Author Topic: Anglepoise refurbishment  (Read 1899 times)

Tim Hall

  • I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes
Anglepoise refurbishment
« on: July 06, 2018, 05:10:31 pm »
Amongst the stuffs in Dad's house is an original-with-cloth-covered-flex Anglepoise 1227.  It's a bit battered, there are paint splashes on the formerly black shade, the lamp holder has been replaced with a white one from a DIY shed and it's fitted with a CFL lamp.

It's lovely. I'd like to do some gentle restoration. Should I get some black spray paint in a can and give the shade a quick blast, or try to clean it?  Replace the lampholder with a black one for sure and I guess source a GLS shaped lamp of some sort. Apparently CFL lamps are often too heavy for the springs, causing droopage. 
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

Re: Anglepoise refurbishment
« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2018, 07:05:42 pm »
Collectors item. Deffo.
I have some Anglepoise nut-and-bolt-ery, sitting in a drawer.
If you need it.

ETA - I'd get the shade shot / bead blasted, before having it stove enamelled.
LED blubs are the future....

Re: Anglepoise refurbishment
« Reply #2 on: July 06, 2018, 07:15:25 pm »
Collectors item. Deffo.
I have some Anglepoise nut-and-bolt-ery, sitting in a drawer.
If you need it.

ETA - I'd get the shade shot / bead blasted, before having it stove enamelled.
LED blubs are the future....
Or leave it as it is. Just do the necessary to keep it in safe working order.
It sounds like it has character / war wounds / tells a story etc....
Which, at least to me, is an attraction in itself.
There's a sense that you'd be erasing that history by restoring it to what it was like when it was new.
Just my 2p's worth...

Re: Anglepoise refurbishment
« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2018, 08:57:26 pm »
yup. CFls are too heavy right enough. A carefully chosen LED bulb will be a better weight for the springs, and will work well enough to boot.

The cloth-covered wiring can look tatty and still be OK provided the rubber inside is alright. However it can also look OK and be dangerous if the rubber inside is not OK. The rubber tends to fail wherever it gets hot, e.g. near the lampholder. Sometimes it is possible to shorten the wires near the lampholder and pull the wires through a bit more, leaving the exposed wires at the hinges etc all from previously protected and hidden wiring that ought to be in pretty good shape.

Needless to say if you have a functional earth wire and/or a RCD connected, you are unlikely to kill yourself with it.

 I think you can get a brass bulbholder  that will fit easily enough too.

I agree that patina is worth preserving; one that looks used but cared for is so much more characterful than one that looks factory fresh.

cheers

Re: Anglepoise refurbishment
« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2018, 09:18:14 pm »
With the internets, it's now easy to find replacement fabric covered flex, for e.g. https://www.lampsandlights.co.uk/lighting-flex-and-holders.php. I would definitely replace it if it's old enough to be actual rubber inside.
Quote from: tiermat
that's not science, it's semantics.

Tim Hall

  • I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes
Re: Anglepoise refurbishment
« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2018, 10:03:52 pm »
Useful posts everyone, thanks. I'll probably replace the flex with new cloth covered then. I don't recall the original lampholder being brass, so will do a bit more research on that.
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

Re: Anglepoise refurbishment
« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2018, 12:59:21 pm »
re lampholders; there were many variations (which I am no expert on) but IIRC one of the most common types was this



which I think was made by crabtree. Brass (or brassed) lampholders might be a bit more robust and they usually have a an earth wire fitting which you might want to retain/use.


Note that at a certain date the anglepoise lamp became 'double insulated' i.e. it was wired with twin core flex throughout. However prior to that some models were wired with three-core (plaited) flex and the earth wire was sometimes connected at the base, e.g. using an eyelet onto a fastening there.
or



 Two of the three wires would then run to the top of the lamp. Obviously this arrangement is only satisfactory (i.e. safe) if all the pivots and bushings in the construction are able to conduct electricity, which in the case of later lamps was certainly not the case. I thnk there are 1227 models of both double insulated and earthed varieties. I think that it may haven been OK at one point to have a twin wire system with a metal cases bulb holder but that it isn't now. This page
http://www.relightlamps.com/home/anglepoise-1227-lamp-electrical-safety-uk-earthing-laws/
has some info.


This page
https://artdecolightingcompany.co.uk/products/1227-75-or-9-a-basic-guide-to-identify-your-anglepoise-lamp-model-item-1032has some info and examples of the 1227 variations. This may or may not be comprehensive.

This website has some more info
https://twelvetwentyseven.wordpress.com/history/

cheers



Re: Anglepoise refurbishment
« Reply #7 on: July 07, 2018, 01:34:48 pm »
FWIW I just checked my own lamps and I have two 1227 examples; an early two-step (with metal bushings and spring mounts) and a later two-step (with more plastic parts, similar to the white one pictured above). Both are fitted with earth wires and metal lamp-holders.

cheers

Re: Anglepoise refurbishment
« Reply #8 on: July 07, 2018, 01:58:12 pm »
Much as I admire Carwardine's design, I prefer Richard Sapper's modern day version (if, at 46 years old,it can be regarded as modern day).
I'm on my second one of these.
The first was destroyed a couple of years ago because darkness+flex+trip.
The replacement's flex has been re-routed and the lamp is operated via a remote R/C switch, mounted on the edge of my bed.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Anglepoise refurbishment
« Reply #9 on: July 07, 2018, 02:16:12 pm »
A carefully chosen LED bulb will be a better weight for the springs, and will work well enough to boot.

I've had some nice LED lamps from Wilko:  They're the newfangled filament type (several thin strips of dozens of COB LEDs in series, arranged in a vintage filament lamp style - as seen in your local hipster coffee emporium), warm-white, and here's the cunning bit - in a standard pearl style glass envelope.  Impressively, they've managed to get the electronics right[1] (in spite of cramming it all into a bayonet cap), and there's no measurable flicker.  The overall effect is so close to a genuine 60W tungsten lamp that the most obvious difference is the amount of heat not produced.  Sounds like an ideal candidate, assuming you don't want to dim it.



[1] Normally these filament lamps have no smoothing at all, and strobe harshly at 100Hz - the high series voltage of the filaments means that the duty cycle is particularly obnoxious compared to traditional LED lamps with no smoothing.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Re: Anglepoise refurbishment
« Reply #10 on: July 07, 2018, 03:39:12 pm »
I just checked this page (and neighbouring ones)
https://artdecolightingcompany.co.uk/collections/herbert-terry-anglepoise-restoration-spare-parts?page=3

and you can see all kinds of interesting parts for potential refurbishments, and (perhaps importantly) it shows what the correct parts look like in many cases. However none of the bulb holders they have look identical to the (original) ones fitted to my 1227 lamps.

cheers

Re: Anglepoise refurbishment
« Reply #11 on: July 07, 2018, 05:30:41 pm »
This is a very useful thread. I have a very old one which was my Aunt's, it must be 60+ years old.
Thanks for the links, I'm going to refurbish it.

Re: Anglepoise refurbishment
« Reply #12 on: July 07, 2018, 06:21:14 pm »
There isn't a single page on the interweb that shows the basic differences between various anglepoise models. In lieu of this here is a potted guide

Equipoise lamp



ancestor of the anglepoise, with four springs, branded 'Cardine'. Terry made revised versions of this design which were known as 1208 and 1209 'anglepoise' models. An easy distinction between them are the brackets, which are quite different in the Terry versions. Most (but not all) of these lights have long arms and were most commonly found in industrial settings e.g. attached to lathes and in drawing offices etc. These models remained in production long after the 1227 model was introduced.


First three spring model (three step base) 1227 anglepoise



which (amongst other things) attracts far less dust than the four-spring models. The three springs are more nearly coilbound more of the time, have caps at the top end, and are mounted nearly vertically; all these things mean that they don't so quickly get covered in whatever crud is flying about the place and the whole thing is easier to clean.

This was replaced by a slightly simpler 1227 two-step base model (which shares hardly any parts BTW) which is far more commonly found than the three-step model.



The one above is from the 1960s and has a plastic hinge link as well as a (more easily dented) rimless shade.

and then the '75' model (~1969)



which is easily identified by the rocker switch in the shade. Then came the '90' model

which was like the 75 but used a few simpler/cheaper made parts and used a push-botton switch instead of the rocker. The push-button switch allowed a simpler one-piece shade to be used. Other simplified parts included capless springs and pressed steel fork connecting to the base.

and finally the '90 apex' model


which IMHO is the runt of the litter; there are too many plastic parts at the most highly stressed parts of the arm; these lamps break too often.

There were innumerable variations on these basic designs with long arms, short arms, different bases/brackets/stands, different materials and finishes. Probably enough variation to be able to write a good-sized book about it. There are also reissues of older lamp designs; however with the exception of the 'giant 1227' model you are buying a Chinese-made lamp these days if you buy new (or new-ish).

I got a model 90 as a birthday present in the 1970s and despite its obvious quality and brilliant design (I think it was an exhibit in the design centre London at the time) I think it cost less than fifteen quid. They had made parts of this light cheaper than the previous 75 model but the only part of mine that failed was the star washer holding the base on. I have used this lamp every day for about forty years and it is still good! The '90 apex' model afterwards was made a lot cheaper and these are so horrible I won't have one in the house.

I also have a model 75 (weirdly on a two-step base) and a couple of two-step 1227s. 

cheers


Re: Anglepoise refurbishment
« Reply #13 on: July 08, 2018, 10:24:14 pm »
also worth a mention are Hadrill & Horstmann 'counterpoise' lamps (made in Godalming I think) which used a single counterweight coupled with an articulated arm. Early models used a simpler counterbalance and then a 'U' shaped fork at the base with an articulated  weight sat in the 'U'. Later models used what is sometimes called a 'C-fork' which allowed a simpler lower arm;



Note that counterbalance (rather than spring balance) lamps like this can often use a smaller base (or exert lower bending loads on any bracket) because the centre of mass of the whole lamp remains central over the swivel at all times. This design with an articulated upper arm connected to a single articulated weight also allows a lightweight upper structure, like the anglepoise.

cheers

Re: Anglepoise refurbishment
« Reply #14 on: March 12, 2019, 12:46:21 am »
A fellow forum member just asked me about the long bolt in the lower pivot of an anglepoise 1227 and I thought it may be of use to others, so here is the information;

I measured the bolt from the nearest one to hand (which was a mid-production 1227 with a rimmed shade, two step base and metal lower linkage) and the bolt is as follows;

- 59mm long (shank plus screw thread)
- small plain head
- 5/32" plain shank, 49.6mm long, stepping down to a smaller screw thread
- ~ 10mm long screw thread which is some species of 1/8" dia thread, ~0.6mm pitch
- both bolt and knurled nut are made of brass. The bolt is nicely plated.

My best guesstimate for the screw thread is 1/8" x 40tpi BSW.

The bolt in the later 1227 version (rimless shade, plastic T links in lower pivot) looks the same to me but I have not measured one to confirm.  [That you can buy a kit of metal parts to upgrade from the plastic links suggests that it is the same too.]

The bolt is rather special, and is constructed so that the arms all pivot on a plain shank and therefore don't wear very fast; the arms are soft aluminium and would wear fast if they bore against a screw thread.

5/32" is very slightly smaller than 4mm but I suspect that a 4mm pin will work OK.

You can buy the knurled nut new, but at a price (nearly ten quid....). I have no idea where to get the special bolt from.


Failing being able to get the special bolt I would suggest getting a ~70mm  length of brass rod (4mm or 5/32" dia) and cutting an M4  screw thread ~ 10mm long on each end so that you are left with a 50mm long plain shank. Then I'd use fibre washers as packing and M4 Nylock nuts either end. This would mean you would have to forego the fingertip adjustment, but this isn't required that often anyway, so it is no great loss.

 cheers