Author Topic: Handlebars  (Read 9468 times)

Re: Handlebars
« Reply #75 on: July 07, 2019, 08:43:53 pm »
I have now got used to my bar extensions after a few months. Couldn't spend long in them at first but now am on them most of the time.  Not modern aero versions but will relieve any prolonged hand pressure which is main concern.

zigzag

  • unfuckwithable
Re: Handlebars
« Reply #76 on: July 07, 2019, 08:50:21 pm »



Not doing PBP, but have got my bars sorted for TCR:


if that's your preferred shape, there are profile jammer gt extentions that look neater and would be lighter too

zigzag

  • unfuckwithable
Re: Handlebars
« Reply #77 on: July 07, 2019, 08:57:17 pm »
before people get carried away - the discussion here is not whether tribars work or not (they do), but how to set them up in a pbp-compliant way and whether it's worth it (it depends).

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Handlebars
« Reply #78 on: July 07, 2019, 09:04:43 pm »


if that's your preferred shape, there are profile jammer gt extentions that look neater and would be lighter too

Yeah, there's bars out there that are close to the right shape, But considering I got these for €20 (including the bar tape!), and added €10 bar ends, It's hard to beat on price. Not sure it's worth worrying about the few grams I'd save in terms of weight, Also the setup I have now works well for strapping a bag too.

Maybe when I have another job, I'll experiment, but for now, these work for me. I'm loving having the di2 shifter on the uprights. Being able to shift from the aero position is amazing! They would be PBP compliant if I was to cut about 15mm off the end of the horizontal too...

J

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: Handlebars
« Reply #79 on: July 07, 2019, 10:07:55 pm »
Bullhorns might allow you to use longer extensions (or not cut them down as much).

Shifters are less of a problem if you're using Di2 (or fixed). I didn't mind losing the drops as I rarely used them, much prefer aerobars for headwinds.

Compare these two for example and see how the aerobars don't stick out as far past the brake levers with bullhorns:

http://www.greenbank.org/bikes/tempo/tempo6.jpg

http://www.greenbank.org/bikes/tempo/tempo7.jpg
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Handlebars
« Reply #80 on: July 08, 2019, 11:30:33 am »
was playing around and testing different options today:

found a comfy setup that works, only the levers have to be opened forward (alternatively - a longer stem):


The rules say "Handlebars extensions are allowed only if they can't extend beyond a line created between the front of the brake levers, which must not be pointed forward."

Probably a good thing because my 2 foot long brake levers were a bit of a hazard.

Re: Handlebars
« Reply #81 on: July 08, 2019, 12:05:36 pm »
The "must not be pointed forward" part doesn't appear in the French rules.

Quote
Sur les guidons dits « 3 positions ou course » les prolongateurs avec repose avant-bras sont autorisés à condition qu'ils ne puissent pas dépasser la ligne passant par les points les plus en avant des poignées de frein.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Handlebars
« Reply #82 on: July 08, 2019, 12:06:50 pm »


What do they mean by not pointed forward?

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: Handlebars
« Reply #83 on: July 08, 2019, 12:48:11 pm »
The "must not be pointed forward" part doesn't appear in the French rules.

Quote
Sur les guidons dits « 3 positions ou course » les prolongateurs avec repose avant-bras sont autorisés à condition qu'ils ne puissent pas dépasser la ligne passant par les points les plus en avant des poignées de frein.

They are still a little bitter about Agincourt.

Re: Handlebars
« Reply #84 on: July 09, 2019, 12:22:09 am »
I had almost given up on the idea of using aero bars for the PBP because I couldn’t stay on them long without lower back and hip pain. It was also difficult to mount my lights as they need to be the right way up and would normally go in the same place the arm rests have to go. With the Mersey 24 hour TT coming up I decided to make a few changes to my bike including flipping the stem to raise the handlebars about three inches and then refitting the aero bars. I tested the new set up on Sunday on an easy DIY 200km and found it made a huge difference. I could stay on the aero bars almost all the time without any discomfort and the kilometres flew by with little effort. I’d only just recovered from illness and been off the bike for two weeks yet did my fastest ever 200km!
The bars are full length so too long for PBP but after the Mersey 24 I’ll fit some short ones that happen to be the same diameter into the same arm rests. As for the front lights, I have zip tied and taped them to the side of each aero bar so their beams are directed nicely onto the road ahead. I’m planning to test the new setup including lights at the weekend with another DIY 200km ahead of the 24 hour the following weekend.


zigzag

  • unfuckwithable
Re: Handlebars
« Reply #85 on: July 09, 2019, 10:54:27 am »
was playing around and testing different options today:

found a comfy setup that works, only the levers have to be opened forward (alternatively - a longer stem):


The rules say "Handlebars extensions are allowed only if they can't extend beyond a line created between the front of the brake levers, which must not be pointed forward."

Probably a good thing because my 2 foot long brake levers were a bit of a hazard.
all drop bar levers point forward if they are set up correctly, the question is how much forward is still usable/rideable.

zigzag

  • unfuckwithable
Re: Handlebars
« Reply #86 on: July 09, 2019, 10:59:46 am »
Bullhorns might allow you to use longer extensions (or not cut them down as much).

Shifters are less of a problem if you're using Di2 (or fixed). I didn't mind losing the drops as I rarely used them, much prefer aerobars for headwinds.

Compare these two for example and see how the aerobars don't stick out as far past the brake levers with bullhorns:

http://www.greenbank.org/bikes/tempo/tempo6.jpg

http://www.greenbank.org/bikes/tempo/tempo7.jpg
bullhorns are an option, but i like riding on the drop part and use it often. one other option would be to use long reach drop handlebars, but i can't stand the shape to actually use them.

Re: Handlebars
« Reply #87 on: July 09, 2019, 11:20:55 am »
I think the intention is that you cannot provide a placement for your hands which is further forward than provided by the brake hoods. They have picture of “within the rules” tribars on Facebook. If people start pushing the boundaries officials could become pedantic. My tri bars don’t extend beyond the brakes but they are capable of doing so if I adjusted them. They therefore might break the rules depending  on how you interpret “puissent”

Re: Handlebars
« Reply #88 on: July 09, 2019, 11:28:54 am »
all drop bar levers point forward if they are set up correctly, the question is how much forward is still usable/rideable.

Standard mounting for modern STIs has them pretty much vertical. Mine point backwards because they're set to minimum reach.

zigzag

  • unfuckwithable
Re: Handlebars
« Reply #89 on: July 09, 2019, 12:01:59 pm »
all drop bar levers point forward if they are set up correctly, the question is how much forward is still usable/rideable.

Standard mounting for modern STIs has them pretty much vertical. Mine point backwards because they're set to minimum reach.
it's one of the uncomfortable shapes of the bars i was talking about earlier, with long ramps sloping down. with ergonomic handlebars brake levers are slightly forward (at least when set up the way i like it)

Re: Handlebars
« Reply #90 on: July 09, 2019, 12:29:07 pm »
It's worth thinking how you might modify your handlebar setup if you get Shermer's neck. I'm a bit concerned that riders are trying to limit the strain on their backs. The shock absorption given by the back, when arms are not locked out, will be transferred to the neck muscles.

Here's an article where a RAAM rider turned his aero bars through 90 degrees, and the problems with that.
https://felixwong.com/2015/08/my-experience-with-shermers-neck/

Bianchi Boy

  • Cycling is my doctor
  • Is it possible for a ride to be too long?
    • Reading Cycling Club
Re: Handlebars
« Reply #91 on: July 10, 2019, 09:31:25 pm »
I have stayed out of this discussion as I am not a tri-bar user. Most of the people who I have ridden with who use them are not aware that they weave around and make close group riding impossible. There are some exceptions who can ride in a straight line, but that is not common in my experience. If you must use these then please use them after the large groups have thinned out.

BB
Set a fire for a man and he will be warm for a day, set a man on fire and he is warm for the rest of his life.

Re: Handlebars
« Reply #92 on: July 10, 2019, 10:42:18 pm »
There are some exceptions who can ride in a straight line

Paging Dunning-Kruger, Dunning-Kruger to a white courtesy telephone please...
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Handlebars
« Reply #93 on: July 11, 2019, 08:27:02 pm »
Inspired by this thread. Two cheap aerobars used - some modifications still needed but mainly ok. I added bolt to keep arm pads in right position and don't have to tighten too much.


Re: Handlebars
« Reply #94 on: September 09, 2019, 09:22:21 am »
Did any of you guys who used tri bars have any issues at all during bike check?
Did any of the bike checkers actually measure forward extension? Did they just eyeball it?
Was anyone asked to move/adjust tribars to make them compliant?


Re: Handlebars
« Reply #95 on: September 09, 2019, 10:22:52 am »
Did any of you guys who used tri bars have any issues at all during bike check?
Did any of the bike checkers actually measure forward extension? Did they just eyeball it?
Was anyone asked to move/adjust tribars to make them compliant?

Bike checker eyeballed mine, then checked other things, then eyeballed mine again...then produced a board with a a spirit level screwed to it and announced "2mm". 2mm??? WTF?! I'd measured pretty carefully and can only think the 2mm could be because I'd done a pretty average job of tucking the bar tape into the end caps when retaping them the week before. Out came the multitool and I rotated them an infinitesimal amount which seemed to make my checker happy, no further spirit level required, waved onwards.

Talking to others (with aerobars plainly further forward than mine) I was particularly unlucky and they all just got eyeballed and waved through *sigh* so much for the scientific approach turns out it was luck that you got the one guy actually checking properly.

Wouldn't have been without them though; hands were fine at the finish. :thumbsup:

zigzag

  • unfuckwithable
Re: Handlebars
« Reply #96 on: September 09, 2019, 10:41:06 am »
similar experience, the controller showed my aerobars need to be in line with the hoods. i showed that they are inline with the levers. then he took a spirit level board, measured against the hoods  - "see?". i was about to get my allen key out, but he said "it's ok, good luck".

Re: Handlebars
« Reply #97 on: September 09, 2019, 12:01:04 pm »
I didn't, but the Australian next to me did.  I think it might be because I took the advice on this forum and tried to speak French to them. They voluntarily switched to English so obviously I wasn't that good at it.

Diesel

  • or Richard
Re: Handlebars
« Reply #98 on: September 09, 2019, 12:28:07 pm »
Seems like there are a variety of experiences

I had a very quick bike check and I didn't notice them even look at the aero bars.

I also noticed one person ahead of me in my start group who hadn't moved their aerobars for the event, they protruded quite a way from the hoods.


That said, the short aerobars worked really well for me. No numbness of fingers and shoulders/neck were fine.

I did find though that using the aerobars limited my ability to join any groups. as I won't use them when I'm behind someone and I wanted to use them extensively.


Ironically, having put the aerobars back to their previous (long/regular) position this feels less comfy now! having spent 6 months getting used the the shorter configuation. But they are off the bike now and not planning on using again for a while.

Re: Handlebars
« Reply #99 on: September 09, 2019, 12:33:26 pm »
Yes, quick check of extensions with their hands, but all good.  Then lights. Then checked bottle cages.  Then tried to stick the pass sticker with my number on the wet frame.  That sticker didn't stick for long.