Author Topic: Machining parallels  (Read 1012 times)

Tim Hall

  • I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes
Machining parallels
« on: November 28, 2018, 10:22:57 pm »
When clearing out the now empty parental home, I came across a pair of parallels (bits of ground hardened steel, 7" x 1" x 0.5") with my Dad's initials on. They're from his early engineering career, probably when he worked at BSA.

I'd like to keep them and put them to good use, but not being of a fitting and turning persuasion it's unlikely that I'd use them for their intended purpose.

I thought perhaps joining them with a couple of pieces of rod to make a saucepan stand.

What are the chances of being able to drill and tap a couple of holes in them, or is this a no go, seeing as they're hardened?

I have a mate with drills, lathes and all that gubbins to do the work.
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

Re: Machining parallels
« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2018, 10:45:13 pm »
You'd probably be able to drill holes in the parallels using carbide tipped masonry drills.

At work we sometimes used masonry or carbide drills to drill out broken taps.
I don't want to grow old gracefully. I want to grow old disgracefully.

Re: Machining parallels
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2018, 12:59:57 am »
a suggestion; why not use a router to make some parallel-sized (but not quite full depth) pockets in a piece of wood, then glue them into said pockets?  Should work OK as a pan stand?

cheers

Tim Hall

  • I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes
Re: Machining parallels
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2018, 05:48:41 pm »
a suggestion; why not use a router to make some parallel-sized (but not quite full depth) pockets in a piece of wood, then glue them into said pockets?  Should work OK as a pan stand?

cheers

Ooh, that's a good idea. I shall see if there's a suitable piece of wood in the house then get onto my chum the Cheery Chippy for routing purposes.
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

Re: Machining parallels
« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2018, 08:17:24 pm »
They will rust... Sorry to be negative!

Re: Machining parallels
« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2018, 09:08:25 pm »
They will rust... Sorry to be negative!

lacquer them with shellac or a clear coat ?
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

T42

  • Gaulois réfractaire
Re: Machining parallels
« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2018, 08:35:34 am »
Judging from what I have learnt in trying to harden plane blades of doubtful origin, various combinations of heat and cooling can de-harden steel, usually when you want the opposite.  You could then drill it.
Tout à gauche sur le plat

Tim Hall

  • I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes
Re: Machining parallels
« Reply #7 on: November 30, 2018, 10:11:28 am »
Regarding the rust thing, they've been in a tool box in the garage for 60 years and have that old tool patina.
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

Tim Hall

  • I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes
Re: Machining parallels
« Reply #8 on: January 02, 2019, 08:58:32 am »
A quick update on this. I found a cheese board in my parent's house, made of strips of various hardwoods glued together. My mate the Cheery Chippy did some router magic, followed up with a bit of chisel wizardry so the parallels were recessed into it about 150mm apart. Dad's initials on the ends of the parallels are nicely visible.

My sister, who was there when Dad collapsed and died earlier this year, was very pleased to receive it as a Christmas present.

Thanks Brucey for the steer.
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

Re: Machining parallels
« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2019, 01:28:21 pm »
I found a cheese board in my parent's house, made of strips of various hardwoods glued together...…... so the parallels were recessed into it about 150mm apart. Dad's initials on the ends of the parallels are nicely visible.

My sister, who was there when Dad collapsed and died earlier this year, was very pleased to receive it as a Christmas present.

A perfect tribute to your dad.  Well done.  I'm sure that he'd have been pleased to know that his tools are in use, even if unconventionally!

I have 3 of my late father's woodworking planes, and they have all been sharpened, cleaned up, and when I use them I thank him and have a chat.  I hope my kids will keep some of my tools in service as a memento.

Re: Machining parallels
« Reply #10 on: January 02, 2019, 08:00:40 pm »
A quick update on this. I found a cheese board in my parent's house, made of strips of various hardwoods glued together. My mate the Cheery Chippy did some router magic, followed up with a bit of chisel wizardry so the parallels were recessed into it about 150mm apart. Dad's initials on the ends of the parallels are nicely visible.

My sister, who was there when Dad collapsed and died earlier this year, was very pleased to receive it as a Christmas present.

Thanks Brucey for the steer.
Any pics ?  (I can't believe there aren't.)
Rust never sleeps

Tim Hall

  • I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes
Re: Machining parallels
« Reply #11 on: January 03, 2019, 07:27:09 am »
Oddly enough I didn't photograph it. I'll ask my sister, who art in Kingston, to snap some with her phone.
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

Re: Machining parallels
« Reply #12 on: January 03, 2019, 09:06:23 am »
That surely is the defining definition of 'odd'.

:-)
Rust never sleeps

Tim Hall

  • I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes
Re: Machining parallels
« Reply #13 on: January 03, 2019, 12:21:49 pm »
That surely is the defining definition of 'odd'.

:-)

Heh.


The parallels before.


Shonky camera phone picture


Not so shonky camera phone picture.
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)