Author Topic: Is This The End Of Retail?  (Read 15219 times)

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Is This The End Of Retail?
« Reply #275 on: July 25, 2019, 12:39:54 pm »
Using the place-that-nobody-will-be-too-upset-about-if-an-errant-rocket-blows-up logic, the BRITISH equivalent is surely the Isle of Wight...
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Re: Is This The End Of Retail?
« Reply #276 on: August 05, 2019, 03:21:41 pm »
Not fast & rarely furious

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Woofage

  • Ain't no hooves on my bike.
Re: Is This The End Of Retail?
« Reply #277 on: August 05, 2019, 05:01:05 pm »
They're also predicting in the medium-term a slowdown in e-commerce as at some point consumers will be forced to pay the true costs of delivery; this has to happen at some point because most retailers are not making much money from e-commerce, including - they say - Amazon.

Most (bigger) retailers make a big chunk of margin back on supplier rebates. If the retailer hits a target sales value (from the supplier) they get an end-of-period discount or rebate. Therefore they can afford to sell at very low margins provided they shift enough boxes. A bonus to this strategy is the pushing out of their smaller competitors at the same time.
Pen Pusher

Re: Is This The End Of Retail?
« Reply #278 on: August 10, 2019, 08:36:55 pm »
https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/aug/10/house-of-fraser-year-of-mike-ashley


We don't have one of these in Liverpool.  There are 2 branches of Sports Direct, & Ashley owns a large building in the city centre that used to be a department store (Owen Owens), there was talk of that becoming a HOF, but I can't see it happening.   
Not fast & rarely furious

tweeting occasional in(s)anities as andrewxclark

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: Is This The End Of Retail?
« Reply #279 on: August 12, 2019, 11:00:03 am »
https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak/status/1158371180325343232?s=21


Tesco cutting 4,500 jobs.

The current model of supermarkets (large and small) – where they can pack umpteen different ones within walking/driving distance of each other really depends on them overcharging customers, cutting costs (internal and suppliers), brand loyalty, and taxpayer subsidy. It doesn't seem very sustainable.
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Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Is This The End Of Retail?
« Reply #280 on: August 16, 2019, 10:52:58 pm »
A knight in shining armour!

OK, sorry, I exaggerated, it's a policy. According to this story, Council officials will be running shops... (after they have sorted out having to close public toilets, youth clubs, blah blah.)

OK - instead of this, what needs to be done?

1) Cut rates in town centres
2) Raise rates to sensible levels out of town
3) Ensure that companies that are doing business in this country are paying appropriately levels of tax.

If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Is This The End Of Retail?
« Reply #281 on: August 17, 2019, 11:43:13 am »
Councils running shops sounds pretty daft. Councils enabling community enterprises and small startups to use empty shops presumably free of rent or at very much lower rents sounds sensible, as long as the projects do sensible things and the startups move on to commercial premises as they become established. No, it doesn't help shops but perhaps we have too much shopping.
sideways bounding monkey lounging under fruit tree

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Is This The End Of Retail?
« Reply #282 on: August 17, 2019, 12:19:32 pm »
1) Cut rates in town centres
2) Raise rates to sensible levels out of town
3) Ensure that companies that are doing business in this country are paying appropriately levels of tax.
Perhaps it's not just a retail thing?
Quote
Visitors now prefer to stay in holiday parks out of town rather than the historic, sometimes outdated, guesthouses in the centre, making the resort these days more of a day trip than a summer holiday destination. Which made it even more important, said Plant, that sites built principally as tourist draws were now valued above all by the community.
Once the online holiday becomes a reality – downloading the experience directly into your brain, maybe – this will be The End of Tourism!
sideways bounding monkey lounging under fruit tree

bludger

  • Randonneur and bargain hunter
Re: Is This The End Of Retail?
« Reply #283 on: August 17, 2019, 12:41:21 pm »
For me what would make the high street more attractive to shoppers would be to ban cars and lorries from them, beautify them with hedges and whatnot, make them actually pleasant places to be. My nearest high street is basically a ghastly through road full of constant maintenance work being done on the road surfaces or utilities. It's just not a nice place to be around.
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Re: Is This The End Of Retail?
« Reply #284 on: August 19, 2019, 12:48:52 pm »
Clas Ohlson Now definitely closing their retail sites. Liverpool store has a closing down sale with staggered discounts up to 30%.  Worth a look if you need household/ kitchen stuff or cheapish tools & bike kit.
Not fast & rarely furious

tweeting occasional in(s)anities as andrewxclark

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: Is This The End Of Retail?
« Reply #285 on: August 19, 2019, 01:08:48 pm »
For me what would make the high street more attractive to shoppers would be to ban cars and lorries from them, beautify them with hedges and whatnot, make them actually pleasant places to be. My nearest high street is basically a ghastly through road full of constant maintenance work being done on the road surfaces or utilities. It's just not a nice place to be around.

This, really. Our local high street is in the doldrums (even the Coop and Subway have closed). Parking seems to get a lot of the blame, though I'm unclear who drives to their local high street – surely the point is that it's local. If people get in their cars, they're likely to drive somewhere else. There's no point competing with that, there's never going to be acres of parking and a warehouse full of stock (and even those venues lose out to the internet). Really, you need places that people want to go, that don't replicate what is cheaper and more convenient elsewhere. So, cafes, boutiques, restaurants etc. There's endless studies to back this up, but to be honest, they could just go look at a successful high street and it won't be a main road. That just takes people elsewhere and, if they stop, it'll be lottery tickets and fried chicken, and that's the high street you'll get, punctuated by charity stores. At which point, why go? The ambience of the occasional drunk and the thrill of watching shoplifting teens do a runner? Or an evening out watching underaged kids drink the booze they're bought from the convenience store followed by a kebab?

But nothing in the local development plan challenges that (though they at least acknowledge the principle that building a high street around traffic won't work, while being unwilling to do anything to change that). They won't stop through traffic (there's a bypass anyway) or pedestrianise, and they're adding yet another supermarket, so basically it's a slip road to the weekly shop, and even less reason to hang around.

At least we can just get the train into London, which is shame, we'd like to do more stuff locally.
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