Author Topic: food lore  (Read 2659 times)

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: food lore
« Reply #75 on: January 17, 2019, 05:46:24 pm »
Modern kids who quaff Tropicana don't know they're born!

There's still Capri-Sun, which (for want of something quaffable and non-fizzy halfway through a very hot ride) I recently discovered is a pale imitation of its 80s self.  The original idea seemed to be to cut costs by making hallucinogenic sugar[1]-filled 80s orange drink without the luminous colouring, but now it's turned into a sort of Mostly Harmless ready-made squash.

What happened to Sunny Delight?


[1] Or sometimes alcohol.  I was once made to drink half a very fermented pouch of the stuff, because in those days children who won't eat/drink something that's gone off were by default lying.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: food lore
« Reply #76 on: January 17, 2019, 05:50:26 pm »

What happened to Sunny Delight?


Donald Trump drinks it all.
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

Re: food lore
« Reply #77 on: January 17, 2019, 05:54:09 pm »
^ Very good  ;D
Does that mean that Judith Chalmers has stopped drinking it?

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: food lore
« Reply #78 on: January 17, 2019, 05:58:07 pm »
I thought Sunny Delight was Stormy Daniels' little sister until I discovered Smirnoff.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

Re: food lore
« Reply #79 on: January 17, 2019, 06:01:38 pm »


+1  Though I only got to experience it for a term or two, before Bloody Thatcher (or was it Kenneth Baker?) did away with it.

"Maggie Thatcher, milk snatcher"

Re: food lore
« Reply #80 on: January 17, 2019, 06:10:15 pm »
There's still Capri-Sun,
If you ever pour the contents of a Capri-Sun sachet/pouch/bladder into a glass, you'll understand why they don't sell it in see-through containers.
Doesn't taste too bad thobut.

barakta

  • Bastard lovechild of Yomiko Readman and Johnny 5
Re: food lore
« Reply #81 on: January 17, 2019, 06:10:30 pm »
Capri Sun has gone the way of "adding sweeteners" even to its non "sugar free" version, which is annoying as the modern version was drinkable...

Googling Sunny Delight it seems to be selling itself as high in vitamin D (not sure how that works in a non fat soluble medium) and is full of sweeteners  :sick:

Wasn't there some weird rule about sunny delight and marketing...

Tim Hall

  • I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes
Re: food lore
« Reply #82 on: January 17, 2019, 06:11:48 pm »
You could get 12 portion packs of Batchelors dehydrated stew, chicken supreme, curry etc. Many Scout and Venture Scout expeditions into the boondockd were fuelled by this, with a twelve portion pack enough for four or five underage drinkers before sloping off down Thee Pubbe.

There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

Re: food lore
« Reply #83 on: January 17, 2019, 06:14:36 pm »
Wasn't there some weird rule about sunny delight and marketing...
Yup.
They neglected to tell you not to give it to your kid if you were also giving the kid a Mars bar.

Tim Hall

  • I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes
Re: food lore
« Reply #84 on: January 17, 2019, 06:16:07 pm »
For some reason for Sunday breakfast Mum and Dad would have eggs and bacon* whilst we children were served some weird reconstituted baconesque thing called Breakfast Strips or simla,  from Mr Sainsbury's House of Toothy Comestibles.

After half a grapefruit, obvs.
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

Re: food lore
« Reply #85 on: January 17, 2019, 06:18:20 pm »
Half a grapefruit with a capful of gin1, perchance?

1The recommended amount.
(See also HRH The Queen Mother) Allegedly.

Tim Hall

  • I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes
Re: food lore
« Reply #86 on: January 17, 2019, 06:23:35 pm »
Half a grapefruit with a capful of gin1, perchance?

1The recommended method.
(See also HRH The Queen Mother) Allegedly.
Although you didn't have the pleasure of meeting my mother, I'm sure she would have approved of/tried such pleasures.

(HM not HRH, Shirley)
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

Re: food lore
« Reply #87 on: January 17, 2019, 06:26:57 pm »
HM, Indeed.

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: food lore
« Reply #88 on: January 17, 2019, 06:35:53 pm »
Wasn't there some weird rule about sunny delight and marketing...

The retailers were contractually required to display it in fridges, even though it's about as likely to go off as Marmite.  The (fundamentally flawed, at least for anyone with functional colour vision) idea presumably being to promote an image of wholesome freshness.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

barakta

  • Bastard lovechild of Yomiko Readman and Johnny 5
Re: food lore
« Reply #89 on: January 17, 2019, 07:31:51 pm »
That's the badger!

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: food lore
« Reply #90 on: January 17, 2019, 08:16:17 pm »


+1  Though I only got to experience it for a term or two, before Bloody Thatcher (or was it Kenneth Baker?) did away with it.

"Maggie Thatcher, milk snatcher"
There's a bit of good in everyone.

Although she did it too late for me. I'd already passed the crucial age. Was it 7? Maybe 8? Certainly wasn't the whole of primary.
The earth is vast and beautiful and contains many miraculous places. (Chekhov)

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: food lore
« Reply #91 on: January 17, 2019, 08:43:11 pm »
We had an opportunity to put a milk bottle on a scarcely viewed windowsill and conduct what would now be a banned 'Biological Experiment'.

The data collected was how high the tin foil cap would go before the tumescent stalk of rancid cream fell.

Such fun.
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: food lore
« Reply #92 on: January 17, 2019, 08:50:04 pm »
We had an opportunity to put a milk bottle on a scarcely viewed windowsill and conduct what would now be a banned 'Biological Experiment Warfare'.

The data collected was how high the tin foil cap would go before the tumescent stalk of rancid cream fell.

Such fun.
:thumbsup:
The earth is vast and beautiful and contains many miraculous places. (Chekhov)

menthel

  • Jim is my real, actual name
Re: food lore
« Reply #93 on: January 18, 2019, 09:41:03 am »
For some reason for Sunday breakfast Mum and Dad would have eggs and bacon* whilst we children were served some weird reconstituted baconesque thing called Breakfast Strips or simla,  from Mr Sainsbury's House of Toothy Comestibles.

After half a grapefruit, obvs.

Those strips, a bit like thin, rubbery and rather salty spam as I remember...

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: food lore
« Reply #94 on: January 18, 2019, 09:52:49 am »
Weren't they Mmmmmmatterson Breakfast Strips (or slices). We had them, I think their only selling point was that they were cheaper than the cheapest bacon and made out of mechanically recovered abattoir misfortunes. I'm sure I used to like them. But I like spam fritters – best school meal ever. When the fat would bubble out when you jabbed them with a fork to form a slick across the plate sufficient to innoculate against any benefits from the veg. Though the veg always looked like it been boiled since breakfast, the day before.

I think there was a cheer from my school when Thatcher came round and took the milk away.
!nataS pihsroW

menthel

  • Jim is my real, actual name
Re: food lore
« Reply #95 on: January 18, 2019, 09:56:51 am »
Weren't they Mmmmmmatterson Breakfast Strips (or slices). We had them, I think their only selling point was that they were cheaper than the cheapest bacon and made out of mechanically recovered abattoir misfortunes. I'm sure I used to like them. But I like spam fritters – best school meal ever. When the fat would bubble out when you jabbed them with a fork to form a slick across the plate sufficient to innoculate against any benefits from the veg. Though the veg always looked like it been boiled since breakfast, the day before.

We didn't get anything as posh as Matterson's ones- pretty sure they were Sainy's own. I remember quite liking them, then again they were an overall improvement over my Mum's cooking.

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: food lore
« Reply #96 on: January 18, 2019, 10:45:50 am »
All this sploshing around the sewage outflow on the beach of nostalgia reminds me of a fraught issue in The Asbestos Palace. My wife and I remember a product from our childhood that doesn't seem to exist, yet weirdly we both remember it.

Firstly, let's introduce The Pop Man. Kids these days won't believe you could get stuff just delivered to your door, but back in the 70s and 80s, a man (there may have been Pop Women, but I never saw one) would come around once a week and take away your empties and leave fresh bottles of fizzy sugary confection coloured with luridly hued industrial chemical process byproducts. It was the happiest day of any week because we were all sugar junkies. Don't drink it all, wailed our mother's vainly, that has to last all week. Fortunately, diabetes had yet to be invented, in fact, I think we were working on that very invention.

Anyway, the product was a variety of pop. We think it was called Grandcham. Neither of us can find any record of this childhood nectar or anything similar. It was a like Iron Brew (that's what unofficial Irn Brus were called) but lighter in colour and with a taste never before encountered in nature.
!nataS pihsroW

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: food lore
« Reply #97 on: January 18, 2019, 11:41:54 am »
Firstly, let's introduce The Pop Man. Kids these days won't believe you could get stuff just delivered to your door, but back in the 70s and 80s, a man (there may have been Pop Women, but I never saw one) would come around once a week and take away your empties and leave fresh bottles of fizzy sugary confection coloured with luridly hued industrial chemical process byproducts. It was the happiest day of any week because we were all sugar junkies. Don't drink it all, wailed our mother's vainly, that has to last all week. Fortunately, diabetes had yet to be invented, in fact, I think we were working on that very invention.

Anyway, the product was a variety of pop. We think it was called Grandcham. Neither of us can find any record of this childhood nectar or anything similar. It was a like Iron Brew (that's what unofficial Irn Brus were called) but lighter in colour and with a taste never before encountered in nature.

Oh yes! Ours was improbably called Mr Bacon, which is absolutely the best name ever for a purveyor of fizzy sugar water. He* used to come round with a flatbed lorry laden with crates of bottles, filled with such delights as Dandelion & Burdock and Golden Lemonade. I don't recall Grandcham or anything similar, but there was the ersatz Iron Brew.

*More likely it was actually one of his minions, much like those red-suited, fake-bearded bastards who try to pass themselves off as Father Christmas, although apparently there really was a Mr Bacon, he wasn't just a Col Sanders-type marketing fiction - Henry Thomas Samuel Bacon, to be precise.

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: food lore
« Reply #98 on: January 18, 2019, 11:56:54 am »
I suspect my wife and I may have somehow concocted a fictional drink that really should have existed in our childhood. A sort of kiddie champagne (which we assumed it was, hence the name), the Queen of carbonated beverages. It's quite possible we've convinced each other as to its existence as we can both not only remember drinking it but can recall the taste and colour. Oh well, if you're going to have a false memory, fictional fizzy pop is probably better than satanic ritual abuse. That said, I really want it to exist. Grandcham, not Satan.

I think our pop came from Alpine. I also remember pineappleade. Honestly, that had never been near a pineapple and glowed like an unattended nuclear reactor. The cherryade was similar, and you had be very careful not to spill it, as it would indelibly stain anything it came into contact with. There are council house front steps still bright red forty years later because someone dropped a bottle of the stuff.
!nataS pihsroW

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: food lore
« Reply #99 on: January 18, 2019, 12:11:25 pm »
Pineappleade. Don't remember that. But as I was passing through the Bearpit a couple of days ago (the Bearpit is a sunken area in the middle of a roundabout with subways in and out in the middle of Bristol, a delightful gem of 1960s or 70s town planning but it does have a bear), one of the residents tried to convince me by means of a painted bit of board that the pineapple is the new fruit of peace. He was definitely on something stronger than any -ade.
The earth is vast and beautiful and contains many miraculous places. (Chekhov)