Author Topic: Winter boots  (Read 6952 times)

Re: Winter boots
« Reply #25 on: January 19, 2018, 01:32:14 pm »
High ankles are useful, to assist in channeling water running down the leg over the outside of the boot.

I use Lake MXZ302, which has performed well (provided the water didn't get too deep). They are warm enough that I have largely restricted their use to sub-zero conditions, unless I'm more interested in keeping water out. Waterproofing is Pittards treated leather, which is non-delicate, and can be re-proofed with Nikwax or dubbin if necessary (unlike membranes which can get holes in).
The current MXZ303 is available in a wide version.

Samuel D

Re: Winter boots
« Reply #26 on: January 19, 2018, 01:39:32 pm »
I’ve since ridden many kilometres in the rain in the Northwave Flash TH shoes I mentioned earlier. My feet get soaked by about the second hour of rain.

I like them a lot, but don’t get them to keep your feet dry.

Re: Winter boots
« Reply #27 on: January 20, 2018, 06:11:46 pm »
Been out a couple of times this year wearing my new Specialized Defrosters.

Temperatures have been zero to minus one degrees and my feet have kept dry and toasty warm all day. Have only worn thin cotton socks underneath the boots, not my usual thermal Sealskinz.
I don't want to grow old gracefully. I want to grow old disgracefully.

Re: Winter boots
« Reply #28 on: May 27, 2018, 02:04:56 pm »
Be warned though, I think all Gore-tex Winter boots suffer from the same issue....they prevent water getting out even more effectively than they prevent water getting in. 
Water running down your legs WILL eventually get into your boots on a long ride.  At that point you may find yourself in waterlogged boots for the remainder of the ride* 
It's worth spending a bit of time stretching the ankle of your bib-tights over the boot as far as you can.

*Good news - The water gets warm at least.

Solved this very problem a few years back. Buy a pair of rubber washing up gloves. Cut the hands off at the wrist. Put the remaining wrist section on your leg with the tight bit at the top and the lower section guarding the boot entry neoprene. Completely stops water getting in. Washing up gloves come in a range of sizes too depending on your leg size.

Re: Winter boots
« Reply #29 on: May 27, 2018, 02:06:53 pm »

Solved this very problem a few years back. Buy a pair of rubber washing up gloves. Cut the hands off at the wrist. Put the remaining wrist section on your leg with the tight bit at the top and the lower section guarding the boot entry neoprene. Completely stops water getting in. Washing up gloves come in a range of sizes too depending on your leg size.

Or get some wetsuit cuffs.

Re: Winter boots
« Reply #30 on: May 27, 2018, 02:19:16 pm »
Or get some wetsuit cuffs.

Surely they are water absorbent so the water continues to trickle down the leg?

Re: Winter boots
« Reply #31 on: May 27, 2018, 04:00:31 pm »
Or get some wetsuit cuffs.

Surely they are water absorbent so the water continues to trickle down the leg?

The ones I'm talking about are rubber (or synthetic equivalent).  Don't know the technical term for them!

Manotea

  • Where there is doubt...
Re: Winter boots
« Reply #32 on: May 27, 2018, 05:54:01 pm »
Winter Boots? I'm agin em.

I had a pair of Specialized Defrosters for a while but found them very cold to wear. Then one nominally dry day I got caught out in a squall whilst riding laps in my local park when they instantly filled up with freezing cold water. If that had been in the middle of a 600 .... Anyway, they went on to eBay the next day.

So I stick with standard shoes plus insulated overshoes (not neoprene which get very heavy, and cold and slimy to the touch when full of water, yuk).  I found the Overshoes much warmer, especially when windy, can be taken off when the weather clears and have the benefit of going in the washing machine with the rest of my kit. Much more convenient then de-skogging boots aftera winter ride. I'm just lazy, I guess.

*Like these, though there are lots of different branded versions around, probably all made by the same company.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Pro-Endure-H2O-BIKE-rennrad-uberschuhe-Waterproof-Heat-Insulating-Black-/191957378026?var=&clk_rvr_id=1545157719821&utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=twenga&utm_campaign=twenga&utm_param=eyJlcyI6MCwicyI6OTcyMDIzNywiY2kiOiIwMzBkMjYzNjE5ZGNkY2Y5NDhmOGMwNzk4YjRjNjIzMiIsImkiOiIzOTAxNDEwOTA0NDc5MTk4NTk5IiwidHMiOjE1Mjc0NDAwODYsInYiOjMsInNvIjoxNTAwLCJjIjoxNzc4NjN9&rmvSB=true


Manotea

  • Where there is doubt...
Re: Winter boots
« Reply #34 on: May 27, 2018, 08:46:11 pm »
Looks like  it. Ive had versions from Pro, BBB and Endura, all much the same.

Things to look for, for winter use is internal insulation and a reinforced toe section (MTB shoes really chew the toe area up on lightweight covers).

Ive also got a lightweight pair of uninsulated overshoes I bought for warm weather where the toe section stretch around the outside of the shoe. Wearing those in the winter convinced me the insulation, whilst it doesn't look much, nevertheless 'works'.