Author Topic: 'Gotchas' when riding overseas brevets  (Read 5016 times)

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: 'Gotchas' when riding overseas brevets
« Reply #25 on: October 24, 2018, 06:57:52 am »
Continuing OT for a moment, traditionally recidivist PBPers had a noticeably higher finish rate than first-timers, supposedly because of experience being an advantage. That hasn't been the case for several editions. I can't imagine why the situation would have reversed, using your reasoning.

Perhaps the anciennes are getting older on average.

Than when they were newbies? At least four years older, I'd guess.

The average age of PBPers has been almost static over the past couple of decades, a little under 50 and creeping up perhaps 6 months each edition. I'm not sure whether it was much younger before then.

It wouldn't surprise me if the average age dropped at the next edition. Asian randonneurs tend to be younger than the typical Aussie, Brit and Yank.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Samuel D

Re: 'Gotchas' when riding overseas brevets
« Reply #26 on: October 24, 2018, 10:28:24 am »
I think the vast resource of the internet has steadily reduced the value of experience (not to zero, I feel I must emphasise despite its obviousness). Perhaps newbies to PBP are better informed and better prepared than they’ve ever been, having had the luxury of reading ten thousand forum posts from those who went before them and having spent three grand on every conceivable utensil, garment, and unction that might get them around?

Has the overall finish rate trended upward? It might not have even if the above is true, since people of every age may feel more emboldened to try things beyond certainty of success than was the case decades ago; but if the finish rate is improving overall, it would tend to support my theory.

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: 'Gotchas' when riding overseas brevets
« Reply #27 on: October 24, 2018, 10:44:46 am »
The PBP DNF rate is trending slightly worse over time. I suspect that result is inevitable, given that mostly true hardrider types tend to tackle these sorts of things initially, when there is little information/ history available. Other folk get drawn into riding tough events by the seeming 'normality/ ease/ mythology' of doing them once enough folk have ridden and publicised the events.

A bit off-topic again though.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Re: 'Gotchas' when riding overseas brevets
« Reply #28 on: October 24, 2018, 05:42:51 pm »
I find that on the Normandie Audaxes I've done, it's not unusual for some controls to have no food or refreshment options; so it's best to feed when you spot a nice cafe/ supermarche and bounce the official con trol.


Re: 'Gotchas' when riding overseas brevets
« Reply #29 on: January 15, 2019, 02:57:33 pm »
Is it normal to be asked for a medical certificate to sign up for a French 300?

Re: 'Gotchas' when riding overseas brevets
« Reply #30 on: January 15, 2019, 09:23:15 pm »
Is it normal to be asked for a medical certificate to sign up for a French 300?

I never had to show one.

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: 'Gotchas' when riding overseas brevets
« Reply #31 on: January 20, 2019, 11:31:56 am »
Is it normal to be asked for a medical certificate to sign up for a French 300?

I never had to show one.

We've never needed medical certificates for French brevets, other than historical PBPs.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

T42

  • Tea tank
Re: 'Gotchas' when riding overseas brevets
« Reply #32 on: January 20, 2019, 02:12:09 pm »
Speaking of medical certificats etc., if the Brexshit hasn't hit the fan by brevet time you might still be eligible for a European Health Insurance Card, which conveys to medical authorities in whatever country you've crashed in that you are covered.  It's got a wee ring of stars on it though, which might mean that it goes out with the rest of the bathwater.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Re: 'Gotchas' when riding overseas brevets
« Reply #33 on: January 20, 2019, 03:14:49 pm »
Speaking of medical certificats etc., if the Brexshit hasn't hit the fan by brevet time you might still be eligible for a European Health Insurance Card, which conveys to medical authorities in whatever country you've crashed in that you are covered.  It's got a wee ring of stars on it though, which might mean that it goes out with the rest of the bathwater.

The wee stars are also the emblem of the Council of Europe, and your UK EHIC covers more than the EEA.

Quote
The wider world

While there are exceptions to the rule, though, there is also good news as a number of other EHIC countries outside the European Economic Area do, in fact, have reciprocal health agreements with the UK. In these instances, presenting your EHIC card can help you access the treatment. It isn’t essential in many instances, but simply proving your entitlement to healthcare in the UK can save valuable time and help you skirt a large amount of red tape.

The following nations have a reciprocal agreement with the UK: Australia, Anguilla, Barbados, Bosnia & Herzegovina, British Virgin Islands, Falkland Islands, Gibraltar, Jersey, Macedonia, Montenegro, Montserrat, New Zealand, St Helena, Serbia, Turks and Caicos Islands.

Save time and money

In all these nations, a European health insurance card technically won’t count for much, but it will assuage the hospital’s fears and ensure that you get seen to quickly. It will also mean that you don’t get presented with a large bill to pay before the hospital agrees to treat you. This has happened before, so make sure you have your card to hand as it will help your cause should the worst happen.

T42

  • Tea tank
Re: 'Gotchas' when riding overseas brevets
« Reply #34 on: January 20, 2019, 03:31:08 pm »
Glad of that.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

mattc

  • n.b. have grown beard since photo taken
    • Didcot Audaxes
Re: 'Gotchas' when riding overseas brevets
« Reply #35 on: January 20, 2019, 05:57:40 pm »
I'm sure the Govt has sorted out all these minor details. They've had 2 years, and seem a pretty competent bunch.

#maycontainsatire
Has never ridden RAAM
---------
No.11  Because of the great host of those who dislike the least appearance of "swank " when they travel the roads and lanes. - From Kuklos' 39 Articles

cygnet

  • I'm part of the association
Re: 'Gotchas' when riding overseas brevets
« Reply #36 on: January 23, 2019, 06:15:14 pm »
I've posted a Australia/helmet question in Lift the Lid
https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=110865.0

would appreciate any knowledgeable advice from those who may not venture in there normally

Thanks
I Said, I've Got A Big Stick

Re: 'Gotchas' when riding overseas brevets
« Reply #37 on: March 19, 2019, 02:09:28 pm »
Randonneurs USA requires riders to wear reflective anklets at night, along with a reflective vest. "When riding all riders must wear an approved helmet."

Yeah, just signed up for a Seattle ride and caught that. For a 300 that starts at 6am. Wonder if my reflective socks will be OK.

Nearly got caught out on Saturdays 200. I just got a receipt as proof of passage at a commercial control but then got told by the guys I was riding with I had to get someone to sign my brevet card instead. Queried it at the end and yeah, brevet cards must be signed at the control...

CrazyEnglishTriathlete

  • Miles eaten don't satisfy hunger
  • 3x Brimstone ancien 3x Pendle/Tan Hill DNF
    • CET Ride Reports and Blogs
Re: 'Gotchas' when riding overseas brevets
« Reply #38 on: March 19, 2019, 10:37:15 pm »
The PBP DNF rate is trending slightly worse over time. I suspect that result is inevitable, given that mostly true hardrider types tend to tackle these sorts of things initially, when there is little information/ history available. Other folk get drawn into riding tough events by the seeming 'normality/ ease/ mythology' of doing them once enough folk have ridden and publicised the events.

A bit off-topic again though.

I'd suggest another factor is the increased use of indoor trainers.  A greater proportion of riders I've met have made reference to training indoors when the weather's bad.   IN 2007, as far as I recall, the UK had a wet spring, so most AUK PBP entrants would have been rained upon and blown apart.  When it came to PBP (which was wet and windy) we had the best completion rate of any nation with a significant number of entries, because we'd had the mental training of suffering in the cold and wet. 

It's difficult to make comparisons but (again based on anecdotal comments as I was ensconced in StIves cooking) a lower experience of adverse conditions made it harder for some to battle the horrible headwinds on the return leg of LEL in 2017.  This is a judgemental observation totally unbacked by any statistical analysis, but I throw it up there for consideration. 

Back to the topic, I think weather can be a gotcha - if you are unprepared.  I think I was lucky with the 2010 edition of Mille Miglia, in that it was a particularly hot June and July in the UK and so I got experience of riding up hills in 30C heat which in a more ordinary summer (if such things still exist) I might not have got and I might have suffered more when the thermometer regularly rose into the 30s in Tuscany.
Eddington Numbers 124 (imperial), 168 (metric) 517 (furlongs)  111 (nautical miles)

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: 'Gotchas' when riding overseas brevets
« Reply #39 on: March 19, 2019, 11:28:10 pm »
Yeah, just signed up for a Seattle ride and caught that. For a 300 that starts at 6am. Wonder if my reflective socks will be OK.

Nearly got caught out on Saturdays 200. I just got a receipt as proof of passage at a commercial control but then got told by the guys I was riding with I had to get someone to sign my brevet card instead. Queried it at the end and yeah, brevet cards must be signed at the control...

Does that mean an ATM doesn't work as PoP in .US?

Who is acceptable for signing?

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Karla

  • car(e) free
    • Lost Byway - around the world by bike
Re: 'Gotchas' when riding overseas brevets
« Reply #40 on: March 20, 2019, 01:03:33 am »
Thailand (Trang): I wasn't asked to wear a helmet and there was food at most controls.  The whole thing was easy, friendly and absent of gotchas.  The ride was run (along with a while series of events) by Titisak at Happy Wheels, who speaks some English.

Re: 'Gotchas' when riding overseas brevets
« Reply #41 on: March 20, 2019, 02:38:07 am »
Does that mean an ATM doesn't work as PoP in .US?

Who is acceptable for signing?

J

No idea, this was in Canada. And no idea if it's a club thing or a country thing. Seems odd either way.

One of the guys I was riding with apparently An employee of the establishment we stopped at.

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: 'Gotchas' when riding overseas brevets
« Reply #42 on: March 20, 2019, 07:45:26 am »
Randonneurs USA requires riders to wear reflective anklets at night, along with a reflective vest. "When riding all riders must wear an approved helmet."

Yeah, just signed up for a Seattle ride and caught that. For a 300 that starts at 6am. Wonder if my reflective socks will be OK.

It'd be better to ask the organiser or a local rider beforehand but I would expect separate reflective anklets. RUSA tends towards the fundamentalist approach to randonneuring.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Re: 'Gotchas' when riding overseas brevets
« Reply #43 on: March 20, 2019, 07:51:52 am »
The PBP DNF rate is trending slightly worse over time. I suspect that result is inevitable, given that mostly true hardrider types tend to tackle these sorts of things initially, when there is little information/ history available. Other folk get drawn into riding tough events by the seeming 'normality/ ease/ mythology' of doing them once enough folk have ridden and publicised the events.

A bit off-topic again though.

It's difficult to make comparisons but (again based on anecdotal comments as I was ensconced in StIves cooking) a lower experience of adverse conditions made it harder for some to battle the horrible headwinds on the return leg of LEL in 2017.  This is a judgemental observation totally unbacked by any statistical analysis, but I throw it up there for consideration. 

My experience is more that riders were not used to change planning + calculations based on the wind predictions. So a lot of riders stayed put in the first night because they were already 'ahead of schedule'. This resulted in an overcrowded control and the few riders continueing through the night lacking any groups to ride with (and gain more time).
Same for PBP 2007. A lot of riders decided to wait for the end of the rain/daylight at Mortagne. This meant that in the 2nd half of the night there was hardly anyone riding from Mortagne to Villaines. Those riders still on the road had to battle the elements alone, resulting in not only the group waiting at Mortagne being out of time but those riders continuing also being very close to the timelimit.
Group behaviour does have influence on your times, even if you don't follow it.

Re: 'Gotchas' when riding overseas brevets
« Reply #44 on: March 20, 2019, 09:20:09 am »
I didn't have an issue with receipts on the RUSA ride I did a few years ago. They actually had a nice rule (not sure if it's been proposed here) that you only need one receipt per group if you've designated this with the organiser - I rode part of the way with a father and daughter pair that didn't have to do the slightly ridiculous two receipt thing. For tandems this must be a no-brainer.
“That slope may look insignificant, but it's going to be my destiny" - Fitzcarraldo