Author Topic: food lore  (Read 3508 times)

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: food lore
« Reply #100 on: January 18, 2019, 12:14:42 pm »
I loved Mr Bacon's Cherryade, which I presume was made to the same or very similar recipe (or perhaps that should be 'chemical formula' rather than 'recipe').

We also had a Sodastream, of course. Always did too many pumps of the gas in a bid to make it more fizzy, inevitably leading to it bubbling over.

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: food lore
« Reply #101 on: January 18, 2019, 12:33:08 pm »
We had a SodaStream at some point, the novelty was mostly dented by the foul taste of the syrups, but on the plus side you could superstrength your drink by mixing half syrup with half water. Like everything in my childhood, it was rationed, so I had to eek out the carbon dioxide until the cylinder could do little more than a gentle, resigned sigh into the bottle. To this day I like flat soft drinks, and this is probably why, it's a learned response from a pikey-parented childhood.
!nataS pihsroW

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: food lore
« Reply #102 on: January 18, 2019, 12:37:34 pm »
Sodastream + milk + impressionable little brother.  I'll leave the rest to your imagination.   :demon:

(Its day job was carbonating tap water[1] so my mum could listen to it fizzing on her bedside table, or something.  Though there were also experiments with super-strength cherryade.  The Amiga 500's mouse cable became irrevocably contaminated with the stuff, and we had to wrap it in insulating tape to *reduce* the stickiness.)


[1] Which IMHO had more than enough carbon in it already.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Torslanda

  • Professional Gobshite
  • Just a tart for retro kit . . .
    • John's Bikes
Re: food lore
« Reply #103 on: January 18, 2019, 02:01:19 pm »
To take away the smell of the chlorine gas...?

Bloody tapwater around stinks like cheap Domestos or Formula 77 which incidentally used to be made in Middleton...
VELOMANCER

Well that's the more blunt way of putting it but as usual he's dead right.

Re: food lore
« Reply #104 on: January 18, 2019, 02:25:47 pm »
Is there some unexpected interaction between milk and sodastream (I'm treating 'it's fizzy and rank as an expected one...)? I vaguely recall my childhood mate's one having dire warnings against trying to carbonate dairy, and somehow we never dared try it.

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: food lore
« Reply #105 on: January 18, 2019, 02:44:55 pm »
Foam.  Lots of foam.   :hand:

(Lovely.  Milky milky.)
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: food lore
« Reply #106 on: January 18, 2019, 03:03:21 pm »
Yes, I vaguely recall trying that experiment too. We were trying to invent kefir before it was fashionable, obviously.

Only tried it the once, obviously.

Tim Hall

  • I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes
Re: food lore
« Reply #107 on: January 18, 2019, 03:29:36 pm »
Where does the Pop Man, mentioned up thread, end and Tom Lehrer's Old Dope Peddler begin?
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

Re: food lore
« Reply #108 on: January 18, 2019, 09:41:26 pm »
You know Sodastream is going high end? They're trying to move away from the machines we grew up with that honked like disc brakes when putting fizz into things. They are trying to persuade people to buy high end machines and glass bottles with push buttons and servos to control exactly how much fizz goes in. I think they saw what Nespresso can charge and  thought they'd like some of that.

Re: food lore
« Reply #109 on: January 18, 2019, 11:11:06 pm »
The Alpine Lorry , that's  a childhood memory.  Bright green Cream Soda,  Orange, Pineapple & plain white fizz.  Don't remember the Cherry.
Not fast & rarely furious

tweeting occasional in(s)anities as andrewxclark

Mrs Pingu

  • Who ate all the pies? Me
    • Twitter
Re: food lore
« Reply #110 on: January 19, 2019, 05:33:50 am »
Oh yes the Alpine man. American Cream Soda though, what was that about? About the same time my brother lived off fizzy Vimto, which is probably one reason why his teeth are so crumbly now.
Then we moved to Aberdeen and it was all Bon Accord drinks instead. Moray Cup  :sick:

I loved the cherry cola sodastream though.
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

Pedal Castro

  • so talented I can run with scissors - ouch!
    • Two beers or not two beers...
Re: food lore
« Reply #111 on: January 19, 2019, 06:33:05 am »
Have we had boil in the bag meals yet? I particularly remember the chicken curry meal. Cant recall who made them tho, maybe Batchelors?

Boil in a bag fish meals, Vesta curries and crispy pancakes. I was introduced to all these at the age 17 on a 2 week YHA cycle tour by my best mate. I guess they were common fare in his house, I'd never seen them before.

Re: food lore
« Reply #112 on: January 19, 2019, 07:42:15 am »
Powdered Oxtail soup.

I liked it. :P

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: food lore
« Reply #113 on: January 19, 2019, 10:46:50 am »
Powdered Oxtail soup.

I liked it. :P
Cooked or straight from the packet?  :D
An ungovernable laughter, a joyous agitation which makes the summer stretching before you seem like an unrolling canvas on which you might draw those first rude pure strokes that are free. (Capote)

Re: food lore
« Reply #114 on: January 19, 2019, 10:50:46 am »
In a mug, with the sludge at the bottom

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: food lore
« Reply #115 on: January 19, 2019, 11:25:10 am »
Boil-in-the-bag fish in parsley sauce was a childhood staple. Our freezer was a battle between the forces of Captain Birdseye and Findus. Battalions of crispy pancakes, squadrons of fish fingers, and a corps of various extruded, reformed, and breaded potato products.

A large part of childhood is submerged in parsley sauce. I imagine that if you could build a pipe that goes back in time to drain my childhood we could basically form a large lake of the stuff. And who wouldn't want a lake of historical parsley sauce? Out of bags or the staple Knorr packet. You had to keep stirring it, a moment of inattention meant it clagged on the bottle of the pan and guaranteed washing up fun. My parents only had children because they couldn't afford an electric dishwasher. It was quite a shock for me to realise that sauces and soups didn't have to come out of a packet. I even assumed that soup in a tin was probably out of a packet originally. My best friend's mum was proper middle-class and used to cook things from actual recipes which was both astounding and troubling. He wasn't allowed to eat crispy pancakes unless he came round my house, which I think he did all the time. The only thing my mother ever really cooked was meat and potato pie. This was a casserole dish filled with potatoes in Bisto covered with a piece of frozen puff pastry, a sort of DIY Fray Bentos. There was supposed to be mince in it, but in my entire childhood I never found any meat in one of her pies, the best you could hope for was a lump of undissolved gravy powder.
!nataS pihsroW

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: food lore
« Reply #116 on: January 19, 2019, 12:17:55 pm »
Have we had boil in the bag meals yet? I particularly remember the chicken curry meal. Cant recall who made them tho, maybe Batchelors?

Boil in a bag fish meals, Vesta curries and crispy pancakes. I was introduced to all these at the age 17 on a 2 week YHA cycle tour by my best mate. I guess they were common fare in his house, I'd never seen them before.

I don't think I have EVER had any of these!

Re: food lore
« Reply #117 on: January 19, 2019, 12:30:31 pm »
There was an urban legend at primary school relating to the free milk (I went to primary school before Thatcher snatched the milk). 

Our local dairy was Express Dairies, so most of the little bottles were theirs and had an italic "E" on them.  A few bottles from other dairies used to creep in from time to time, probably because they were mistakenly returned to the wrong bottling plant. 

It was believed by almost everyone that the bottles with the Co-Op logo contained goat's milk, so they were always the last to be taken.
Never tell me the odds.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: food lore
« Reply #118 on: January 19, 2019, 12:30:35 pm »
Parsley sauce:
Never had this a home.
Made some from scratch for David in the microwave.
Packet was on Special Offer from Sainsbury's recently so I thought I'd giv it a whirl. NOW WAY was I going to use a saucepan so I adapted the instructions to make in a Pyrex jug in the microwave. Result was OK but HOW MUCH did I pay for a little seasoning and flour? Even on Special, this seemed like a rip-off!
And there was the obligatory single-use plastic sachet.
Will not repeat.

Re: food lore
« Reply #119 on: January 19, 2019, 12:34:04 pm »
There were lots of wonderful fried things you could have for lunch.  Findus Crispy Pancakes, obviously, but also Chicklets (reconstituted chicken arses and eyelids in coarse beige breadcrumbs) and a cheese and potato triangular thing in orange breadcrumbs, whose name I can't remember.

It's a wonder I'm still alive.
Never tell me the odds.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: food lore
« Reply #120 on: January 19, 2019, 12:38:45 pm »
There was an urban legend at primary school relating to the free milk (I went to primary school before Thatcher snatched the milk). 

Our local dairy was Express Dairies, so most of the little bottles were theirs and had an italic "E" on them.  A few bottles from other dairies used to creep in from time to time, probably because they were mistakenly returned to the wrong bottling plant. 


The glass milk bottles in which my pints are delivered do not  all bear the 'Milk and More' branding: I frequently get Cotteswold Dairies and many bottles now have no branding. Kirby and West were the Dairy that supplied my Leicester childhood. I had one of their bottle not long ago and got all nostalgic.

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: food lore
« Reply #121 on: January 19, 2019, 12:39:28 pm »
Lunch? Lunch. It's dinner. And in the evening, tea.
!nataS pihsroW

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: food lore
« Reply #122 on: January 19, 2019, 01:03:25 pm »
Our freezer was a battle between the forces of Captain Birdseye and Findus.

Both brands owned by Nomad now, of course.

Pingu

  • Put away those fiery biscuits!
  • Mrs Pingu's domestique
    • the Igloo
Re: food lore
« Reply #123 on: January 19, 2019, 06:17:07 pm »
I am reminded of Ruskoline, but I can't think of any childhood meals that were slathered with it.

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: food lore
« Reply #124 on: January 19, 2019, 08:00:31 pm »
Our freezer was a battle between the forces of Captain Birdseye and Findus.

Both brands owned by Nomad now, of course.

Shocking, the two sides of the grand frozen battle reconciled. Clarence will be spinning in his flash-frozen grave.

Ah, the school dinner joke of I've just been fingered by Captain Birdseye while waving around a fish finger. It's hilarious when you're eight and evidently have no clue what being 'fingered' is other than it's probably rude, and for boy, unlikely as it wasn't a Catholic school. If you wanted anatomy lessons there was a girl with the exotic name of Francesca who'd apparently pull down her knickers for 20p and frankly quite scared us all. It's telling that rather than available ourselves of that opportunity, we'd buy four packs of Football 77 cards in hope of not getting another bloody Trevor Francis and instead the near-mythical Sheffield Wednesday badge that everyone needed. And I didn't even like football.
!nataS pihsroW