, obvs), there's a park (in various states of completion) all the way from the Battery up to the Cloisters and Fort Tyron and Inwood Park. If you like galleries, go to the Cloisters anyway. You can get down the East River side, they're extending the paths, but it's also a interesting walk, with views of the rapidly gentrifying Queens and Brooklyn watersides.

Cheap, fun escapades include – of course and as mentioned – the Staten Island ferry. SI has some surprisingly pleasant beaches that really are a world away from NYC (and a subway ride from the ferry terminal). Or if you haven't got a towel and don't want to turn around immediately without leaving the ferry terminal, Snug Island Harbour Cultural Centre and Botanic Garden is worth the fifteen-or-so minute walk.

The Roosevelt Island tramway (a cable) car with get you an interesting view for the the price of a subway ride. Roosevelt Island itself is now most upscale apartments though, in the late 90s it was still a bit spooky.

All the bridges have pedestrian and cycleways. The Brooklyn Bridge is the most famous and they do a great job of fixing it up after the frequent monster attack and alien invasions but does get tourist clogged. The Manhattan Bridge isn't as pretty put dumps you in the delightfully named Dumbo (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass). You can count all the hipster commuters crossing the Williamsburg Bridge.

Central Park is the definitive park, of course, but the trek through Brooklyn to Prospect Park, it's venerable and lesser known sister is worth the effort. Strolling through Cobble Hill and then SW to Prospect Park which abuts the park is a bit of NYC that most people don't see.

Lots, lots more besides the guide book stuff, but I'll stop before I bore people. It is worth getting out of Manhattan and seeing more of NYC, there's five boroughs and they all have something to see (Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, Flushing Meadows/Kissena Park in Queens, Coney Island in Brooklyn etc.). The subway and buses are cheap ($2.75 a ride, anywhere in NYC, you need a Metrocard which the machines will vend and top-up).

*shamelessly played my I'm Foreign card to get out of that ticket.
!nataS pihsroW

Re: New York, New York...
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2017, 05:47:29 pm »
What else would you regard as essential to do here, other than just walk or ride around (hotel does bikes) ?

One thing I would recommend without hesitation is a visit to Grand Central Terminal on 42nd St [or somewhere round there].
Passing it, you'd never know it was there, but go inside and it has a beauty that opens out all of it's own. Not to be missed IMO.
Garry Broad

Aunt Maud

  • Le Flâneur.
Re: New York, New York...
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2017, 05:55:18 pm »
I think I'd like to see some of the stunning, hidden architectural gems. Such as.......

http://www.nytransitmuseum.org/oldcityhall/

Re: New York, New York...
« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2017, 08:10:07 pm »
I've never been to New York, but it looks to me like you're staying at The Grand Budapest Hotel!!


It has some history.  A sailors hostel which was used to house survivors from the Titanic, then a real doss house before being done up.  The top of the building which is now the rooftop bar use to be RuPaul's apartment.


The  Jane Ballroom is apparently a "place to be seen", with a draconian door policy. I think as a guest I get automatic access so may go down in trackie bottoms & crocs & schmooze with the glitterati... :-D
Not fast & rarely furious

tweeting occasional in(s)anities as andrewxclark

ianrauk

  • Tattooed Beat Messiah
Re: New York, New York...
« Reply #9 on: August 17, 2017, 10:08:34 pm »
Go up the Rockefeller Centre Tower rather then the Empire SB.
You get a much better view imo, it's cheaper and it's far less busy.

Go on a Circle Line Boat 2 hour tour of the Island from pier 83 at 42nd St. Sit on the left hand side of the boat, Grab a beer and a dog and watch the world go by.

Re: New York, New York...
« Reply #10 on: August 18, 2017, 11:58:46 am »
High Line Park
https://www.nynjtc.org/park/high-line?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI3YSKpcvg1QIVx7vtCh3FhAa3EAAYASAAEgK2z_D_BwE
A Yankees game at (new) Yankee Stadium, Bronx (surprisingly good value) If in season
NYPD Museum (now moved to Governor's Island)
Joey Ramone Place/Bowery (only if you're a Ramones fan but who isn't?)
Asbury Park (Springsteen Fan?) Takes all day - 3hr each way by bus
TBH so much to see, been twice and still got loads on the list. Try some research beforehand but be aware it can take hours to get around and queues for Liberty, Empire etc can eat up time. We stayed at Wyndham New Yorker so was handy for trains at Penn Station and buses out of Port Authority.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: New York, New York...
« Reply #11 on: August 18, 2017, 12:24:55 pm »
You could try to visit every place mentioned in a Velvet Underground song.
A cup of tea is the perfect bridge between real life and cake.

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: New York, New York...
« Reply #12 on: August 18, 2017, 12:26:45 pm »
Yes, Grand Central is amazing. Don't muddle it with Penn Station though, which is pretty much Birmingham New Street (though marvel at the epic Post Office opposite). Rockefeller Center gives great views without the same queues as the Empire State (I used to go there on business).

The New York Public Library (on fifth, between 42 and 40) is another gem.
!nataS pihsroW

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: New York, New York...
« Reply #13 on: August 18, 2017, 04:33:54 pm »
Yes, Grand Central is amazing. Don't muddle it with Penn Station though, which is pretty much Birmingham New Street

CrinklyLion showed me some pictures of Penn Station.  The resemblance was uncanny.

The actual Birmingham New Street now has a foil-wrapped retail opportunity with "GRAND CENTRAL" written on it in big unfriendly letters on top of it.  I've noticed that people have started referring to the station as "Birmingham Grand Central", which is clearly asking for trouble.  (Referring to it as Mordor Central, OTOH, is clear[1] and informative.)


[1] Geographically, 'Mordor Central' should really be Sandwell & Dudley, but that would disregard the aesthetics.  "Mordor Partway" might be appropriate.  I've also had people confuse 'Mordor Central' with the otherwise lovely Birmingham Moor Street, on account of phonetics.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: New York, New York...
« Reply #14 on: August 18, 2017, 04:45:29 pm »
The original Penn Station was magnificent and rivalled Grand Central (it's worth Googling for pictures). Demolished in 1962 and replaced by the grim concrete of Madison Square Gardens and Penn Plaza.
!nataS pihsroW

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: New York, New York...
« Reply #15 on: August 18, 2017, 04:57:50 pm »
Yes, Grand Central is amazing. Don't muddle it with Penn Station though, which is pretty much Birmingham New Street

CrinklyLion showed me some pictures of Penn Station.  The resemblance was uncanny.

The actual Birmingham New Street now has a foil-wrapped retail opportunity with "GRAND CENTRAL" written on it in big unfriendly letters on top of it.  I've noticed that people have started referring to the station as "Birmingham Grand Central", which is clearly asking for trouble.  (Referring to it as Mordor Central, OTOH, is clear[1] and informative.)


[1] Geographically, 'Mordor Central' should really be Sandwell & Dudley, but that would disregard the aesthetics.  "Mordor Partway" might be appropriate.  I've also had people confuse 'Mordor Central' with the otherwise lovely Birmingham Moor Street, on account of phonetics.
The etymology of Partway stations is not what people usually think; it's nothing to do with parking, like Park & Ride. It's nothing to do with New York either!
A cup of tea is the perfect bridge between real life and cake.

Re: New York, New York...
« Reply #16 on: August 18, 2017, 06:20:38 pm »
The High Line is quite near the hotel, so will probably get a visit.  I've no interest in ball sports at all, so Yankee Stadium won't.  Asbury Park ? If Bruce was playing......


Grand Central station was already on the list , as is Penn station as I'll probably get the  train there from JFK.  I believe the original station was beautiful, but demolished in the name of progress.


I've read that my hotel is directly opposite what used to be the main Cunard terminal, so it may well have been familiar to my grandfather, who was a steward on their transatlantic liners for most of his career.
Not fast & rarely furious

tweeting occasional in(s)anities as andrewxclark

Re: New York, New York...
« Reply #17 on: October 01, 2017, 11:59:07 am »
That nice Mr Springsteen is doing a 79 gig residency on Broadway, but it's already sold out with tickets going for $$$$$  >:(


https://www.theguardian.com/music/2017/sep/29/bruce-springsteen-the-boss-on-broadway


Oh well.  I've already got 3 decent classical concerts booked.
Not fast & rarely furious

tweeting occasional in(s)anities as andrewxclark

Re: New York, New York...
« Reply #18 on: October 02, 2017, 07:09:03 am »
Walk

across

The Brooklyn Bridge

but look at some of the various artistic interpretations of it first.

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: New York, New York...
« Reply #19 on: October 02, 2017, 09:21:03 am »
And check the forecast for irradiated saurians.
!nataS pihsroW

Re: New York, New York...
« Reply #20 on: October 04, 2017, 10:46:19 pm »
The £/$ ratio isn't in my favour, but is there anything over there notably cheaper than over here?   iPad or iPhone appears slightly cheaper as long as I don't get nabbed at customs!
Not fast & rarely furious

tweeting occasional in(s)anities as andrewxclark

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: New York, New York...
« Reply #21 on: October 04, 2017, 10:51:00 pm »
You need to factor in sales tax (in NYC you have both state and city tax and the MCTD levy, about 9% if I recall). Or you can take the train to Delaware where there's no sales tax, of course. That's about the only reason people go to Delaware.
!nataS pihsroW

Re: New York, New York...
« Reply #22 on: October 05, 2017, 02:00:11 am »
The Yankees are in the playoffs and that would be an amazing, but very expensive experience. I haven't been to NYC for a very long time (2004?) and at the point, a ticket to a regular game in the nosebleed levels was $170.

Re: New York, New York...
« Reply #23 on: October 05, 2017, 02:52:59 pm »
I was there for just 24hrs, with family so didn't do much.

Central park worth a visit, just because it is so damn weird being in what is very wild parkland, utterly surrounded by super-tall skyscrapers, literally a wall of the things. As parks go, it is a bit meh, particularly if you are into your plants. Nice trees.

Maybe it was because I had two small kids in tow, but New York seemed to have a nicer class of down-and-out than most mega cities. Must be something about the way I dress, but often end up passing time of day with such people, or asking them for directions.

Any visit to the USA should include breakfast in an american diner. Definitely a great experience (apart from the coffee; that is universally awful).
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Re: New York, New York...
« Reply #24 on: October 15, 2017, 02:36:37 am »
7 1/2 hours on a Virgin Economy seat has caused more arse pain than most bike rides.


Through customs OK then Air Train, Long Island Railway & Subway into town. I’ll never criticise Transport For London again.....


Walked to the hotel, a very warm night, Jane St had people partying in the streets & drinking on stoops..


Room is tiny as advised, I have a window the let fresh air & the noise of the city in.


There is a very loud bar, where I have yet to venture & I’m currently in their restaurant (also loud) waiting for squid with pasta & drinking a $7 beer...
Not fast & rarely furious

tweeting occasional in(s)anities as andrewxclark