Author Topic: Help with Component Terminology  (Read 1358 times)

Help with Component Terminology
« on: August 30, 2018, 12:39:34 pm »
... those spring-loaded cages / holding devices on traditional-style luggage carriers. What do you call them? Do they have an 'official' name?

TIA

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Help with Component Terminology
« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2018, 01:02:20 pm »
Pletscher call it a 'clamp' but that is a bit ambiguous IMHO. I tend to call it a 'sprung bracket' but I don't like that term either.
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Re: Help with Component Terminology
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2018, 01:13:44 pm »
Sprung luggage retainer?

Re: Help with Component Terminology
« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2018, 01:19:05 pm »
Spring clamp.

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: Help with Component Terminology
« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2018, 10:56:39 pm »
Finger-gnasher.
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Basil

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Re: Help with Component Terminology
« Reply #5 on: August 30, 2018, 11:25:48 pm »
Lunch masher.
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Re: Help with Component Terminology
« Reply #6 on: August 31, 2018, 09:20:18 am »
I don’t know what they are called, but I used to wonder if they were good for anything other than holding wedges of cheese (up to a quarter of a round).
Or a newspaper.
L'enfer, c'est les autos.

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: Help with Component Terminology
« Reply #7 on: August 31, 2018, 11:57:28 am »
I was wondering last night whether I'd ever seen anyone actually use one to carry things, rather than to inflict minor injuries on themselves.  I think the closest I've come was attempting to make them restrain a bike lock, before giving up as a waste of time.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Re: Help with Component Terminology
« Reply #8 on: August 31, 2018, 12:10:46 pm »
Still use them to immobilize big or bulky goods on the luggage carrier, like those family supplies of bog rolls.

For heavier things like beer crates, I would not trust them on their own.

Used them as well, back in the day, when journalism still was any good, to clamp those huge packages of the weekend papers underneath them.

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: Help with Component Terminology
« Reply #9 on: August 31, 2018, 12:25:03 pm »
Still use them to immobilize big or bulky goods on the luggage carrier, like those family supplies of bog rolls.

Bungee cords seem a much more effective and versatile solution to that sort of thing.  I suppose the spring clamp pre-dates bungees.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Re: Help with Component Terminology
« Reply #10 on: August 31, 2018, 01:07:48 pm »
Yeah, but loose bungee cords get stolen from bikes over here, the only item regularly taken away in the Netherlands never mentioned. So using one means more planning than I'll ever do before shopping.

Your regular Dutch bike used to come with fixed rubbery bungee cords, called snelbinders ( fast binders), but those do not stretch out enough for bulky items like kitchen rolls. They would nicely hold a lunch box though, or a pillow for a loved one to sit on.




Cudzoziemiec

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Re: Help with Component Terminology
« Reply #11 on: August 31, 2018, 01:19:57 pm »
You can still get carriers with those fixed hookless bungees. I always wonder how long they'll last before wearing out. I know I've used those spring clamp things in the past for carrying light, flattish objects like newspapers but I'm surprised to hear they'll cope with something as bulky as a family pack of bog rolls.
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Oaky

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Re: Help with Component Terminology
« Reply #12 on: August 31, 2018, 01:26:00 pm »
I was wondering last night whether I'd ever seen anyone actually use one to carry things, rather than to inflict minor injuries on themselves.  I think the closest I've come was attempting to make them restrain a bike lock, before giving up as a waste of time.

I use the one on my commute bike to hold my GBFO Abus Chain lock.  If you fold it a particular way it holds rather well.
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Re: Help with Component Terminology
« Reply #13 on: August 31, 2018, 01:32:13 pm »
You can still get carriers with those fixed hookless bungees. I always wonder how long they'll last before wearing out. I know I've used those spring clamp things in the past for carrying light, flattish objects like newspapers but I'm surprised to hear they'll cope with something as bulky as a family pack of bog rolls.

They'll last a good few years IME. I don't think I ever had to replace the ones on my Dutch bikes, but replacements are easily obtainable. For big and relatively large items like loo roll it usually jams in between the saddle and the spring clamp, and is stable enough for the pootle home.

Re: Help with Component Terminology
« Reply #14 on: September 01, 2018, 04:08:30 pm »
Have none of you ever been to skule! In my day they were regularly used for keeping the satchel/briefcase on the bike ( or not as the case might be) if you weren't one of the flash kids who had a big Carradice and a Karrimor bag carrier (and spent all your time balanced on the nose of the saddle to stop the weight in the saddlebag from overcoming the saddle clamp and turfing you off the back)! Fine times  ;D

Re: Help with Component Terminology
« Reply #15 on: September 01, 2018, 05:16:33 pm »
I'm sure you could molish one of these into a mousetrap.
For oversize mice.

Re: Help with Component Terminology
« Reply #16 on: September 02, 2018, 12:22:12 am »
Have none of you ever been to skule! In my day they were regularly used for keeping the satchel/briefcase on the bike...
+1. Till I got interested in bikes and started riding ones that didn't have carriers like that...

Re: Help with Component Terminology
« Reply #17 on: September 02, 2018, 08:43:57 am »
Mine is mostly used to pin down the release straps of my Ortlieb panniers so they can't get lifted at traffic lights so easily.

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Re: Help with Component Terminology
« Reply #18 on: September 07, 2018, 10:04:01 am »
Thanks, everyone!

We call it a 'rat trap', but I don't know if this term has any currency?

Mrs TB has them on her 2 Raleigh ebikes. I wondered what use they could be but they have proved excellent for securing soft things, especially backrests, which she often has to carry