Author Topic: Everyday pedals  (Read 1443 times)

Everyday pedals
« on: January 03, 2019, 08:46:56 pm »
My resurrected mountain bike has some plasticy cage pedals. These are ok for the mile to the station in everyday shoes, but my feet feel like they slide / bounce about / easily poorly placed on a longer ride (lanes, maybe the odd rough track, local cobbles).

I’m enjoying this bike more than the narrow tyred alternative for the winter and contemplating using it to enable mildly off road adventures in the summer too. But, I want to keep the ability to ride comfortably in ordinary shoes.

My other bikes all have crank brothers pedals, but their one-side clipped / the other platform offering is expensive and doesn’t get great reviews. I’ve mostly ignored other sorts of pedals for years. Are the Shimano XT T8000 or A530 what others would choose for this sort of thing, or just platforms and spikes, or something else?

Wowbagger

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    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Everyday pedals
« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2019, 09:02:04 pm »
I'm mostly riding on quick-release pedals.

https://www.cyclestore.co.uk/mks_promanade_ezy_removeable_pedals-ID_10087&sv_source=google&sv_medium=cpc&sv_campaign=[campaign_name]&sv_term=[keyword]?gclid=CjwKCAiAgrfhBRA3EiwAnfF4tphRlRkV5ncEqUw_q-ZvQo9XCuw1vLhVjdaadQqg11tGJ_weiu8RbxoC3K0QAvD_BwE

Something like that. They have the great advantage that you can simply take them off, which is great when you are putting your bike in a car/on a train/somewhere with lots of other bikes.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.


Re: Everyday pedals
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2019, 09:44:20 am »
Thanks, both of you. Worth a think, especially the qr for trains.

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Re: Everyday pedals
« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2019, 09:50:52 am »
I have Shimano PD-M324 pedals on a couple of bikes. SPD one side and normal pedal the other side. Good reliable pedal, if a little weighty.

Re: Everyday pedals
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2019, 10:02:20 am »
PD-A530 and PD-M324 are both good pedals but like many others of similar ilk they share one feature which can make them irritating to use if you mostly ride in flat shoes not clipless ones; these pedals are weighted so that the binding is naturally presented upwards.

  This makes little difference when the pedals are new and/or have slightly draggy bearings (the pedals are not so heavily weighted as they always hang at one angle if the bearings are even slightly draggy) and is a positive benefit if you mostly ride clipless. But it is worth knowing about beforehand.

Other comments I would make are that the flat side of PD-A530 is not particularly grippy. PD-M324 is quite a bit grippier but that pedal is a weighty beast and has one snag which is that the bearings require a (pricey) special tool to adjust them properly.  Some folk ride them for years without feeling the need to adjust them at all but if you push hard on the pedals and don't maintain them, it is more likely than not that it will end badly.

FWIW I use PD-M324 on my everyday bike and -in stark contrast to most other pedals- apart from the points mentioned above I find it hard to fault them. If you look after them they can last for many years.  XT PD-T8000 appear to offer a lighter weight design, easier bearing servicing than PD-M324  and more grip than PD-A530, so might suit you well.

cheers

Re: Everyday pedals
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2019, 10:12:16 am »
I use the Shimano XT T-780 pedals, which are the predecessor of the T-8000, and get on with them well. The pedals hang with the cleat side to the rear, so a normal foot on pedal from the rear action gets the cleat side, and that using the flat side required an unusual "draw back" action. I dare say you'd get used to it easily enough if you mostly use the flat side, but I don't, so I find it a little awkward.
The main difference is that the T-8000 has grip pegs, whilst the T-780 doesn't.

I would comment that a mix of pedal/cleat types will be a bit of a nuisance - you'll have to have a separate pair of shoes for each cleat type, and pick the right cleated shoe for the bike, which will lead to either riding wet shoes, winter shoes in summer etc, or spending on duplicate pairs.

Also, if you've been riding exclusively cleats for years (mostly), flat pedals will take a bit of getting used to.
You may not be conscious of pulling up on the pedal, but it's very easy to be in the habit of a slight lift that's enough to lose contact with a flat pedal enough that the foot moves on the pedal. This may be what's happening with your plastic pedals.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Everyday pedals
« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2019, 11:21:56 am »
I have both A530 and M324 pedals (on different bikes, obviously). For riding in flat shoes, the A530 are more comfortable but the M324 are slightly grippier, especially in the wet. In the dry there's not a great difference in grippiness but probably the A530 just shade it due to the larger platform. However, I think that grippiness and to an extent comfort is very much dependent on the nature of the soles of your flat shoes. I've never tried pedals with pegs like the T8000 that Andrew linked to, but I'd be tempted if I didn't already have the pedals I've got.
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fuaran

  • rothair gasta
Re: Everyday pedals
« Reply #8 on: January 04, 2019, 11:25:22 am »
Look at the Shimano PD-EH500 pedals as well, they seem to be the same as A530, but with proper pins. So should be better grip.

Re: Everyday pedals
« Reply #9 on: January 04, 2019, 12:02:26 pm »
I have Shimano PD T400 Click'R pedals on my commuting bike.

Half the time I ride this bike I wear SPD shoes (commuting) and half the time trainers or astroturf boots (to go to/from 5-a-side or just utility cycling).

Selling points for me:-
* Cheap
* No problems with non-SPD shoes slipping off, don't notice the cleats when riding in normal shoes
* No problems pulling up hard in SPD shoes when commuting (with heavy panniers too) and I often accelerate hard away from lights
* Double sided so you don't ever have to faff with pedal orientation (especially with a stop/start London commute with lots of traffic lights)
* Pedal reflectors so legal for riding at night

The only downside is that they're heavy for pedals (but still relatively little compared to the rest of the bike).

I won't ever go back to single sided pedals. Way too much faff compared to just stomp and go of double sided.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Everyday pedals
« Reply #10 on: January 04, 2019, 12:21:57 pm »
Me and Mrs Morbihan have both recently switched to flats and its been quite a revelation. Really comfortable, so easy to use. Solid.
We had been using the A530 one sided pedals for touring and commuting, but both find them a little fiddly TBH.
We have just test ridden the festive 500  in sneakers with large platform flats with studs. One set of VO and one set of compass. They were quite pricey but I'm sure there are other options out there that would be fine and less $
They are not quick release though and I can see that as being useful if you are jumping on and off trains.
I had a really tough time in the high stuff mounting /dismounting and clipping back in on the TCR with road pedals/cleats.  Next time I'm using flats for sure.
All the gear and no idea.Three dimensionally dyslexic.

Cudzoziemiec

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Re: Everyday pedals
« Reply #11 on: January 04, 2019, 01:13:21 pm »
Has anyone switched from SPDs to clips and straps? I haven't used them for years but I've recently had thoughts of switching back as it seems they might offer the best of both worlds: security thanks to the toe clips but the ability to use any shoes. OTOH I do remember the horrible way the nose scraped on the ground when you didn't clip in (either straightaway or, for whatever reason, at all).
sideways bounding monkey lounging under fruit tree

Re: Everyday pedals
« Reply #12 on: January 04, 2019, 01:15:28 pm »
I've switched to flat pedals too.   I've bought a selection.  I'm mainly using Pedaling Innovations Catalysts, which are nice and big but expensive.  My second choice are cheap, plastic ones, like you would find on a supermarket bike, which I find have better grip than Shimano single-sided SPD ones I have on other bikes.

Re: Everyday pedals
« Reply #13 on: January 04, 2019, 01:35:07 pm »
Look at the Shimano PD-EH500 pedals as well, they seem to be the same as A530, but with proper pins. So should be better grip.



hadn't seen those before; they do look nice and grippy

cheers

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Everyday pedals
« Reply #14 on: January 04, 2019, 02:02:16 pm »
Has anyone switched from SPDs to clips and straps? I haven't used them for years but I've recently had thoughts of switching back as it seems they might offer the best of both worlds: security thanks to the toe clips but the ability to use any shoes. OTOH I do remember the horrible way the nose scraped on the ground when you didn't clip in (either straightaway or, for whatever reason, at all).

PowerGrips style straps are probably a better choice than traditional clips for this:  The tighten/release is achieved by a twisting motion that will be instinctive to a SPD user, which is less faffy than operating toestraps by hand, and more secure than leaving them loose.

The downside of course is that like toeclips you've got to flip the pedal over to insert (making them more complicated to use than SPDs), and prolonged use causes wear on the shoe upper.  They still rub on the ground if you use the other side of the pedal, though not as scrapily.


Alternatively (and with the disclaimer that I've only briefly experienced them on someone else's bike) those strapless half-toeclips seem like a reasonable improvement on bare platforms if you're not interested in foot retention that you can pull up with.
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Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Everyday pedals
« Reply #15 on: January 04, 2019, 02:08:21 pm »
TBH if I were to go back to toe clips I probably wouldn't use straps. I'm more interested in foot security and being able to position the pedals for starting while stationary than in pulling up while riding.
sideways bounding monkey lounging under fruit tree

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Everyday pedals
« Reply #16 on: January 04, 2019, 02:08:58 pm »
Btw does anyone else find themselves singing Sly & the Family Stone from this thread?
sideways bounding monkey lounging under fruit tree

Re: Everyday pedals
« Reply #17 on: January 04, 2019, 02:22:23 pm »
Mrs Dan has dual sided pedals, and i ride her bike enough to know the flick to flat side thing.
The new shoes isn't ideal, and if the crank brothers pedal looked better for the money i would have just bought them. However, its not that complicated - i only have one pair of cycling shoes anyway.


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Re: Everyday pedals
« Reply #18 on: January 04, 2019, 03:38:41 pm »
Btw does anyone else find themselves singing Sly & the Family Stone from this thread?

Arrested Development for me...
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Everyday pedals
« Reply #19 on: January 04, 2019, 03:48:24 pm »
Btw does anyone else find themselves singing Sly & the Family Stone from this thread?

Arrested Development for me...
That one had passed me by, but you've got me listening to it now. Quite good. It seems there are at least 9 other covers, from the Staple Singers to Maroon 5.
sideways bounding monkey lounging under fruit tree

Re: Everyday pedals
« Reply #20 on: January 04, 2019, 04:26:53 pm »
My resurrected mountain bike has some plasticy cage pedals. These are ok for the mile to the station in everyday shoes....

I think perhaps you need to describe what everyday shoes are to get a decent recommendation. Smart shoes for work? Or maybe something a bit more casual? What are the soles made of?

I have some DMR flats with the pins which I use on my MTB sometimes, but whilst they offer great grip, they absolutely chew the soles of certain types of shoes pretty quickly. And if you have a bit of an off, you can find the skin on your shin punctured in several places by said pins and have to limp to the nearest pub to ask for a first aid kit. DAHIKT...
Those wonderful norks are never far from my thoughts, oh yeah!

Re: Everyday pedals
« Reply #21 on: January 04, 2019, 05:32:42 pm »
I used the M324 pedals for quite a while on my commuter/tourer, one thing that slightly bothered me, though I guess it's just mostly just a cosmetic issue, was that everything steel on them seemed to rust very easily, but I don't know if this applies to ALL SPD-type pedals - e.g. the entire cleat interface, the spring, all bolts etc. Admittedly the bike they were used on was used in all weathers, but other bits of the bike haven't rusted anything like as bad.
Old enough to know better, but young enough to do it anyway

Re: Everyday pedals
« Reply #22 on: January 04, 2019, 05:43:14 pm »
My resurrected mountain bike has some plasticy cage pedals. These are ok for the mile to the station in everyday shoes....

I think perhaps you need to describe what everyday shoes are to get a decent recommendation. Smart shoes for work? Or maybe something a bit more casual? What are the soles made of?

I have some DMR flats with the pins which I use on my MTB sometimes, but whilst they offer great grip, they absolutely chew the soles of certain types of shoes pretty quickly. And if you have a bit of an off, you can find the skin on your shin punctured in several places by said pins and have to limp to the nearest pub to ask for a first aid kit. DAHIKT...
Shoes vary, but mostly softish soled shoes.

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Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Everyday pedals
« Reply #23 on: January 04, 2019, 06:15:02 pm »
I used the M324 pedals for quite a while on my commuter/tourer, one thing that slightly bothered me, though I guess it's just mostly just a cosmetic issue, was that everything steel on them seemed to rust very easily, but I don't know if this applies to ALL SPD-type pedals - e.g. the entire cleat interface, the spring, all bolts etc. Admittedly the bike they were used on was used in all weathers, but other bits of the bike haven't rusted anything like as bad.
My M324s are definitely rustier than my A530s but they've also had more use.
sideways bounding monkey lounging under fruit tree

Re: Everyday pedals
« Reply #24 on: January 04, 2019, 07:13:06 pm »
pedals see the worst road spray, being as they go nearer the road than almost anything else.  SPDs have chromed claws and black oxide or chrome-finish springs. PD-M324 also have chromed steel cages. All these parts wear and/or go rusty.   It is normal for the plating to wear off parts of the claws entirely. Salt spray turns anything that can rust into rust quite quickly.  BTW shimano parts are better plated than most others but still don't resist british winter road salt.

I normally treat the undersides of the claws and the springs with waxoyl, running it in using a hairdryer (it melts quite easily).  This treatment lasts a year or two before it needs redoing.

cheers