Author Topic: Coping with the heat  (Read 1844 times)

AK

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Coping with the heat
« on: July 02, 2018, 09:41:16 pm »
So my first 600 this weekend and it's set to be a very hot one. Other than the usual things to keep on top of eating and drinking and not going too fast, anyone got any advice for riding for a long time in the heat? Factor 50 sun cream also packed.  :thumbsup:

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2018, 09:43:45 pm »
So my first 600 this weekend and it's set to be a very hot one. Other than the usual things to keep on top of eating and drinking and not going too fast, anyone got any advice for riding for a long time in the heat? Factor 50 sun cream also packed.  :thumbsup:
Factor 50 is King. Stay hydrated.

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2018, 09:52:46 pm »
Wear a HRM. An early indicator for me that I need to cool off is if on a descent, my HR doesn't recover as well as it ought to.

So, let's say I climb a hill and my HR is 170. If it's still 160 a few minutes into the descent, I'm overheating and need a 10 minute sit under a tree - and I might send my stoker off to find Gelato. Normally, after a climb my HR will be back to 130 within a minute of descending.

Also - use two Bidons, one with water, the other with plain electrolyte (no calories). Drink lots.

Feanor

  • It's mostly downhill from here.
Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2018, 09:56:24 pm »
For hydration, I tend to use something that's replenishing your electrolytes like nuun tablets or similar, not just fresh water, because you will be sweating out all those salts.
I tend to dilute these rather more than most people, because I find them a bit much at full concentration.
If I'm carrying two filled bottles ( eg if there's a long stage between stops ), then I'll usually take one with nuun, and one of plain water.
YMMV!

ETA: Like wot he said ^^


Zed43

  • prefers UK hills over Dutch mountains
Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2018, 09:58:11 pm »
Consider a nap in the afternoon and riding through the night. Wearing a buff soaked in water can be nice. And I tend to feast on ice cream :)

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2018, 09:59:48 pm »
Very difficult.

It is said that it takes time to acclimate to high temperatures so for sudden increases such as Britain is now experiencing the change is hard to adjust for. The temperatures where I am have been in the 90's for the past 6 - 8 weeks (as I type this it is 98) so there has been an opportunity to gradually get used to it, but copious quantities of fluid with electrolytes, salt stick capsules, ice in the helmet if you can find it all helps. But if the conditions allow you to ride later, earlier, night time, then take it - not possible of course on an organised ride, but maybe they can change the time to start?

Expect and allow the ride to take longer than usual and find shade whenever possible. I'm going to say something which will create horror in many minds, but I have found of late that rising sans helmet helps. Helmets can be very hot and a typical mesh peloton cap works best in keeping the sun off the face and cooling the head.

Most important of all, my advice will be to listen to you body and if you are heating up and unable to keep cool, go home and live to ride another day.

For me, I'm just riding pops (100K's) until the weather behaves itself.  I cannot ride in the heat any longer so I'm dialing back until the autumn.

CrazyEnglishTriathlete

  • Miles eaten don't satisfy hunger
  • 3x Brimstone ancien 3x Pendle/Tan Hill DNF
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Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2018, 10:00:46 pm »
IMHO heat is a matter of acclimatisation, just like altitude.  The more often and longer you ride in the heat the better able you will be able to cope with it.  Sadly that's not much help for a 600 just coming up.  Preparing for the Mille Miglia  in 2010 (Italy, August, bound to be hot), I tried to organise as many of my training rides as possible to be in the heat, and involving as many hills as possible, as those are the crunch points.  Aided by a hot summer I was reasonably well prepared for the actual event.

There's a few other tips that might have short term benefit. 

Take your cycling shoes off at every control and massage the feet.  That should reduce sweating and tension that can cause the contact points in the feet to become very painful.  Ditto the helmet.  If it's really hot (as it was one day on the Mille Miglia, I soaked my helmet and put it on my head, which gave some short term relief but not sure about the longer term benefits.

Part of coping with heat is mental just like coping with a persistent headwind.  You can't do anything about it but if you let it get to you it will be twice as hard. 

If you can cope with electrolyte drinks then make sure you drink these as much as water or other liquids.  I find that they upset my stomach, so I try to make sure I add salt to meals and have salty snacks (salt & vinegar crips, pork pies, and ham and cheese toasties all help)

Always stop in the shade, especially if you can find a bit of breeze.  Avoid sitting in the sun at controls.

I considered trying to sleep for a bit during the day and riding longer at night but that just doesn't work for me. 

There is a positive.  With the current night temperatures being so high, you can wear less clothes at night and your legs are likely to keep warm, which should mean you don't slow down as much at night as you otherwise would.

Reapply sunscreen on the second morning.  You'll probably sweat or rub off the previous day's application, even if you don't have a control with a shower.

Enjoy.  It's probably better to be a bit hot for a few hours than shivering cold for a lot more.
Eddington Numbers 120 (imperial), 165 (metric) 510 (furlongs)

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #7 on: July 02, 2018, 10:09:14 pm »
Trad cotton cap.  Pubs are good for pints of orange and soda or similar. 

Keep one bottle plain water, whatever potions you put in the other.

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #8 on: July 02, 2018, 10:12:04 pm »
Start hydrating now.

Dont eat big meals during ride.

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #9 on: July 02, 2018, 10:19:31 pm »
Keep an eye on how often you are peeing and the colour when you do. Increase / decrease rate of drinking as necessary.

I do not get on with electrolyte stuff in my drinks. I carry salted peanuts, crisps and other salty stuff to keep on top of that.

Cap soaked in water when you get a chance. Easier when you pass rivers at reasonable intervals.

Stop at pubs have a pint of lemonade or something with a pack of salted peanuts and get bottles refilled. Sit in shade for a bit. Get some ice cubes whilst there,  stick in ziplock bag under cap.

Seen riders with white arm (coolers?) not sure how effective.

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #10 on: July 02, 2018, 10:27:40 pm »
Don't be afraid to dive into airconditioned premises for short periods and scoff ice creams. Ice in bidons encourages drinking more than body temperature water does.

Salty food is good but keep meals small.

Keep it steady on climbs, particularly if you are bigger than average. Surface area to volume ratio makes heat loss more difficult for big folk.

Don't get sunburnt.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #11 on: July 02, 2018, 10:28:00 pm »
Keep an eye on how often you are peeing and the colour when you do. Increase / decrease rate of drinking as necessary.

I dunno about this one. I pee something akin to Golden Syrup on a 200, whatever the weather, and however much I drink. The fact that you're peeing is enough I think. If you haven't peed since you got up in the morning, and it's mid-afternoon, you probably need to drink more.

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #12 on: July 02, 2018, 10:30:30 pm »
Depending on what kind of 600 it is, how remote the ride gets etc, I'd have thought one of the main issues is where you can refill your bottles more than anything. keep your eyes open for opportunities. I'd easy get through a couple of liters of fluid in conditions like this, but then it may not be quite so easy to get replacements when you need them. But then, I'm in no fit state to do a 600 in this weather, so that wouldn't be a good idea in the first place!

Lucky you though. Hope the ride goes well.
Garry Broad

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #13 on: July 02, 2018, 10:30:42 pm »
Now trying to picture pee flowing like golden syrup.

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #14 on: July 02, 2018, 10:31:43 pm »
Now trying to picture pee flowing like golden syrup.

It needs patience  O:-)

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #15 on: July 02, 2018, 10:39:16 pm »
Now trying NOT to imagine pee flowing like golden syrup!! Sounds painful!

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #16 on: July 02, 2018, 10:51:53 pm »
I find a wet hankerchief/bandana round he neck helps as it cools the blood supply to/from your brain.
Reine de la Fauche


Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #17 on: July 02, 2018, 10:54:53 pm »
Don't hesitate to abandon if things get ropey. Heat kills. Hydration and the right balance of minerals in your blood isn't a 'nice to have' it's a fundamental of life, your health isn't worth putting on the line for a bike ride.

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #18 on: July 02, 2018, 11:28:33 pm »
Keep an eye on how often you are peeing and the colour when you do. Increase / decrease rate of drinking as necessary.

I dunno about this one. I pee something akin to Golden Syrup on a 200, whatever the weather, and however much I drink. The fact that you're peeing is enough I think. If you haven't peed since you got up in the morning, and it's mid-afternoon, you probably need to drink more.
i often don't even pee on a 200, i did the meridian hills perm some weeks back, 5 litres went in, nothing came out except through the skin.
   E = 73  SR = 1

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #19 on: July 02, 2018, 11:51:17 pm »
Keep at least one bidon filled with plain water. Sponge yourself or wet clothing if you need to cool down. Make sure you LIKE your drinks. You won't drink enough if swallowing them is a chore.

Refill your bottles at every opportunity so you don't run out if you find a control without potable cold water. (This HAS happened to me a long long time ago.)

Try not to push to hard to reduce excess sweating.

If you wear a helmet, remove it as soon as you get off the bike.

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #20 on: July 03, 2018, 07:25:05 am »
I dunno about this one. I pee something akin to Golden Syrup on a 200, whatever the weather, and however much I drink.

Darkest I've had was at the halfway point of The Midlander Super Grimpeur in 2009. Really got my hydration wrong on that one. It was approaching the colour of cola. Ugh.

And I still managed to screw up hydration on the next section ("Shall I stop at this shop in Glossop to fill up my bottles? Nah, I'll stop at the next one", oh). I think I had to drink about 5 pints of water at the pub in Longnor.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

AK

    • Bloggy blog
Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #21 on: July 03, 2018, 07:52:16 am »
Thanks all, for your replies  :thumbsup:

I’m pretty sorted with what I can tolerate eating / drinking wise. Happy to drink weak nuun and water. Good advice regarding salt intake, something I can be prone to forgetting. Will let you know how it goes.

Zed43

  • prefers UK hills over Dutch mountains
Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #22 on: July 03, 2018, 08:12:10 am »
Is salt enough when you're drinking a lot (5-6 litres on a day) or do you need other elements as well?

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #23 on: July 03, 2018, 08:30:05 am »
Late afternoon on Saturday (having been on the bike since before dawn) I started to suffer a really weird visual effect - a bit like going from widescreen to narrowscreen, able to see reasonably clearly in front but my peripheral vision was increasingly dark - like black bars at the edge of my visual field. I reasoned that this was probably either heat exhaustion or dehydration so stopped and downed a bottle each of coke and water and rested for half an hour (I was fine after that).

Any medics able to comment on whether that kind of visual effect is a symptom of either heat exhaustion or dehydration?

TIA
R10000 x 1   RRtY x 6    SR x 7    E = 126

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #24 on: July 03, 2018, 08:52:26 am »
Is salt enough when you're drinking a lot (5-6 litres on a day) or do you need other elements as well?

Electrolyte tablets contain a variety of salts.

The High-5 Zero electrolyte tube I have in front of me lists: Vitamin C, Magnesium, Sodium, Potassium, Calcium and Green Tea.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."