Author Topic: Coping with the heat  (Read 1858 times)

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #25 on: July 03, 2018, 09:27:01 am »
Is salt enough when you're drinking a lot (5-6 litres on a day) or do you need other elements as well?

Proper food should be fine.

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #26 on: July 03, 2018, 09:41:27 am »
I dunno about this one. I pee something akin to Golden Syrup on a 200, whatever the weather, and however much I drink.

Darkest I've had was at the halfway point of The Midlander Super Grimpeur in 2009. Really got my hydration wrong on that one. It was approaching the colour of cola. Ugh.

And I still managed to screw up hydration on the next section ("Shall I stop at this shop in Glossop to fill up my bottles? Nah, I'll stop at the next one", oh). I think I had to drink about 5 pints of water at the pub in Longnor.
Whilst being entertained by simonp doing pushups on the pub floor, if I recall.

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AK

    • Bloggy blog
Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #27 on: July 03, 2018, 10:29:31 am »
Is salt enough when you're drinking a lot (5-6 litres on a day) or do you need other elements as well?

Proper food should be fine.

Yes, I hate gels, energy bars and the like. Give me a decent scotch egg, pastie or all day breakfast sarnie, anytime. The helmet thing could be an issue. I always wear a helmet but don't often wear a cap. I'm thinking I'm probably going to wear both as I can see keeping the sun off my head needs a bit of control. I'm usually pretty good in the heat and listen to my body but being out ALL day, all night and then for a chunk of the next morning has got me thinking about this a lot more carefully, than I would normally. I can be the 'press-on regardless' type so the advice about stopping more regularly and taking advantage of pubs and shops etc will be heeded. It's the Buzzard, an X event so no manned controls and I think that this fact has got me thinking about it a bit more carefully.

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #28 on: July 03, 2018, 10:46:54 am »
I always wear a bandana or cap. Firstly because my helmet liner is getting a bit flakey but also for added sun protection and keeps sweat from my eyes. And as a big plus when you come to a stop you can soak your cap/rag in chilled water for extra cranial cooling.

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #29 on: July 03, 2018, 10:57:09 am »
I dunno about this one. I pee something akin to Golden Syrup on a 200, whatever the weather, and however much I drink.

Darkest I've had was at the halfway point of The Midlander Super Grimpeur in 2009. Really got my hydration wrong on that one. It was approaching the colour of cola. Ugh.

And I still managed to screw up hydration on the next section ("Shall I stop at this shop in Glossop to fill up my bottles? Nah, I'll stop at the next one", oh). I think I had to drink about 5 pints of water at the pub in Longnor.
Whilst being entertained by simonp doing pushups on the pub floor, if I recall.

ITB stretches...
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Roy

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #30 on: July 03, 2018, 12:17:48 pm »
A pharmacist friend suggested Dirolyte or similar in the bidon. Have n't tried it yet. As for queer visual effects, while riding a 100 mile t.t. some years ago I was approching a feeding station and saw what looked like a dwarf with a very long arm waving a seed tray. It was in fact a race marshall waiting to hand up a sponge. I suppose this was from the effects of my fatigue coupled with the distortion caused by the heat rising from the road surface.

Bobby

  • Previously called "Can't Climb"
Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #31 on: July 03, 2018, 12:36:13 pm »
How do I cope?  I bailed after 240km at the weekend, 30degrees was killing me.

On reflection:
  • I should have rested in aircon, not just in the shade
  • I should have consumed colder food more - milkshake, ice cream etc when stopped to help cool me down from the inside
  • I shouldnt have fallen asleep in the sun!  :facepalm: :facepalm:

Good luck!

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #32 on: July 03, 2018, 12:38:35 pm »
Some good tips.  In hot conditions, I've being finding plain, warm water from the bottle fairly unpalatable, especially when my digestive system may be going on strike (not quite worked this one out yet).  So may try one plain & one electrolyte, and take some spare electrol. tabs to pop into water from purchased bottles of cold spring water when needed.  I have resorted to cold Cola sometimes, but I fear this is not the best idea.   I used to wear a wide brim hat when touring in hot weather, but these days cope with a helmet. However having fair skin and the need to douse in SPF50, direct hot sun, just gets too much and I need to stop, sit in the shade to cool off.  Crisps go down quite well for me, if I start craving something salty with water...

edit. if it's going to be too hot, probably a DNS for me.
"an inordinate fondness for beetles"

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #33 on: July 03, 2018, 01:22:45 pm »
Think these will have been covered by now:

Have had some very hot days (by scottish standards) this year on the bike; Tour of the highlands sportives days 1, 2 and finally 3 was insane.
Also the snow Roads.

TOTH's organizer lives in Australia for half the year and some of my colleagues (and some of my relatives to but I dont' speak to them) have lived in South Africa so picked up some ideas from them.

Factor 50+ Suncream, and layer it on, make sure you can see it; not only will it help prevent burning it's placing moisture on the skin which will assist cooling.
You can pick up a flight sized bottle at most chemists now and refill it from a proper sized bottle when you get home. So easy enough to carry in a back pocket or bag.

Hat/Cap, and soak it; I did hear some bemusement when I tipped the remains of a 2L bottle of water over my head at dufftown; the best feeling I've ever had was when climbing Errochty (TOTH) I got a bottle of water dumped on me, and the cooling effect lasted until I'd dried off; the wet hat and beard really helped on that Dufftown to Tomintoul stretch.
I considered carrying a buff for the same purpose on the snow roads for the same process; also contemptlated dumping my baselayer or jersey in a burn too but decided that probably wouldn't dry off enough for the chilly descent into Angus (much cooler as the sea breeze isn't blocked by the mounth)

Facial Hair: not sure about this one; went into the snowroads with a scraggly beard, holds moisture better than skin (you'll just sweat off the suncream but most pictures show the sun cream hanging on to hair) so like the hat/cap the suncream on the hairs may have helped with "desert cooling".

Though desert cooling fails when the humidity of the air is higher than that of the moisture screen it's being forced though.


Also, stop when you can, find shade at those stops; I wouldn't have got back to Kirrie on the bike if I hadn't stopped at both Rhynie and Tomintoul; one is on route the other slightly off so research slightly off route locations for shops and pubs as well; also remember get the bottle of water and food first then grab the ice cream from the freezer...
If done in the same transaction, eat the ice cream first.

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #34 on: July 03, 2018, 01:57:35 pm »
I live in a semi-desert and regularly ride in temps over 90degF in summer.
Yes, acclimatization definitely helps, but regardless
* Drink lots, obviously. That you are drinking lots is much more important than what you are drinking lots of, but avoid alcohol and caffeine. Many folks around here like the Camelbak types of reservoir because they make drinking regularly so easy.
* Cover up. Don't be frugal with the sunscreen. A high factor sunscreen, in addition to protecting your skin, will help you feel cooler.
* You can get enough salt if you just eat plenty of salty snacks, but there's no harm in supplements, either. I habitually take an Enduralyte capsule every couple of hours and unscientifically believe it probably helps.
* Wetting head and body certainly feels good and probably helps if you're already over-heating but it's not a preventative because in high temps it's impossible to stay wet. Better to concentrate on hydration. Having said that, I wear a bandana under my helmet and wet it when spare water is available.
* Learn the signs of heat stroke in yourself and others. It's potentially life alteringly dangerous. Confusion, nausea, shivering, lack of sweat, uncontrollable rapid and shallow breathing, pulse that won't drop, all-over red flush - any of these can be a danger sign. Get to a cool place, drink small sips continually and get urgent medical help if symptoms don't improve very quickly.


hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #35 on: July 03, 2018, 02:46:45 pm »
If you have the time and opportunity, you can 'dump' a lot of heat by putting extremities in a basin of cool water for around ten minutes.

Enjoy an ice cream, when available, at any time.

ETA McFlurrys are recommended on another thread here.

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #36 on: July 03, 2018, 05:11:42 pm »
It's also amazing how much you do have to drink to stay hydrated.

I did a 4h ride yesterday (10.15am to 2.15pm) in temps that reached 31 deg C.

I drank 4L of liquids on the way round (squash, plain water, electrolyte mix, lucozade sport, cola) and I still came home 3kg lighter than when I set out.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #37 on: July 03, 2018, 06:32:24 pm »
That's true if you are only relying on perspiration to cool your body.

Reducing heat stress and sweating will drop the need for huge volumes of water and the electrolytes that accompany them.

I'm a hefty sweater and did some rides in heat similar to recent conditions but never went through HUGE amounts of water.

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #38 on: July 03, 2018, 06:54:53 pm »
Organiser's ride tomorrow.  Looks like a headwind all the way round, and too warm on Thursday.

mmmmartin

  • BPB 1/1: PBP 0/1
    • FNRttC
Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #39 on: July 03, 2018, 06:57:00 pm »
On the first day of the Acme Grand I started with two litres of water then drank two litres at each of the five controls to Tewkesbury. Had half an Isostar tablet in each bottle.
At the bus shelter sleep, I woke twice with terrible cramps in my legs, worst it's ever been. Don't normally get cramps.
That was a hard ride.
Well, the first third was, I can't really comment on the rest of it....
Besides, it wouldn't be audacious if success were guaranteed.

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #40 on: July 03, 2018, 07:03:02 pm »
A head covering is better than no head covering, as long as it is white. Get a white helmet if you wear one.

<i>Marmite slave</i>

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #41 on: July 03, 2018, 07:35:17 pm »
I live in a semi-desert and regularly ride in temps over 90degF in summer.
Yes, acclimatization definitely helps, but regardless

* Wetting head and body certainly feels good and probably helps if you're already over-heating but it's not a preventative because in high temps it's impossible to stay wet. Better to concentrate on hydration. Having said that, I wear a bandana under my helmet and wet it when spare water is available.
* Learn the signs of heat stroke in yourself and others. It's potentially life alteringly dangerous. Confusion, nausea, shivering, lack of sweat, uncontrollable rapid and shallow breathing, pulse that won't drop, all-over red flush - any of these can be a danger sign. Get to a cool place, drink small sips continually and get urgent medical help if symptoms don't improve very quickly.
I don't live in a semi-desert and, like most, am not acclimatised.
Wetting head and body not only feels good, it IS good and acts to increase heat loss from the body thus cooling it. Why is it "impossible to stay wet"? Drink a bit but use water to keep your body wet. Doubles the heat loss rate. Assumes readily available water resupply.
I'm not a medic but have had to deal with my fair share of overheating (short of heatstroke) bodies engaged in hard, sustained exercise. At that stage use the water to cool (ie pour over body) - dehydration is likely to be the less threatening hazard (assuming subject has been drinking up till then). Then use more water: in a normally temperate climate like UK, streams are often accessible.
Offering an anecdote - after 4 hours hard running (the body loses heat when cycling at a much higher rate than when running) in the heat of the day (31 mile Scafell Pike stage of Three Peaks Yacht Race) having been drinking well, my heart rate suddenly elevated, without any increase in pace along a flat road (alongside Wastwater). Next water stop the water went over my body with just a sip to drink. HR immediately dropped 35 beats (to 145). I had started to overheat. Finished the run in good time (at or near the lower HR), repeating dousing with coolish water every quarter hour. Made the tide.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #42 on: July 03, 2018, 07:43:51 pm »
I suspect 100ml of water applied to clothing can cool someone better than drinking it.

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #43 on: July 03, 2018, 07:46:43 pm »
Why is it "impossible to stay wet"? .... Assumes readily available water resupply.

You answer your own question.

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #44 on: July 03, 2018, 07:48:59 pm »
I suspect 100ml of water applied to clothing can cool someone better than drinking it.

Depends how much further they have to ride before the next available water.

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #45 on: July 03, 2018, 07:58:49 pm »
Also non-potable water is often far easier to find than potable water.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #46 on: July 03, 2018, 08:04:19 pm »
Why is it "impossible to stay wet"? .... Assumes readily available water resupply.

You answer your own question.

In terms of the event in question, you're never far from civilization.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #47 on: July 03, 2018, 10:48:41 pm »
Also non-potable water is often far easier to find than potable water.

I keep a couple of strips of puritabs in my top tube bag, in case I come across water of doubtful quality, but am in need of the water. When touring I carry a water filter as well.

At the weekend I did a 100km DIY in 24°C sunshine. I went though 4l of water on that ride. The previous weekend, in the first 275km (before I bailed), of a 600, I went through over 5L before I lost count.

I am a fan of freezing my bottles before a ride, so that they defrost over the course of the ride. Also adding ice cubes if refilling at pubs/bars is nice.

If in doubt drink...

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #48 on: July 03, 2018, 10:59:13 pm »
I am a big fan of a wet flannel...

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: Coping with the heat
« Reply #49 on: July 03, 2018, 11:06:18 pm »
I'm a big fan of not riding my bike when it's oppressively hot.  (I know, I'm a rubbish audaxer.)  It's sometimes necessary, but I never enjoy it.  Better to skew towards the morning or (preferable for lower pollen levels) evening where possible.  Just avoiding the couple of hours around astronomical noon makes a big difference, if only because the available shade is better.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...