Author Topic: Extinct supermarkets  (Read 3035 times)

diapsaon0

  • Advena ego sum in terra
Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #25 on: January 16, 2019, 03:12:25 pm »
~Ford & Lock's and Lipton's in Barnstaple when I was young, and Sanders in the Weston-super-Mare area
Advena ego sum in Terra

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #26 on: January 16, 2019, 03:13:43 pm »
I don't think I discovered Morrisons until I was a student,
In Canterbury?

I was a student in Canterbury at the time, but I think the Morrisons in question was somewhere in the vicinity of PeatBogHorror - an area notorious for not making its mind up about being in the North.

 
Quote
I have a feelign there was Morrisons in Buckinghamshire, where my grandmother lived, but it certainly didn't exist at about the same latitude 90 miles or so west, so it might have been a southeast/home counties thing. (Not sure if Buckinghamshire really qualifies as home counties, but near enough.)

The bit south of Aylesbury surely qualifies.  Seems a bit pointless not including the rest.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #27 on: January 16, 2019, 03:13:50 pm »
Presumably no connection with Lipton tea?
An ungovernable laughter, a joyous agitation which makes the summer stretching before you seem like an unrolling canvas on which you might draw those first rude pure strokes that are free. (Capote)

Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #28 on: January 16, 2019, 03:15:50 pm »
I'd never heard of Morrisons until about 1990 when a northern housemate told me about them. I believe they had the ad slogan "There's more reasons to shop at Morrisons". Catchy. I remember it almost 30 years later. They're still shit though...
Those wonderful norks are never far from my thoughts, oh yeah!

Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #29 on: January 16, 2019, 03:31:07 pm »
Not so much a supermarket as a chain,  Hugh Fay and Co Manchester.
Get a bicycle. You will never regret it, if you live- Mark Twain

nicknack

  • Fledgling Swampy
Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #30 on: January 16, 2019, 03:37:52 pm »
There was a Pricerite in Sittingbourne when I were littler.

I see Wikithing has a page of them.
There's no vibrations, but wait.

billy crystal

  • aka hillbilly
Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #31 on: January 16, 2019, 03:43:40 pm »
Wullie Low's when I was growing up in Scotland.

Also Littlewoods used to have a sizeable food section in the Dundee branch.  I suspect not unrelated to it being the closest store to what were the bus stops out to the schemes back in the day.  Not sure if this counts though.
By the time a man is wise enough to watch his step, he's too old to go anywhere.

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #32 on: January 16, 2019, 03:49:48 pm »
Morrisons was a new thing in the East Midlands too – they had to build one on our school playing fields which annoyed the student smokers greatly as it was the best bit of playing field to elude the teachers' surveillance (not that the teachers could probably see out of the nicotinic fug of their staff room anyway).

It's also where my mother worked for many years after all the garment factories disappeared off to be sweatshops in the far-east.
!nataS pihsroW

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #33 on: January 16, 2019, 04:31:44 pm »
I'd never heard of Morrisons until about 1990 when a northern housemate told me about them. I believe they had the ad slogan "There's more reasons to shop at Morrisons". Catchy. I remember it almost 30 years later. They're still shit though...

There's a smallish grocery near here called More Reasons...

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small just Far Away at the back
Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #34 on: January 16, 2019, 05:04:34 pm »
Presto

The company behind Presto bought Safeway

for some bizzare reason when the vast majority of Presto's became Safeways (as it was the better known name or something), the Presto in Cupar remaind Presto until it closed.

There was Wm Low around here. They were quite modern and impressive for the time. Then taken over by Tesco, seems most of them have since been replaced by much larger Tesco shops.

there are clues in the design as to which were designed for Wullie Low's, but the ones that were can often be identified by the tiling in the bakery having not been updated.


Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #35 on: January 16, 2019, 05:15:48 pm »
I remembered Fine Fare, and I also remembered my mum collecting Green Shield stamps, so I looked up what happened to them. They (Green Shield) became Argos. I never knew that!

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #36 on: January 16, 2019, 05:30:46 pm »
I thought Safeway was higher class than Presto. (You'll be depressed at Presto...)

Green Shield had its HQ near Edgware Station, which was on my way to school.

Green Shield House became Premier House and the offices have now been converted to overpriced shoebox housing.

Argos is, I think, now part of Sainsbury's.

Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #37 on: January 16, 2019, 05:48:16 pm »
I wonder how many of these were regional? I recognize several names: Bejam, Safeway, KwikSave, I think Presto – but others I've definitely never heard.: Lennons, Jackson's, Bishops, Diamond Frozen Food, LoCost. Of course they might have been national just I never encountered them. I think Netto was, maybe is, German?

I wondered if anybody would mention Bejam.

If you want yo know what an abbatoir smells like, defrost one of their Economy Dog Food tubes  :sick:

Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #38 on: January 16, 2019, 05:56:57 pm »
Hinton's in Cockerton. Now a small Co-Op, but it felt big at the time.

Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #39 on: January 16, 2019, 06:05:23 pm »
Lipton > Gateway> Somerfields> Morrisons

I think that was the evolution.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #40 on: January 16, 2019, 06:09:25 pm »
There was a Pricerite in Sittingbourne when I were littler.

I see Wikithing has a page of them.
Oooh! But of course there would be.
An ungovernable laughter, a joyous agitation which makes the summer stretching before you seem like an unrolling canvas on which you might draw those first rude pure strokes that are free. (Capote)

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #41 on: January 16, 2019, 06:12:34 pm »
I remembered Fine Fare, and I also remembered my mum collecting Green Shield stamps, so I looked up what happened to them. They (Green Shield) became Argos. I never knew that!
Were Green Shield stamps from Fine Fare? That would make sense as I remember my mum collecting them – great pages of them – at about the time of Fine Fare. And there was later an Argos in the same shopping centre, though I thought Fine Fare was at the other end. So maybe at one point Fine Fare and Key Markets were there simultaneously. Oh, what choice!
An ungovernable laughter, a joyous agitation which makes the summer stretching before you seem like an unrolling canvas on which you might draw those first rude pure strokes that are free. (Capote)

Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #42 on: January 16, 2019, 06:12:45 pm »
I wonder how many of these were regional? I recognize several names: Bejam, Safeway, KwikSave, I think Presto – but others I've definitely never heard.: Lennons, Jackson's, Bishops, Diamond Frozen Food, LoCost. Of course they might have been national just I never encountered them. I think Netto was, maybe is, German?

Bishops was regional- had about 60 stores in the South-East, was bought by, or became, Budgens.

Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #43 on: January 16, 2019, 06:13:08 pm »
Booker used to own (or franchise) a lot of the smaller local supermarkets - Fine Fare, Londis, Budgens, Mace etc.
Of which there are zillions.
They are, amongst other things, a wholesale supplier for whom, in another life, I used to drive an artic.
Booker were bought up by Tesco in (I think) 2017.

Fun fact - they're the same Booker as the one responsible for the literary prize.

ETA - Does anyone remember Pink Shield Stamps - or is there something wrong with my memory?

Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #44 on: January 16, 2019, 06:15:54 pm »
Wavy Line

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #45 on: January 16, 2019, 06:19:32 pm »
ETA - Does anyone remember Pink Shield Stamps - or is there something wrong with my memory?

Pink stamps were A thing.
The Co-op had its own Dividend Stamps.

diapsaon0

  • Advena ego sum in terra
Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #46 on: January 16, 2019, 06:29:34 pm »
Presumably no connection with Lipton tea?

Yes, I think the same company.  My mother used to get her groceries (we called them 'arrants' in North Devon) from Liptons.
Advena ego sum in Terra

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #47 on: January 16, 2019, 06:32:02 pm »
Wikipedia says:
Quote
Tesco founder Jack Cohen was an advocate of stamps; he signed up in 1963, shortly after his competitor Fine Fare adopted S&H Pink Stamps, and Tesco became one of the company’s largest clients.
Quote
So pink from Fine Fare, green from Tesco – and presumably Key Markets among many others.
An ungovernable laughter, a joyous agitation which makes the summer stretching before you seem like an unrolling canvas on which you might draw those first rude pure strokes that are free. (Capote)

Cudzoziemiec

  • Solar powered, tea fuelled cycle-wol
Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #48 on: January 16, 2019, 06:32:34 pm »
Presumably no connection with Lipton tea?

Yes, I think the same company.  My mother used to get her groceries (we called them 'arrants' in North Devon) from Liptons.
I'm not a fan of Lipton tea.  :(
An ungovernable laughter, a joyous agitation which makes the summer stretching before you seem like an unrolling canvas on which you might draw those first rude pure strokes that are free. (Capote)

Vince

  • Can't climb; won't climb
Re: Extinct supermarkets
« Reply #49 on: January 16, 2019, 07:32:53 pm »
Presumably no connection with Lipton tea?

Yes, I think the same company.  My mother used to get her groceries (we called them 'arrants' in North Devon) from Liptons.

Both were at one time owned by Lever Brothers (Unilever). They decided to get out of the retail market and sold the supermarkets (and MacFisheries). Part of the deal was that they couldn't use the name for the tea in the UK, which is why the Brooke Bond brand was promoted.
216km from Marsh Gibbon