Author Topic: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?  (Read 7431 times)

Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #50 on: May 16, 2018, 09:03:48 am »
I got bugger all at the pre ride meal so went over the bridge and had pizza. That saw me to  Montagne where a bar on the hill gave me free frites and a beer. That then saw me to Villaines.

Ah yes - the fabled pre-ride meal. No food left when I got there - in plenty of time too !

Fortunately I'd already eaten at a reasonable restaurant the other side of the bridge.

vorsprung

  • Opposites Attract
    • Audaxing
Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #51 on: May 16, 2018, 06:42:46 pm »
Doesn't seem particularly good value if 200 quid don't get you any food. 6000 cyclists time 200 means over a million pound budget... one should be able to buy a few baguette with that kind of money...  ::-)

Have you ever run an event?

Audaxing Blog follow @vorsprungbike on

fboab

  • It's a fecking serious business, riding a bike
Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #52 on: May 17, 2018, 08:46:58 am »
For those of us with a special needs start I can confirm the pre-ride meal was bloody lovely, MUCH better than the 2011 offering.

Pre-qual wise, we're thinking we really need to get our act together sharpish, as it's been a crap 18 months audax-wise for the Smith-Clayton tandem :(.
I think this is largely because now we're shacked up we don't need stupid long bike rides to spend time together :D
TSS is not Total Sex Score, Chris!

Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #53 on: May 17, 2018, 09:34:53 am »
Thanks for the discussion, all. It’s still murky but I can Google the rest, starting with the terms of art used on the first page alone:
  • SR series
  • BRM
  • homologating bodies
  • qualifier
  • LEL
  • FFCT
  • Randonnée
  • ACP
  • randonneur brevets
  • baguette

Audax pasta is typically dire

French pasta is typically dire: cheap stuff boiled to a limp mess. I think last generation’s French customer came to expect pasta to be like that. Thankfully French restaurants, even humble ones, do lots of other things reliably well – even in the north, in my limited experience.

simonp

  • Omnomnomnipotent.
Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #54 on: May 17, 2018, 10:32:38 am »
I've not done anything this year. I've been busy being beasted down the rowing club. I won't say I'm unfit, but I'm not Audax fit.

That's why I'm riding the Irish Mail 400. I reckon that ought to be sufficient, assuming I can make it round.

Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #55 on: May 17, 2018, 11:01:42 am »
What's the precise, super pedantic meaning of the qualifier date windows? On a previous thread it sounded like they were actually for when organisers should run their events.

From a rider's POV it seems like the goal is simply to complete a BRM SR by the July registration cutoff, which could hypothetically involve other events, especially substituting longer events. Is this correct?

(the wisdom of ignoring the date windows is, of course, another matter)

Planet X Paul

  • The Green Machine
Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #56 on: May 17, 2018, 11:25:42 am »
All interesting reading and 'food' for thought and am considering entering my first PBP.  Talking of food, being a veggie, I'm very concerned whether I would be able to get fed sufficiently well at controls or elsewhere, as France doesn't do veggie. 

Any experience from any other veggie audaxers who have previously done PBP ?

simonp

  • Omnomnomnipotent.
Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #57 on: May 17, 2018, 11:28:24 am »
What's the precise, super pedantic meaning of the qualifier date windows? On a previous thread it sounded like they were actually for when organisers should run their events.

From a rider's POV it seems like the goal is simply to complete a BRM SR by the July registration cutoff, which could hypothetically involve other events, especially substituting longer events. Is this correct?

(the wisdom of ignoring the date windows is, of course, another matter)

You certainly can substitute longer events, so e.g. missing the 300k window you can ride an extra 400k or 600k.


Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #58 on: May 17, 2018, 11:31:49 am »
All interesting reading and 'food' for thought and am considering entering my first PBP.  Talking of food, being a veggie, I'm very concerned whether I would be able to get fed sufficiently well at controls or elsewhere, as France doesn't do veggie. 

Any experience from any other veggie audaxers who have previously done PBP ?

https://youtu.be/0Uz9EUGMaOM?t=162

Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #59 on: May 17, 2018, 11:44:32 am »
Talking of food, being a veggie, I'm very concerned whether I would be able to get fed sufficiently well at controls or elsewhere, as France doesn't do veggie. 

Things are changing slowly around here. Many restaurants will still serve you a fish when you ask for a vegetarian dish, but at least you will (most often) not get the patronizing comments "you should eat a steak, it's good for you" that you would have had 10 years ago.

A

Manotea

  • Where there is doubt...
Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #60 on: May 17, 2018, 12:10:29 pm »
All interesting reading and 'food' for thought and am considering entering my first PBP.  Talking of food, being a veggie, I'm very concerned whether I would be able to get fed sufficiently well at controls or elsewhere, as France doesn't do veggie. 

Any experience from any other veggie audaxers who have previously done PBP ?

Veggies have it easy... try following a keto diet and explaining to cycling event organisers that you don't eat carbs.

It's a bit like being a vegan, only in reverse. Maybe we should buddy-up! :)

Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #61 on: May 17, 2018, 12:48:41 pm »
All interesting reading and 'food' for thought and am considering entering my first PBP.  Talking of food, being a veggie, I'm very concerned whether I would be able to get fed sufficiently well at controls or elsewhere, as France doesn't do veggie. 

Any experience from any other veggie audaxers who have previously done PBP ?

The controls in 2015 were not good for veggie food - I didn't even find a cheese baguette at any of them. So different from LEL!

But it was easy enough to eat outside of the controls - creperies, pizza, boulangeries and the like. A bit of research beforehand about where they are paid off.

Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #62 on: May 17, 2018, 01:26:28 pm »
All interesting reading and 'food' for thought and am considering entering my first PBP.  Talking of food, being a veggie, I'm very concerned whether I would be able to get fed sufficiently well at controls or elsewhere, as France doesn't do veggie. 

Any experience from any other veggie audaxers who have previously done PBP ?

The controls in 2015 were not good for veggie food - I didn't even find a cheese baguette at any of them. So different from LEL!

But it was easy enough to eat outside of the controls - creperies, pizza, boulangeries and the like. A bit of research beforehand about where they are paid off.

In 2015 veggie food at the controls consisted largely of rubber omelettes - though to their credit I did get a ratatouille at Villaines and a fresh omelette at Dreux. Actually the most difficult thing to survive was the lack of tea. A typical request for tea at a control went as follows (at this point I should add that I don't speak French but do speak German and Russian, and I know that the word for tea in French is the same as in German, so begin in that language):

"Tee, bitte."
"Kaffee?"
"No, tea."
"Schokolade?"
"Nyet, chay"
"Potazh?"
"TEE!!!"
"Ah, Tee". At which point I am given an are-you-crazy look and presented with a bowl of lukewarm water containing a bag of Liptons.

The French don't do tea.

Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #63 on: May 17, 2018, 01:44:49 pm »
All interesting reading and 'food' for thought and am considering entering my first PBP.  Talking of food, being a veggie, I'm very concerned whether I would be able to get fed sufficiently well at controls or elsewhere, as France doesn't do veggie. 

Any experience from any other veggie audaxers who have previously done PBP ?

The controls in 2015 were not good for veggie food - I didn't even find a cheese baguette at any of them. So different from LEL!

But it was easy enough to eat outside of the controls - creperies, pizza, boulangeries and the like. A bit of research beforehand about where they are paid off.

In 2015 veggie food at the controls consisted largely of rubber omelettes - though to their credit I did get a ratatouille at Villaines and a fresh omelette at Dreux. Actually the most difficult thing to survive was the lack of tea. A typical request for tea at a control went as follows (at this point I should add that I don't speak French but do speak German and Russian, and I know that the word for tea in French is the same as in German, so begin in that language):

"Tee, bitte."
"Kaffee?"
"No, tea."
"Schokolade?"
"Nyet, chay"
"Potazh?"
"TEE!!!"
"Ah, Tee". At which point I am given an are-you-crazy look and presented with a bowl of lukewarm water containing a bag of Liptons.

The French don't do tea.

that's a lesson learnt for me then. After Loudeac on the way out (ie day one) I gave up trying to find something at the controls.

Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #64 on: May 17, 2018, 02:12:30 pm »
It's fair to say that if you do PBP without learning any French then you're going to encounter a lot more difficulties than people who can speak even a little French.

Being able to ask for hot/just-boiled water in a bowl (that's just how the French do tea) and some cold milk means you can then make your own tea with your own tea bags.

Same goes for being veggie. If you don't know how to ask for various things then you're going to struggle.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

simonp

  • Omnomnomnipotent.
Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #65 on: May 17, 2018, 02:31:38 pm »
Ou est la plume de ma tante?

mattc

  • n.b. have grown beard since photo taken
    • Didcot Audaxes
Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #66 on: May 17, 2018, 03:14:53 pm »
...

But it was easy enough to eat outside of the controls - creperies, pizza, boulangeries and the like. A bit of research beforehand about where they are paid off.
this is true, but folks should bear in mind the night sections (unless you are fast enough to mainly ride in daylight!). Nothing is open in France outside their regular shopping hours, and the route is *not* designed to take in various motorway services :P

Personally, I ate most of my control food at night, and rarely found food elsewhere at night.
Has never ridden RAAM
---------
No.11  Because of the great host of those who dislike the least appearance of "swank " when they travel the roads and lanes. - From Kuklos' 39 Articles

Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #67 on: May 17, 2018, 03:34:53 pm »
Some of these dietary issues could be overcome by having someone follow you round in a motorhome.  :)

Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #68 on: May 17, 2018, 03:45:13 pm »
From memory the only food I got outside of controls was at Tinteniac on the way out where it was all a bit manic and the pub down the road was doing a deal on a beer and baguette and at Sizun where I experienced the locals saying you go to the front of the Queue when it was out the door. I had a Paris Brest and a Baguette with special ham and cheese....I can't say I found any of the food along the way particularly bad but then I think my expectations were never of restaurant quality meals. It was easy to digest and contained energy to keep me going, I'm easily pleased ;D
Enjoying a quiet year

Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #69 on: May 17, 2018, 03:52:53 pm »
Food-wise I didn't have much of an issue, but riding as a vedette last time we got the first opportunity to eat beforehand. I didn't eat all the pre-ride meal, honest, just a bit  :P

Controls seemed to be OK, but there wasn't much in the way of choice. No queues as I was ahead of most other rides but definately little choice for anyone veggie or specialist.

I'd suggest planning ahead where possible and, like I did, carrying enough dried food for emergencies.

simonp

  • Omnomnomnipotent.
Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #70 on: May 17, 2018, 04:14:04 pm »
I think Vedettes makes life a lot easier at the controls. On the return, I used a few of the roadside stalls, and a cafe open all night in Ambrieres-les-Vallees. I was pleasantly surprised to find such a welcome at 4am. I've visited that cafe on 3 PBPs but the first two were full value 90h rides and it was during the day.

Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #71 on: May 17, 2018, 04:23:54 pm »
It's fair to say that if you do PBP without learning any French then you're going to encounter a lot more difficulties than people who can speak even a little French.

Being able to ask for hot/just-boiled water in a bowl (that's just how the French do tea) and some cold milk means you can then make your own tea with your own tea bags.

Same goes for being veggie. If you don't know how to ask for various things then you're going to struggle.

Point taken. I must admit I have something of a blind spot with French - I think it's something to do with the spelling and pronunciation having so little to do with one another. But speaking the three most widely-used languages in Europe and being able to get by in a few others means that I can make myself understood across most of the continent: but somehow not in France.

And I do take my own tea bags. However asking for hot water/heisses Wasser/goryachoy vody etc. causes even more confusion, and ends up with me taking out a tea bag and miming dunking it in something. It still comes lukewarm, though.

Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #72 on: May 17, 2018, 04:53:08 pm »
I think Vedettes makes life a lot easier at the controls. On the return, I used a few of the roadside stalls, and a cafe open all night in Ambrieres-les-Vallees. I was pleasantly surprised to find such a welcome at 4am. I've visited that cafe on 3 PBPs but the first two were full value 90h rides and it was during the day.

The café in Ambrieres-les-Vallees was open on night one as well. I remember a welcome coffee and slice of cake at 4am ish Monday morning.

Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #73 on: May 17, 2018, 04:53:57 pm »
And I do take my own tea bags. However asking for hot water/heisses Wasser/goryachoy vody etc. causes even more confusion, and ends up with me taking out a tea bag and miming dunking it in something. It still comes lukewarm, though.

It was probably the ideal temperature when it started its journey.

The phrase "Café bouillu, café foutu" in Northern France may have something to do with it too.

https://fr.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20081003043427AAMlBxo&guccounter=1
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Paris–Brest–Paris in 2019 – what steps to get there?
« Reply #74 on: May 17, 2018, 04:56:01 pm »
I gave up after the third food stop and just bought it along the route (apart from Dreux on the return by which time most of the field had either already gone through or packed); so pre-paying for food at controls would have just eaten into my riding / sleep time. Plus I'm veggie and the french think that equates to pasta without the sauce.

Plus you get plenty of people by the side of the road either giving away or selling extremely cheap food.

I think you have to pay for the sleep stops at official controls, i never used one as there was a big queue in each

It would be worth every € cent at £500 IMO

(and it may well cost that by that time the way the £ is going!)