Author Topic: TRP Spyre Brake pads  (Read 1385 times)

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
TRP Spyre Brake pads
« on: January 01, 2019, 02:42:35 pm »

I need new brake pads for my TRP Spyre brakes. I swapped the ones that came from the factory at about 7.2Mm, They still had over 1mm of pad left, but I was about to do a big tour, so wanted fresh pads. I put on Uber bike pads, and put the originals in a ziplock bag in my top tube bag. Last week on day 2 of my festive 500, I hit the front brake, it made horrible noises, and didn't seem to do all that much at all. I was on a relatively hilly route, was tired, and needed faith in my kit, so I swapped the pads back to the originals that were still in my top tube bag (phew). The Uber bike pads still have over 1mm of pad left, but their performance had dropped off massively (I'm wondering if this is related to my failure to stop crash on a recent audax https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=110388). They had only done just over 4Mm. So Now I'm in the market for new pads that fit my TRP Spyre calipers. I'd like metalic rather than organic (I think?)

Options seem to be:

Kool stop KS-D620 - Semi Metalic
Shimano B01s - Resin?
Swiss stop Disc 15 Sintered - Metalic
Jagwire DCA016 - Semi Metalic.

I want the best stopping power and long life, in wet, snow, mud, gravel, road, and the YouDoNotWantToKnow, that covers Dutch roads. I'm not too fussed about price.

What would people recommend? Any I should avoid?

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: TRP Spyre Brake pads
« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2019, 03:16:01 pm »
I've used the Nukeproof sintered pads for a few years, no issues. I can't really compare against other pads, but I got these on recommendation from other riders at the time I switched over from the original Spyre pads.

Re: TRP Spyre Brake pads
« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2019, 03:48:14 pm »
disco brake pads. which ever ones offer best performance

Re: TRP Spyre Brake pads
« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2019, 04:08:46 pm »
in clarty conditions with a mechanical disc brake I would suggest that you use a sintered pad; wear rates are often unacceptably high with other compounds.  However there are some wrinkles/features you may want to know;

- initial 'bite' is usually better with sintered pads when the disc itself is really wet.
- sintered pads are noisier in operation than most (if not all) other pad types
- sintered pads wear discs faster than most of other pad compounds
- sintered pads are so aggressive that they are not suitable for some discs; the discs are too soft. For example   Shimano discs are sometimes marked 'resin pads only' and these models will wear out quickly with sintered pads and even some semi-metallic pads.

BTW if you have ~1mm of friction material remaining, your pads are knackered. They definitely ought to be replaced at this point; the brake manufacturer almost invariably stipulates that this is the wear limit of the pads.  [It looks like you have ~2.5mm of pad material that you can wear away on a new pad; you don't: The pads ought to be changed no later than when there is ~1.5mm worn off them.]   If you wear pads more than is recommended, various nasty things can happen, such as the pad springs getting snarled up in the works, or the remaining friction material suddenly parting company with the backing wholesale.... :o

[edit here https://www.trpbrakes.com/userfiles/file/SPYRE_Final_053113(1).pdf it says 0.8mm is the minimum lining thickness. This is a bit optimistic IME.]

BTW you don't always get new pad springs with replacement pads; best to check this if you need new springs.

cheers

Re: TRP Spyre Brake pads
« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2019, 04:17:12 pm »
Here you go:

https://www.discobrakes.com/?s=0&t=0&c=14&p=100&tb=001#top

Think I've got Ceramic pro on at the moment. Not bothered about pad wear, just want stopping power.

Re: TRP Spyre Brake pads
« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2019, 04:28:16 pm »
I've also got TRP brakes and have always used the Shimano BO1S pads without any problem, just change when required
Mind of a cyclist, body of a dart player.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: TRP Spyre Brake pads
« Reply #6 on: January 01, 2019, 04:29:34 pm »
I've also got TRP brakes and have always used the Shimano BO1S pads without any problem, just change when required

What sort of distance do you get out of each set of pads?

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

bludger

  • Randonneur and bargain hunter
Re: TRP Spyre Brake pads
« Reply #7 on: January 01, 2019, 04:33:35 pm »
Being quite new to discs I hadn't realised there was such diversity in pad choice.

https://www.planetx.co.uk/i/q/BSEBCBP/ebc-disc-brake-pads

Blimey.
Bikepacking bargain basement: reviews of high value kit great for the tourer, bikepacker and randonneur on a budget

https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=109048.msg2312359#msg2312359

Re: TRP Spyre Brake pads
« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2019, 04:35:11 pm »
I've also got TRP brakes and have always used the Shimano BO1S pads without any problem, just change when required

What sort of distance do you get out of each set of pads?

J

No idea, i just inspect regularly and change when i think the pad is getting worn. If i can be arsed i also from time to time pour white spirit or some other combustible liquid on them (removed from bike of course) and ignite, this burns all the crap off and does make a difference to braking. Failing that i just rub some steel wool on them to clean. I usually buy them from Decathlon for about £6.
Mind of a cyclist, body of a dart player.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: TRP Spyre Brake pads
« Reply #9 on: January 01, 2019, 05:04:45 pm »
in clarty conditions with a mechanical disc brake I would suggest that you use a sintered pad; wear rates are often unacceptably high with other compounds.  However there are some wrinkles/features you may want to know;

- initial 'bite' is usually better with sintered pads when the disc itself is really wet.
- sintered pads are noisier in operation than most (if not all) other pad types
- sintered pads wear discs faster than most of other pad compounds
- sintered pads are so aggressive that they are not suitable for some discs; the discs are too soft. For example   Shimano discs are sometimes marked 'resin pads only' and these models will wear out quickly with sintered pads and even some semi-metallic pads.

BTW if you have ~1mm of friction material remaining, your pads are knackered. They definitely ought to be replaced at this point; the brake manufacturer almost invariably stipulates that this is the wear limit of the pads.  [It looks like you have ~2.5mm of pad material that you can wear away on a new pad; you don't: The pads ought to be changed no later than when there is ~1.5mm worn off them.]   If you wear pads more than is recommended, various nasty things can happen, such as the pad springs getting snarled up in the works, or the remaining friction material suddenly parting company with the backing wholesale.... :o

Have just checked the pads with a set of calipers. 1.8mm of pad left on the uber bike pads.

Feeling quite a large amount of option paralysis with variety of pads available. Nuke proof and disco look promising.

Maybe I should spend some time experimenting...

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Blodwyn Pig

  • what a nice chap
Re: TRP Spyre Brake pads
« Reply #10 on: January 01, 2019, 05:39:08 pm »
Another vote for Nukeproof,  (semi sintered IIRC).  Beware Clarkes pads, the pad material comes off the metal backing, leaving you with only 1 brake, hopefully. Happened to me 3 times.. :o

Re: TRP Spyre Brake pads
« Reply #11 on: January 01, 2019, 05:44:30 pm »
Another vote for Nukeproof,  (semi sintered IIRC).  Beware Clarkes pads, the pad material comes off the metal backing, leaving you with only 1 brake, hopefully. Happened to me 3 times.. :o

which compound was that?

  I am hoping that clarks sintered pads are not affected in the same way; they are made via a completely different route and often even by a different manufacturer and then rebranded. For example EBC sintered pads are made in the USA unlike their other pads.

cheers

Blodwyn Pig

  • what a nice chap
Re: TRP Spyre Brake pads
« Reply #12 on: January 01, 2019, 06:47:30 pm »
Another vote for Nukeproof,  (semi sintered IIRC).  Beware Clarkes pads, the pad material comes off the metal backing, leaving you with only 1 brake, hopefully. Happened to me 3 times.. :o

which compound was that?

  I am hoping that clarks sintered pads are not affected in the same way; they are made via a completely different route and often even by a different manufacturer and then rebranded. For example EBC sintered pads are made in the USA unlike their other pads.

cheers

semi sintered [semi metallic]

Re: TRP Spyre Brake pads
« Reply #13 on: January 01, 2019, 08:13:02 pm »
they only make semi-metallic (resin pads with extra bits of metal in) or fully sintered pads. I suppose you had the former. I have seen failures in those too.

cheers

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: TRP Spyre Brake pads
« Reply #14 on: January 04, 2019, 08:58:09 pm »

Have ordered some Nuke proof sintered pads. Couldn't find them anywhere on the continent, so had to order them from wiggle.

Will see how they work when they arrive.

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

fuaran

  • rothair gasta
Re: TRP Spyre Brake pads
« Reply #15 on: January 05, 2019, 01:59:38 am »
Nukeproof are mostly a Chain Reaction/Wiggle/Hotlines own brand. So maybe not available from many other shops.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: TRP Spyre Brake pads
« Reply #16 on: January 05, 2019, 12:20:19 pm »
Nukeproof are mostly a Chain Reaction/Wiggle/Hotlines own brand. So maybe not available from many other shops.

Well until the end of March, ordering from wiggle is relatively affordable. In so far as they charge in Euros, and have free shipping over €49. What I'll do after that, I'm not sure.

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: TRP Spyre Brake pads
« Reply #17 on: January 05, 2019, 01:14:58 pm »
There are bound to be similar brands available in Netherlands, Germany, etc. In some case probably the very same item under a different brand name.
The earth is vast and beautiful and contains many miraculous places. (Chekhov)

fuaran

  • rothair gasta
Re: TRP Spyre Brake pads
« Reply #18 on: January 05, 2019, 05:02:19 pm »
BIke24 are now owned by Chain Reaction/Wiggle, so might start sharing brands. Though looks like no Nukeproof yet.

Yes, the brake pads are probably generic stuff rebranded anyway. So probably available under loads of other brands.

Torslanda

  • Professional Gobshite
  • Just a tart for retro kit . . .
    • John's Bikes
Re: TRP Spyre Brake pads
« Reply #19 on: January 06, 2019, 07:11:50 pm »
Numb-as-a-piss-stone-question. (And apologies if I've missed it)

Did you adjust the caliper to compensate for the wear in the pads?

You mention a lack of bite which gets progressively worse until the bike won't stop, you just haven't mentioned how often they were adjusted. Leads me to think the pads won't bite because they aren't contacting the disc.
VELOMANCER

Well that's the more blunt way of putting it but as usual he's dead right.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: TRP Spyre Brake pads
« Reply #20 on: January 06, 2019, 07:14:48 pm »
Numb-as-a-piss-stone-question. (And apologies if I've missed it)

Did you adjust the caliper to compensate for the wear in the pads?

You mention a lack of bite which gets progressively worse until the bike won't stop, you just haven't mentioned how often they were adjusted. Leads me to think the pads won't bite because they aren't contacting the disc.

They were contacting, as they made a weird nose when they did...

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: TRP Spyre Brake pads
« Reply #21 on: January 06, 2019, 08:26:18 pm »
weird noises would usually indicate something like the pad springs touching the disc. To clarify, you say your old pads have 1.8mm remaining;  is that 1.8mm total thickness or 1.8mm of friction material ( so 1.8mm + 1.6mm backing = ~ 3.4mm total thickness)?

 If the latter,  pad springs ought not be touching the disc; however if the former it is almost impossible for the pad springs not to  touch.

If you examine the springs you will soon see if the disc has touched and marked them.

BTW I forgot to mention one other feature of sintered pads; they conduct heat into the brake mechanism many times faster than other pad types. This means they are not always a good idea in a hydraulic system, but are OK in most mechanical systems except perhaps those in which the pads are retained by magnets; the magnets can more easily get so hot that they (irreversibly) lose their magnetism.

cheers

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: TRP Spyre Brake pads
« Reply #22 on: January 06, 2019, 08:38:39 pm »
weird noises would usually indicate something like the pad springs touching the disc. To clarify, you say your old pads have 1.8mm remaining;  is that 1.8mm total thickness or 1.8mm of friction material ( so 1.8mm + 1.6mm backing = ~ 3.4mm total thickness)?

Of the friction material, I didn't measure the thickness of the yellow bit.


Quote
If the latter,  pad springs ought not be touching the disc; however if the former it is almost impossible for the pad springs not to  touch.

If you examine the springs you will soon see if the disc has touched and marked them.

BTW I forgot to mention one other feature of sintered pads; they conduct heat into the brake mechanism many times faster than other pad types. This means they are not always a good idea in a hydraulic system, but are OK in most mechanical systems except perhaps those in which the pads are retained by magnets; the magnets can more easily get so hot that they (irreversibly) lose their magnetism.

I'm using cable operated brakes, hydraulics seem to be too hard to fix at the side of the road (at least 1 SRMR rider scratched due to total loss of Hydraulic fluid).

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Torslanda

  • Professional Gobshite
  • Just a tart for retro kit . . .
    • John's Bikes
Re: TRP Spyre Brake pads
« Reply #23 on: January 06, 2019, 09:42:32 pm »
I don't have any new pads to hand but that sounds like they were barely worn.

In which case it's either contamination leading to loss of friction (hence wierd noises) or you're running out of travel - the pads still make contact but insufficient pressure for significant retardation under load.

Which leads me back to my original question. Are the calipers adjusted correctly? I'm sorry to keep going on about it.
VELOMANCER

Well that's the more blunt way of putting it but as usual he's dead right.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: TRP Spyre Brake pads
« Reply #24 on: January 06, 2019, 09:43:36 pm »
Which leads me back to my original question. Are the calipers adjusted correctly? I'm sorry to keep going on about it.

Yes.

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/