Author Topic: British Heart Foundation London to Brighton Bike Ride 2018  (Read 2570 times)

British Heart Foundation London to Brighton Bike Ride 2018
« on: April 19, 2018, 05:32:37 pm »
I didn't see an existing post for this, but if there is one, guess this one can be deleted,

Anyone here doing the British Heart Foundation London to Brighton Bike Ride this year?

https://www.bhf.org.uk/get-involved/events/bike-rides/london-to-brighton-bike-ride-2018

My wife and I and a few friends of mine have signed up for this...
Old enough to know better, but young enough to do it anyway

Re: British Heart Foundation London to Brighton Bike Ride 2018
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2018, 09:46:36 pm »
There'll probably be the standard family hatler turn out towards the end of the ride.
Rust never sleeps

Redlight

  • Enjoying life in the slow lane
Re: British Heart Foundation London to Brighton Bike Ride 2018
« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2018, 12:58:58 pm »
I did it "officially" for several years before getting fed up with the congestion and having to stop so often.  I'm afraid it's simply become too big for the roads it uses. 

Some years I ride down from SE London and pick up the ride around Turners Hill just because it's quite pleasant to ride on the latter parts of the route when they are closed to traffic, but I skip the finish and meander back on an almost parallel route. 
Why should anybody steal a watch when they can steal a bicycle?

Re: British Heart Foundation London to Brighton Bike Ride 2018
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2018, 03:46:43 pm »
I enjoyed the ride, there was a good atmosphere and it was fun cycling with a big group of other cyclists and it was great to have no cars on the sections completely closed to traffic (which was quite a lot of the way, there were also sections which were half-closed to traffic, so no cars on one side of the road). The start was a little drizzly, but not too bad, and it did clear up later, even a little bit of sun before Ditchling Beacon. Was quite a mix of bikes, mostly aluminium or carbon road bikes and touring bikes, but also mountain bikes, hybrids, quite a few Bromptons, a few tandems and fatbikes, the odd recumbent and even a penny farthing(!).

I was with my wife and some (mosly) not-hardcore cyclist friends, so we took it at a fairly easy pace, and took, I think, 3 or 4 stops for coffee/bacon baps etc. We started just after 7:30pm and got to the finish line after 2pm, though actual riding time was about 4 hours 45 mins, averaging just under 12mph. None of us got off and walked up any of the hills, though - was slightly shocked to see that probably 90% (or more!) of the riders (including a large number on expensive-looking carbon race bikes) didn't seem to even attempt to ride up Ditchling Beacon and walked from the start - it's quite long, but not ridiculously steep (compared to say Kop Hill, near Oxford). Having said, that, my knees were glad I had a triple and not a compact, though one of my friends did it on a 39T chainring all the way \o/

Also noticed quite a few riders (even ones on road bikes) getting of to walk right at the start of pretty much *any* hill, even very minor ones that you could've done on a fixie, although it looked like most had plenty of gears! I guess it is an event for the more casual cyclist, though.
Old enough to know better, but young enough to do it anyway

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: British Heart Foundation London to Brighton Bike Ride 2018
« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2018, 04:32:25 pm »
Not done it myself, but I was under the impression that you'd end up walking Ditchling Beacon on this ride simply because of the sheer volume of people getting off and walking in front of you.  Probably depends on when you start, though.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: British Heart Foundation London to Brighton Bike Ride 2018
« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2018, 04:38:34 pm »
Not done it myself, but I was under the impression that you'd end up walking Ditchling Beacon on this ride simply because of the sheer volume of people getting off and walking in front of you.  Probably depends on when you start, though.

They did try to stagger groups of riders before the climb, to try to mitigate bottlenecks, and kept a route clear on the right hand side for those actually riding, which helped.
Old enough to know better, but young enough to do it anyway