Author Topic: Flags on St George's Day  (Read 1869 times)

Flags on St George's Day
« on: April 24, 2018, 08:08:54 pm »
As I now refuse to wave the Union Flag other than for sporting / royal occasions due to its toxicity I thought I'd strap a St George's flag to my bike yesterday as I happen to think it's a day worth celebrating despite having been pretty much castigated;

Thanks to the Random other cyclist possibly OTP (his attire fitted anyway) who shouted something about Palestinians at me as I rode across Hyde Park

Huh? (yes I know about the history)

Re: St George's Day
« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2018, 11:07:38 pm »
We paraded with the Scouts as usual. As I pointed out to them and the parents, there are 24 countries, on at least five continents, in which St George is recognised, and he is a patron saint in, for example, Georgia, Brazil, Ethiopia and Greece as well as England. As that leaves only Antarctica and Australasia as continents where he is not so significant, and penguins are not known for having patron saints, he is probably one of the most international of saints.

Our attititude is a bit odd.

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: St George's Day
« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2018, 11:37:55 pm »
As I now refuse to wave the Union Flag other than for sporting / royal occasions due to its toxicity I thought I'd strap a St George's flag to my bike yesterday as I happen to think it's a day worth celebrating despite having been pretty much castigated

Curious.  For me the St George's flag is irreparably tainted with ballsports and nastier shades of nationalism, while the Union Flag is still acceptable in sufficiently international[1] contexts.

But then while I'm happy to think of myself as British, I don't really identify with Englishness.  *shrug*

I don't really know or care about saints.  I'm not sure what I'm missing out on...



[1] Flying one in the UK would be suspect unless accompanied by an assortment of other flags, but I'd be fine with sticking one on my pannier while touring abroad[2], and it's always pleasing to see one on a spacesuit.
[2] In practice it seems that a jersey with a .co.uk address on it is sufficient, and avoids the flaggy baggage.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Re: St George's Day
« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2018, 11:50:31 pm »
A model to look up to. Obviously legendary in this case, but Baden Powell chose him for Scouting because he symbolises, responsibility, truthfulness, devotion to duty, bravery, a noble spirit and dedication to helping others.

Of course, some people don't feel that they need a model, which is fine. But sometimes it's hard to hit the target if you're not looking at it. Even if you have to imagine the target a bit ;D

Re: St George's Day
« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2018, 07:30:23 am »
As I now refuse to wave the Union Flag other than for sporting / royal occasions due to its toxicity I thought I'd strap a St George's flag to my bike yesterday as I happen to think it's a day worth celebrating despite having been pretty much castigated

Curious.  For me the St George's flag is irreparably tainted with ballsports and nastier shades of nationalism, while the Union Flag is still acceptable in sufficiently international[1] contexts.


Maybe this depends on age?  I have no idea whether you’re older or younger than me, but IME as a teenager in the 70s the Union Jack was hijacked first by the NF and then by the BNP, with the growing use by English sports fans of the cross of St George in the late-80s and 90s a way of showing support whilst keeping their distance from the NF/BNP. 
R10000 x 1   RRtY x 6    SR x 7    E = 126

T42

  • Old fool in a hurry
Re: St George's Day
« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2018, 08:09:54 am »
UJ also hijacked by prod extremist bastards in Norn Iron. What annoys me even more is that they also hijacked the Red Hand of Ulster, meaning that while Scots, Welsh and English can wear their national symbols proudly, decent folk from NI can't.
I dare eat all that may become a man.

But hold the oysters.

Re: St George's Day
« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2018, 09:46:12 am »
As I now refuse to wave the Union Flag other than for sporting / royal occasions due to its toxicity I thought I'd strap a St George's flag to my bike yesterday as I happen to think it's a day worth celebrating despite having been pretty much castigated

Curious.  For me the St George's flag is irreparably tainted with ballsports and nastier shades of nationalism, while the Union Flag is still acceptable in sufficiently international[1] contexts.


I find the Union Flag has become a lot more tainted with nastier shades of nationalism since a certain vote (witness how many now fly around some of the more down at heel residential areas)

Yes the England flag is moslty just ballsports now (which is how I obtained it) I think it's a sad day when the patron saint of another country is recognised far more than our own (Which is probably true for many countries on St Partick's Day)

re NI I've never seen a car number plate with any sort of flag (UK NI Eire or EU) in that province

Pingu

  • Put away those fiery biscuits!
  • Mrs Pingu's domestique
    • the Igloo
Re: St George's Day
« Reply #7 on: April 25, 2018, 10:00:56 am »
...I don't really know or care about saints.  I'm not sure what I'm missing out on...

Some bizarre stories.

Feanor

  • It's mostly downhill from here.
Re: St George's Day
« Reply #8 on: April 25, 2018, 10:39:40 am »
...I don't really know or care about saints.  I'm not sure what I'm missing out on...

Some bizarre stories.

And body parts. Don't forget about the body parts.

Re: St George's Day
« Reply #9 on: April 25, 2018, 11:03:06 am »
As I now refuse to wave the Union Flag other than for sporting / royal occasions due to its toxicity I thought I'd strap a St George's flag to my bike yesterday as I happen to think it's a day worth celebrating despite having been pretty much castigated

Curious.  For me the St George's flag is irreparably tainted with ballsports and nastier shades of nationalism, while the Union Flag is still acceptable in sufficiently international[1] contexts.


I find the Union Flag has become a lot more tainted with nastier shades of nationalism since a certain vote (witness how many now fly around some of the more down at heel residential areas)

Yes the England flag is moslty just ballsports now (which is how I obtained it) I think it's a sad day when the patron saint of another country is recognised far more than our own (Which is probably true for many countries on St Partick's Day)

re NI I've never seen a car number plate with any sort of flag (UK NI Eire or EU) in that province
I think St Patrick has been adopted as the patron saint of beer drinkers.
The earth is vast and beautiful and contains many miraculous places. (Chekhov)

T42

  • Old fool in a hurry
Re: St George's Day
« Reply #10 on: April 25, 2018, 11:20:12 am »
re NI I've never seen a car number plate with any sort of flag (UK NI Eire or EU) in that province

An EU plate might pass muster with prod & mick arseholes, but your car'd probably be burnt out by enraged Brexiters.
I dare eat all that may become a man.

But hold the oysters.

Re: St George's Day
« Reply #11 on: April 25, 2018, 11:22:14 am »
re NI I've never seen a car number plate with any sort of flag (UK NI Eire or EU) in that province

An EU plate might pass muster with prod & mick arseholes, but your car'd probably be burnt out by enraged Brexiters.

I think the GB bit would be the problem....

T42

  • Old fool in a hurry
Re: St George's Day
« Reply #12 on: April 25, 2018, 11:24:21 am »
I think St Patrick has been adopted as the patron saint of beer drinkers.

Nope. St. Arnulf of Metz got there first.
I dare eat all that may become a man.

But hold the oysters.

Re: Flags on St George's Day
« Reply #13 on: April 25, 2018, 11:42:22 am »
I've got a multi-purpose flag for special occasions. It's John O' Gaunt's standard. So serves for Lancashire where I'm from, and alludes to Gaunt's speech in Richard II, which neatly encompasses England and Shakespeare, whose birthday is 23rd April. It does lay claim to France and Spain, so it's a bit ambiguous regarding Brexit.

Here I am chatting about it to Prince Charles at a hedgelaying competition.


Re: St George's Day
« Reply #14 on: April 25, 2018, 01:49:27 pm »
As I now refuse to wave the Union Flag other than for sporting / royal occasions due to its toxicity I thought I'd strap a St George's flag to my bike yesterday as I happen to think it's a day worth celebrating despite having been pretty much castigated

Curious.  For me the St George's flag is irreparably tainted with ballsports and nastier shades of nationalism, while the Union Flag is still acceptable in sufficiently international[1] contexts.

This is definitely my perspective. There are legitimate cases for flying either or (eg Olympic vs Commonwealth games). My feeling is that there is much more subtext about the cross of St George than there is about the union flag. But then, as a Welshman, the flag of St George doesn't even theoretically represent me in any way. ;)

T42

  • Old fool in a hurry
Re: St George's Day
« Reply #15 on: April 25, 2018, 01:50:05 pm »
re NI I've never seen a car number plate with any sort of flag (UK NI Eire or EU) in that province

An EU plate might pass muster with prod & mick arseholes, but your car'd probably be burnt out by enraged Brexiters.

I think the GB bit would be the problem....

GB has always been a problem. ;)
I dare eat all that may become a man.

But hold the oysters.

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: St George's Day
« Reply #16 on: April 25, 2018, 02:07:32 pm »
As I now refuse to wave the Union Flag other than for sporting / royal occasions due to its toxicity I thought I'd strap a St George's flag to my bike yesterday as I happen to think it's a day worth celebrating despite having been pretty much castigated

Curious.  For me the St George's flag is irreparably tainted with ballsports and nastier shades of nationalism, while the Union Flag is still acceptable in sufficiently international[1] contexts.


Maybe this depends on age?  I have no idea whether you’re older or younger than me, but IME as a teenager in the 70s the Union Jack was hijacked first by the NF and then by the BNP, with the growing use by English sports fans of the cross of St George in the late-80s and 90s a way of showing support whilst keeping their distance from the NF/BNP.

Seems likely.  I was born in 1979, and mostly missed the NF.  Also, as white British sometimes-visible[1] QUILTBAG, my personal safety radar is calibrated to consider football fans a more immediate[2] threat than the politer shades of nationalist.


[1] Moreso in my teens and early 20s.  While I still wear comfortable shoes, I now have the invisibility of middle age on my side.
[2] I'm fully aware that the likes of the BNP would like to round me up just as soon as they've finished with the Poles, but that doesn't mean they're paying attention.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

mattc

  • "Hannibal"
  • n.b. have grown beard since photo taken
    • Didcot Audaxes
Re: Flags on St George's Day
« Reply #17 on: April 25, 2018, 04:27:42 pm »
I have no love for the NF or similar groups - but I'm quite happy to wave an England flag on appropriate occasions. It is not a racist/xenophobic symbol. (and neither is a shaved head). Same for the Union Flag.

IMHO, part of standing up to these twats is to stand by things like national flags; otherwise what next - stop speaking English cos so many racists do??
Has never ridden RAAM
---------
No.11  Because of the great host of those who dislike the least appearance of "swank " when they travel the roads and lanes. - From Kuklos' 39 Articles

Pingu

  • Put away those fiery biscuits!
  • Mrs Pingu's domestique
    • the Igloo
Re: St George's Day
« Reply #18 on: April 25, 2018, 06:05:51 pm »
...I don't really know or care about saints.  I'm not sure what I'm missing out on...

Some bizarre stories.

And body parts. Don't forget about the body parts.

Hell, yeah!

Re: St George's Day
« Reply #19 on: April 25, 2018, 09:32:31 pm »
... in the 70s the Union Jack was hijacked ...
So let's hijack it back. Best ever use of flags? Probably the Last Night of the Proms. Wave whatever makes you proud, and we'll all enjoy watching you.

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
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Re: Flags on St George's Day
« Reply #20 on: April 26, 2018, 01:09:01 pm »
Didn't that tedious peasant Farage get thoroughly exercised over someone waving a large EU flag at the Last Night?  Anything which rouses that bean-filled scrotum's ire is undoubtedly a Good Thing.
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Re: Flags on St George's Day
« Reply #21 on: April 26, 2018, 01:24:49 pm »
Didn't Flatus have fun when flying a Dorset flag from his Flatusmobile winding up a French woman who turned out to be a Mme Farage type? Or so he said...

I reckon flying a St George with a UN flag would be fun. Or a combination of nautical flags that means something like "Stay away, bubonic plague on board".
The earth is vast and beautiful and contains many miraculous places. (Chekhov)

handcyclist

  • watch for my signal
Re: Flags on St George's Day
« Reply #22 on: April 29, 2018, 07:48:03 pm »
I have no love for the NF or similar groups - but I'm quite happy to wave an England flag on appropriate occasions. It is not a racist/xenophobic symbol. (and neither is a shaved head). Same for the Union Flag.

IMHO, part of standing up to these twats is to stand by things like national flags; otherwise what next - stop speaking English cos so many racists do??

^ This

Now having dual British/Irish nationality as a post-Brexit insurance policy, I feel fine waving an Irish/English/British national flag as appropiate.
Doubt is is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is absurd.

Re: Flags on St George's Day
« Reply #23 on: April 29, 2018, 10:17:17 pm »
I rarely find myself in flag waving situations, though I'm not opposed to holding a flag or showing it respect. Given a choice I prefer the union flag to the England one. I sing along to Jerusalem with a stronger voice than Rule Britannia at last night of the proms style events. As a child of the 70s I share the avoidance of nationalists and football fans upthread.

My neighbour put up a big flag pole and a union flag somewhere around Brexit and puts it half mast at appropriate times. He also flew it upside down for several weeks, which amused me.

I can't think of reason that I'd put a large flag on my bike. Though I might get an EU one for when Brexit happens (and go cycling not in the UK to avoid the whole thing). There's too many reasons to have a flag on a bike to get shouty at the with them though. So :shrug:

Re: Flags on St George's Day
« Reply #24 on: April 30, 2018, 08:45:15 am »
There's a house a few streets away that has a flagpole in the garden and flies various appropriate flags at appropriate times. For the last week they've been flying a curious version of a St George. Curious because I've not seen anything exactly like it before; it has a miniature cross of St George in the hoist quadrant, within the big normal cross.
The earth is vast and beautiful and contains many miraculous places. (Chekhov)