Author Topic: How much glycogen  (Read 2041 times)

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: How much glycogen
« Reply #25 on: January 31, 2018, 04:53:54 pm »
And working muscles take up any rise in blood sugar. For most folk, blood sugar only noticeably rises (with subsequent insulin surges) if at rest.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: How much glycogen
« Reply #26 on: January 31, 2018, 05:27:10 pm »
And working muscles take up any rise in blood sugar. For most folk, blood sugar only noticeably rises (with subsequent insulin surges) if at rest.

Agreed.
Glycogen synthesis is highest immediately after exercise so it's worth trying to get sugars in early (pudding first?!) when you rest, especially if you'll be on the move short(ish)ly.

simonp

  • Omnomnomnipotent.
Re: How much glycogen
« Reply #27 on: January 31, 2018, 08:36:24 pm »
Glass of milk.

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: How much glycogen
« Reply #28 on: January 31, 2018, 08:37:02 pm »
Lovely.  Milky milky.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: How much glycogen
« Reply #29 on: January 31, 2018, 09:17:43 pm »
Sludge'n'custard.

Thursday afternoon tea with Grandma used to set me up for record-breaking Friday morning commutes and good Audax weekends.

Re: How much glycogen
« Reply #30 on: January 31, 2018, 09:46:19 pm »
Forcing large amounts of sugar into body tissues takes huge amounts of Insulin, even when exercising - so chronic use of sugars to fuel exercise can still lead to Insulin Resistance, and T2DM. There are plenty of middle-aged triathletes and runners out there with T2DM and metabolic syndrome.

Also - relying on a continual flow of carbohydrates becomes a problem on a long ride if suddenly you can't eat for some reason; gastric distress is pretty common on endurance events, and if you're reliant on a steady intake of food, you'll be in trouble.

When Insulin is elevated, burning stored fat is shut down completely - so once you've taken that step onto the carb roller coaster, you're stuck there for the rest of the event.

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: How much glycogen
« Reply #31 on: January 31, 2018, 09:53:37 pm »
Meh. I've not had such problems.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

simonp

  • Omnomnomnipotent.
Re: How much glycogen
« Reply #32 on: January 31, 2018, 10:08:48 pm »
Forcing large amounts of sugar into body tissues takes huge amounts of Insulin, even when exercising - so chronic use of sugars to fuel exercise can still lead to Insulin Resistance, and T2DM. There are plenty of middle-aged triathletes and runners out there with T2DM and metabolic syndrome.

Also - relying on a continual flow of carbohydrates becomes a problem on a long ride if suddenly you can't eat for some reason; gastric distress is pretty common on endurance events, and if you're reliant on a steady intake of food, you'll be in trouble.

When Insulin is elevated, burning stored fat is shut down completely - so once you've taken that step onto the carb roller coaster, you're stuck there for the rest of the event.

A comprehensive survey of cardiovascular disease was carried out on 779 persons over 15 yr of age. Carbohydrate provided more than 90 per cent of caloric intake and the consumption of protein and salt were about 25 and 1 g daily, respectively. Drinking water was soft. The population was lean, physically fit and in good nutritional state. There was no increase with age in mean blood pressure, serum cholesterol (average), fasting blood glucose or adiposity. Glucose tolerance was high. The average fasting serum triglyceride level was 142mg/100ml. Serum uric acid levels were not high. Pipe smoking was common. No diabetes or gout were found. There was a low prevalence of diagnosable cardiovascular diseases: hypertension, valvular disease, cardiac decompensation (mostly cor pulmonale) and cerebral and peripheral vascular disease. Ischemic heart diesase was rare if not absent as indicated by resting and post-exercise electrocardiograms. Rates for all codeable ECG items were low except low voltage and T wave changes (commonest in middle aged women). Age-related degenerative changes occurred, such as increasing diameter of the aorta and decreasing creatinine clearance, and the declining ECG voltage with age may be indicative of cardiac disease.


Re: How much glycogen
« Reply #33 on: January 31, 2018, 10:29:36 pm »
2 hours' glycogen at moderate speed (brisk but not racing).  For rides longer than 2 hours you need to eat (in the saddle is fine), or be good at running on fat.
Never tell me the odds.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: How much glycogen
« Reply #34 on: January 31, 2018, 10:33:33 pm »
Not everyone can eat in the saddle.
I couldn't but agree otherwise with RZ.

Re: How much glycogen
« Reply #35 on: February 01, 2018, 12:54:19 pm »


A comprehensive survey of cardiovascular disease was carried out on 779 persons over 15 yr of age. Carbohydrate provided more than 90 per cent of caloric intake and the consumption of protein and salt were about 25 and 1 g daily, respectively. Drinking water was soft. The population was lean, physically fit and in good nutritional state. There was no increase with age in mean blood pressure, serum cholesterol (average), fasting blood glucose or adiposity. Glucose tolerance was high. The average fasting serum triglyceride level was 142mg/100ml. Serum uric acid levels were not high. Pipe smoking was common. No diabetes or gout were found. There was a low prevalence of diagnosable cardiovascular diseases: hypertension, valvular disease, cardiac decompensation (mostly cor pulmonale) and cerebral and peripheral vascular disease. Ischemic heart diesase was rare if not absent as indicated by resting and post-exercise electrocardiograms. Rates for all codeable ECG items were low except low voltage and T wave changes (commonest in middle aged women). Age-related degenerative changes occurred, such as increasing diameter of the aorta and decreasing creatinine clearance, and the declining ECG voltage with age may be indicative of cardiac disease.


I could hazard a guess, but population? Total energy intake?

I suspect hot climate, low food intake

simonp

  • Omnomnomnipotent.
Re: How much glycogen
« Reply #36 on: February 01, 2018, 01:18:22 pm »


A comprehensive survey of cardiovascular disease was carried out on 779 persons over 15 yr of age. Carbohydrate provided more than 90 per cent of caloric intake and the consumption of protein and salt were about 25 and 1 g daily, respectively. Drinking water was soft. The population was lean, physically fit and in good nutritional state. There was no increase with age in mean blood pressure, serum cholesterol (average), fasting blood glucose or adiposity. Glucose tolerance was high. The average fasting serum triglyceride level was 142mg/100ml. Serum uric acid levels were not high. Pipe smoking was common. No diabetes or gout were found. There was a low prevalence of diagnosable cardiovascular diseases: hypertension, valvular disease, cardiac decompensation (mostly cor pulmonale) and cerebral and peripheral vascular disease. Ischemic heart diesase was rare if not absent as indicated by resting and post-exercise electrocardiograms. Rates for all codeable ECG items were low except low voltage and T wave changes (commonest in middle aged women). Age-related degenerative changes occurred, such as increasing diameter of the aorta and decreasing creatinine clearance, and the declining ECG voltage with age may be indicative of cardiac disease.


I could hazard a guess, but population? Total energy intake?

I suspect hot climate, low food intake

PNG. About 2300kcal/day for the men. Low by modern western standards, but modern western food intake is way too high. It's about 500kcals more than I aim to eat in a day if not training. They would have been far more active than a typical westerner.

They're not alone in having a traditional diet that's very high in carbohydrate but also having none of the diseases of western lifestyle. When they switch to a western diet, they typically are adding a lot of fat and protein, and in particular frying.

Re: How much glycogen
« Reply #37 on: February 01, 2018, 02:11:21 pm »
Quote
Carbohydrate provided more than 90 per cent of caloric intake

But what did they eat?
Quote
Local foods, such as tubers, fresh fruit, coconut and fish, make up the backbone of the Kitavan diet. The most commonly consumed tubers include yam, cassava (aka yucca or manioc), sweet potato (aka kumara) and taro. Common fruit include banana, papaya, guava, pineapple, mango, and water melon. The consumption of Western food is extremely low, with an average Kitavan spending a meagre 3 US dollars per year on Western foods. The intake of dairy products, tea, coffee and alcohol is close to nil, and salt intake is low by Western standards. Also the consumption of oils, margarine, sugar, grains and cereals is low. The overall fat intake is equally low, and most fat consumed is saturated or marine n-3 polyunsaturated fat (omega-3 fat from seafood).

In summary, the Kitavan diet comprises an abundance of foods that have a low glycemic index rating and that are rich in soluble fiber, magnesium, potassium, and omega-3 fatty acids. All of these characteristics may contribute to the exceptional health benefits associated with the Kitavan diet.

So complex starches and coconut.