Poll

What do you think of dropper seatposts on MTBs?

The best thing since suspension forks, an absolute must
1 (7.7%)
Kinda useful and worth the money
3 (23.1%)
Kinda useful but not worth the money
4 (30.8%)
Good for posing but not my cuppa
3 (23.1%)
Yet another so called 'must have' invented by marketeers - avoid like Biopace
2 (15.4%)

Total Members Voted: 13

Voting closed: March 09, 2018, 11:00:05 pm

Author Topic: Dropper seatpost - yes or no?  (Read 2635 times)

handcyclist

  • watch for my signal
Dropper seatpost - yes or no?
« on: February 07, 2018, 11:00:05 pm »
Having been out on the mountain bike today - in life affirmingly glorious, if bloody freezing, weather - it occured to me that I must get off-road more often. I'm thinking of getting a new toy as an incentive, so considering a remote dropper seatpost. Opinions?
Doubt is is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is absurd.

Re: Dropper seatpost - yes or no?
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2018, 10:03:21 pm »
I was extremely sceptical when they first appeared, but found myself completely won-over very quickly when I tried one. Most surprisingly, I find I drop the post slightly (maybe an inch) on relatively gentle slopes as the speed picks up. Conversely, you can have the saddle at full height for pedalling efficiency on smooth terrain without compromising your off road position.
Life is too important to be taken seriously.

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Dropper seatpost - yes or no?
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2018, 10:12:32 pm »
Back in the '80s, we used the seatpost QR and Hite-Rite spring quite a bit. A dropper post is just a better and more complicated way of doing the same thing.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Dropper seatpost - yes or no?
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2018, 10:15:32 pm »
Never used one, but they seem like an excellent idea.  I regret not lowering my QR saddle for technical bits often enough.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

woollypigs

  • Mr Peli
    • woollypigs
Re: Dropper seatpost - yes or no?
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2018, 11:25:31 pm »
Only thing I know about them is what I would be very very careful with them. Young lad had his bike in the shop and his seat shot up like a canon. I just looked at him and he told me - his finger slipped and hit the tricker one day going down the high street and hit him right there, pure luck that he didn't drop right in front of the car behind him and that he needed a few minutes to compose himself.
http://www.letusbeheard.uk March in London on October 19th and on the 12th Rally 4 Our Rights

PaulF

  • "World's Scariest Barman"
  • It's only impossible if you stop to think about it
Re: Dropper seatpost - yes or no?
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2018, 03:55:14 am »
I bought one a few years ago but rarely use it, most of the riding that I do isn’t technical enoug( to justify it and when I do those sections it’s invariably on another bike. Think it’s actually sitting on a shelf at 5he moment

Re: Dropper seatpost - yes or no?
« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2018, 07:46:43 am »
Only thing I know about them is what I would be very very careful with them. Young lad had his bike in the shop and his seat shot up like a canon. I just looked at him and he told me - his finger slipped and hit the tricker one day going down the high street and hit him right there, pure luck that he didn't drop right in front of the car behind him and that he needed a few minutes to compose himself.

Sounds a bit odd. The cheap, purely mechanical ones are undamped, but need a ‘tap’ of the saddle to release the retention pin, so should only come up if your posterior is already in contact. The more sophisticated ones that allow release unweighted all have, afaik, damping systems to limit the speed.  It’s possible that it may have been over-pressurised, I suppose.  Can you remember the model?
Life is too important to be taken seriously.

woollypigs

  • Mr Peli
    • woollypigs
Re: Dropper seatpost - yes or no?
« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2018, 10:32:38 am »
Sadly no but I wouldn't be surprised it the owner had done some DIY to it.
http://www.letusbeheard.uk March in London on October 19th and on the 12th Rally 4 Our Rights

Re: Dropper seatpost - yes or no?
« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2018, 10:58:24 am »
I've had a few of these , on various bikes and wouldnt have a mountain bike without one now.   Great for just dropping a bit when on the gnarly ( ;D) stuff  and popping back up for pedalling efficiency on fireroads etc.   Worth the money.

I have a Thompson post on my Orange currently but have also had a Lev, both worked/ work reliably  and I've never had it work like an ejector seat :-)

I've got a spare 27.2 dropper in the garage that cost me £70 which Ill part with at cost of anyone wants to try one on the cheap and it'll fit.

JennyB

  • Old enough to know better
Re: Dropper seatpost - yes or no?
« Reply #9 on: February 09, 2018, 12:13:51 pm »
Back when mountain bikes were a NEW THING (1984ish) someone  came up with a cam-lock seat clamp. To lower, release the clamp and let the saddle sink under your weight;  to raise, just grab the saddle nose and pull up.

Does anyone else remember that?
Jennifer - walker of hills



LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Dropper seatpost - yes or no?
« Reply #10 on: February 09, 2018, 01:04:41 pm »
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Re: Dropper seatpost - yes or no?
« Reply #11 on: February 09, 2018, 01:35:56 pm »
If you're going actual off road (which sounds odd when talking about mountain bikes, but it's all railway tracks and that round here) I'd be having one for sure. They're brilliant.

handcyclist

  • watch for my signal
Re: Dropper seatpost - yes or no?
« Reply #12 on: February 09, 2018, 09:08:27 pm »
Back when mountain bikes were a NEW THING (1984ish) someone  came up with a cam-lock seat clamp. To lower, release the clamp and let the saddle sink under your weight;  to raise, just grab the saddle nose and pull up.

Does anyone else remember that?

Yes - and face planted into the countryside when I hadn't quite finished lowering the saddle before rolling over a short-notice drop off  ::-)
Doubt is is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is absurd.

handcyclist

  • watch for my signal
Re: Dropper seatpost - yes or no?
« Reply #13 on: February 09, 2018, 09:10:02 pm »
I've got a spare 27.2 dropper in the garage that cost me £70 which Ill part with at cost of anyone wants to try one on the cheap and it'll fit.

Mmm, interested - will send PM
Doubt is is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is absurd.

Re: Dropper seatpost - yes or no?
« Reply #14 on: January 03, 2019, 12:35:32 pm »
Definitely a yes.
I have a Rockshox reverb dropper. It played up like mad until Rockshox replaced the internals for free. Now it works perfectly.
My other dropper is a BikeYoke cable actuated model. It's fantastic. If the reverb ever packs it in, it will be replaced by the BikeYoke.

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small just Far Away at the back
Re: Dropper seatpost - yes or no?
« Reply #15 on: January 03, 2019, 01:39:29 pm »
Used a dropper on my Full Sus, but not on my XC bikes once I got good enough to do the Laggan Lower Red without adjusting my seat post mid-ride.
Where I think it does help for XC is climbing as you can get the post to lift you to your most efficient position for the climb and then drop to your trade off for technical sections.

If you're riding "Enduro" then the mix of need for XC mechanical efficiency and Downhill's technical "get the saddle out the way so I can use my arse as a brake" makes it a must.

If you're riding downhill then your saddle is pretty much there for Homologation purposes.

If you're riding non-technical MTB stuff then there's no point.