Author Topic: More Brompton protectionism  (Read 1420 times)

More Brompton protectionism
« on: September 09, 2018, 11:40:10 am »
You can't buy a stem any more unless it's fitted by one of their price-maintained* dealers.  A quill stem.  How hard is it to fit one of those, and wouldn't you want to check it yourself anyway?   Meanwhile, a car dealer will sell you any part you like.

*they've always refused to supply dealers selling at a discount.  Spa fell out with them in a very big way.

Never tell me the odds.

Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star
Re: More Brompton protectionism
« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2018, 12:48:10 pm »
Still do not understand how brompton could stop dealers selling between EU countries, and not get in trouble. 

Re: More Brompton protectionism
« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2018, 12:51:27 pm »
Bromptons are basically low end bikes with a vastly inflated price which gives Brompton a big profit margin. I suppose that's why they need to takes  these measures.


Re: More Brompton protectionism
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2018, 12:58:17 pm »
Report them!

"Avoid and report anti-competitive activity "
https://www.gov.uk/cartels-price-fixing

Quote
Other anti-competitive activities

You must avoid other activities that break competition law, eg:

    buying or selling jointly with your competitors
    agreeing with your competitors to reduce production of something to raise its market value
    restricting how much other businesses can sell your product for
    agreeing with your competitors not to sell to certain customers or deal with certain suppliers
    having long-term exclusive contracts with any customers or suppliers

Re: More Brompton protectionism
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2018, 03:28:18 pm »
They've been doing it since the very beginning, according to the Henshaw book (which is a bit of a fanboi piece).  They are a litigious firm;  I suspect a large percentage of the purchase price goes on lawyers since the patent on the fold expired ages ago so they notoriously use copyright law now.

What are you supposed to do if you don't live near a dealer, I wonder?  They're not exactly widespread. Evans account for a fair few, and Evans are on the skids.
Never tell me the odds.

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: More Brompton protectionism
« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2018, 06:31:00 pm »
What are you supposed to do if you don't live near a dealer, I wonder?  They're not exactly widespread.

But everyone's in That London, aren't they?  (Exceptions for people buying Bromptons as a status symbol in Leftpondia and the Far East.)
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Re: More Brompton protectionism
« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2018, 06:44:15 pm »
What are you supposed to do if you don't live near a dealer, I wonder?  They're not exactly widespread. Evans account for a fair few, and Evans are on the skids.

I suppose if you do have to go further afield to get one serviced, at least they're easy to take on public transport...

Re: More Brompton protectionism
« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2018, 09:39:30 pm »
I have to say I rather agree. I only got my Brompton this year. I'm really pleased with everything except Brompton's attitude to maintenance. I was really taken aback when I found that you can't buy and fit stems. Mine came a bit loose a while back, in the normal way of things; I tightened that myself, but maybe I should have taken that into a dealer too? There's not really much difference between that and fitting one.

It was bad enough finding that we aren't allowed to service the rear pivots. I've done that too, and it's not hard - but they won't sell the tools and they no longer sell the parts.

Bromptons are widely ridden by enthusiasts, many of whom do all their own maintenance on any bike. Are they trying to drive us away?

Re: More Brompton protectionism
« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2018, 07:33:12 am »
For a commuter bike like the Brompton, I suspect enthusiasts are a minority (never mind enthusiasts with the will to fettle pivots); most will treat it like a car to be services (or not!) by pros.

Re: More Brompton protectionism
« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2018, 10:17:24 pm »
Doubt it is just Brompton. Buy a Birdy folder, and you're demanded to have certain parts replaced by a certified dealer after a certain amount of miles, or time, or lose your guarantee.

And certified dealers do seem to exist. But that is just the theory.

Aunt Maud

  • Le Flâneur.
Re: More Brompton protectionism
« Reply #10 on: September 11, 2018, 07:13:30 am »
For a commuter bike like the Brompton, I suspect enthusiasts are a minority (never mind enthusiasts with the will to fettle pivots); most will treat it like a car to be services (or not!) by pros.

Quite.

And after talking with Condor Cycles about maintenance and the prices they like to charge, they're treating it like it's not a Daaaaewooooooooo.

Re: More Brompton protectionism
« Reply #11 on: September 11, 2018, 09:23:14 pm »
I've totally rebuilt three and fixed some of the factory faults like the wrong size rim tape, hopeless wheelbuilds and head tubes that stretch (ok, Loctite is the only cure for that one).  The local dealer is a nice enough guy but ICBA to drive 10 miles there and leave the bike, then go and collect it later, for something I can do just as well.
Never tell me the odds.

Aunt Maud

  • Le Flâneur.
Re: More Brompton protectionism
« Reply #12 on: September 12, 2018, 07:54:28 am »
He seemed a bit perturbed when I coughed as he told me the service charges.

I think I'll be pumping up my own tyres, thank you.

Re: More Brompton protectionism
« Reply #13 on: September 13, 2018, 03:54:34 pm »
The two everyday advantages to Bromptons, compared to other folding bikes, were smaller folded size and parts availability.  Since the second one has gone now, it may be time to exploit the third advantage - residual value - and get out!
Never tell me the odds.