Author Topic: PBP 2019 ROUTE  (Read 13948 times)

simonp

  • Omnomnomnipotent.
Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #100 on: February 20, 2019, 01:34:28 pm »
Hmm. Sub 70 is 17.5 overall.

Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #101 on: February 20, 2019, 01:59:43 pm »
Hmm. Sub 70 is 17.5 overall.

Hmmm.   71h56m last time.

Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #102 on: February 26, 2019, 10:29:45 pm »
Thank you for this =) I see "Accueil" translates to "Home", but what does that mean?  Somewhere to sleep?

Google Translate gives a single translation of "accueil" as "home", which shows the danger of trusting a simple translation like that.

Accueil also means "reception" or "hospitality". I wouldn't rely on there being dedicated dorms like some of the other controls, but there might be places where you can lie down and sleep (if you can sleep with noise going on around you). Mostly it'll just be some food/water/toilets.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #103 on: February 26, 2019, 10:41:06 pm »
Accueillir is the verb 'to welcome'. So Accueil is literally a welcome point. So it's use in this context is to indicate hospitality, without being a formal control point.

You don't have to stop, but you're welcome to. It's also used at Semaine Federale, for feeding and entertainment stops.

Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #104 on: April 12, 2019, 06:40:52 pm »
Accueillir is the verb 'to welcome'. So Accueil is literally a welcome point. So it's use in this context is to indicate hospitality, without being a formal control point.

You don't have to stop, but you're welcome to. It's also used at Semaine Federale, for feeding and entertainment stops.

I notice it is quite close to another control. Does this mean the previous control is just a place to get card validated with few other facilities?
   Eddington  87 miles

wilkyboy

  • "nick" by any other name
    • 16-inch wheels
Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #105 on: April 12, 2019, 06:43:31 pm »
Accueillir is the verb 'to welcome'. So Accueil is literally a welcome point. So it's use in this context is to indicate hospitality, without being a formal control point.

You don't have to stop, but you're welcome to. It's also used at Semaine Federale, for feeding and entertainment stops.

I notice it is quite close to another control. Does this mean the previous control is just a place to get card validated with few other facilities?

No.  ALL the controls are fully furnished; the hospitality controls are just extras, presumably laid on by the locals to get in on the excitement.

And "close" is a relative term when considering most riders will be three days in at the point they get to Quédillac for the second time.
RRTY #7 done.  Need something else to do ... ah, welcome #8 8)

Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #106 on: April 12, 2019, 11:19:30 pm »
Basically they are overflow area's. Since especially Loudéac tends to be overrun, both Quedillac and St. Nicolas are extra sleeping points to accomodate more people. Offering a point midway encourages riders to set out for at least half a stage and not stay in Loudéac, further cluttering up the place.

Redlight

  • Enjoying life in the slow lane
Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #107 on: April 14, 2019, 11:28:29 am »
Basically they are overflow area's. Since especially Loudéac tends to be overrun, both Quedillac and St. Nicolas are extra sleeping points to accomodate more people. Offering a point midway encourages riders to set out for at least half a stage and not stay in Loudéac, further cluttering up the place.

Worth noting if you at the full value end of the ride that the catering at these controls is somewhat limited so don't rely on them as your only food options on the return leg.  Quedillac had run out of almost everything when I reached it eastbound in 2015 - and there were still a lot of riders behind me at that stage.
Between the Disney abattoir and the chemical refinery

Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #108 on: April 17, 2019, 03:33:20 pm »
I slept in Quedillac reception on the way back last time.  That's when I couldn't find my bike on waking as the front of the bulge had caught me up whilst I slept. Was trying to get back to Tintiniac before sleeping but got the dozies so stopped.  I then ate when I got to Tintiniac after my sleep.

wilkyboy

  • "nick" by any other name
    • 16-inch wheels
Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #109 on: April 17, 2019, 03:35:57 pm »
I slept in Quédillac on the way back.  Face-down on the bar waiting for my pizza to arrive ...

Beats the sleep on the way out in Gorron: face-down in my omelette.  There's a photo somewhere, which I've never actually seen  ???
RRTY #7 done.  Need something else to do ... ah, welcome #8 8)

Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #110 on: April 17, 2019, 04:31:43 pm »
I also slept on the way back in Quedillac. But towards the end of the night.

wilkyboy

  • "nick" by any other name
    • 16-inch wheels
Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #111 on: May 21, 2019, 12:17:31 am »
A couple of route changes in the last few days:

— Stage 9 now heads into Gouarec before heading up the D5, making the stage slightly longer;
— Stage 15 now turns into the Bergerie nationale de Rambouillet, thru the archway; although in make this change, the route now appears to head the wrong way down one-way streets in Rambouillet, which doesn't seem quite right  ::-)
RRTY #7 done.  Need something else to do ... ah, welcome #8 8)

wilkyboy

  • "nick" by any other name
    • 16-inch wheels
Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #112 on: July 18, 2019, 01:31:24 pm »
There have been no more changes to ACP's official GPS files in the past couple of months, so I've published my versions of the GPS files, in both GPX and TCX and various point-counts (for legacy devices).  Also a RideWithGPS link for pinning.

It's all here, as well as my usual UK-stylee routesheet  8) :thumbsup:
RRTY #7 done.  Need something else to do ... ah, welcome #8 8)

Deano_44

  • Enjoy the Ride!
Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #113 on: July 18, 2019, 03:15:53 pm »
There have been no more changes to ACP's official GPS files in the past couple of months, so I've published my versions of the GPS files, in both GPX and TCX and various point-counts (for legacy devices).  Also a RideWithGPS link for pinning.

It's all here, as well as my usual UK-stylee routesheet  8) :thumbsup:

Thanks for the route sheet and especially for pointing out the McDonalds!  :)

Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #114 on: July 18, 2019, 03:57:09 pm »
I went to PBP and all I got was Le Burger....

bairn again

Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #115 on: July 18, 2019, 09:39:23 pm »
superb work Nick.   :thumbsup:

dubya

  • You can't stop the waves,but you can learn to surf
Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #116 on: July 19, 2019, 09:47:22 am »
Many thanks Nick.  It is very generous of you to prepare these gpx tracks, they offer a reassurance while riding the route. 

I plan on riding using the route arrows and leave the Garmin tracking while I follow the arrows, if I wonder off course the Garmin will (hopefully) sound the alarm!

Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #117 on: July 19, 2019, 02:01:27 pm »
Thanks, gone for the 2 x 600km set.

andyp

  • Andrew Preston
Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #118 on: July 28, 2019, 10:32:20 pm »
Thanks Nick! ...that's all loaded up onto my etrex perfectly, and is much appreciated.

I've gone for the set of separate stages: there's something quite satisfying about loading up a new one at each control*, and something manageable about never having more than 70 or 80km to go  :thumbsup:

* top tip: load up the new track when you arrive at the end of a stage, that way you won't miss the chance to leave with a group, or be a danger faffing about getting the track loaded as you pull out.

zigzag

  • unfuckwithable
Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #119 on: July 29, 2019, 07:23:48 am »
i'll be making customised courses, ending around 2-3km before controls - it gives enough time to load a new course and also indicates when to move towards the front of the group. will be using wilkyboy's full route as a template :thumbsup:

wilkyboy

  • "nick" by any other name
    • 16-inch wheels
Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #120 on: August 07, 2019, 11:43:56 am »
It's all here, as well as my usual UK-stylee routesheet  8) :thumbsup:

And I've added a side-by-side version, so you can use it single-folded to A5 on top of a bar-bag with two A6 panels side-by-side.

From experience, if you're folding all the way down to A6 then you'll want the "natural" or "vertical" version, as this enables flipping the corner to see what's over the page, which side-by-side does not.
RRTY #7 done.  Need something else to do ... ah, welcome #8 8)

Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #121 on: August 07, 2019, 11:49:46 am »
It's all here, as well as my usual UK-stylee routesheet  8) :thumbsup:

And I've added a side-by-side version, so you can use it single-folded to A5 on top of a bar-bag with two A6 panels side-by-side.

From experience, if you're folding all the way down to A6 then you'll want the "natural" or "vertical" version, as this enables flipping the corner to see what's over the page, which side-by-side does not.

Awesome work my friend! When do you see the family?!?!?!?

Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #122 on: August 09, 2019, 02:15:00 pm »
There have been no more changes to ACP's official GPS files in the past couple of months, so I've published my versions of the GPS files, in both GPX and TCX and various point-counts (for legacy devices).  Also a RideWithGPS link for pinning.

It's all here, as well as my usual UK-stylee routesheet  8) :thumbsup:

Thanks! All loaded onto my wahoo.

On a related note,

Does anyone know if I can record the ride as one file on a wahoo device or is it going to be best to split it up?  Biggest ride recorded so far was my qualifying 600.

Cheers

Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #123 on: August 09, 2019, 03:20:45 pm »
There have been no more changes to ACP's official GPS files in the past couple of months, so I've published my versions of the GPS files, in both GPX and TCX and various point-counts (for legacy devices).  Also a RideWithGPS link for pinning.

It's all here, as well as my usual UK-stylee routesheet  8) :thumbsup:

Thanks! All loaded onto my wahoo.

On a related note,

Does anyone know if I can record the ride as one file on a wahoo device or is it going to be best to split it up?  Biggest ride recorded so far was my qualifying 600.

Cheers

I'm going to try for a single ride & cross my fingers.

However for the route I'm going to reload per control. For a couple of 600's including WCW this wasn't an issue however on Willesden's Last Gasp I was finding it hanged (around 4 times) when clicking back to the map page. Near the end of the ride I met another rider who had the same issue, he had redrawn the route in Strava (manually) so it wouldn't have been an identical file, my guess the route just had too many points due to road profile but this is nearly impossible to prove.

To recover from the hanging I had to hold the power button down for ~30s to force reboot, the route then reloaded and continued so I ended with a single 600k file (with tiny bits missing during reboot). I believe the other rider just waited for the device to auto-reboot, from what he said this took minutes (so a slow watchdog timer...).

wilkyboy

  • "nick" by any other name
    • 16-inch wheels
Re: PBP 2019 ROUTE
« Reply #124 on: August 09, 2019, 03:42:22 pm »
FWIW, Garmins just record right through*  :thumbsup:



* although it does help to STOP + START every 300km or so, just in case your specific device still suffers from the dreaded 10k [recorded] points issue  :facepalm:
RRTY #7 done.  Need something else to do ... ah, welcome #8 8)